2020-2021 Course Catalog - E.W. Grove School - Henry County High School

 
E.W. Grove School                        Henry County High School
            215 Grove Blvd                               315 South Wilson
            Paris, TN 38242                               Paris, TN 38242
Phone: (731) 642-4586 Fax: (731) 642-4577     Phone: (731) 642-5232 Fax: (731) 642-5240

                    2020-2021 Course Catalog
Graduation Requirements

English                          4 credits                           To earn a diploma from HCHS, students
Math1                            4 credits
Science2                         3 credits
                                                                    must earn the prescribed 27 credits and
World History                    1 credit                          have a satisfactory record of discipline and
US History                       1 credit                                         attendance.
Economics                        ½ credit
US Government                    ½ credit
Lifetime Wellness                1 credit                                            State Mandated Testing
Physical Education               1 credit
                                                                     EOC Tests: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Biology I, English I,
Computer Education3              1 credit
                                                                                   English II, World History, US History
Personal Finance                 1 credit
Program of Study/Pathway4        3 credits                          ACT: Taken during a regular school day--spring semester of 11th
Foreign Language5                2 credits                                      grade and fall semester of 12th grade
Fine Art5                        1 credit
Electives                        3 credits                                  Civics Exam: must be passed during 12th grade

English: Students are required to earn four credits in English. Students must take an English class each year.

Mathematics: 1Students graduating in 2013 and beyond are required to have a minimum of four credits in math. All students
complete a mathematics course sequence including Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and one additional math course. All
students must take a math class each year of high school. High school math courses taken during middle school will serve
to accelerate a student’s level of math but will not be a substitute for the “math each year” requirement.

Science2: Students are required to earn a minimum of three credits in science. Biology I and Chemistry I are required by all.
The Henry County Board of Education requires all students to take a science during their senior year.

Social Studies: Students are required to earn three credits in Social Studies. World History, US History, Government and
Economics are required. The Henry County Board of Education requires all students to take a Social Studies class during their
senior year.

Lifetime Wellness, Physical Education and Personal Finance: One full credit in each is required.

Computer Education3: All students enrolled at EW Grove are required to take either Computer Applications or Computer
Science Foundations to meet this requirement. Students that transfer to Henry County in the 10th-12th grades may be exempt
from this requirement.

Program of Study/Pathway4: Students will have a minimum of 3 Program of Study/Pathway credits which relate to career
and academic areas of interest. Students who wish to expand and enhance their career focus will have a minimum of 6
Program of Study/Pathway credits. In July 2019, federal legislation was passed requiring all Program of Study/Pathway
credits be taken in specific sequence.

Foreign Language/Fine Art5: Foreign Language and Fine Art may be waived for students not planning to attend a four-year
college or university and may be replaced with three courses designed to enhance and expand the Program of
Study/Pathway focus. When taken, both foreign language credits must be of the same language.

Electives: An elective is any course that is not already a requirement for graduation.

Athletes and Athletic Eligibility: Students who wish to play sports in Division I or Division II colleges and universities must meet
the NCAA requirements for high school credits. These requirements are above and beyond what is required by the State of
Tennessee. Certain high school courses will not count for NCAA core course requirements. Student athletes are encouraged
to work closely with their school counselor to ensure all NCAA requirements are met.

ACT: Beginning with the Class of 2018, students are required to have taken the ACT in order to graduate. The ACT is given
free of charge to all students in the spring semester of the 11th grade and in the fall semester of the 12th grade. Both tests are
given during a regular school day. The scores earned on the ACT in this program are college reportable scores, accepted
by all colleges and universities. Students who score at or above all of the subject area readiness benchmarks on the ACT
with graduate with Honors. The ACT benchmarks are: English: 18, Math: 22, Reading: 22, Science: 23.
GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA)

The CUMULATIVE grade point average includes grades earned in all courses and is determined on a numerical scale. For
instance, a student may have a cumulative GPA of 101.56 or 87.9.

The HOPE SCHOLARSHIP grade point average is based on a fixed quality point system. Points are earned for the grade in a
course. For instance, a student may have a GPA of 3.25 or 3.75. (A = 4.0; B = 3.0; C = 2.0; D = 1.0; F = 0.0)

Weighted courses include the addition of 3, 4 (beginning in 2017-18) or 5 points to the added to the passing grade of the
course.

   Honors Courses and Courses Earning                 Early Post-Secondary               Advanced Placement Courses
      National Industry Certification            Opportunities/Dual Enrollment
                                                             Courses
  Will include the addition of 3 points to   Will include the addition of 4 points   Will include the addition of 5 points to
  the grades used to calculate the           to the grades used to calculate the     the grades used to calculate the
  semester average.                          semester average.                       semester average.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS, GRADUATION WITH DISTINCTION

Graduation with Honors: Students who score at or above all of the subject area readiness benchmarks on the ACT will
graduate with Honors. The ACT benchmarks are: English: 18, Math: 22, Reading: 22, Science: 23.

Graduation with Distinction: Students will be recognized as graduating with Distinction by attaining at least a 3.0 GPA and
completing at least one of the following:

       Earn a nationally-recognized industry certification
       Participate in at least one Governor’s School
       Participate in at least one of the state’s All State musical organizations
       Be selected as a National Merit Finalist or Semi-Finalist
       Attain a score of 31 or higher composite score on ACT
       Attain a score of 3 or higher on at least two AP exams
       Earn 12 or more semester hours of transcripted postsecondary credit

Students must complete the necessary paperwork in the School Counseling Office to receive Distinction recognition.
Students graduating with Honors and/or Distinction are recognized during the commencement ceremony.

READY GRADUATE INDICATOR
A newer requirement included in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) for school and district accountability is an
“indicator of school quality and student success.” Tennessee’s goal in creating this indicator is to capture evidence of
student performance beyond academic proficiency to represent a holistic, well-rounded education.

