Section 4 George Best Belfast City Airport Noise Action Plan

Section 4 George Best Belfast City Airport Noise Action Plan

Section 4 George Best Belfast City Airport Noise Action Plan

Environmental Noise Directive Draft Noise Action Plan George Best Belfast City Airport August 2008

Table of Contents Executive Summary Action Plan Summary 1. Introduction 1.1. Purpose 1.2. Requirement of Noise Action Planning 1.3. Current Status 1.4. Layout of Action Plan 2. Policy Context 2.1. The authority responsible 2.2. The legal context 2.3. Any limit values in place 3. Characteristics 3.1. A description of the agglomerations, the major roads, major railways or major airports and other noise sources taken into account. 3.2. Definition of Areas 3.3. A summary of the results of the noise mapping 3.4. An evaluation of the estimated number of people exposed to noise 4. Action Planning Process 4.1. Identification of problems and situations that need to be improved 4.2. Any noise reduction measures already in force and any projects in preparation 4.3. Actions which the Competent Authorities intends to take in the next five years, including measures to preserve quiet areas 4.4. Long term strategy 4.5. Financial information: budgets, cost-effectiveness assessment, cost-benefit assessment 4.6. Provisions envisaged for evaluating the implementation and the results of the Action Plan 4.7. Estimates in terms of the reduction of the number of people affected (annoyed, sleep disturbed, or other)

Appendices Appendix A – List of Current Policy and Legislative Framework for Controlling Environmental Noise in Northern Ireland. Appendix B - Glossary of Acoustic and Technical Terms Appendix C – Belfast Agglomeration indicating location of GBBCA. Appendix D – Strategic Noise Maps for airport within Belfast Agglomeration. Appendix E – Strategic consolidated Noise Maps for all sources within Belfast Agglomeration.

Executive Summary In 2002, the European Parliament agreed a Directive, commonly referred to as the Environmental Noise Directive [END], to enable a standardised assessment of environmental noise across Europe and set the framework for the future management and ongoing assessment of noise. The first stage in the assessment of environmental noise in Northern Ireland was completed in 2007 with the publication of strategic noise maps to show levels of environmental noise across the Belfast agglomeration and in other defined areas in the province. This Noise Action Plan, along with the Plans being developed by other Competent Authorities, forms the next stage in the process of assessing and managing noise.

George Best Belfast City Airport lies within the Belfast agglomeration and the Action Plan for the airport will therefore form an element of the consolidated Agglomeration Action Plan. The GBBCA Action Plan outlined here relates solely to aircraft noise. The other elements of the Agglomeration Action Plan are rail, road and industrial noise for which separate Action Plans are being developed by their respective Competent Authorities. This Plan summarises the extent of aircraft noise in the agglomeration; the restrictions and procedures already in place at GBBCA to manage aircraft noise and actions proposed over the next five years to set criteria to define noise management areas and quiet areas within the agglomeration. GBBCA is conscious that all forms of transport result in environmental disturbance. As part of its programme of continuous improvement the airport is currently installing a noise and track monitoring system that will add to the capabilities of assessing aircraft noise. This enhanced capability, working within the framework provided by the END, will enable a better understanding and communication of environmental noise issues, as it is important to note that the END requires Noise Mapping and Action Planning will be repeated at five yearly intervals.

George Best Belfast City Airport Noise Action Plan Summary. Annex V of the Environmental Noise Directive requires that Action Plans must include the detail under the various headings below. This information has been summarised from the main body of the plan for the purpose of complying with the Environmental Noise Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2006 in order to assist with EU reporting requirements. A description of the agglomerations, the major roads, major railways or major airports and other noise sources taken into account. The Belfast Agglomeration comprises the urban areas of Belfast, Castlereagh, Carrickfergus, Lisburn, Newtownabbey and North Down Local Government Districts. The Agglomeration extents to 198km and generally forms a continuous area with the exception of the urban areas around Bangor, Carrickfergus and Carryduff.

George Best Belfast City Airport [GBBCA] lies within the Belfast agglomeration and the Action Plan for the airport will therefore form an element of the consolidated Agglomeration Action Plan. The GBBCA Action Plan outlined here relates solely to aircraft noise. The other elements of the Agglomeration Action Plan are rail, road and industrial noise for which separate Action Plans are being developed by their respective competent authorities. The authority responsible. The Regulations state that the Competent Authority for drawing up Action Plans for GBBCA is George Best Belfast City Airport.

The legal context. The Environmental Noise Directive was implemented in Northern Ireland by the Environmental Noise (Northern Ireland) Regulations 2006 (the Regulations) which outline a number of stages to manage and, where necessary, improve environmental noise. Any limit values in place in accordance with Article 5. UK government policy on aviation, including the management of noise, is set out in “ The Future of Aviation”, published in 2003 and more generally known as the Air Transport White Paper [ATWP]. The ATWP requires airport operators with immediate effect to: “Offer acoustic insulation (applied to residential properties) to other noise-sensitive buildings, such as schools and hospitals, exposed to medium to high levels of noise (63 Leq or more).

There are no noise sensitive properties in the vicinity of GBBCA that experience this level of noise exposure. A summary of the results of the noise mapping. The results of the noise mapping for GBBCA are set out Tables 3.1 and 3.2 of the Action Plan. The tables show the area within each noise contour band, inside the Belfast Agglomeration and the number of dwellings and population within these dwellings. An evaluation of the estimated number of people exposed to noise. Total area exposed to noise categories within the BMUA for GBBCA, Lden 60 dB Lden = 1 km2 .

Lnight 45 dB = 1 km2 . Total population living within dwellings exposed to noise categories within the BMUA for GBBCA, Lden Lden 60 dB = 0. Lnight 45 dB = 0. Identification of potential problems and situations that may need to be improved. Over the first year of the Action Plan, GBBCA will develop with the other competent authorities, through the NIENDSG, a methodology to determine appropriate and robust noise assessment criteria. The aim of the methodology and criteria will be to minimise any uncertainty and to ensure that those criteria and management areas selected are relevant thereby enabling the most appropriate and cost effective action to be determined. The noise assessment criteria, which may include the definition of limit values, will provide a framework for the detailed assessment of the strategic noise maps to inform the identification of priorities for the Action Plan. In the first instance, the criteria will be used to select Candidate Noise Management Areas and further refine the previously identified Candidate Quiet Areas. A record of the public consultations organised in accordance with Article 8(7).

