National Defense University - 2018-2019 Electives Program Catalog

 
National Defense University - 2018-2019 Electives Program Catalog
National Defense University

        2018-2019
Electives Program Catalog
Table of Contents
NATIONAL DEFENSE UNIVERSITY ELECTIVES GENERAL INFORMATION ............................................................... 3
AY 18-19 ELECTIVES PROGRAM CATALOG .............................................................................................................. 7
    FALL SEMESTER COURSES............................................................................................................................................ 7
   CIC ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 7
   CISA ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
   ES........................................................................................................................................................................................ 12
   NDU .................................................................................................................................................................................... 15
   NWC ................................................................................................................................................................................... 23
AY 18-19 ELECTIVES PROGRAM CATALOG .............................................................................................................27
    SPRING SEMESTER .....................................................................................................................................................27
   CIC ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 27
   CISA .................................................................................................................................................................................... 29
   ES........................................................................................................................................................................................ 32
   NDU .................................................................................................................................................................................... 36
   NWC ................................................................................................................................................................................... 45

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National Defense University Electives General Information

Elective courses are held in the fall and spring semesters of each year and convene one time a
week over a 12 week period, unless otherwise stated in the course description. Elective courses
will be held Tuesdays and Wednesdays each week, except for the week of Thanksgiving – elective
courses will not be held during that period. Class times are based on an early and late time
schedule. The early sessions run from (1330 – 1525) and late sessions run from 1535 – 1730,
unless otherwise stated in the course narrative/description. Courses will switch times after the
sixth session - early classes (1330 – 1525) will switch to the late time slots (1535 – 1730) and
late classes (1535 – 1730) will move to the early time slots (1330 – 1525), unless otherwise
stated in the course narrative.

Students will have an opportunity to obtain a better understanding of the courses being offered
during the National Defense University Electives Open House. This forum provides students the
opportunity to meet professors and obtain information on their courses of interest. Two Open
Houses will occur during the academic year – the fall Electives Open House will occur on August
15, 2018 (from 1330 – 1500), and the spring Electives Open House will occur on October 17,
2018 (from 1145 – 1300). Immediately following the Open House, the course selection process
will open and students will have until Thursday evening (for fall electives) to create and submit
their prioritized course list. The suspense for the spring selection process will be determined at
a later date. More information regarding the Open House and electives selection process will be
provided by your College Electives Directors (please see below list).

College electives points of contact are:
College of International Security Affairs (CISA)          Ms. Sheila DeTurk     (202) 685-7377
Eisenhower School (ES)                                    Dr. Timothy Russo     (202) 685-4349
College of Information and Cyberspace (CIC)               Ms. Nakia Logan       (202) 685-2110
National War College (NWC)                                CAPT Corey Ray        (202) 685-3654
National Defense University Program Manager               Mr. Larry Johnson     (202) 685-2128

Elective courses are also used to satisfy a wide variety of concentrations available at the National
Defense University. Some concentrations are restricted to specific colleges, but most are open to
students across all colleges. To better prepare students for the University’s electives selection
process and how the concentrations play into this arena, an informational Concentration and
Scholars Program briefing will be offered on August 7, 2018 that will answer most, if not all, of
your questions and help guide you in your electives selection process. The following
concentrations will be offered in Academic Year (AY) 2018-19.

                                    Elective Concentrations:

American Studies (Open to International Fellows at CIC/ES/NWC)                Dr. Brittany Bounds
Required Courses:
      NDU 6047: American Studies I (International Fellows)
      NDU 6048: American Studies II (International Fellows)

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American Studies (American Fellows Program)                    Dr. Brittany Bounds
Required Courses:
      NDU 6030: American Studies I (American Fellows Program)
      NDU 6031: American Studies II (American Fellows Program)

Cyber Security Leadership                                             Mr. Jim Churbuck
Students must take two from the following:
      CIC 6017: Cyber Security in the 21st Century (CSL)
      CIC 6024: Cyber Security Awareness (CSL)
      CIC 6025: Infrastructure and Information Operations (CSL)
      CIC 6026: Cyber Terrorism and Cyber Crime (CSL)
      ES 6048: Cybersecurity and Cyber Warfare
      NWC 6005: Cyber Operations and National Security Strategy

Data Analytics and Visualization                                      Mrs. Nakia Logan
Required Courses:
      CIC 6004: Big Data to Decisions (EIT/DAV)
      CIC 6037: Data Analytics for Decision Making (DAV)

Emerging Information Technology                                     Mrs. Nakia Logan
Students must take two from the following:
      CIC 6004: Big Data to Decisions (EIT/DAV)
      CIC 6030: Future Emerging Technologies (EIT)
      NDU 6019: Social Media as a Source of Information-Legal, Policy & Ethical Issues

Ethics                                                               Dr. Gregory D. Foster
Required Course:
       NDU 6028: The Ethical Strategist – Incorporating Values-Based Decision Making into
       Strategy and Policy Development
Additional Course: Select one of the following:
       NDU 6025: Ethical Challenges for Strategic Leaders
       NDU 6029: Ethical Leadership and Strategic Organizations: Changing the Culture,
       Eliminating Toxic Behaviors, and Creating High-Performance
       NDU 6034: U.S. Civil-Military Relations and Professionalism
       NDU 6059: Strategic Ethics Through Cinematic Narrative
       NWC6073: War Crimes and Strategy
       NWC 6082: National Security Law: Legal & Ethical Issues for National Security Strategists

Health Strategy                                                    Dr. Douglas J. Robb
Required Courses:
      NDU 6056: Leadership Perspectives in Health Strategy: Solving Wicked Strategic/Global
      Health Problems
      NDU 6075: Health Strategy as a Foundation for National and Global Security

Joint Land Air Sea Strategic-Special Program (JLASS-SP)             COL Voris McBurnette
Required Courses:
       NDU 6061: Joint Land Air Sea Strategic-Special Program (JLASS-SP)
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NDU 6062: Joint Land Air Sea Strategic Special Program (JLASS-SP)