    How does a student meet this Ready Graduate Indicator? A Ready Graduate meets one of the following criteria
    (students can only be “counted” once):
       score a 21 or higher on the ACT; OR
       complete four early postsecondary opportunities (EPSOs); OR
       complete two EPSOs + earn an industry certification (on a CTE pathway leading to a credential); OR
       complete 2 EPSOs + earn a score of 31 or higher on the ASVAB

EARLY POSTSECONDARY OPPORTUNITIES (EPSOs)
EPSOs are courses that allow students the chance to earn college credit while still in high school. The Henry County School
System currently offers several avenues for students to earn EPSO credits: Advanced Placement, Dual Enrollment, CLEP and
Student Industry Certification.

        Advanced Placement (AP)
        Advanced Placement courses are taught according to the College Board Advanced Placement guidelines and
        students will use college level materials and texts. AP exams must be taken on a specific date and hour during the
        second or third week of May. Students enrolled in an AP course at Grove or HCHS are required to take the
        correlating AP exam in order to receive high school credit for the course. Students are responsible for any fees
        related to the AP exam. It is important to note that the determination of college credit is done at the receiving
        institution of higher learning. This means that every college or university sets the level of performance expected on
        the AP exam in order to accept the exam for college credit. It is the responsibility of the student to research the
        score requirements at the college or university they wish to attend. Specific course descriptions for each AP course
        offered by Henry County Schools can be found in this catalog. Students may inquire about taking AP tests for
        courses not offered at HCHS. Advanced Placement Courses offered for the 2019-2020 school year will include:
AP Human Geography               AP Computer Science Principles            AP Biology
        AP Chemistry                     AP English III                            AP English IV
        AP US History                    AP Calculus                               AP Statistics
        AP Psychology                    AP Computer Science A                     AP Environmental Science
        AP Physics                       AP Art

Dual Enrollment (DE)
Students who meet specified admission requirements have the privilege of applying to earn credit through Jackson
State Community College (JSCC) and/or Tennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT). Students meeting set
requirements will be eligible for the Dual Enrollment Grant during their junior and senior years of high school. The
grant funding typically covers the cost of the Dual Enrollment class, but does not pay for any needed textbooks,
supplies, and/or materials. Information and Orientation meeting will be required in Spring and Summer prior to
enrollment.

Dual Enrollment courses are offered in a variety of formats. Some are held on the HCHS campus and are taught by
HCHS faculty. Other DE courses are taken at the TCAT campus, just across the street from HCHS. Several DE course
options will be available to students on the JSCC campus at Central School in Paris, and many dual enrollment
courses will be offered online. When students enroll in college courses, they must follow the rules and schedules of
both HCHS and the college they are taking the dual enrollment course from. For the 2019-2020 school year, the
following Dual Enrollment courses will be offered to students:

        Dual Enrollment: Jackson State Community College (JSCC)
        11th and 12th grades only; application and admission to JSCC required

        DE English IV(1010)              DE English IV(1020)                       DE US History
        DE College Algebra               DE Biology I (1010)                       DE Biology II (1020)
        DE Speech                        DE Music Appreciation                     DE Statistics & Probability
        DE Sociology                     DE Psychology                             DE Accounting
        DE Spanish 1010 and 1020         DE French 1010 and 1020

        Dual Enrollment: Tennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT)
        11th and 12th grades only; application and admission to TCAT required; MINIMUM of 2 sections of same
        course per year; all DE TCAT courses align with a specific program of study/pathway. Supply fee required
        each semester (varies by course). Courses offered include:

        DE Industrial Maintenance        DE Welding                                DE Computer Info Technology
        DE Residential Maintenance       DE Machine Tool                           DE Motorcycle/ATV Repair
        DE Cosmetology                   DE Collision Repair                       DE Admin Office Technology
        DE Health Info Management

INDUSTRY CERTIFICATION (IC)
Industry certifications are earned through secondary and postsecondary career and technical education
programs and courses. High school students are encouraged to focus their elective credits on robust, career-
aligned learning programs of study (also known as pathways). All student industry certification options in Henry
County Schools are aligned with local, state and national postsecondary and employment readiness opportunities.
Industry certifications offered to qualified students at HCHS could include:
         Certified Production Technician (CPT), OSHA 10, American Welding Society Certified Welder, Animal
         Science Certification, NCCER Construction Technology, Adobe Illustrator Specialist Certification, Child
         Development Associate (CDA), Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA), CompTIA IT Fundamentals, MicroSoft
         MOUS Specialist (Word, PowerPoint, Excel)

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP)
Developed by the College Board, College Level Examination Program (CLEP) exams can be taken by students to
assess mastery of postsecondary-level material acquired in a variety of ways, including through general academic
instruction, significant independent study or extracurricular work. Students may earn credit for postsecondary
coursework in a specific subject. Henry County High School does not set the scoring criteria or award credit for CLEP
exams; that is done at the postsecondary institution. Students and parents are encouraged to contact the college
or university they plan to attend to determine which CLEP assessments are accepted, and the minimum score
requirements. CLEP opportunities are available in:
          American Literature, Analyzing & Interpreting Literature, College Composition, English Literature,
          Humanities, French, Spanish, German, American Government, History of US, Human Growth &
          Development, Intro to Educational Psychology, Intro to Psychology, Intro to Sociology, Principles of
          Macroeconomics, Principles of Microeconomics, Biology, Chemistry, Calculus, Natural Sciences, Financial
          Accounting, Information Systems, Intro to Business Law, Principles of Management, Principles of Marketing
SCHEDULING PROCEDURES AND POLICIES
During each spring semester, registration information sessions are held. These informational sessions will include: 1) a
presentation of information found throughout this course catalog; 2) the opportunity to meet with teachers and students
currently enrolled in available programs; 3) the opportunity to work with a counselor or other trained faculty member to
create/review/adjust the student’s 4-year plan and to make course request selections.