Ongoing.

Any noise-reduction measures already in force and any projects in preparation. GBBCA has in force a number of measures designed to reduce and manage noise. These are detailed in the draft Noise Action Plan but may be summarised as: • A Planning Agreement that imposes a number of obligations and restrictions on the operation of the Airport, including but not limited to restrictions on operating hours and the types of aircraft that may be used, and limits on the number of aircraft movements and seats offered for sale by airlines. • Noise abatement procedures designed to minimise noise disturbance, for example, instructions to pilots on the flight tracks to be flown. • A noise complaints handling procedure.

Actions which the Competent Authorities intend to take in the next five years, including any measures to preserve quiet areas. The Action Planning Process includes five key stages as outlined in the Table below. GBBCA will work with the other competent authorities, through the NIENDSG, to achieve these objectives. Stage Description 1 Analysis of the strategic noise maps. 2 Identification and prioritisation of Candidate Noise Management Areas and Candidate Quiet Areas. 3 Confirmation of Noise Management Areas and Quiet Areas. 4 Evaluation of potential mitigation measures. 5 Evaluation of existing UK and Northern Ireland Policies, Plans and Programmes.

Long-term strategy. GBBCA is committed to the continuous monitoring of aircraft noise to provide data upon which to base ongoing analysis of noise disturbance. This and any other

relevant research will contribute to the development of further appropriate noise management. GBBCA will therefore continue to be actively involved in the work of the NIENDSG to assess, prioritise and agree what actions are necessary. Financial information (if available): budgets, cost-effectiveness assessment, cost-benefit assessment. GBBCA has invested approximately £150,000 in the purchase and installation of an aircraft noise and track monitoring system to record aircraft noise data for the ongoing assessment of the impact of aircraft noise in the agglomeration. The ongoing costs of maintaining this system and the preparation of annual noise contours in Laeq 16 hour format, etc. will continue to be met by GBBCA. Provisions envisaged for evaluating the implementation and the results of the Action Plan.

The current NIENDSG system has proved to be effective in developing this draft Noise Action Plan. Consideration will be given to the form in which the group will continue in order to facilitate ongoing planning work (including identification of Noise Management Areas), implementation of actions, and the development of future plans following the required five yearly reviews of the noise maps. As a contribution to this work, and in compliance with the GBBCA Planning Agreement, annual noise contours based on the 16-hour Laeq measure and including the estimated population exposure within each noise contour, will be prepared and a community attitude survey will be undertaken. The evaluation of noise complaints will also continue during the period of the Action Plan.

Estimates in terms of the reduction of the number of people affected (annoyed, sleep, disturbed, or other). It is estimated that there will be no reduction in the population affected as a result of this first round Action Plan. This being the first round Action Plan, with subsequent Plans to be developed in 2013 and every five years thereafter, it is the aim of this plan to set the framework for the identification and assessment of potential noise management areas and quiet areas. This process will determine if the current noise impact is acceptable and if not, prioritise those areas where future actions will be developed.

1. Introduction 1.1. Purpose 1.1.1. The purpose of Noise Action Plans is to describe how the Department and other Competent Authorities1 propose to comply with their obligations under the Environmental Noise Directive for environmental noise within the Agglomeration2 of Belfast and in other relevant areas across Northern Ireland. The George Best Belfast City Airport [GBBCA] is the designated Competent Authority for the aircraft noise action plan within the agglomeration. 1.1.2. This is one of a set of five Action Plans relating to noise sources within and out with the agglomeration, namely: • The Roads Noise Action Plan; • The Railways Noise Action Plan; • The Industrial Noise Action Plan; • The George Best Belfast City Airport Noise Action Plan • The Belfast International Airport Plan. 1.2. Requirement of Noise Action Planning 1.2.1. The European Parliament and Council Directive for Assessment and Management of Environmental Noise 2002/49/EC, more commonly referred to as the Environmental Noise Directive (END), was published in the Official Journal of the European Union in July 2002. The Directive deals with noise from roads, rail, and air traffic, and from agglomerations. 1.2.2. The aim of the Directive is to define a common approach intended to avoid, prevent or reduce on a prioritised basis the harmful effects, including annoyance, due to exposure to environmental noise. The three main objectives of END are: • To determine exposure to environmental noise, through noise mapping; • To ensure information on environmental noise and its effects is made available to the public; and • Adopt Action Plans based upon the mapping results, to prevent and reduce environmental noise where necessary, where exposure levels can induce harmful effects on human health and to preserve environmental noise quality where it is good. 1.2.3. The Environmental Noise Regulations 2006 (Northern Ireland) came into force on 20th October 2006 and apply to environmental noise levels, in particular in built-up areas, public parks or other quiet areas in 1 The competent authorities as per the Regulations are, Department of the Environment, Department of Regional Development, Northern Ireland Transport Holding Company and airport operators 2 Major Continuous Urban Area as set out within the Regulation No. 3

agglomerations, and other noise-sensitive buildings and areas. The Regulations apply to noise from road, railway and airport sources, as well as industrial noise. The Regulations do not apply to noise that is caused by the person exposed to the noise from, domestic activities, noise created by neighbours, noise at workplaces, or noise inside means of transport or due to military activities in military areas. 1.2.4. Annex V of the Directive requires that Action Plans must include the detail in Table 1.1 below. Their location in this plan is indicated. No Description Location in this document 1 A description of the agglomerations, the major roads, major railways or major airports and other noise sources taken into account.