Long Term Strategy (SECRET & US only)                              Dr. Sorin Lungu
Required Courses:
      ES 6453: Seminar in Diagnostic Net Assessment and Defense Strategic Planning
      ES 6458: Military Technology Diffusion and the Asian Defense Market Dynamics
      ES 6466: Long Term Strategy Research Project

Senior Acquisition Course (ES ONLY)                                  Dr. Brian Buckles
Required Course:
      ES 6110: Strategic Acquisition - An Examination of Select Topics Highlighting the
      Fundamental Forces Driving Defense Acquisition)
Additional Course: Select one of the following:
      ES 6102: Science and Technology Policy
      ES 6103: Comparative International Acquisition Systems and FMS
      ES 6104: Sustaining Technological Advantage in Defense Acquisition
      ES 6105: Leading Innovation in Business and Government
      ES 6109: Congress and the Quest for Acquisition Reform

Supply Chain Management (ES ONLY)                                    Ms. Kinney-Perkins
Required Courses:
      ES 6404: Supply Chain Management: Strategy & Concepts I
      ES 6405: Supply Chain Management: Strategy & Concepts II
      ES 6402: Supply Chain Management Research Colloquium

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD)                                   Dr. John Mark Mattox
One required course (Can use either course as the required course):
      NDU 6014: Contemporary Issues in Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction: Through
      the Film-maker's Lens OR
      NDU 6015: The Gravest Danger: Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction
And one additional Course: Select one of the following:
      NDU 6014: Contemporary Issues in Combatting Weapons of Mass Destruction: Through
      the Film-maker’s Lens**
      NDU 6015: The Gravest Danger: Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction**
      NDU 6070: From the War Zone to the Hot Zone: Rapidly Evolving Challenges in
      Biodefense
      NDU 6071: Thinking about the “UNTHINKABLE”: Strategic Weapons, Strategic Warfare,
      and Enduringly Consequential Choices
      NDU 6900: Independent Research Study
      NWC 6009: Nuclear Weapons and National Security in the 21st Century
      NWC 6066: Deterrence Theory and National Security
      CISA 6005: Nuclear Statecraft: Diplomacy, Summitry, and Collective Action
      CISA 6910: Nuclear Threats and Responses: Addressing Nuclear Risks in a Dangerous
      World
      **If you take NDU 6014 as the required course, you can take NDU 6015 as the additional
      course, and vice-versa.

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Congratulations on your selection to attend the National Defense University and get ready to
participate in a very exciting and rewarding electives program.

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AY 18-19 ELECTIVES PROGRAM CATALOG

                                 FALL SEMESTER COURSES

                                               CIC

CIC 6004: Big Data to Decisions (EIT/DAV)
This course explores data management and its enabling technologies as key components for
improving mission effectiveness through the development of open, enterprise wide, and state-of-
the-art data architectures. It examines management issues such as the implementation of the
data component of the Enterprise Architecture specified by OMB. In addition, the course covers
key data management strategies, including the DoD Net-Centric Data Strategy and the Federal
Enterprise Architecture (FEA) Data Reference Model and their enabling information technologies
including data warehousing, electronic archiving, data mining, neural networks, and other
knowledge discovery methodologies. Case studies allow students to explore data management
issues and implementation. While geared for managers, the course provides sufficient insight
into the underlying technologies to ensure that students can evaluate the capabilities and
limitations of data management options and strategies.
(Class Limit 20) (2 Credit Hours)
WED, 1330 - 1525, 09/19/2018 – 12/12/2018 (changes to 1535 – 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Prof. Andrew Gravatt

CIC 6017: Cyber Security in the 21st Century (CSL)
This course provides a comprehensive overview of information assurance and critical
information infrastructure protection. Information assurance of information assets and
protection of the information component of critical national infrastructures essential to national
security are explored. The focus is at the public policy and strategic management level, providing
a foundation for analyzing the information security component of information systems and
critical infrastructures. Laws, national strategies and public policies, and strengths and
weaknesses of various approaches are examined for assuring the confidentiality, integrity, and
availability of critical information assets. Learning Outcomes: Students will be able to analyze
laws, national strategies, and public policies; and assess the strengths and weaknesses of various
approaches for assuring t h e confidentiality, integrity, and availability of those information
assets created, stored, processed, and communicated by information systems and critical
information infrastructures
(Class Limit 20) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 - 1525, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535 - 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Prof. Mark Duke

CIC 6025: Infrastructures and Information Operations (CSL)
Prerequisite: Top Secret/ SCI clearance is required. This course will be limited to U.S. citizens.
This course examines the potential strategic consequences of attacks, using cyber and
information operations approaches, as well as other means, on national critical infrastructures,
a concept the course describes as “Information and Infrastructure Operations” (I2O). The course

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explores the national security concept of "strategic fragility" and modern society’s growing
reliance on inter-connected, complex, and potentially fragile critical infrastructures. The course
covers issues such as the role of the information infrastructure as a control mechanism, sources
of vulnerability, and examples of infrastructure attacks and their consequences. The course also
examines current roles and missions of various U.S. government entities and military commands
and the capabilities resident in the Department of Defense. Learning Outcomes: Students will be
able to analyze the national security impact of society’s dependence on interconnected critical
infrastructures and to develop effective strategies to protect those fragile critical infrastructures.
Information Operations Concentration Program approved course. This course requires TS/SCI
clearance.
(Class Limit 16) (2 Credit Hours)
WED, 1535 - 1730, 09/19/2018 - 12/12/2018 (changes to 1330 - 1525 after 6th session)
Instructor: Prof. James F. Churbuck

