CONCURRENT SESSION 1 SYNOPSES - 31 May 2018, Thursday Collaborate and Be a CHEERful Buddy - iCTLT

 
CONCURRENT SESSION 1 SYNOPSES - 31 May 2018, Thursday Collaborate and Be a CHEERful Buddy - iCTLT
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 1 SYNOPSES
                               31 May 2018, Thursday

                            Collaborate and Be a CHEERful Buddy

Author(s)            : Jasmine Tan, Carian Ye
Presenter(s)         : Jasmine Tan, Carian Ye
With the vision of nurturing girls to women of grace and substance, the school has a structured Life
Skills Programme to develop SEL and 21st Century Competencies in students. The programme
provides non-threatening platforms for building interpersonal relationships (e.g. TSR and SSR).
The school has attained the Best Practice Award for Character and Citizenship Education in 2016.
The programme integrated MOE Peer Support Package and the school’s ‘Be a Buddy’ Programme.
Students learnt three steps on how to seek help from a trusted adult/friend and five steps in the
CHEER model to support their friends who need help. Authentic scenarios were used to elicit
discussions through meaningful interaction using ICT. The student-facilitated ‘Be a Buddy’ Programme
was an extension of the CCE syllabus and aimed to strengthen friendships and promote racial
harmony among students. It encouraged students to reach out to others who are different from
them. Through cooperative teamwork, core values such as respect, care and harmony were put to
practice. Demonstrating these values in action, students developed social awareness and relationship
management skills. Through real-life examples and collaboration, students were given opportunities
to deepen their learning while promoting Cyber Wellness among their peers.
Leveraging on technology, collaborative inquiry has been infused into the CCE curriculum through
Collaborative Learning (CoL) and Visible Thinking. Using the evidence-based cycle for collaborative
inquiry on quality learning and teaching with technology (Hattie, 2016), teachers can evaluate the
impact on students’ learning through the use of ICT.
To support mp4, Nearpod was used as a school-wide platform and the school has a structured ICT PD
to provide teachers with pedagogical strategies to facilitate CoL and AfL effectively. Using collaborative
and self-assessment features of Nearpod, students participated in engaging activities and teachers
monitored their learning actively. Students’ responses were generated in a report for evaluation.
Students activated their learning by setting their own goals for the programme. Teachers promoted
students’ thinking and discussion using Nearpod and students facilitated their demonstration of
learning through the implementation of the programme. Both teachers and students then monitored
and provided feedback through their digital learning journal. Through engaging in CoL and Visible
Thinking activities, and interacting in the Life Skills Programme, students were able to ‘Collaborate and
Be a CHEERful Buddy’ to their peers.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 1 SYNOPSES
                               31 May 2018, Thursday

   Gamifying Lesson with ‘Quizizz’ to Engage and Motivate Kinesthetic Learners

Author(s)            : Choo Shi Qian
Presenter(s)         : Choo Shi Qian
Many of our students are kinaesthetic learners, and quite often, they require hands-on learning
activities in their Science lessons to engage them. In response to this need, the team developed
a learning activity that is akin to the “Escape room” concept and incorporated both ICT and
“gamification” elements.
“Gamification” is the process of transforming typical academic components into gaming themes.
It appears to be an increasingly popular trend amongst educators as a means of engaging students
during lessons and improving their motivation and engagement (Deterding, Dixon, Khaled & Nicke,
2011). With increasing ownership of data-enabled mobile devices, the convenience of mobile apps
like Quizizz and Kahoot can provide novel ways of achieving effective student learning. When
“gamification” is applied appropriately, it not only allows learning to be enjoyable, but it potentially
makes teaching Science concepts that are normally harder to grasp, easier.
The impact of the lesson was measured using observations made during the activity and qualitative
surveys obtained from students via an online survey platform, Survey Monkey. The qualitative survey
focused on students’ feelings of engagement & motivation as it was premature to assume a significant
impact on students’ learning could be measured based on one game-based lesson. Students’
engagement and motivational levels were analysed on the following domains: Joy of Learning and
Engagement in Learning.
In this sharing, participants will learn how to create and conduct lessons that incorporate ICT and
game-based learning using Quizizz. The team will also share how the lesson idea was differentiated to
cater to various student profiles. Participants will also try out some hands-on activities and bring back
ideas that can be easily implemented.
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 1 SYNOPSES
                              31 May 2018, Thursday