Section 3.1 2 The authority responsible. Section 2.1 3 The legal context. Section 2.2 4 Any limit values in place in accordance with Article 5. Section 2.3 5 A summary of the results of the noise mapping. Section 3.2 6 An evaluation of the estimated number of people exposed to noise. Section 3.3 7 Identification of potential problems and situations that may need to be improved. Section 4.1 8 A record of the public consultations organised in accordance with Article 8(7). Ongoing 9 Any noise-reduction measures already in force and any projects in preparation.

Section 4.2 10 Actions which the Competent Authorities intend to take in the next five years, including any measures to preserve quiet areas. Section 4.3 11 Long-term strategy. Section 4.4 12 Financial information (if available): budgets, cost- effectiveness assessment, cost-benefit assessment. Section 4.5 13 Estimates in terms of the reduction of the number of people affected (annoyed, sleep, disturbed, or other). Section 4.7 14 Provisions envisaged for evaluating the implementation and the results of the action plan.

Section 4.6 Table 1.1 – Annex V Minimum Requirements for Action Plan from Directive

1.3. Current Status 1.3.1. Under the NI Regulations a number of stages are outlined to manage and, where necessary, improve environmental noise. The first two of these are as follows: Stage Detail Due Completion Date 1 Produce the first round of strategic noise maps for major roads, rail, airports, and agglomerations 31 March 2007 2 Competent Authorities to draw up first round Action Plans to manage noise 30 April 2008. 18th July 20083 Table 1.2 – Environmental Noise Regulation Stages 1.3.2. Stage One, the creation of the first round of strategic noise maps, has been completed and published on the Northern Ireland Noise Map website www.noiseni.co.uk.

1.3.3. The Department published draft guidance in accordance with the regulations for the purpose of identification of priorities for action plans in June 2008. This allowed the current process of preparing draft Action Plans and the subsequent consultation to take place. 1.3.4. On completion of consultation, the Noise Action Plan will be finalised, adopted and formally submitted (summary) to the European Commission in January 2009. 1.3.5. The first round Action Planning Process will continue over a five year period (2008 – 2013). During the first year of the Action Plan, the Department will develop, with the other Competent Authorities, a methodology to determine; • Noise map assessment criteria; • Noise Management Areas; and • To further assess previously identified Candidate Quite Areas. 1.3.6. Thereafter, and throughout the remainder Action Plan period, the Department will work with the other Competent Authorities to: • To make recommendations for action; • To consult on the recommendations for action; and • To update the plan as and when is necessary over the life of the plan.

1.3.7. This will be discussed more in Section 4. 3 The 18th July applies to the industry and consolidated plans.

1.3.8. At the end of the five year period, Noise Mapping and Action Plans will be reviewed and revised as part of the second round process required by the Directive. 1.4. Layout of Action Plan 1.4.1. Section 2 contains information on Policy context. Section 3 provides an outline of the characteristics of the areas considered as well as the findings of the noise mapping process. Section 4 gives details of the action planning process. This includes mitigation measures already in place, financial information available and future provisions for targets, monitoring and review.

2. Policy Context 2.1. The authority responsible 2.1.1. The Environmental Noise Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2006 (the “Regulations”) sets out various responsibilities associated with the production of noise action plans. Various Competent Authorities are charged with the responsibility of producing noise action plans, and the Department of the Environment (DoE) is the designated Authority overseeing the implementation. 2.1.2. The Regulations state that the Competent Authority for drawing up Action Plans for: • major roads; and • roads within the agglomerations; is the Department for Regional Development.4, 5 • major railways; and • railways within the agglomerations; is the Northern Ireland Transport Holding Company.6, 7 • major airports; and • other airports that were mapped; is the relevant airport operator.8, 9 4 Regulation 26 5 See Appendices E & F for the schedule of roads for which maps were produced in the first round of mapping 6 Regulation 30 7 See Appendices D for the schedule of railways for which maps were produced in the first round of mapping 8 Regulation 34

• industrial sources within the agglomerations; is the Department.10, 11 2.1.3. The Northern Ireland Environmental Noise Directive Steering Group (NIENDSG) was set up by the Department in 2005 to provide input to the development of the strategic noise maps for Northern Ireland and subsequent Action Plans. This group is made of representatives from each Competent Authority as described in 2.1.2 including: • Roads Service; • Ports and Public Transport Division; • Translink; • George Best Belfast City Airport; • Belfast International Airport; • Northern Ireland Environment Agency’s Industrial and Radio Chemical Inspectorate; and • Planning and Environmental Policy Group. 2.2. The legal context 2.2.1. Directive 2002/49/EC relates to the Assessment and Management of Environmental Noise and is referred to as the Environmental Noise Directive or END12 . The END requires Member States to produce strategic noise maps for the main sources of environmental noise, ie major roads, major railways, major airports. The Directive also requires strategic noise maps to be produced for agglomerations with a population of more than 250,000 persons and a certain population density in 2007 and those with a population of more than 100,000 persons and a certain population density in 2012 and subsequent rounds13 . Action Plans must be produced based on the results of the noise mapping. The Regulations require the Competent Authorities to produce an Action Plan in 2008, 2013 and every five years thereafter, based on the results of the noise mapping. 2.2.2. The Regulations also require the noise maps to be reviewed and revised if necessary from time to time and whenever a major development14 occurs affecting the existing noise situation. 2.2.3. The first round production of the noise mapping process was completed in December 2007.

9 See Appendices B for the schedule of airports for which maps were produced in the first round of mapping 10 Regulation 38 11 See Appendices C for the schedule of industrial sources for which maps were produced in the first round of mapping 12 For further information see http://eur-lex.europa.eu/pri/en/oj/dat/2002/l_189/l_18920020718en00120025.p df 13 In the Regulations, the population density used is equal to or greater than 500 people per km 2 . 14 The term ‘major development’ is not defined in the Regulations or the END.

2.2.4 The Regulations do not apply to noise caused by the person exposed to, noise from domestic activities, noise created by neighbours, noise at work places, noise inside means of transport or due to military activities in military areas. They apply solely to environmental noise to which humans are exposed, in particular in built-up areas, in public parks or other quiet areas in an agglomeration, near schools, hospitals and other noise-sensitive buildings and area Noise from domestic activities or noise created by neighbours or construction sites can be dealt with under the Pollution Control and Local Government (Northern Ireland) Order 1978. Noise at work is governed by the Control of Noise at Work Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2006.