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CISA

CISA 6005: Nuclear Statecraft
This course takes a “deep dive’ into historical and current issues associated with nuclear
weapons, through the lens of nuclear statecraft. Since the dawn of the nuclear age, decision
makers have dealt with the question of what purposes are served by nuclear weapons and how
such weapons can (or cannot) be incorporated into national policies and strategies. Through the
lens of statecraft – which incorporates the range of diplomatic, military, and other strategies
countries use to advance their security objectives – the course employs a case study
methodology to look at how decision makers have tried to use nuclear weapons to advance other
security objectives; efforts to contain the growth of nuclear stockpiles and to impede arms races;
the role of arms control in trying to reduce nuclear dangers; lessons learned from crises such as
the Cuban Missile Crisis; issues associated with nuclear deterrence; and collective strategies that
have been advanced to address current and historical threats.
(Class Limit 20) (2 Credit hours)
WED, 1330 - 1525, 09/19/2018 – 12/12/2018 (changes to 1535 - 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Dr. Marco DiCapua

CISA 6910: Nuclear Threat and Response
This course helps students to understand today’s nuclear threats. The course focuses on current
issues and challenges but also provides an historic perspective of how the threat has changed
since the Cold War. Students will attain a basic understanding of nuclear weapons technologies
and the role of the nuclear fuel cycle, how the threat has expanded as both states and terrorist
organizations pursue nuclear/radiological materials and capabilities, the threat posed by under-
secured nuclear/radiological materials worldwide, and bilateral and global responses to these
and related challenges.
(Class Limit 20) (2 Credit hours)
TUE, 1330 – 1525, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535 - 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Ms. Heather Looney

The following courses are mandatory electives for CISA students. Space may be available
                        after pre-registration of CISA students.

CISA 6916: Rule of Law: Policing and National Security
State failures often occur when governing institutions malfunction and can neither protect rights
of its citizens nor provide justice. Similarly, corruption and lack of accountability fuel and
exacerbate internal conflicts and make it even harder to achieve reconciliation after the conflict.
Once a state or any part of it slides into lawlessness and chaos, violence becomes a norm. This
course focuses on 'Rule of Law' framework as a recipe for preventing and managing internal
conflicts as well as a critical tool for enhancing security. In terms of instruments that empower a
state to effectively tackle insurgency, counter terrorism and disrupt criminal networks, the
dynamics and potential of a law enforcement model are analyzed in this course. The course also
looks at intelligence sharing arrangements and cooperation between law enforcement
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organizations for dealing with organized crime and cyber threats, both of which are emerging as
a formidable global menace. Lastly, various case studies, ranging from South Asia to Middle East,
are incorporated in the course to understand different approaches to tackle law enforcement and
justice related problems. Lessons for capacity building in conflict-ridden states are also drawn
from these examples. An assessment of how the United States developed a rule of law model and
how it has fared in its rule of law promotion abroad are also included in the course. New York
Police Department (NYPD) is also a major case study used in the course. In this overall context,
various perspectives as regards role of culture and faith in local dispute resolution and treating
lawlessness are evaluated.
(Class Limit 16) (2 Credit hours)
WED, 1330 - 1525, 09/19/2018 – 12/12/2018 (changes to 1535 - 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Dr. Hassan Abbas

CISA 6926: Perspectives on the American Way of War
While much appears new in the recent American encounter with irregular warfare, in fact, the
United States was very much an actor in irregular conflicts throughout its past. The United
States began with a revolutionary endeavor—a people’s war. In forming a country and in
trying to ensure its survival, it experienced a variety of threats and challenges to its existence
and to its national identity. As the original Thirteen Colonies evolved into the United States and
expanded across the continent and then assumed a greater role in international affairs,
conflicts abounded. While some were great struggles, such as the Civil War, there was
throughout the elements of irregular war. Some were unique to the American experience, such
as the Indian Wars, but many bear a remarkable similarity to the present and while many of the
‘lessons’ of those experiences may have been lost or not received sufficient attention, they
shaped much of what we think and do in the world today. This course will examine some of the
most salient examples of this environment and its meaning, not only in shaping the American
way of war and strategy and its experience and understanding of irregular war, but how that
background and experience might inform current and future ideas about what is to be done.
(Class Limit 16) (2 Credit hours)
TUE, 1330 - 1525, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535 - 1730 after 6th session)
Instructors: Dr. Tom Marks, Dr. Kirklin Bateman, COL Michael Sullivan

CISA 6953: Principles of Homeland Security
Many have stated that the al Qaeda attacks against the United States on September 11th 2001
changed the world. One of the obvious results of the mass-murder committed in Washington,
New York, and Pennsylvania was the comprehensive and wide-ranging reform of the way the
American government provides for national security. From the Patriot Act to the creation of a
Department of Homeland Security, these changes mark the greatest restructuring of American
national security architecture since the National Security Act of 1947.
Principles for Homeland Security provides the essential knowledge enabling practitioners to
navigate these changes, understand the lessons learned, and deduce the applicability or unique
sui generis aspects of approaches deployed since “9-11.”
The course addresses the foundations and core issues of Homeland Defense and Homeland
Security.
(Class Limit 16) (2 Credit hours)

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TUE, 1330 - 1525, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535 - 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: LTC David Oakley, USA

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ES

ES 6210: Economics of National Security Policy
Economics is the study of decision-making in light of scarcity. National Security policymakers
face many decisions and there is always scarcity of some sort. This course will provide students
with the perspective and tools to approach those decisions.
(Class Limit 18) (2 Credit Hours)
WED, 1535 – 1730, 09/19/2018 – 12/12/2018 (Changes time to 1330 – 1525 after 6th session)
Instructor: Dr. Tim Russo, other Economics faculty as available

 The following Eisenhower School (ES) courses are not considered open elective courses
            and will not appear in/on the Electives Course Selection Survey.