            Use of Desmos in the Teaching of Linear Functions and Graphs

Author(s)            : Tan Poh Hong, Sasi Kumar Anbanandan
Presenter(s)         : Tan Poh Hong, Kalai Vani Sivam
Students generally find it difficult to understand the concept of gradient in coordinate geometry.
They are usually unsure why gradient is calculated by the rise over run formula and this eventually
affects their application of the gradient formula in Upper Secondary. The team wanted to strengthen
the learning of the concept of Cartesian coordinates as well as the derivation of gradient for Secondary
One students.
The lesson package consists of 3 main segments:
1) Introduction to coordinate system using Scratch programme
2) Plotting of coordinates using Desmos app
3) Deriving and calculating Gradient using Desmos app
As Geogebra and Geometer Sketchpad have been used extensively in the teaching of coordinates,
we decided to try out different softwares. Scratch is inter-disciplinary and interactive in nature and
through designing a game with it, students will find that understanding the Coordinate System actually
gives them an edge in game making. The team also used Desmos, a free app that runs on smart
phones, which therefore eliminates the hassle of booking laptops or computer labs which would have
been needed if Geogebra and GSP were used. As long as students have a smart phone, they will have
immediate access to the app. Desmos includes a slider function which makes it easier for students
to make any form of adjustments on the app in order to make the desired observations.
We wanted to find out if students were able to observe the relationship of slope to the calculation
of rise over run, through the use of the Desmo app and self-designed worksheet.
Two classes of similar student profiles and progress levels were chosen for this study. The SA 1 results
were used as a pre-test and a post-test was carried out after the intervention. An unpaired 2 sample
t-test was carried out to determine if there was a significant difference in the mean performance
of the students.
A quick survey was carried out with the whole class for the experimental group after each lesson and a
focused group discussion was conducted to follow up on any data or feedback which was not reflected
in the survey results. These data and analyses provided the qualitative feedback on the intervention.
The experiment group did significantly better than the control group and this confirmed our hypothesis
that the design of the lesson with its embedded ICT tools did have a positive influence on the
learning outcomes.
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 1 SYNOPSES
                              31 May 2018, Thursday

                           Collaborative ‘Musicking’:
    The Usage of an Online Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) in the Classroom
          as an Avenue to Listen,Create, Perform and Respond to Music