2.2.5 If a proposed development is likely to be a source of noise, its location and measures regarding the level or timing of noise emissions may be controlled through the planning system. Existing sources of noise such as road or rail traffic are not subject to planning control but they may be considered in the context of proposed development which may be affected by such sources. 2.2.6 Noise from aircraft in flight is not treated as nuisance. Under the Airports (Northern Ireland) Order 1994, the Department for Regional Development has a role to play in relation to civil aircraft noise at airports in Northern Ireland.

2.2.7 It is important that the action planning process takes into account the existing legislative and guidance framework that exists within Northern Ireland. Appendix A represents the current policy and legislative framework for controlling noise in Northern Ireland. 2.2.8 In drawing up Action Plans, each of the Competent Authorities will take into account any relevant policies and regulations applicable to themselves. In the case of the GBBCA these include but are not necessarily limited to the following: • The Airports (Northern Ireland) Order, 1994 • The GBBCA Planning Agreement, 1997 • The Air Transport White Paper, 2003 • The Aerodromes (Noise Restrictions)(Rules and Procedures) Regulations, 2003 2.2.9 An Action Plan reflects the wider context of local and national sustainable development plans, policies and strategies. Therefore each of the Competent Authorities will also take into account those elements of the wider policy framework that apply to each of them including but not necessarily limited to, the following: • Regional Development Strategy 2025; • Draft Belfast Metropolitan Area Plan 2015; • Belfast Metropolitan Transport Plan; • A Planning Strategy for Rural Northern Ireland, 1993;

• Regional Development Strategy 2025; • Regional Transportation Strategy for Northern Ireland 2002-2012; • Regional Strategic Transport Network Transport Plan 2015; • Strategic Environmental Assessment Regulations; • Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations; • Air Quality Regulations and Action Plans; • Renewable Energy Action Plan; • Local Authority Open Spaces policies; • Planning Policy Statements and design guides;; • Emerging climate change initiatives; • Mosaic GI strategy for Northern Ireland; • Urban Regeneration Strategies; and • Noise Abatement Policy. 2.2.10 When detailed action plan recommendations have been developed, these will be assessed in the context of current plans, polices and strategies to establish potential synergies or conflicts.

2.3 Any limit values in place 2.3.1 Currently there are no noise limit values set under the Environmental Noise Directive (END) for the UK. Although there are no immediate plans to introduce limit, values Defra and the DAs will keep the option under review during the implementation phase of the early rounds of action planning and when the Commission develops proposals for a revision of the END in 2010. 2.3.2 Within the UK, the control of aviation noise is governed by legislation and agreements at European, national, regional and local level. 2.3.3 In addition to the requirements of the Environmental Noise Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2006, that transpose EU Directive 2002/49/EC into Northern Ireland legislation, a further relevant EU Directive applies. Directive 2002/30/EC, transposed into UK legislation through the Aerodromes (Noise Restrictions)(Rules and Procedures) Regulations 2003 provides designated airports with additional powers to prohibit or limit the operation of the nosiest types of aircraft. George Best Belfast City Airport is designated as a Competent Authority within the meaning of the Regulations and has used the powers granted by the Regulations to prohibit the noisiest aircraft types.

2.3.4 At national level, UK government policy on aviation, including the management of noise, is set out in “ The Future of Aviation”, published in 2003 and more generally known as the Air Transport White Paper [ATWP]. The ATWP requires airport operators with immediate effect to:

“Offer households subject to high levels of noise (69 dBA Leq or more) assistance with the costs of re-locating” Furthermore, with regard to mitigation when capacity enhancement proposals are brought forward, the ATWP expects airport operators to: “Offer to purchase those households suffering from both a high level of noise (69dBA Leq or more) and a large increase in noise (3dBA Leq or more).” No residential properties in the vicinity of GBBCA experience this level of noise exposure.

2.3.5 At regional level, Article 22 of the Northern Ireland (Airports) Order, 1994 makes provision for the introduction by the Department for Regional Development of a sound insulation scheme requiring the airport authority to make grants towards the costs of insulation. No such scheme has been made. No residential properties in the vicinity of GBBCA experience the level of noise exposure which require airport operators to offer acoustic insulation, ie residential property which suffers from both a medium to high level of noise (63dBA Leq to 69dBA) and a large increase in noise (3dBA Leq or more.) 2.3.6 Locally, a Planning Agreement governs the Airport operations. The restrictions imposed by the agreement are detailed in the next section. The Planning Agreement has recently undergone an extensive review, which involved an Examination in Public hearing in front of an independent panel. At the time of drafting the Action Plan, a determination on the result of the review is yet to be made.

3 Characteristics 3.3.1 A description of the agglomerations, the major roads, major railways or major airports and other noise sources taken into account The agglomeration is defined by the Department of the Environment as being the Belfast Metropolitan Urban Area [BMUA]. Covering an area of approximately 198 km2 , the agglomeration encompasses Belfast and parts of the Lisburn, Newtownabbey, Carrickfergus, Castlereagh and North Down borough areas. Noise sources identified within the agglomeration include

roads, railways, industry and GBBCA. Appendix C shows the extent of the agglomeration and the location of GBBCA within it. Descriptions of the major roads, major railways, major airports and other noise sources outside the agglomeration are contained in other relevant Action Plans. 3.3.1 Definition of Areas mapped 3.3.2 Under the Regulations there is a requirement to assess the noise levels from roads, industry and airports at locations within any agglomerations. An agglomeration is a continuous area of urban development extended around a town or city, including out lying suburbs. The agglomeration extents are determined by the Department of Environment Northern Ireland under the Regulations.