ES 6102: Science and Technology Policy
This elective is part of the Senior Acquisition Course (SAC) concentration at Eisenhower School and
is only open to SAC students. This seminar group is concerned with understanding the Science
and Technology Policy issues associated with collaborative scientific research among defense
allies and the implications for security and national economic growth. Students work jointly
with colleagues in the French counterpart to the Eisenhower School, the Institute for Higher
Education in National Security (IHEDN) in Paris, to analyze a current issue facing science and
technology in the trans-Atlantic national security alliance. The technology focus for AY19 will be
cybersecurity. The seminar will travel to Paris for field studies and joint seminar
scollaboration in early November 2018, and will host their IHEDN colleagues in Washington
DC in early February 2019.
(Class Limit 15 - SAC students only) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 – 1730, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (Does NOT change time after 6th session)
Instructors: Dr. Clark Groves, CAPT Frank Futcher, USN

ES 6104: Sustaining Technological Advantage in Defense Acquisition
This elective is part of the Senior Acquisition Course (SAC) concentration at Eisenhower School and
is only open to SAC students. Technological innovation continues to transform our world at an
ever-increasing pace (robotics, information and communications technology, genetics,
nanotechnology, biotechnology, and more!). U.S. Government acquisition leaders must be
prepared to make strategic-level investment decisions at the nexus of technological innovation,
the acquisition process, and under austere fiscal realities in order to advance warfighting
capabilities. Such innovations can rapidly and unpredictably alter the balance of power in the
world, while creating an opportunity for U.S. strategic advantage, if properly managed. This sets
up a tension between the dynamic world of innovation and a defense acquisition process
characterized by highly defined methods, budgets, schedules, and oversight requirements.
Acquisition leaders must understand how to sustain the bedrock of U.S. national security
strategy, technological innovation, while effectively managing defense acquisition processes.
This elective analyzes strategic acquisition approaches for sustaining U.S. technological
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advantage. This elective and its faculty/student team will analyze and evaluate the factors that
influence technological innovation in today’s national security environment to include the
defense acquisition system and industrial base. The course will allow students to ask tough
questions of a select lineup of experts and senior acquisition leaders from key organizations and
think tanks: Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense, Research & Engineering (OASD (R&E)),
Deputy Assistance Secretary of Defense, Emerging Capability & Prototyping (DASD (EC&P)),
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), other
agencies, and industry. NOTE: requires local area travel on 26-27 October.
(Class Limit 15 – SAC Students only) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 – 1730, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (Does NOT change time after 6th session)
Instructor: TBD

ES 6105: Leading Innovation in Business and Government
This elective is part of the Senior Acquisition Course (SAC) concentration at Eisenhower School and
is open to SAC students only. With the recent interest in bridging the gap between the U.S.
military and cutting edge companies in Silicon Valley, the Department of Defense (DoD) has
come to recognize the value of leaders who can consistently create the conditions for innovation
in organizations across a broad spectrum from technology development to leadership of large
military units.
 (Class Limit 15, SAC Students only) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 – 1730, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (Does NOT change time after 6th session)
Instructors: Col. Jerry Traughber and Dr. Brian Buckles

ES 6109: Congress and the Quest for Acquisition Reform
This elective is part of the Senior Acquisition Course (SAC) concentration at Eisenhower School and
is only open to SAC students. Over the decades, DoD and Congress have been concerned with the
effectiveness of the defense acquisition system (DAS). As an example, the House Armed Services
Committee’s report of the FY2007 defense authorization bill stated, “Simply put, the Department
of Defense (DoD) acquisition process is broken. The ability of the Department to conduct the large
scale acquisitions required to ensure our future national security is a concern of the committee.”
While over the last forty years, hundreds of reports and dozens of reform efforts have resulted in
little noticeable improvement to defense acquisitions, Congress persists in the effort to reform
acquisition, as well as other parts of the defense enterprise. In that context, the class will seek to
understand the workings of congress and specifically reform efforts, focusing on the work of the
Section 809 Panel, which was established in the 2016 NDIA to conduct a two-year review of all
acquisition regulations applicable to the DoD with a view toward streamlining and improving the
efficiency and effectiveness of the DAS.
(Class Limit 15 – SAC Students only) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 – 1730, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (Does NOT change time after 6th session)
Instructors: CAPT Tom Monroe, Mr. Moshe Schwartz

ES 6404: Supply Chain Management Concepts and Strategy I
Supply Chain Management is a driving force behind America’s economic growth and prosperity.
It is important to understand the critical role supply chains play in supporting American industry
and national security and how every element of the Department of Defense (DoD) and the
world’s economy is affected by supply chains. This is the first course in the SCM concentration.
(Class Limit 22) (2 Credit Hours)
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TUE, 1330 - 1525, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (Changes to 1532 – 1730 after the 6th session.)
Instructor: Dr. Susan Kinney-Perkins, other SCM faculty as needed

ES 6651: Research Elective
A student may choose a research project appropriate to the concerns of the Eisenhower mission
in lieu of one elective. The project should be of such scope that it can be researched and written
in one semester. It is anticipated that such projects will normally between 25-35 pages in length.
Please contact Dr. Frank Cooling, ES Room 332 for more information about this elective.
(Class Limit 99) (2 Credit Hours)
This is a self-paced program under the mentorship of an NDU professor.
Instructors: Dr. Frank Cooling

ES 6691: Research Elective
A student may choose a year-long research project appropriate to the concerns of the
Eisenhower mission in lieu of two electives, with the consent of the Research Director and
Faculty Research Advisor. It is anticipated that such projects will normally be between 35-50
pages in length. Please contact Dr. Frank Cooling, ES Room 332 for more information about this
elective.
(Class Limit 99) (4 Credit Hours)
This is a self-paced program under the mentorship of an NDU professor.
Instructors: Dr. Frank Cooling