The master schedule for the school is created based on the course requests of the students.

All students receive their schedules on the first day of the new semester. Should schedules be available before the first day
of school, communication from the school (typically via email, Facebook, and/or Twitter) will relay schedule availability and
access.

Schedule Change Requests: Requests for schedule changes must be done during the designated drop/add period at the
beginning of a semester or prior to a semester beginning (dates will be communicated). Only VALID schedule changes will
be considered. Valid requests could include updating course selections based on summer school credits or correcting a
scheduling error made by the school. INVALID changes include changing classes because of reconsiderations, for the sake
of getting a different teacher, or to take classes with one’s friends, and will not be considered. A student may request a
change of teacher if the student is retaking a class that he/she failed with the same teacher during a previous semester.
Again, the master schedule has been completed based on course requests and schedule changes will be very limited.

No Dropping in Level: Students who requested and who were recommended for Honors and Advanced Placement courses
will be obligated to remain in them during the year. Students may not drop a level because they changed their minds over
the summer or because they desire a different teacher. Simply finding the work of the course to be difficult is not a valid
reason for a course change. Consideration, however, will be given to special hardships.

Courses Must Be Taken In Sequence: Students must pass one level of a course before they can take the next level of the
same course. For example, students must pass Spanish I before they can take Spanish II. Students must pass English I before
they can take English II, English II before they can take English III, and so on.

Class Structure: Grove and HCHS are on a 4x4 block system with 4 ½-week grading periods. Class periods are typically 90
minutes long with 4 periods per day in a normal day. Courses for one-half credit are nine-weeks in duration. Full credit
courses are eighteen-weeks (or one semester) in duration. Students have the opportunity to earn eight credits per school
year.

Standard level courses follow the content standards, learning expectations and performance indicators approved by the
Tennessee State Board of Education and Henry County Schools. Standard level courses are open to all students.

Honors level courses substantially exceed the content standards, learning expectations and performance indicators of
standard courses. Teachers of honors courses model instructional approaches that facilitate maximum interchange of ideas
among students: independent study, self-directed research and learning and appropriate use of technology. All honors
courses include multiple assessments exemplifying coursework such as: short answer, constructed-response, writing prompts,
performance based tasked, portfolios and analytical writing.

Additionally, Henry County School Board Policy 4.6 requires that honors level courses include a minimum of five (5) of the
following components:

        1) extended reading assignments that connect with the specified curriculum;
        2) research-based writing assignments that address and extend the course curriculum;
        3) projects that apply course curriculum to relevant situations;
        4) open ended investigations in which the student selects the questions and designs the research;
        5) writing assignments that demonstrate a variety of modes, purposes and styles;
        6) integration of appropriate technology;
        7) deeper exploration of the culture, values, and history of the discipline;
        8) extensive opportunities for problem solving experiences through imagination, critical analysis, and application;
        9) job shadow experiences with presentations which connect class study to the world of work.
The following is a list of all courses TYPICALLY offered at E.W. Grove and Henry County High Schools. Keep in
mind that all course offerings are dependent upon course requests, enrollment, and faculty teaching
assignments. E.W. Grove and HCHS set their course sections and build their master schedules based entirely on
student requests for courses. The spring registration determines the courses that the schools will offer the
following fall. Once the master schedules are created, students are obligated to take the courses they
requested. Students, therefore, should plan their schedule requests carefully, in a manner which matches their
abilities and educational goals.

                                                     COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ENGLISH
All students are required to earn four credits in English while in high school, and are required to take an English course each
year. The English Department program in Henry County Schools uses an English language arts curriculum designed for
whole-class instruction. Developed by professional educators, this curriculum guides teachers and students through the
development of thematic units that ensure all students can read, understand, and express their understanding of complex,
grade-level texts.

English IA/IB** is a course designed to give a brief review of basic grammatical skills before moving into more advanced
reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. These skills are based upon the standards designated by the Tennessee
Department of Education and are taught in an integrated progression that ensures all students meet post-secondary and
workforce expectations.

Honors English I is a course designed to give a brief review of basic grammatical skills before moving into more advanced
reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. These skills are based upon the standards designated by the Tennessee
Department of Education and are taught in an integrated progression that ensures all students meet post-secondary and
workforce expectations. Not only does this course move at a quicker pace than a standard English class, but it also requires
additional expectations as set forth by the Tennessee Board of Education (Policy 3.301) and the Henry County Board of
Education (Policy 4.60). This course focuses on challenging students with nonfiction passages, literature and enhanced
writing expectations. Text analysis will center on examining the structure, purpose and central ideas of a passage, and
writing assignments will emphasize constructing various types of strong sentences and improving organization, content, and
style in written work.

English II: English II is a course designed to improve writing skills and to emphasize reading comprehension. Course work will
include various types of composition, reading selections from the text and additional readings.

Honors English II This course provides a challenging, enriched curriculum for the college-bound student. Emphasis will be
placed on the development of essay writing and research techniques. The course will focus on developing strong analytical
thinking and writing skills and will work to prepare students for ACT and AP English III (AP English Language).

English III: This course English III is designed to refine writing skills and to increase the student’s knowledge and appreciation
of both classical and contemporary American literature. The course focuses on learning basic principles of grammar and
usage, increasing vocabulary skills, constructing various types of strong sentences, and emphasizing organization, content
and style in written work.

Honors English III This course will feature American literature and focus on advanced principles of grammar and usage,
increasing vocabulary skills, writing persuasive essays and literary analyses, recognizing the various elements of literature,
developing advanced reading skills through the short story, drama and novel. Additional topics will include literary
terminology and approaches to literary criticism. Major out of class reading and writing assignments will be required.