Author(s)           : Lim Ying Xuan Tiffany, Hoe Jun Wei Wilson
Presenter(s)        : Lim Ying Xuan Tiffany, Hoe Jun Wei Wilson
The musical performance, listening and compositional process, i.e. ‘musicking, (Smalls, 1998) have
evolved together with the ways we use technology with music. Digital audio workstations have provided
musicians additional avenues and unprecedented affordances to ‘music’, such as engineered sounds
and space. In light of moving toward Information and Communication Technology (ICT)-enabled, and
student-centric teaching and learning, Xinmin Secondary School’s Music Unit has piloted the usage of
SoundTrap in the students’ compositions of music and sound effects.
The model lesson will share how three teachers utilised SoundTrap as a vehicle to encompass
the creating, performing and listening/responding processes emphasised in the General Music
Programme tripartite. Participants can learn how the usage of SoundTrap enabled and empowered
students’ creativity and provided means of collaborative learning anytime, anywhere.
SoundTrap is, essentially, a digital audio workstation (DAW) with the added dimensions of real-time
collaboration and portability, because of its availability both on computers and handheld devices.
Students are able to work on their sound projects both in class and beyond the classroom. If a novel
sound is needed somewhere, they can whip out their devices, record and process and save said
sound as an audio loop to be used instantaneously. Students are hence equipped with the right tools
should they experience an opportune ‘musicking’ moment.
Lesson observations, feedback and post module reflections showed substantial qualitative evidence
of the programme value-adding to their ‘musicking’ experiences, in areas of self-directed learning,
active contributing, and critical/inventive thinking.
Self-directed learning: Students were seen actively viewing non-prescribed additional resources and
lessons on the SoundTrap webpage and the web to value-add to their projects. (e.g. tutorials, royalty
free music/clips)
Active Contributors: Students were more willing and took initiative on the app to express viewpoints
and opinions on certain musical elements with each other.
Critical/Inventive Thinking: Students were innovative, and used novel, unexpected sounds as a result
of the vast selection of musical loops in the app and the ease of recording/saving.
Measures had to be taken in order to circumvent internet connection limitations, and other logistic
issues. Solutions to mitigate the challenges imposed will be shared with the audience during the
session as well.
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 1 SYNOPSES
                              31 May 2018, Thursday

                Augmented Reality Based Character Composition Game
                    for Improving Chinese Character Recognition

Author(s)           : Alex Xie, Queenie Huang, Dr Wen Yun, Wang Yanyan, Lucy Sim
Presenter(s)        : Alex Xie, Queenie Huang
In Singapore, the proportion of Chinese pupils with English as their most frequently used language
at home was more than half since 2010. Chinese is taught as a stand-alone subject while all other
subjects are taught in English. With limited opportunities in practising and reinforcing the use of
Chinese vocabulary learnt in school, recognition of Chinese characters has become a major hurdle for
many young learners. Unlike the phonetic transcription of words in English, Chinese characters are
made of strokes and components, which require learners to memorise in order to write them.
Augmented Reality-based Chinese Character Learning (ARC) system, developed by a team of SCCL
researchers and professors, is a game-based learning platform designed according to radical-derived
character learning approach. Differentiated Instruction is adopted to cater to the different readiness
of learners. With appropriate activities assigned to them, pupils with different readiness can learn at
their own pace.
ARC is based on augmented reality (AR) with paper interfaces for collaborative character learning
in classroom. By using this platform, teachers could design and redesign their character teaching
lessons, and enhance the learning activities with integrated AR technology. Near-field communication
(NFC) readers were used to “augment” paper, which is a specialised subset within the Radio-frequency
identification (RFID) family. NFC readers, as the input devices, were connected to tablets that were
used as the output devices to project the results of the paper cards being manipulated in each group
of learners.
The use of ARC enabled teachers to be innovative in the teaching and learning of Chinese character
and enhanced the learning experience of students by allowing them to explore the use of technology
in learning the language.
Based on the post-test result analysis, pupils who used ARC as part of their character learning
demonstrated better ability in identifying the similar structures in the Chinese characters than those
who did not use the platform. Also, based on the post-lesson interviews and feedback, most pupils
preferred the ARC platform enabled lessons to the traditional paper-and-pen practices.
Lower Primary pupils need constant support in managing collaborative learning activities based on
the observation as well as the sociocultural theory of development. Going forward, there will be plans
to enhance the structure of collaborative learning through specific guidelines on teacher-monitoring,
designs of assessment and use of reflection. These aspects will develop individual accountability
among group members and encourage them to strive towards their common goals.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 2 SYNOPSES
                               31 May 2018, Thursday