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NDU

ES 6017: Non-Lethal Weapons: Supporting the Operational Art Across the Range of
Military Operations
Today, U.S. forces are required to execute missions spanning the full range of military operations
against threats who are dispersed among the civilian population. Scalable capabilities must be
employed to accomplish the mission while maintaining the security of US forces and mitigating
the casualties among non-combatants. Non-lethal weapons (NLWs) enable commanders to tailor
their responses to targets and situations across the force continuum. This course combines
integrated lectures, discussion, in-class exercises and a capabilities demonstration that provide
field commanders, staff planners and those who support the warfighter with information on the
utility and limitations of NLWs to support current and future military operations. Students are
challenged to plan operations using NLWs while analyzing the medical, legal, ethical, political
and public perception implications of their use. Subject matter experts who are NL program
managers or recognized experts in their fields will support the course and provide first-hand
information.
(Class Limit 18) (2 Credit Hours) (Administered by NDU-AA)
TUE, 1330 – 1525, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535 - 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Mr. John Hodgson (Penn State University)
Administrator: Mr. Larry P. Johnson/University Registrar

NDU 6014: Contemporary Issues in Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction: Through the
Film-maker's Lens
Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) have figured prominently in U.S. foreign and national
security policies for three generations. There is a rich body of academic literature, research, and
official commentary addressing the WMD threat to American interests and presenting solutions
to the threat. Much of the official commentary comes from the highest level of the United States
Government and is meant to be a message to the American people and the world about how
seriously American officials view WMD and the actions taken to deal with WMD. Weapons of
mass destruction also have figured prominently in the global popular culture. For decades, WMD
themes in entertainment film, fiction, and television have informed the public‘s perspectives on
WMD issues. This course explores the contemporary challenge of nuclear, biological, and
chemical weapons and the American strategic and policy responses to those dangers. The course
compares and contrasts perspectives expressed by political authorities, subject matter experts,
and the shapers of popular opinion. We will use film (entertainment, documentary, and
propaganda) along with official policy documents and the work of subject matter experts to
introduce students to the changing face of the contemporary WMD challenge. We will ask why
political officials, subject matter experts, and the public often believe very different things about
WMD. We will examine when conflicting perspectives between policy makers, subject matter
experts, and the public are important and what can be done, if anything, to resolve discord. This
course requires two short written papers, high-quality classroom participation, and energetic
participation in a classroom tabletop exercise. It is also a foundation course for the University’s
WMD Studies Concentration open to all students from all colleges. However, be warned. If you

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take this course, it will change forever the way you watch film. This (or NDU 6015) is a
required course for the University’s WMD Studies Concentration and is open to all
students from all colleges).
(Class Limit 12) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 – 1525, 09/18/2018 - 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535-1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Dr. Natasha E. Bajema

NDU 6015: The Gravest Danger: Countering Weapons of Mass Destruction
Countering the threat of weapons of mass destruction from hostile state and non-state actors is a
national security priority. This course explores the complex dangers of nuclear, chemical, and
biological weapons and the array of tools for countering them. It will address core questions
such as: What incentives drive WMD proliferation and how can the United States reduce these
incentives? How has the WMD threat changed traditional thinking about deterrence and can
terrorist groups such as al Qaeda and ISIL be deterred? The course will also explore efforts to
deter, prevent, and defeat proliferation challenges posed by current and potential WMD-armed
adversaries, illicit procurement networks, and new WMD technologies. Classes include lectures
from experts, seminar discussions, in-classroom exercises, and student research presentations.
This (or NDU 6014) is a required course for the University’s WMD Studies Concentration
and is open to all students from all colleges).
(Class Limit 12) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 – 1525, 09/18/2018 - 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535-1730 after 6th session)
Instructors: Dr. John Mark Mattox and Mr. Harrison Menke

NDU 6019: Social Media as a Source of Information – Legal, Policy & Ethical Issues
This course will explore the important issues surrounding the use of social media as a source of
information for the Department of Defense. For example, should you exploit the information just
because you can? Can you trust it? Are you allowed to use it? If you don’t use it, what are you
missing? Students will consider the potential uses of information extracted from social media,
and evaluate the legal and policy requirements that restrict DOD access to much of that
information. Course Objectives: Students will be able to: 1) identify and differentiate the
overlaps between traditional news media and news derived from social media; 2) develop
strategies for applying information from social media to support a diverse mission set; and 3)
evaluate the relevant legal, policy and ethical implications. Learning outcomes will be assessed
through class participation, an oral presentation, and a 2000-word position paper. This course is
included in the Emerging Information Technology concentration.
(Class Limit 10) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1535 - 1730, 09/18/2018 - 12/11/2018 (changes to 1330 - 1525 after 6th session)
Instructors: Mr. Philip Stockdale, Prof. Veronica Wendt and Ms. Joanna Seich

NDU 6025: Ethical Challenges for Strategic Leaders                Course Not Offered
Those who go on to “strategic leadership” and “high-level policy, command, and staff
responsibilities” can count on being confronted with formidable ethical challenges---it goes with
the turf. Students at NDU schools should take advantage of this year to help prepare themselves
for such challenges. If you aspire to such policy, command, and staff positions, this course is for
you. This will be a seminar-style course built around case studies of ethical challenges
encountered in military, government, and private sector organizations, supplemented by
additional readings from a variety of theoretical and historical perspectives. Carefully studying
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the case studies assigned in the course readings, reflecting on them in the light of other course
readings, and discussing all of them in class should: (a) alert you to the types of ethical challenges
you can expect to face, (b) give you some insights into how others have navigated such
challenges, (c) provide you a better intellectual foundation for thinking and acting ethically, and
(d) help you identify and hone practical strategies, tactics, skills, and techniques for successfully,
or at least more effectively, navigating such challenges over the rest of your career. Students will
be required to write a paper, 10 pages maximum. In order to facilitate active participation by all
students in the course, enrollment will be kept to a maximum of 10 students.
(Class Limit 10) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1535 - 1730, 09/18/2018 - 12/11/2018 (changes to 1330 - 1525 after 6th session)
Instructor: Dr. Albert C. Pierce