AP English III (course taught in tandem with AP US History, encompassing both semesters, students earn 1 credit in each) The
AP English III course challenges students who have established a record of achievement and self-discipline in the study of
English. The assignments will focus on preparation for the AP English Language and Composition Exam, AP English IV and
future college independence. Students will be expected to identify major American literary genres and historical periods, to
reinforce vocabulary through personal reading and in-class assignments, to develop topics using rhetoric, synthesis,
argumentation, and research, and to express ideas clearly in oral and reports and multiple written essays. Through close
reading and discussion, students will develop a language of discourse for non-fiction writing. Numerous supplemental
readings and documented papers will be required.

English IV: English IV is designed to further refine writing skills and increase the student’s knowledge and appreciation of
both contemporary and classical British literature. Coursework will include advanced styles of composition, selected
readings from outside sources, development of advanced research skills and the improvement of listening and speaking.
DE English IV (English 1010): This course is the study and practice of expository and persuasive writing. Topics will include
critical reading and writing essays, with emphasis on research, writing process and effective formatting. Dual Enrollment
English IV is a college level course offered in conjunction with Jackson State Community College. The pace and scope of
the work is accelerated and students must exhibit self-discipline and motivation. Upon successful completion of the course,
students will earn a credit in both high school English and a freshman composition class. Note: DE English 1020 is the next
course in progression and may be offered as well.

AP English IV: This is a college level course for students who wish to pursue college credit while in high school. The pace and
scope of the work is accelerated and students must exhibit self-discipline and motivation. In May, students will take the
national AP exam designed by the College Board to determine if they may receive 3-6 hours of freshman level college
credit. This course pursues varied genres and writers from world literature. The student will be expected to identify major
literary genres and literary periods, review modes of composition and how those best fit individual needs for
communication, and express ideas clearly in both oral and written reports.

Creative Writing: Creative writing is designed to aid students in their creative expression, as well as delivery of one’s writing.
Students will read and discuss articles on the craft of writing. Students will read and evaluate the effectiveness of fiction of
varying styles, and will write and workshop short stories. Students will also analyze poetic vocabulary and read and interpret
poems of varying styles. Students will be expected to deliver their writing to an audience. This course is only offered at
Grove.

Math
All students are required to complete a math course sequence including at minimum Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and
one additional mathematics course. All students must take a math class each year of high school. High school math
courses taken during middle school will serve to accelerate a student’s level of math but will not be a substitute for the
“math each year” requirement. The mathematics program in Henry County Schools provides multiple opportunities for
advanced study and significant support for the scheduling of those course options. Students are strongly advised to develop
a plan for their mathematics courses in consultation with parents, school counselors, and especially with mathematics
teachers. This plan should reflect a student’s aptitude, interests and post-secondary aspirations and should be reviewed
annually for continued applicability.

Algebra IA/Algebra IB**: Algebra I uses problem situations, physical models and appropriate technology to extend
algebraic thinking and engage student reasoning. Problem solving situations will provide all students an environment that
promotes communication and fosters connections within mathematics to other disciplines and to the real world.

Honors Algebra I uses problem situations, physical models and appropriate technology to extend algebraic thinking and
engage student reasoning. Problem solving situations will provide all students an environment that promotes
communication and fosters connections within mathematics to other disciplines and to the real world. In accordance with
the Tennessee Department of Education Curriculum Standards, students in the course will understand computations results
and operations involving real numbers in multiple systems, understand properties of and relationships between subsets and
elements of the real number system; understand and apply algebraic properties in order to perform operations with
polynomials; solve linear equations; use the Pythagorean Theorem, and understand basic counting procedures and
concepts of probability. Extensive out of class and independent problem solving will be expected at the Honors Algebra I
level.

Geometry: The heart of Geometry is the study of transformations and the role transformations play in defining congruence.
The topic of transformations was introduced in a primarily experiential manner in Grade 8 and is formalized in the Geometry
course with the use of precise language. The need for clear use of language is emphasized through vocabulary, the
process of writing steps to perform constructions, and ultimately as part of the proof-writing process. Geometry is the study
of two and three dimensional geometric figures introduced by points, lines, planes and writing proofs.

Honors Geometry emphasizes inductive and deductive reasoning to independently make and evaluate mathematical
arguments and construct appropriate proofs of the fundamental theorems of geometry. Students will utilize multiple
representations (verbal, iconic/pictorial, graphical, symbolic) to solve problems, model mathematical ideas, and to
communicate solution strategies. In addition, appropriate technology will be incorporated to develop understanding of
abstract mathematical ideas, to facilitate problem solving and to produce accurate and reliable models.

Algebra II: Algebra II extends and deepens the mathematical concepts and procedures development in Algebra I and
introduces the mathematics student to higher order polynomial, rational and transcendental functions. Students will
understand the hierarchy of the complex number system and relationships among the elements, properties and operations.
Students will also understand the trigonometric functions and their relationships, understand statistical sampling and
calculate measures of central tendency and spread. Emphasis is placed on relations and functions, systems of equations
and inequalities, rational and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions.
Honors Algebra II is an accelerated version of Algebra II. It extends and deepens the mathematical concepts and
procedures development in Algebra I and introduces the mathematics student to higher order polynomial, rational and
transcendental functions. Students will understand the hierarchy of the complex number system and relationships among
the elements, properties and operations. Students will also understand the trigonometric functions and their relationships,
understand statistical sampling and calculate measures of central tendency and spread. Emphasis is placed on relations
and functions, systems of equations and inequalities, rational and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions.
More emphasis is placed on problem solving techniques that challenge students’ level of competence.

DE College Algebra is a college-level course offered in conjunction with Jackson State Community College. The pace and
scope of the work is accelerated and students must exhibit self-discipline and motivation. Upon successful completion of
the course, students will earn both high school and college credit.