3.3.3 There is also a requirement for the relevant component authorities to assess the noise levels from “major roads”, “major railways” and “major airports” at any locations outside any agglomerations. For the first round of noise mapping in 2007: • “major roads” are those sections of road above a flow threshold of 6,000,000 vehicle passages per year15 ; • “major railways” are those sections of rail route above threshold of 60,000 vehicle passages per year16 ; • “major airports” are those which have more than 50,000 movements per year ( a movement being a take-off or a landing), excluding those purely for training purposes on light aircraft17 ; and These provisions do not apply to GBBCA because 50,000 annual aircraft movements are not exceeded.

Agglomeration of Belfast 3.3.4 The mapping exercise for the agglomerations required the production of noise level maps for the extent of the Belfast agglomeration as defined in the Regulations. The Belfast Metropolitan Urban Area (BMUA) constitutes the agglomeration for the noise mapping project. 3.3.5 The mapping exercise for the agglomeration required the production of noise level maps for an area of approximately 198km2 . Figure 1 shows the Belfast agglomeration for which the noise assessment was undertaken. Extent of Airports 3.3.6 Within the agglomeration there is a requirement to assess the noise levels from all airports. At the time of the assessment there was one airport within the agglomeration boundary to be considered within the noise mapping process, namely George Best Belfast City Airport. Figure 1 15 See Appendices E & F for the schedule of roads for which maps were produced in the first round of mapping 16 See Appendices D for the schedule of railways for which maps were produced in the first round of mapping 17 See Appendices B for the schedule of airports for which maps were produced in the first round of mapping

shows the location of GBBCA modelled during the assessment of noise within the Belfast agglomeration. Assessment of Other noise sources 3.3.7 The assessment of noise from sources within the agglomeration other than aircraft noise is discussed in the other Action Plans. 3.4 A summary of the results of the noise mapping 3.4.1 The approach set out within the Directive is to first undertake strategic noise mapping within agglomerations, and for major sources outside agglomerations, and then assess the numbers of people exposed to noise within 5 dB bands.

3.4.2 The results of the strategic noise mapping process help to gain an understanding of: • Where environmental noise is located; • The approximate magnitude of noise levels within the assessment area; and • Approximately how many people are exposed to differing levels of environmental noise. 3.4.3 The results of the area analysis for GBBCA are set out in Table 3.1 below. These illustrate the areas of aircraft noise exposure within each of noise categories. Table 3.1 Area exposed to GBBCA noise categories. Area (km2 ) Noise Scenario Noise Category dB GBBCA 75 0 Lnight

55 – 59 0 60 – 64 0 65 – 69 0 >70 0 75 0 3.4.4 Comment on the results above of areas exposed to noise categories a. The area exposed to the noise categories follows the north - east to south - west orientation of the runway. With landing aircraft approaching the airfield along the line of the ‘extended runway centreline’, but departing aircraft following the noise abatement tracks described in Section 4, the shape of the area is not entirely symmetrical. Contours to the north east are drawn slightly to the north as a result of departing aircraft following the 6 degree left turn after take off over Belfast Lough. On the other hand, contours to the south west are drawn slightly to the south as almost all traffic departing over the city executes a left turn to get on track to its destination.

b. It can also be noted that the contours exhibit bulges around the runway ends. These are the result of the additional engine thrust required at the aircrafts’ ‘start-of-roll’. c. Noise categories of 60 Lden and above are largely contained within the airfield boundary but, where the 60 Lden noise category does stretch beyond the airfield boundary, it is confined to non-residential areas such as Victoria Park in the south and the nature conservation area in the north. d. The area of the 55 – 60 Lden noise category is again mostly confined to the airfield and non-residential areas but does reach northwards to part of Kinnegar and southwards to parts of Inverary, Sydenham, Connswater and Ballymacarret.

e. The only residential area encompassed by the northern half of the 50 – 55 Lden contour is Kinnegar. The remainder of the northern half of the contour area is over the sea, commercial and utility properties and the nature conservation area. f. The southern half of the 50 – 55 Lden contour area is where the greatest concentration of population is to be found, encompassing parts of Inverary, Sydenham, Connswater, Ballymacarret, Ravenhill and Ormeau. 3.4.5 Following the establishment of noise assessment criteria by the NIENDSG, GBBCA will determine, using these criteria, the number of noise sensitive premises that lie within each of the noise map contour bands for the purpose of determining whether action is required. 3.4.6 Where noise from a major source affects an agglomeration then prioritisation of recommendations for action will be agreed with the other relevant Competent Authorities via the NIENDSG.

3.5 An evaluation of the estimated number of people exposed to noise 3.5.1 The results of the population analysis for the airport are set out in Table 3.2, below. These illustrate the areas of aircraft noise exposure within each of the noise categories. Table 3.2 Population exposed to GBBCA noise categories. Population Noise Scenario Noise Category dB GBBCA Total within BMUA 75 0 1,300 Lnight

60 – 64 0 28,500 65 – 69 0 3,000 >70 0 100 75 0 3.5.2 Comment on the results of population exposed to noise categories. a. In line with the results of the areas covered by each of the noise categories seen in Section 3.3.4 above, there is no population exposure to noise categories 60 Lden and above. b. The restricted operating hours of the airport also mean that no population is exposed to Lnight noise categories of 45 and above. c. The noise mapping exercise indicates some 2,300 residents exposed to 55 – 59 Lden and 14,300 exposed to 50 – 54 Lden. 4 Action Planning Process 4.1 Identification of problems and situations to be improved. 4.1.1 In identifying problems and situations to be improved, reference is made to the Environmental Noise Regulations (Northern Ireland), 2006, Noise Action Planning Guidance and the Environmental Noise (England) Regulations, 2006, Action Planning Guidance for Airport Operators. 4.1.2 As noted in Section 3 of this Action Plan, the strategic noise mapping provides an estimate of the population exposed at each noise category. The Guidance considers it advisable that, prior to the review of potential noise mitigation measures and any subsequent commitment of budget to

undertake any necessary actions, the noise levels indicated by the strategic noise maps as being experienced by the population within the study area are validated by more detailed assessment. 4.1.3 An initial further assessment as to whether the noise levels indicated by the strategic noise maps are being experienced by the population within the study area has been carried out by a comparison of the strategic noise maps with the GBBCA annual noise contours for 2007. This comparison showed a close correlation between the strategic noise maps and the 2007 annual contours and confirmed that no residents or residential properties are exposed to noise levels of 63 Laeq 16-hour or above which is the limit value identified within the ATWP for sound insulation. 4.1.4 Note has also been taken of the results of a Community Attitude Survey commissioned by GBBCA in 2003. One of the objectives of the survey was to ascertain the degree to which respondents felt that aircraft noise had an adverse affect on their quality of life. Of the 17 indicators which were used in the study, including such things as ‘feeling of personal security’, street cleanliness and neighbourhood air quality, etc., aircraft noise was rated overall as the third least detrimental factor to the quality of life of the respondents.