              Tinker Thinker: Code@Play in the Lower Primary Classroom

Author(s)            : Yok Joon Meng
Presenter(s)         : Yok Joon Meng, Abdul Hadi Baharudin
The learning issue is that students lack logical reasoning and critical and inventive thinking skills.
Basic literacy in the digital age is more than just learning facts. Coding is a critical skill which enables
children to succeed. Besides learning to use technology, it is even more important to understand the
logic behind how technology works and learn to innovate by creating gadgets, tools or apps.
Pedagogically, coding is closely aligned with the approaches used in the teaching and learning of
Mathematics and Science. In Mathematics, the central focus is using Mathematics to solve problems
through conceptual understanding, skills proficiency and mathematical processes, and applying that
knowledge to create solutions to real-world problems. In Science, scientific inquiry is grounded in
knowledge, issues and questions that relate to the roles played by Science in daily life, society and
the environment.
In this Model Lesson, participants will experience a typical coding lesson in a Lower Primary classroom
(Primary 1/2). Primary One students used Coding Awbie, which consisted of hands-on physical
blocks, to acquire sequencing and logical reasoning skills. Each block was a coding command that
directs Awbie through fun-filled challenges. Primary Two students were introduced to fundamental
programming concepts and logical reasoning through Ozobots.
A study indicated that children who learnt Logo had a better understanding of selected geometrical
concepts (Noss, 1985). The use of tangible programming elements, Electronic Blocks, indicated that
children learnt simple programming with minimum adult support (Wyeth et al., 2002). Another study
showed that younger children exposed to robotics mastered basic robotics and programming skills,
while the older children learnt increasingly complex concepts (Sullivan et al., 2015).
The impact on learning was that students were able to understand and apply sequencing thinking to
solve problems. Through basic Mathematical and Science concepts, they could use logical reasoning
to code the robots to move. Through the lessons, students began to think more inventively and
critically. We found in our project that the P1 students were able to code Awbie to navigate through the
challenges in Coding Awbie while the P2 students were able to understand the colour language codes
and design mazes and paths to move the Ozobots.
Currently, Science is not taught at P1 and P2 explicitly so some concepts may not be easily understood
by students. In future, our plan is to introduce real-world problems to students which they could solve
as part of project work.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 2 SYNOPSES
                               31 May 2018, Thursday

                    My Math Homework PAL - Software Demonstration

Author(s)            : Jahangeer Mohamed Jahabar, Pao Wee Boon Melvin
Presenter(s)         : Jahangeer Mohamed Jahabar, Pao Wee Boon Melvin
Slow progress primary school students generally find solving word problems in Mathematics to be very
challenging. When they do homework by themselves at home, it is common for them to make mistakes
or do things that are not logical or meaningful with regard to what the problem is asking. Often, there
is no one around to provide useful feedback in spotting errors and making correction. In the end, the
students would finish their homework without knowing whether they are doing it correctly. They might
receive some feedback in class after the teacher had finished marking the homework. When errors are
repeated without timely correction, it may result in the formation of misconceptions and development
of bad habits which in turn would make students prone to making mistakes and not able to perform
well. This may ultimately lead them to lose confidence and interest in learning Mathematics.
My Math Homework PAL is a eduLab funded project seeking to build up the confidence and competence
of slow-progress students in Mathematical sense making when solving Math word problems through
the use of a purposeful software in their homework. The software uses a 4+1 approach to help students
solve specially designed word problems - Identify Data, Establish Facts, Derive New Information, and
Write Solution. The problems are presented to help students focus sentence-by-sentence. Students
identify the data by picking up relevant unknowns to work with. They can choose to represent facts
of each problem using either the ‘math expression’ or the ‘pictorial’ mode. Throughout the 4 steps,
students can activate the software PAL which will give hints so that they will not give up too easily with
timely help and proper scaffolding. After submitting the answer, students will be asked to verify their
solutions, using leading questions to help them to check if their answer is correct. If the students enter
incorrect answer after the verification, they will be asked to solve one or more similar problems which
are simpler or contextualised.
In this model lesson, we will demonstrate the use of the software in terms of creating questions,
assigning homework, and viewing students’ work. Participants will also have the opportunity to solve
some of the problems using the software.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 2 SYNOPSES
                               31 May 2018, Thursday