Applied Mathematical Concepts: Applied Mathematical Concepts is a math course designed for students who have a
math ACT sub-score of 19 or higher. This course is designed for students who have an interest in careers that use applied
mathematics such as banking, industry, human resources, etc. In-depth topics include financial mathematics, probability
and statistics, and linear programming.

Bridge Math: Bridge Math is designed for senior students who have a math ACT sub-score below 19. Concepts taught
include emphasis on previously taught math concepts, college and career readiness standards, and real-world math
application.

DE Statistics: This is a college-level course offered through Jackson State Community College. The pace and scope of the
work is accelerated and students must exhibit self-discipline and motivation. Students will earn a credit in both high school
Statistics and a college mathematics class recognized by many Tennessee public post-secondary schools.

AP Statistics: This is an accelerated course for highly motivated students with a strong background in mathematics. Students
will take the national Statistics exam for the opportunity to earn college credit for the course.

Honors PreCalculus: This course is designed to prepare students for college math courses focusing on advanced math
concepts.

AP Calculus: This is an accelerated course for highly motivated students with a strong background in mathematics. Students
will take the national Calculus exam for the opportunity to earn college credit for the course. Differential and integral
calculus will be studied.

SCIENCE
Every student is required to have a sequence of three credits in science for graduation. The courses include Biology I,
Chemistry I and one other lab science course. In addition, it is a Henry County School Board Policy that students will be
enrolled in a science course in their senior year. Data shows that students who take high school biology, chemistry and
physics score higher on the ACT test than students who do not. In addition, many colleges and universities require incoming
freshmen to have completed additional upper-level high school science courses, regardless of their intended college
major. The science departments of Grove and HCHS provide a variety of opportunities for scientific exploration.

Biology I: Students will learn about living things through explorations in to the basic principles of biology, biochemistry, and
micro-organisms. Learning will occur through both traditional and laboratory experiences.

Honors Biology I is an accelerated version of Biology I. More emphasis is placed on problem solving techniques that
challenge students’ level of competence.

Physical Science: Physical Science is designed to prepare students to succeed in other high school courses, especially
physics and chemistry. Physical Science focuses on the elements, atoms and other fundamental principles of basic
chemistry.

Environmental Science: Environmental Science is a course that enables students to develop and understanding of the
natural environment and the environmental problems facing the world.

Chemistry I: Chemistry I is designed to focus on fundamental problem solving skills, laboratory skills, data interpretation and
the use of the periodic table of elements as a basic tool.

Honors Chemistry I is an accelerated version of Chemistry I. More emphasis is placed on problem solving techniques that
challenge students’ level of competence.
Honors Chemistry II: This is a second year Chemistry course, offering advanced study for students interested in majoring in
science. Topics will include the nature of matter, chemical laws, chemical calculations, chemical compounds and
equations and kinetics.

Honors Biology II: Honors Biology II is a lab course focusing on cell structure and function, genetic principles, anatomy and
physiology of plants, microorganisms and ecology.

AP Physics: This is an accelerated course for highly motivated students with a strong background in mathematics and
science. It will cover motion mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics and light and optics. Extensive use of
algebra is required for problem solving. Students will take the national Physics exam for the opportunity to earn college
credit for the course.

DE Biology I (1010) and DE Biology II (1020): This is a college level course offered in conjunction with Jackson State
Community College. The pace and scope of the work is accelerated and students must exhibit self-discipline and
motivation. Upon successful completion of the course, students will earn credit for both high school and college.

AP Biology: This is a college level course offering advanced study of biology. Students will take the national Biology exam for
the opportunity to earn college credit for the course.

AP Chemistry**: This is a college level course offering advanced study of chemistry. Students will take the national Chemistry
exam for the opportunity to earn college credit for the course.

AP Environmental Science: This is a college level course. Students cultivate their understanding of the interrelationships of
the natural world through inquiry-based lab investigations and field work as they explore concepts like the four Big Ideas;
energy transfer, interactions between earth systems, interactions between different species and the environment, and
sustainability.

SOCIAL STUDIES

AP Human Geography: This course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped
human understanding, use and alteration of the Earth’s surface. Students will learn to employ spatial concepts and
landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences. Students will also
learn methods and tools for human research and applications. Students will take the national College Board exam for the
opportunity to earn college credit for this course. This course is only offered at Grove.

World History: This course is designed to give the student an overview of world history and the development of human
civilization from ancient times to the present.

Honors World History is an accelerated level of the World History course. In addition to regular course assignments, students
will be expected to complete extensive reading, writing and research projects focusing on economics, politics and
international relations.

US History: This course begins with a study of major themes that have shaped the formation of the United States and ends
with a look at contemporary issues generated by those recurrent American themes.

DE US History: This is a college-level course offered in conjunction with Jackson State Community College. The pace and
scope of the work is accelerated and students must exhibit self-discipline and motivation. Upon successful completion of
the course, students will earn a credit in both high school Honors US History and a freshman history class.

AP US History (course taught in tandem with AP English III, encompassing both semesters, students earn 1 credit in each):
This is a college level course offering advanced study of American History. Students will take the national US History exam for
the opportunity to earn college credit for the course.

US Government: This course deals with the structure and functions of government with emphasis on political process, parties,
and pressure groups. Public opinion, polling and campaigns will be examined as a part of the political process.

Honors US Government is an accelerated level of US Government. Students will be expected to complete extensive
reading, writing and research assignments focusing on the American government.

Economics: This course examines how the American economy works.

Honors Economics is an accelerated level of Economics. Students will be expected to complete extensive reading, writing
and research assignments focusing on the American economy.
Sociology: Students will explore the ways sociologists view society and also how they study the social world. In addition,
students will examine culture, socialization, deviance and the structure and impact of institutions and organizations. Also,
students will study selected social problems and how change impacts individuals and societies.

DE Sociology: This course is offered through Jackson State Community College. Students will explore the ways sociologists
view society, and also how they study the social world. In addition, students will examine culture, socialization, deviance
and the structure and impact of institutions and organizations. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be
awarded both high school and college credit.