NDU 6028: The Ethical Strategist – Incorporating Values-Based Decision Making into
Strategy and Policy Development
This course will examine ethical dilemmas inherent in the development and execution of
national strategies and combat operations in support of national security policy. As public
officials and representatives of the nation’s principles, it is the obligation of strategic leaders and
their senior advisors to be conversant with the potential ethical challenges arising in the
development and execution of national security policy and to integrate solutions to those
challenges into our strategies. The course will provide the practitioner with the tools to identify
and deal with potential ethical issues arising in the course of strategic planning and execution.
Students will receive instruction in just war theory, strategic leadership using values-based
decision making, building strategic frameworks that address and integrate ethical concerns, and
applying international and domestic laws and customs to enable strategies and operations.
Specific topics of discussion include international and non-international armed conflict,
humanitarian intervention, genocide, cyberwarfare, and the use of drones, torture, artificial
intelligence, and autonomous weapons systems. Through a combination of lecture, group
discussion, and case studies, students will develop and hone their ethical reasoning skills and
integrate that reasoning into national security strategy and policy development. Requirements
include an 8-10 page analysis of a selected issue chosen by the student and accompanying oral
presentation. This course is a required foundational course for students enrolled in the Ethics
Concentration. This course is the required foundational course for students enrolled in the Ethics
Concentration. May be taken either semester.
(Class Limit 20) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 – 1525, 09/18/2018 - 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535-1730 after 6th session)
Instructors: CAPT Errol Henriques, USN, and Chaplain (COL) Kenneth Williams, USA, PhD

NDU 6029: Ethical Leadership and Strategic Organizations: Changing the Culture,
Eliminating Toxic Behaviors, and Creating High-Performance
Transitioning from leadership at the operational level to the strategic level presents challenges
to the leader’s character and competence. Through examining and contrasting healthy and
counterproductive elements of organizational culture, this course explores and prepares
students for the unique challenges of leading strategic organizations – expanded responsibility;
multiple and differentiated business processes; competing demands; conflicting values; volatile,
uncertain, complex and ambiguous environments; and decision making at the policy level – by
creating the conditions for high performance. Incorporating an iterative process emphasizing
applied leadership, this course will provide students with understanding and practice in (1)
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identifying the role and skills of the strategic leader; (2) identifying considerations that impact
organizational culture; (3) identifying and analyzing organizational culture; (4) operationalizing
the foundational elements of a high performing, adaptive strategic organization, including trust,
respect, and an ethical culture that mitigates counterproductive processes and systems, toxic
leadership, and workplace incivility; (5) leading organizational change, i.e., how to design,
initiate, and implement change; (6) conducting strategic communications to facilitate and
reinforce change; and (7) presenting analysis and plan for change. Methods of instruction include
facilitated discussion of readings and cases, practical exercises, student presentations, and guest
practitioners. Required assignments include a one-page strategic leadership philosophy, an
eight-page organizational cultural analysis, and a six-minute class presentation on the analysis,
followed by 20 minutes of discussion (Q&A).
(Class Limit 15) (2 Credit Hours)
WED, 1330 – 1525, 09/19/2018 – 12/12/2018 (changes to 1535 – 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Chaplain (COL) Kenneth Williams, PhD

NDU 6030: American Studies I (American Fellows Program)
The American Fellows program invites U.S. students at the National War College, the Eisenhower
School, and the College of Information and Cyberspace to participate in the American Studies
program alongside International Fellows (IFs) in both the fall and spring semesters. American
Studies is an elective program offered in fall and spring directed by the International Student
Management Office (ISMO) for each international cohort enrolled at the National War College,
the Eisenhower School, and the College of Information and Cyberspace. Aligned with NDU’s core
college curricula, the course explores the significance of American identities, society, and
institutions as well as the philosophical, historical, and contemporary American principles which
contribute to U.S. strategic thinking. Under the direction of the NDU President and Provost, the
American Fellows program brings U.S. students from diverse backgrounds into the classroom to
enrich the learning environment, infuse American perspectives in discussions on U.S. issues, and
foster joint security cooperation with International Fellows.
During the weekly elective on Tuesdays, American Fellows participate in all lectures, discussion
seminars, and local visits with the International Fellows. In addition, American Fellows travel
with International Fellows on two field practicums per year to various locations throughout the
United States (one practicum per semester) plus additional events and social opportunities,
which provide rich exposure to American society, institutions, and way of life. American Fellows
must commit to two field practicums and all course-related events and cannot be scheduled for a
competing elective on Tuesday.
ISMO seeks military and civilian students who possess substantive international or cross-cultural
experience, have a strong interest in developing meaningful partnerships with International
Fellows from over 50 countries, and can successfully represent the United States and NDU’s joint
security cooperation mission.
Application Instructions: Interested students may attend an information session in ISMO on
Tuesday, August 7th during the NDU concentration programs open house. A brief application is
required and will be due by Monday, August 13th. Top applicants will be invited to attend a
follow-on interview. In order to ensure all applicants are considered for other NDU electives
should they not be selected for this highly competitive program, students are encouraged to
attend the electives open house on Wednesday, August 15th and submit elective preferences per
the prescribed process.
(Class Limit 12) (2 Credit Hours)
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TUE 1330 - 1525, 09/18/2018 - 12/11/2018 (Does NOT change after 6th session)
Instructor: Dr. Brittany Bounds (Brittany.bounds.civ@msc.ndu.edu)

NDU 6034: U.S. Civil-Military Relations and Professionalism
This course examines the nature and health of current civil-military relations in the United States
against a normative ideal that calls for a strategically effective (operationally competent,
politically neutral, socially responsible) military whose leadership provides strategically sound
advice to strategically competent civilian authorities who are representative of and answerable to
a civically engaged, strategically aware public, all undergirded by a critical free press, a vibrant
civil society, and a properly subordinated military-industrial complex. Emphasizing the
interactions between those in uniform and those in positions of civilian authority throughout the
national security establishment, broadly defined, the course places due emphasis on the
professional and constitutional imperatives that ensure adherence to the rule of law, ethical
propriety, sound democratic governance, and strategic effectiveness.
(Class Limit 15) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 – 1525, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535 – 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Dr. Gregory D. Foster