4.1.5 GBBCA is committed to continually reviewing noise levels within the study area and to this end will, during the next 5 years, continue to produce and scrutinize annual noise contours and, utilising both the fixed and mobile recording facilities of the recently purchased noise and track monitoring system, undertake periodic studies based on actual recorded noise levels in the area. These studies will form the basis for an on-going identification and prioritisation, where necessary, of actions. 4.2 Noise reduction measures already in force and projects in preparation 4.2.1 The Planning Agreement GBBCA already has in force a number of measures designed to reduce and manage noise. A noise management programme has been in existence at the Airport since 1994 when the original Planning Agreement between the Airport and the Department of the Environment [DoE] came into force. The Agreement, which was revised in 1997, contains a number of obligations and restrictions on the operation of the Airport. These are: a. Aircraft will only be scheduled to operate between 06.30 hours and 21.30 hours.

b. Delayed aircraft may be permitted to operate between 21.31 hours and midnight in exceptional circumstances. c. No scheduled flights will be permitted between midnight and 06.29 hours.

d. No more than 45,000 air transport movements are permitted in any period of 12 months. e. To accept only those aircraft types that comply with the certified noise limits as laid down in Chapter 3 of Annex 16 of the standards adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organisation Council. f. No more than 1.5 million seats on scheduled flights to be offered for sale from the Airport in any period of 12 months. g. To maintain a bias of approaches over Belfast Lough and maximise the use of approaches and climb-outs over the Lough. h. Prepare annual indicative noise contours at 60 and 63 Laeq and compare them against the indicative contours prepared by the DoE. The Planning Agreement is currently under review. Any changes that alter the operational restrictions specified above resulting from the review will be incorporated into this Action Plan.

4.2.2 Noise Abatement Procedures Mindful of the need to minimise noise disturbance in residential areas, the Airport has in force a series of noise abatement procedures for both arriving and departing traffic. These are designed to minimise noise disturbance while ensuring the safe flight of aircraft and the safe and efficient management of air traffic at both Belfast City and Belfast International airports. These procedures may be summarized as follows: a. Runway 22 - Arriving Traffic [arriving over Belfast Lough] Aircraft are to cross the North Down coast at an altitude not below 2500 feet before establishing on the final approach track not below 1500 feet altitude at 5 miles from the threshold, descending to the runway threshold at an angle of 3 degrees.

b. Runway 22 – Departing Traffic [departing over the city] o Propeller aircraft up to 13,000 kilos Maximum Take off Weight [MTOW] are to climb to an altitude of 1500 feet before commencing a turn. o Propeller aircraft greater than 13,000 kilos MTOW are to climb to an altitude of 2000 feet before commencing a turn. o All jet propelled aircraft are to climb to an altitude of 3000 feet before commencing a turn.

c. Runway 04 - Arriving Traffic [arriving over the city] Aircraft are to establish on the final approach track no later than 5 miles from the threshold at an altitude of 1500 feet, descending to the runway threshold at an angle of 3 degrees. d. Runway 04 - Departing Traffic [departing over Belfast Lough] On achieving 500 feet or 0.4 nautical miles, whichever is the sooner, all departing aircraft turn left unto a track of 035 degrees and do not undertake a subsequent right turn until: i. Propeller aircraft up to 13,000 kilos MTOW climb to an altitude of 1500 feet.

ii. Propeller aircraft greater than 13,000 kilos MTOW climb to an altitude of 2000 feet. iii. All jet propelled aircraft climb to an altitude of 3000 feet. The effect of these measures is to localise noise disturbance from arriving aircraft to those areas under the ‘extended runway centreline’ of the flight track, made necessary by the need for aircraft to be stabilised on the approach track approximately 5 miles from the runway to effect a safe landing at. For departing aircraft, these measures result in the wider distribution of lower levels of noise disturbance.

4.2.3 Further Measures a. Using the powers contained within The Aerodrome (Noise Restrictions)(Rules and Procedures) Regulations, 2003, the Airport has prohibited the use of those aircraft types that are only ‘marginally compliant’ with the standards adopted by the International Civil Aviation Organisation Council and documented within Chapter 3 of Annex 16 of the standards. b. The Airport maintains a noise complaints system. Complainants may lodge complaints by e-mail via the Airport website; by dedicated noise complaint telephone line; by letter or by fax. All complaints are centrally logged and investigated. Complainants receive a response to their complaint and complaints are reported to the Airport consultative committee, the Airport Forum. Where investigations reveal a failure to follow procedures or in the procedures themselves, these are reported to the offending organisation, e.g. airline or air traffic control. c. The airport is currently [summer 2008] installing a noise and track monitoring system to monitor, record and report the noise levels from

aircraft movements and the tracks flown. The information provided by this system will: i. Develop a further understanding of the levels of aircraft noise and the adherence of aircraft to the noise abatement procedures. ii. Provide data to inform and, where necessary prioritise, the development of future noise management strategies. iii. Provide tabular and graphical reports for the relevant Departments, the Airport Forum and the wider community. 4.3 Actions which the Competent Authorities intends to take in the next five years, including measures to preserve quiet areas. 4.3.1 At present there are no criteria or limit values for Quiet Areas or Noise Management Areas within an agglomeration and thus a policy approach needs to be developed by the NIENDSG during the first phase of the Action Plan. It is therefore the focus of this Action Plan to provide the assessments and associated data that will lead to: o Setting the criteria for noise management and quiet areas within the agglomeration.