DE Psychology: This course is offered through Jackson State Community College. Students will study the development of
scientific attitudes and skills, including critical thinking, problem solving, and scientific methodology Students will elaborate
on the importance of drawing evidence-based conclusions about psychological phenomena and gain knowledge on a
wide array of issues on both individual and global levels.

AP Psychology: The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the
behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts,
principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major fields within psychology, and also learn about the ethics and
methods psychologists use in their science and practice.

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS
Students must take one credit of a fine or performing art to meet graduation requirements. Henry County Schools supports
the offering of a strong and varied visual and performing arts program. Students have the opportunity to develop, advance
and demonstrate their skill in choral music, theater, instrumental music, and studio art. Beginning, intermediate and
advanced levels are offered in each genre. Several times each year, the talents of students are showcased through school
and community events.

Art I: The art curriculum is designed to study aesthetics, art criticism, art history and art production. In addition to developing
sensitivity to aesthetic values, the skills of drawing, painting, ceramics, calligraphy and print making are explored.

Art II and III: Art II and Art III enhance skills learned in Art I by including more advanced projects. Projects include class
assignments, murals and art work for the community. This course will provide career and school information and stimulate
individual creative expression.

AP Art**: The AP Art course is designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. Students
develop three portfolios for evaluation —2-D Design, 3-D Design, and Drawing—corresponding to the most common
college foundation courses.

Theater Arts I, II, III and IV: Theater Arts I is an introduction to theater, exploring its history, the structure and analysis of plays,
the fundamentals of acting and the play production process. Students will learn to improvise scenes, and will read and
perform scenes from plays. Units in the technical aspect of theater such as scenery and lighting will also be included.
Advanced classes are for those students interested in writing, acting, and directing. Performance will be stressed,
culminating in a One-Act play presented for an audience.

Speech and Communication: Confidence and skill in oral communication are emphasized in this course. The intent is to
prepare students for public speaking required in college courses as well as on the job. Training in debate, group discussion
and student congress will be developed.

Music History: Music History provides an overview of music from Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic and
Contemporary stylistic periods. Parallels are drawn between historical events and their impact on the development of
music.

Chorus: All types and forms of music will be covered, from Bach to pop. All students are expected to perform in after-school
concerts. Some music theory and music appreciation will be included. Students will be expected to work in both ensemble
and solo situations.

Concert Singers, Bella Vocé: More advanced classes than Chorus, these classes will continue the development of singing
with mixed ensembles and in solo situations. Requirements are that each member is expected to participate in all after
school performances and class activities. Students must have director approval to enroll in Bella Vocé.

Madrigals: This is an application only course. Students must apply and perform with the Choral faculty before participating
in the course. Madrigals is a course in advanced choral singing. Extensive rehearsal time is expected. A national choral
festival is attended every year. A large amount of time is devoted to civic and community performances.

Band, Percussion, and Color Guard: All band students participate in both marching and concert band. Marching season is
July – November and includes performances at pep rallies, ball games, parades and marching competitions. Marching
band will also participate in the World’s Biggest Fish Fry and other parades in the spring. Concert season is October – May
and includes performances at the Christmas Concert, spring concert, a concert festival and solo and ensemble events. All
students are expected to attend after school rehearsals for all events. Students are provided a rehearsal schedule each
month.

Strings: Instruction in stringed instruments is provided through the Strings class. Students must maintain their own instruments
and must have had prior instruction in a stringed instrument.

DE Speech: This is a college-level course offered in conjunction with Jackson State Community College. Students will learn
the art of public speaking and will practice speaking in front of others. The pace and scope of the work is accelerated and
students must exhibit self-discipline and motivation. Upon successful completion of the course, students will earn a credit in
both high school and college.

DE Music Appreciation: This is a college-level course offered in conjunction with Jackson State Community College. The
pace and scope of the work is accelerated and students must exhibit self-discipline and motivation. Upon successful
completion of the course, students will earn a credit in both high school and college.

PE/WELLNESS/PERSONAL FINANCE
Students are required to earn one credit in each of the following: PE, Wellness and Personal Finance. The knowledge and
skills developed in these courses serve to prepare students to lead physically and financially healthy lifestyles.

Wellness: This class will cover the seven areas of wellness for a healthy lifestyle.

Physical Education: A goal of the physical education program is to develop knowledge of the rules, strategies and historical
aspects of various sports, such as tennis and racquetball, basketball, volleyball. Focus will be on the benefits of an active
lifestyle. Both Wellness and PE are required for all students.

Personal Fitness: Topics and activities will include personal fitness programs, stress management, fitness games, nutrition and
weight-lifting. A personal work out plan will be designed and implemented.

Weight & Strength Training: This course is designed for the serious student athlete who has a desire to work on total body
strength and fitness. Students will gain knowledge in fitness concepts such as frequency, intensity, duration, sets and
repetitions. A weightlifting program designed to build strength and muscle will be developed and implemented.

Advanced Personal Fitness: Advanced topics and activities involved in personal fitness programs including weightlifting
plans, personal eating plans, development of a personal fitness plan, as well as conditioning activities.

Personal Finance: Personal Finance is a course designed to help students understand the impact of individual choices on
occupational goals and future earnings potential.

Additional Elective Opportunities

College Inquiry (11th grade): This course is designed to provide students support as they begin researching and applying for
post-secondary options. Components may include virtual college tours, researching post-secondary options, completing
surveys to assess personal interests and aptitudes, and completing projects which connect individual students needs to
options available after high school.

College Success (12th grade): This course is designed to empower students to reach their educational, career and life goals.
This class introduces students to a wide range of strategies, techniques and self-management tools commonly recognize to
lead to college success. Key competencies for this class include Academic Planning, Setting Goals, Managing Time, Career
Planning, Note Taking, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, Developing Effective Presentations, Transition to Work, Career
Exploration and Teamwork.