NDU 6047: American Studies I (Open to International Fellows at CIC/ES/NWC)
For International Fellows enrolled in CIC, ES, or NWC, American Studies supports and
supplements the IF Field Studies Program and provides a theoretical foundation for the year in
the United States. The course explores the significance of American identities, society, and
institutions as well as the philosophical, historical, and contemporary American principles which
contribute to U.S. strategic thinking. In the fall course, students learn about diversity in
American life through a focus on regional/historical differences, religion, race, and political
ideologies and the effect these have on the American identity. Students will also analyze the role
of Human Rights in the United States. The class uses a seminar format with a combined lecture
followed by discussion seminars led by NDU faculty members. Students draw from classroom
discussion, readings, and the required field practicums to various locations around the United
States. Select U.S. students are also enrolled in the course as American Fellows. IFs who
complete the fall and spring courses will earn a concentration certificate at graduation.
(Class Limit 70) (4 Credit Hours)
TUE 1330 - 1525, 09/18/2018 - 12/11/2018 (Does NOT change after 6th session)
Instructor: Dr. Brittany Bounds (Brittany.bounds.civ@msc.ndu.edu)

NDU 6059: Strategic Ethics Through Cinematic Narrative
Cinema is the driver of a vehicle made by drama that transports us along the highway to truth,
lying at the foot of a mountain we must scale to reach the pinnacle of justice – all of this
constituting the professional and life journey we call ethics. This course uses cinematic
productions – dramatizations and documentaries – to highlight difficult ethical circumstances
and situations of strategic import that require critical scrutiny, reasoned deliberation, and
thoughtful choice in the public interest. The course will use 12 cinematic dramatizations – “The
Trials of Henry Kissinger,” “Wag the Dog,” “Breaker Morant,” “Ghosts of Rwanda,” “The Tillman
Story,” “Standard Operating Procedure,” “The Gatekeepers,” “Eye in the Sky,” “Control Room,”
“The Most Dangerous Man in America,” “Citizen Four,” and “Zero Days” – to guide discussion.
Course participants will focus their attention on recognizing, identifying, and diagnosing ethical
issues; weighing ethical and strategic consequences and ramifications; evaluating relevant
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factual and normative dimensions of the problems at hand; and arriving at reasoned choices that
were and weren’t made by event participants.
There will be one written deliverable: a 10-12-page paper requiring individual viewing, analysis,
and comparison of two additional dramatizations beyond those considered in regular course
lessons.
(Class Limit 15) (2 Credit Hours)
WED, 1535 – 1730, 09/19/2018 – 12/12/2018 (changes to 1330 – 1525 after 6th session)
Instructor: Dr. Gregory D. Foster

NDU 6061: Joint Land Air Sea Strategic-Special Program (JLASS-SP)
This is a National Defense University Provost’s Special Program open to all colleges within
National Defense University. JLASS-SP is a concentration program, therefore students who enroll
and are accepted into the course participate in both the Fall and Spring semester courses (NDU
6061 and 6062) for a total of four credit hours.
The focus of the course is on developing military and interagency leadership skills. Examples of
the interactions executed by the National Security Council (NSC) and Joint Staff are used
throughout the course as they develop strategy and plans, and apply resources, and employ
decision making during crises that develop. Students and faculty explore anticipated national
security threats, the effects of globalization, and rise of trans-national crime across the
instruments of national power – Diplomacy, Information, Military and Economics (DIME).
Contingency warfighting issues, logistical resource concerns, while planning contingency
operations in a multi-theater, resource constrained environment will be discussed. It is the ONLY
course at National Defense University that collaborates and cooperates with other senior level
war colleges (Air War College, Army War College, and Naval War College).
During this course, NDU students will role play members of the National Security Council (NSC)
to include the White House Chief of Staff, National Security Advisor (NSA), and Cabinet
Secretaries (SECDEF, SECSTATE, DNI, DOJ, DOE, etc.). Additionally, some NDU students will role
play high level roles within the Joint Staff (Chairman and military branch Chiefs). This course is
based on a notional world scenario set a decade in the future. NSC players will, as national level
civilian leadership, evaluate, analyze and create national policies to include a National Security
Strategy (NSS), defense strategic guidance, national intelligence strategy and numerous
presidential policy directives. Joint Staff role players will provide military advice to the civilian
leadership in crafting policy, and prioritize and manage resources to carry out the NSS.
Students will develop a keen understanding of the processes and leadership challenges
associated with planning and operating in a Joint, Interagency, Intergovernmental and
Multinational (JIIM) environment. The academic year course culminates in a joint six-day
exercise that incorporates other participating Senior Service Colleges held at Maxwell Air Force
Base, AL. There students will apply products developed and knowledge learned during the
course of the year against willful adversaries (NDU 6062-1).
There are no prerequisites for this course. However, student backgrounds and preferences are
taken into account when assigning roles. (Notes: (1) On days involving local off-site visits, the
class may run until 1630 to accommodate travel time; (2) If possible, the JLASS class will conduct
a 2 ½ day fall couplet trip to New York City during Oct 2017; otherwise similar visits will be used
locally to achieve objectives).
(Class Limit 35) (2 Credit Hours)
WED, 1330 – 1525, 09/19/2018 – 12/12/2018 (Does NOT change after 6th Session).
Instructors: COL Voris W. McBurnette, CDR Jim Fleming, Mr. Hyong Lee, and Dr. William Eliason
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NDU 6075: Health Strategy as a Foundation for National and Global Security
The Military Health System’s mission is to provide Combatant Commands & Service Components
with a “medically ready force” and a “ready medical force” in support of a full-spectrum
response: from combat operations to humanitarian disaster response to global theater security
engagement. This course is designed for rising leaders to address critical knowledge gaps in the
current education of health strategy, as an instrument of national and global security, to support
the needs of the force. Leaders need to grasp the complexities required to generate a full-
spectrum medical response and the impact that health and health care delivery has on the
security of the nation and the globe. This course will examine the inter-relationship between the
DoD, inter-agency, and civilian health care systems and how they interact to generate a
“medically ready force” and a “ready medical force.” This class does not require a background in
health or medicine. This course counts toward the two-course requirement for the Health
Strategy Area of Concentration.
(Class Limit 12) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1535 – 1730, 09/18/2018 - 12/11/2018 (changes to 1330 - 1525 after 6th session)
Instructors: Dr. Douglas J. Robb (Lt Gen ret USAF), Tracey P. Koehlmoos, PhD.,
Diana M. Luan, PhD.