o Identifying areas within the agglomeration that meet the criteria. o Designating any such areas within the agglomeration that meet the criteria. 4.3.2 Within the timeframe of this Action Plan, GBBCA will work with the NIENDSG to assess the noise maps and other available data to set criteria and identify areas that meet the criteria for designation as noise management and quiet areas. 4.4 Long term strategy 4.4.1 GBBCA is committed to the continuous monitoring of aircraft noise to provide data upon which to base ongoing analysis of noise disturbance. To this end, the airport is currently [August 2008] installing an aircraft noise and track monitoring system to be operational in October 2008. 4.4.2 Using this data and, where appropriate to do so, GBBCA will continue to work with relevant agencies and bodies to explore the optimum tracks for aircraft to fly and the optimum way for aircraft to be flown. 4.4.3 GBBCA will continue to adhere to Government policy as set out in the ATWP and will adopt any revised standards or limit values set for the industry by Government.

4.4.4 GBBCA will continue to be actively involved in the work of the NIENDSG to assess, prioritise and agree what actions are necessary. 4.5 Financial information: budgets, cost-effectiveness assessment, cost- benefit assessment 4.5.1 GBBCA is currently [August 2008] investing approximately £150,000 in the purchase and installation of an aircraft noise and track monitoring system to record aircraft noise data for the ongoing assessment of the impact of aircraft noise in the agglomeration. 4.5.2 GBBCA is committed to the future costs, estimated at approximately £50,000 per year, of maintaining and supporting the noise and track monitoring system, the management of aircraft noise, preparation of annual noise contours in Laeq 16 hour format and management of the noise complaints system.

4.5.3 It is anticipated that throughout the 5-year period of the Action Plan, additional studies to further assess the impact of aircraft noise and its mitigation will be required. GBBCA is committed to working with the Department and the NIENDSG to identify and undertake such studies as are deemed appropriate and cost effective. 4.6 Provisions envisaged for evaluating the implementation and the results of the Action Plan 4.6.1 Annual Report of Noise Contours and Population Exposure Under the terms of the Airport’s Planning Agreement, annual noise contours based on the 16-hour Laeq measure and including the estimated population exposure within each noise contour, are calculated over the summer days period of mid-June to mid-September. While the Planning Agreement requires noise contours to be shown at 60 and 63 Laeq., GBBCA also publishes the 57 Laeq contour.

16-hour Laeq contours do not correspond exactly with the END Lden contours, but they will nevertheless, give an indication of the extent of any annual variation in noise contours and population exposure and therefore as an illustration of change, may be used as an evaluation of the implementation and results of the Action Plan. 4.6.2 Results of Further Assessment As noted in Section 4.3 above, GBBCA is committed to undertaking further assessments of the extent and impact of noise over the next five years. The results of these assessments will be central in evaluating the implementation and results of the Action Plan, in particular determining the location and extent of quiet areas and potential noise management areas. 4.6.3 Community Attitude Survey In Year 5 of the Action Plan and prior to the publication of the next round of noise maps, GBBCA will undertake an extensive community attitude survey to determine:

a. Community attitudes to aircraft noise. b. Community attitudes to aircraft noise in relation to a range of ‘quality of life’ indicators. c. Community attitudes to aircraft noise in relation to other noise sources. The results of this survey will be evaluated and compared with the results of earlier community attitude surveys to detect trends in attitudes towards aircraft noise. Emerging trends from the surveys will be used to evaluate the implementation and results of the Action Plan and, along with the noise maps from the next ‘mapping’ round, will form the basis for the next round of Action Planning.

4.6.4 Evaluation of Noise Complaints GBBCA will continue to record, investigate, evaluate and report noise related complaints. Noise related complaints are reported at each meeting of the airport consultative committee, the Airport Forum. 4.7 Estimates in terms of the reduction of the number of people affected (annoyed, sleep disturbed, or other) 4.7.1 It is estimated that there will be no reduction in the population affected as a result of this first round Action Plan. 4.7.2 This being the first round Action Plan, with subsequent Plans to be developed in 2013 and every five years thereafter, it is the aim of this plan to set the framework for the identification and assessment of potential noise management areas and quiet areas. This process will determine if the current noise impact is acceptable and if not, prioritise those areas where future actions will be developed.

Appendices Appendix A List of Current Policy and Legislative Framework for Controlling Environmental Noise in Northern Ireland. Air Navigation Order 2005 Air Navigation (Environmental Standards) Order 2002 The Airports (NI) Order 1994 Aeroplane Noise Regulations 1999 Land Acquisition and Compensation (Northern Ireland) Order 1973 Pollution Control and Local Government (NI) Order 1978 Pollution Prevention and Control Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2003 Noise Insulation Regulations (NI) 1995 Aeroplane Noise Regulations 1999 Aeroplane Noise (Amendment) Regulations 1999 Air Navigation (General) Regulations 1999 The Aerodromes (Noise Restrictions) (Rules and Procedures) Regulations 2003 The Environmental Assessment of Plans and Programmes Regulations (NI) 2004 The Civil aviation Act 2006 Environmental Noise Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2006. Relevant Policy and Guidance Publications Control of Noise (Code of Practice for Construction and Open Sites) Order (NI) 2002 Calculation of Road Traffic Noise Department of Transport 1998 - NI Modification Design Manual for Roads and Bridges Volume 11 Section3 Part 7 Traffic Noise and Vibration Land Compensation - Your Rights Explained DOE (NI)