Driver Training: Driver Training is offered with the aim of helping instill in the potential driver an attitude of personal
responsibility behind the wheel. Students will complete reading and writing assignments related to traffic laws and will
receive behind-the-wheel driving experience.

WBL Internship: Work-Based Learning Internship is a capstone course intended to provide students with opportunities to
apply the skills and knowledge learned in previous CTE and general education courses within a professional work
environment. The course allows students to earn high school credit for on-the-job work experiences, which allow students to
interact with industry professionals in order to extend and deepen classroom work and support the development of
postsecondary and career readiness knowledge and skills. WBL Internships are available by application only. WBL Internship
can be the 3rd course for any/all program of study areas.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE
Completion of two credits in the same world language is required for graduation. It is also a requirement for admission to
most colleges and universities. A third year of the same language is highly recommended and sometimes expected of
students competing for language scholarships, for admission to competitive universities, and for preparing for language
placement exams.

Spanish I and II: These courses are an introduction to the language and the culture of the Spanish-speaking world.

Honors Spanish I and II will move at an accelerated pace and will include additional readings and course assignments
outside of the classroom.

Honors Spanish III and IV: Honors Spanish III and IV are intermediate level courses. Students will increase their knowledge of
Spanish grammar through the reading of Hispanic literature as well as writing and speaking Spanish in classwork, reports and
tests. These will be offered as available.

German I and II: These courses are an introduction to the language and the culture of the German-speaking world.

Honors German I and II will move at an accelerated pace and will include additional readings and course assignments
outside of the classroom.

French I and II: These courses are an introduction to the language and the culture of the French-speaking world.

Honors French I and II will move at an accelerated pace and will include additional readings and course assignments
outside of the classroom.

Honors German III/IV and Honors French III/IV will be offered as available.

DE Spanish 1010 and DE Spanish 1020: A study of pronunciation, phonetics, and basic grammar through the past tense.
Emphasis on basic conversational sentences and listening comprehension. Some discussion of Spanish history and customs.

DE French 1010 and DE French 1020: A study of pronunciation, phonetics, and basic grammar through the past tense.
Emphasis on basic conversational sentences and listening comprehension. Some discussion of French history and customs.

COMPUTER EDUCATION
All students enrolled as 9th graders at Grove School will take a computer education course. Students will select between
Computer Applications or Computer Science Foundations.

Computer Applications: This course is designed to develop computer technology skills. Students will use a variety of
computer software and hardware tools to explore the historical, social and ethical issues of using computer technology. The
focus of the course is enhancing advanced keyboarding skills, becoming proficient in the use of word processing,
spreadsheet, and presentation software applications. In addition, students will be introduced to database software
applications. This course is offered at Grove only.

Computer Science Foundations: This course provides an engaging introduction to computing concepts. The course focuses
on the conceptual ideas of computing so that students understand why computing tools and languages are used to solve
problems through a study of human computer interaction, problem solving, web design, programming, and data analysis.
This class is the first course in the Information Technology: Coding Program of Study. Upon completion of this course, students
are prepared to advance to AP Computer Science Principles coursework. This course is offered at Grove only.

PROGRAMS OF STUDY (also known as PATHWAYS)

In July 2019, federal legislation was passed requiring all Program of Study/Pathway credits be taken in specific sequence.

All students must select and complete a series of courses in a specialized program of study. These programs of study are
meant to provide a relevant framework for college and career-aligned rigorous courses that progress a student in
knowledge and skills year after year. The courses in these programs of study provide invaluable opportunities for students to
experience a subject they are passionate about and explore interests leading to postsecondary learning and future career
paths. Each program of study offered to students in Henry County is aligned to national career clusters and developed with
input from local business, education and industry leaders. Students will have a minimum of 3 Program of Study/Pathway
credits which relate to career and academic areas of interest. Students who wish to expand and enhance their career focus
will have a minimum of 6 Program of Study/Pathway credits.
Career Cluster: Advanced Manufacturing                                              Program of Study: Machining Technology

Principles of Manufacturing: In this course, students will develop an understanding of the general steps involved in the
manufacturing process and master the essential skills to be an effective team member in a manufacturing production
setting. Course content covers basic quality principles and processes, blueprints and schematics, and systems.

Dual Enrollment Industrial Maintenance** (TCAT): The mission of the Industrial Maintenance Technology Program is designed
to meet both the needs of students and the needs of their future employers to develop the skill, knowledge, and
competencies needed to work and grow in the industrial maintenance field. This program includes classroom and “hands-
on” experience in electronics, electrical, pneumatics, hydraulics, motor controls, programmable controllers, robotics,
machine shop, and related math. Students completing this program are prepared to perform at entry level in a typical
industrial environment. Students will gain experience using the newest RS Logic software in the PLC program.

Career Cluster: Advanced Manufacturing                                                       Program of Study: Welding

Principles of Manufacturing: In this course, students will develop an understanding of the general steps involved in the
manufacturing process and master the essential skills to be an effective team member in a manufacturing production
setting. Course content covers basic quality principles and processes, blueprints and schematics, and systems.

Dual Enrollment Welding** (TCAT): The mission of the Welding Technology Program is to prepare the student for entry into the
labor market as a beginning welder. The course seeks to equip the student with the skills, attitudes, and work habits needed
by those who successfully complete and enter into the labor market. The Welding program will teach industry acceptable
standards of welds for gas metal arc and oxy-acetylene welding as well as the proper set-up of gas tungsten arc welding
equipment.

Career Cluster: Agriculture                                                         Program of Study: Veterinary Science

Agriscience: This class explores animal science, agribusiness, agricultural mechanics, and natural resource management.
The standards prepare students to choose among agricultural careers for the 21st century. This course is offered at Grove
only.