NDU 6080: Strategic Gaming
Wargaming plays an increasingly large role in DoD analysis and policy formulation, but there are
applications across many fields throughout the government and the private sector. Strategic
Gaming is a subset of wargaming that deals with the interaction of more elements than simply
military power. This course will explore the various uses of Strategic Gaming and give students
the necessary background to better utilize games in their future careers.
This course will teach the basics of game design, but it will also specifically cover issues related
to sponsoring, participating in, and interpreting the results of games. Even if students never find
themselves in a position of needing to build a game themselves in the future, they will be well
positioned to appreciate and understand the use (and occasional abuse) of games at a time when
gaming is taking on a much expanded profile within DoD and elsewhere.
(Class Limit 12) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 – 1525, 09/18/2018 - 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535 - 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Mr. Tim Wilkie

NDU 6083: Joint Issues and Strategic Leadership
Joint Issues and Strategic Leadership will function as a seminar designed to equip students with
the tools, perspectives, and frameworks for effective strategic leadership and for developing
high-impact strategies and plans within a joint, interagency, and multinational environment. The
year-long course begins with theoretical approaches to the concepts of strategic leadership and
proceeds to the development, practical implementation, and operationalization of strategies and
strategic plans. The course complements and reinforces the Joint Professional Military Education
(JPME) and leadership topics in the core curriculum. Topics include conceptual frameworks for
understanding what is meant by strategic leadership in high-performing, joint, interagency, and
multinational organizations, analyzing the personal and ethical dimensions of leadership,
understanding the role of organizational culture, crafting strategies and strategic visions,
campaign design and lines of effort, transforming organizations, implementing institutional
change, national security decision making, and understanding the role of a strategic advisor.
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(Class Limit 20) (2 Credit hours)
WED, 1535 – 1730, 09/19/2018 – 12/12/2018 (changes to 1330 - 1525 after 6th session)
Instructors: Dr. Herman “Skeets” Meyer and CH (COL) Ken Williams

NDU 6094: The European Union
This course examines the evolution of the European Union (EU) as a unique geopolitical entity;
analyzes the historical, political, and economic origins of current EU governance policies; sets the
stage for assessment of the EU as a global power with a significant defense industrial base; and
traces implications for US national security strategy in the NATO context. This course is part of
the European Studies Concentration and is administered by the NDU Scholars Program.
(Class Limit 18) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 - 1525, 09/18/2018 – 12/11/2018 (changes to 1535-1730 after the sixth lesson)
Instructor: Dr. Irene Kyriakopoulos

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NWC

NWC 6004: A History of the Vietnam War
Looks briefly at Vietnam’s cultural heritage, the legacy of Chinese occupation, and the French
Indochina War, then examines in depth the American experience in Vietnam. The study
encompasses the diplomatic, political, cultural, informational, and military aspects of the war.
The objective of the course is not only to gain insights about the nature, character, and conduct
of the war, but also to develop an understanding of how national goals are formed and strategy
is designed to achieve them. Students will gain an appreciation for: the difficulty of trying to
achieve political ends such as “security” and “stability”; how domestic political concerns can
influence a nation’s foreign policy; and how personalities can affect the design and
implementation of strategy. The course will further explore how the Vietnam experience has
affected current U.S. strategic endeavors, to include the on-going efforts in Syria, Iraq, and
Afghanistan. An oral presentation on a particular aspect of the war, and why that aspect is
worthy of examination, is required.
(Class Limit 13) (2 Credit Hours)
WED, 1330 - 1525, 09/19/2018 - 12/12/2018; (changes to 1535 - 1730 after 6th session)
Instructors: Dr. Mark Clodfelter

NWC 6011: Intelligence Challenges, Structures, and Strategies
This classified course is intended for those without extensive backgrounds in intelligence. It will
start by looking at and beyond the US Intelligence Community’s (IC) public surface to identify the
foundational elements and undercurrents, such as the role of US intelligence at the national level,
and the IC’s different components, capabilities, and current challenges. It will then examine some
of the IC’s non-traditional challenges and roles, such as support to homeland security, law
enforcement, domestic crises and disasters, public health, counter-threat finance, diplomacy
efforts, arms control, and CT/COIN/IW. It will finish by focusing on broader structural, legal, and
ethical constraints, in addition to ways to think about intelligence as a core key element of any
long-term strategic approach to national security. The course will include one or more site visits
to local IC organizations and meetings with IC expert guest speakers. Students will read sections
of Mark Lowenthal’s book, Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy (7th edition) and other selected
articles, participate in classroom discussions, complete several in-class quizzes, and write several
memos on intelligence issues. This course is open to US students with Top Secret/SCI
clearance (or SCI eligible); students are responsible for verifying/passing clearances
with/to NDU Security.
(Class Limit 13) (2 Credit Hours)
TUE, 1330 - 1525, 09/18/2018 - 12/11/2018; (changes to 1535 - 1730 after 6th session)
Instructor: Dr. Charles Pasquale

NWC 6014: Congress and National Security
This course seeks to explain how Capitol Hill works. We will examine the unique culture and
procedures of the legislative branch in the broad political context of elections and the demands
of local representation, partisan competition, the complex congressional committee system,

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