Land Compensation Your rights explained - Insulation against Traffic Noise 1995 DOE Control of Noise at Surface Mineral Workings 1990 DOE Environmental Effects of Surface Mineral Workings 1992 BS 5228 Noise & Vibration Control on Construction and Open Sites Part 1 1997 - Code of Practice for basic info and procedures for noise & vibration control Part 2 1997 - Guide to noise & vibration control legislation for construction and demolition including road construction and maintenance BS 5228 Part 3 1997 - Code of Practice applicable to surface coal extraction by open cast methods BS 5228 Part 4 1992 - Code of Practice for noise and vibration from piling operations BS 5228 Part 5 1997 - Code of Practice applicable to surface mineral extraction (except coal) sites BS 4142: 1997 - Method of rating industrial noise affecting mixed residential and industrial areas BS 6472 1992 - Guide to Evaluation of human exposure to vibration in buildings (1Hz to 80 Hz) BS 7385 Part 1 1990 – Evaluation and Measurement for Vibration in Buildings – Guide for measurement and evaluation of their effects on buildings BS 7385 Part 2 1993 - Evaluation and Measurement for Vibration in buildings - Guide to damage levels from ground borne vibration BS 7445 Part 1: 1999 - Description and measurement of environmental noise BS 7445 Part 2: 1999 - Guide to the acquisition of data pertinent to land use BS 7445 Part 3: 1999 - Guide to the application of noise limits. BS 8233 1999 - Sound Insulation and noise reduction for buildings – Code of Practice DEFRA - Low Frequency Noise 2002 Delivering the goods – a toolkit for improving night time-deliveries Freight Transport Association in consultation with Department for Transport Calculation of Railway Noise 1995 Department of Transport

Environment Agency IPPC Draft Noise Guidance Part 1 Regulation and Permitting 2001 Environment Agency Horizontal Guidance for Noise Part 2 - Noise Assessment and Control 2001 The Noise Insulation (Railways and other Guided Transport Systems) Regulations 1996 DEFRA – A Review of Published Research On High Freq. Noise and It Effects – May 2003 DOE Circular 10/73 Planning and Noise (19 January 1973) Environmental Impact Assessment (August 1999) DMRB Screening Method Spreadsheet Version 1.02 November 2003 Transport Assessment; Guidelines for Development Proposals in N. Ireland Nov 06 DRD/DOE ODPM -PPG24: Planning and Noise (1994) In addition to the above, the Action Plan will need to consider the wider context of local and national sustainable development plans, policies and strategies, including but not necessarily limited to, the following:  Regional Development Strategy 2025;  Draft Belfast Metropolitan Area Plan 2015;  Regional Transportation Strategy for Northern Ireland 2002-2012;  Belfast Metropolitan Transport Plan 2015;  Regional Strategic Transport Network Transport Plan 2015;  Sub-Regional Transport Plan 2015;  Strategic Environmental Assessment Regulations;  Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations;  Noise Insulation Regulations;  Air Quality Regulations and Action Plans;  A Planning Strategy for Rural Northern Ireland, 1993;  Renewable Energy Action Plan;  Local Authority Open Spaces policies;

 Planning Policy Statements and design guides;;  Emerging climate change initiatives;  Mosaic GI strategy for Northern Ireland;  Urban Regeneration Strategies; and  Noise Abatement Policy.

Appendix B Glossary of Acoustic and Technical Terms Term Definition Agglomeration Major Continuous Urban Area as set out within the Regulations ASL Above Sea Level Attribute Data A trait, quality, or property describing a geographical feature, e.g. vehicle flow or building height Attributing (Data) The linking of attribute data to spatial geometric data BCA Belfast City Airport BIA Belfast International Airport CRN The Calculation of Railway Noise 1995. The railway prediction methodology published by the UK Department of Transport.

CRTN The Calculation of Road Traffic Noise 1988. The road traffic prediction methodology published by the UK Department of Transport. Data Data comprises information required to generate the outputs specified, and the results specified dB Decibel DEM Digital Elevation Model DSM Digital Surface Model DTM Digital Terrain Model DVD Digital Versatile Disk EC European Commission END Environmental Noise Directive (2002/49/EC) First Round Agglomeration An agglomeration but having a population in excess of 250,000 persons.

GIS Geographic Information System INM Integrated Noise Model Irish National Grid (ING) The official spatial referencing system of Ireland ISO International Standards Organisation Metadata Descriptive information summarising data NA Not Applicable Noise Bands Areas lying between contours of the following levels (dB): Lden 74 Ld 74 Le 74 Ln 69

Term Definition Noise Levels Free-field values of Lden Ld, Le, Ln, and LA10,18h at a height of 4m above local ground level Noise Level - Ld - Daytime Ld (or Lday) = LAeq,12h(07:00 to 19:00) Noise Level - Le - Evening Le (or Levening) = LAeq,4h(19:00 to 23:00) Noise Level - Ln - Night Ln (or Lnight) = LAeq,8h(23:00 to 07:00) Noise Level - Lden – Day/Evening/Night A noise rating indicator based upon Ld. Le and Ln as follows: Lden = 10 * lg 1/24 {12 * 10^((Lday)/10) + 4 * 10^((Levening+5)/10) + 8 * 10^((Lnight+10)/10)} Noise Level – LA10,18h LA10,18h = LA10,18h (06:00 to 24:00) Noise Mapping (Input) Data Two broad categories: (1) Spatial (e.g. road centre lines, building outlines). (2) Attribute (e.g. vehicle flow, building height – assigned to specific spatial data) Noise Mapping Software Computer program that calculates required noise levels based on relevant input data Noise Model All the input data collated and held within a computer program to enable noise levels to be calculated. Noise Model File The (proprietary software specific) project file(s) comprising the noise model Output Data The noise outputs generated by the noise model OSNI Ordnance Survey for Northern Ireland Processing Data Any form of manipulation, correction, adjustment factoring, correcting, or other adjustment of data to make it fit for purpose. (Includes operations sometimes referred to as ‘cleaning’ of data) QA Quality Assurance Shapefile ESRI proprietary GIS dataset format. Contains both geometry to define features, and associated alphanumeric attribute information.

Spatial (Input) Data Information about the location, shape, and relationships among geographic features, for example road centre lines and buildings. WG - AEN Working Group – Assessment of Exposure to Noise

Appendix C Belfast Agglomeration indicating location of GBBCA Appendix D Noise Maps for Airport within Belfast Agglomeration

Lden Lnight

Appendix E Consolidated Noise Maps for All Noise Sources within Belfast Agglomeration Lden Lnight

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