Small Animal Science: Small Animal Science is an intermediate course in animal science and care for students interested in
learning more about becoming a veterinarian, vet tech, vet assistant. This course covers anatomy and physiological
systems of different groups of small animals, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry. Upon completion of
this course, proficient students will be prepared for more advanced coursework in veterinary and animal science.

Large Animal Science: Large Animal Science covers anatomy and physiological systems of different groups of large
animals, as well as careers, leadership, and history of the industry.

Veterinary Science: Veterinary Science is an advanced course in animal science that covers principles of health and
disease, basic animal care and nursing, clinical and laboratory procedures, and additional industry-related career and
leadership knowledge and skills. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to pursue advanced study of
veterinary science at a postsecondary institution. Prerequisites: Small Animal Science and Large Animal Science.

Career Cluster: Agriculture                                                         Program of Study: Agribusiness

Agriscience: This class explores animal science, agribusiness, agricultural mechanics, and natural resource management.
The standards prepare students to choose among agricultural careers for the 21st century. This course is offered at Grove
only.

Principles of Agribusiness: Principles of Agribusiness teaches students to apply the economic and business principles
involved in the sale and supply of agricultural products to a wide range of careers across the industry and builds
foundational knowledge of finance and marketing principles.

Ag Leadership: This is an applied-knowledge course for students interested in learning more about the attributes and skills of
successful leaders in the agriculture industry. This course covers organizational behavior, communication, management,
and leadership topics. Students participate in activities that will assist them in the development of communication and
interpersonal skills transferrable to any agribusiness application.

Greenhouse: Greenhouse Management is an applied-knowledge course designed to prepare students to manage
greenhouse operations. This course covers principles of greenhouse structures, plant health and growth, growing media,
greenhouse crop selection and propagation, and management techniques.

Career Cluster: Agriculture                                                         Program of Study: Ag Engineering
Agriscience: This class explores animal science, agribusiness, agricultural mechanics, and natural resource management.
The standards prepare students to choose among agricultural careers for the 21st century. This course is offered at Grove
only.

DE Machine Tool** (TCAT): The Machine Tool Technology Program is designed to provide instruction enabling students to
acquire fundamental knowledge of basic machine tool operation and setup procedures as well as instruction in precision
measurement, bench work, blueprint reading and shop theory. Our program is on the “cutting edge” of the machine tool
industry with an impressive 11 new machines... two Haas CNC lathes, two Haas CNC Mills, two Bridgeport mills, two Sharpe
mills, two Sharpe lathes and a vertical band saw. With the machining industry going high tech, these machines are state-of-
the-line quality.

Career Cluster: Architecture & Construction                                          Program of Study: Residential Construction

Fundamentals of Construction: Fundamentals of Construction is a foundational course in the Architecture & Construction
cluster covering essential knowledge, skills, and concepts required for careers in construction. Upon completion of this
course, proficient students will be able to describe various construction fields and outline the steps necessary to advance in
specific construction careers. Students will be able to employ tools safely and interpret construction drawings to complete
projects demonstrating proper measurement and application of mathematical concepts. Standards in this course also
include an overview of the construction industry and an introduction to building systems and materials.

Residential Construction: This is the second course in the Residential Construction program of study intended to prepare
students for careers in construction by developing an understanding of the different phases of a construction project from
start to finish. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to demonstrate knowledge and skill Page 2 in
the earlier phases of building construction, including site layout, foundation systems, concrete, framing systems, and
electrical systems. Students will be able to perform concrete work; frame walls, ceilings, and floors of a structure; and install
proper wiring while safely employing tools and interpreting construction drawings to complete projects. Emphasis is placed
on demonstrating proper measurement and application of mathematical concepts. Standards in this course also include
principles of the construction industry and business and project management.

DE Residential Maintenance**(TCAT): The mission of the Residential Building Maintenance program is to prepare students to
apply technical knowledge and skills to keep a building functioning and to service a variety of structures. Building
maintenance workers have opportunities for employment in the repair/maintenance of residential and commercial building
such as homes, apartments, schools, or government buildings. The objective of this course is to provide instruction in the
basic maintenance and repair skills required to service building systems such as plumbing and electrical systems. Students
will gain hands-on experience in electrical, plumbing, and basic carpentry.

Career Cluster: Architecture & Construction                                                    Program of Study: Interior Design

Interior Design I: This is the first course in the Interior Design program of study intended to prepare students for careers in
residential and commercial interior design. Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to analyze and
demonstrate the elements and the principles of design, and apply these concepts using sketching techniques in the
creation of perspective floor plans.

Interior Design II: This is the second course in the Interior Design program of study intended to prepare students for careers in
residential and commercial interior design. Students will engage in the development of board presentation techniques for
residential spaces using textiles samples and three-dimensional sketches.

Interior Design III: This is an applied-knowledge course intended to prepare students for careers in the interior design
industry. This course places special emphasis on an internship opportunity and a hands-on capstone project. Upon
completion of this course, proficient students will create a design for a specific space and purpose, either residential or
commercial, applying skills and knowledge from previous courses and industry-specific technologies.

Career Cluster: Arts, Audio/Visual, Technology                                         Program of Study: Graphic Design
                                                                                       (Formerly known as Digital Arts & Design)

Graphic Design I: Digital Arts & Design I is a foundational course in the Arts, A/V Technology, & Communications cluster for
students interested in art and design professions. The primary aim of this course is to build a strong understanding of the
principles and elements of design and the design process.

Graphic Design II: builds on the basic principles and design process learned in the introductory Digital Arts & Design I course.
Upon completion of this course, proficient students will be able to perform advanced software operations to create
photographs and illustrations of increasing complexity. Students will employ design principles and use industry software to
create layouts for a variety of applications. Standards in this course also include an overview of art and design industries,
career exploration, and business management.
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