           Enriching Students’ Experience in Trigonometric Graph Sketching

Author(s)            : Tan Hwee Ping, Toinh Long Teng
Presenter(s)         : Tan Hwee Ping, Toinh Long Teng
Students generally find trigonometric graph sketching difficult. They have limited exposure and
experience in graph sketching which is a skill introduced only at Secondary Three level. The topic
itself also presents new trigonometric functions which raise students’ level of anxiety. Yet another area
of concern is students’ limited ability and low confidence level in expressing mathematical ideas using
proper Mathematical language. Students lapse into layman terms when describing how one graph is
transformed from another, compounding the problem of inaccurate interpretations and hence adding
to their misconceptions. A good ability to use proper language is deemed as important because the
ability to communicate accurately is indicative of a good understanding of graphs, which is essential
for producing good sketches. Riccomini (2015) argued that “Rich development and understanding of
mathematics vocabulary is essential for students to become actively engaged in mathematics past
mundane computational requirements to thorough understanding and meaning making.” Hattie (2017)
recommended that “With quality instruction, students move from everyday language to more formal
mathematical language, eventually developing a mindset for thinking mathematically.”
A series of ICT-based lessons, supported by Desmos, was designed to allow students to explore how
the parameters in a trigonometric graph affected its shape. The objective was to provide opportunities
for students to explore on their own and collaborate with peers in order to promote thinking and
deep conceptual understanding of the topic. Another objective was to help students develop informal
language into formal vocabulary through the Desmos polygraph game feature. Two Secondary Three
Express classes took part in this study with significant success. Students were able to communicate
better using proper Mathematical terms. The sketching of graphs improved when compared to previous
batches of students. There was also some indication of the transfer of learning, anchored upon a good
understanding of the unit. The immediate feedback provided by Desmos to both teachers and students
allowed teachers to use the activities as a tool for assessment for learning. The polygraph activity also
saw a high level of engagement and excitement amongst students.
This model lesson invites participants to experience one part of the topic on the sine curve in the
place of students. Participants will also interact with other participants as players of the polygraph.
Subsequently, teachers can extend the package to cosine and tangent graphs and even to other
graph forms.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 2 SYNOPSES
                               31 May 2018, Thursday

         Using Virtual Reality (VR) Technology to Enhance Students’ Learning
                                 in Descriptive Writing

Author(s)            : Siti Raihana Ismail, Shafizah Wydiana Zailani
Presenter(s)         : Siti Raihana Ismail, Shafizah Wydiana Zailani
Descriptive essay is a writing form that requires students to give detailed description of a specific
situation to readers so that they can experience the situation that is being portrayed in the writing.
Descriptive essays require students to use fine descriptive and emotive language to explain their
five senses in depth about the given situation. Students generally find descriptive essay writing a
challenging task as they have weak grasp of Malay written language. Combined with limited real
experiences of different situations, students are apprehensive when writing a descriptive essay.
Existing teaching methods of fact delivery and visualisation using PowerPoint slides are static in nature
and require little student interaction, hence discouraging students from gaining real experiences which
are important in the process of descriptive essay writing. As Virtual Reality (VR) technology encourages
experiential and authentic learning by providing dynamic feedback, learner experimentation… and
exploration (Kalyuga, 2007) in the learning process, teachers decided to explore using VR headset as
students’ learning aid during descriptive essay lessons.
This presentation will share how the Malay Language teachers taught descriptive and emotive
language using literary devices of similes and hyperbole in descriptive essay writing, with the aid
of VR headsets. Participants can learn how the use of VR headsets helped to engage a class of
16 Secondary Two Express students in writing a descriptive essay based on their experience riding
a roller coaster ride. Coupled with the Visible Thinking (VT) strategy of Think-Puzzle-Explore, lessons
became more enjoyable and engaging for students, especially for those who had never experienced
riding a roller coaster first-hand, as they questioned one another’s experiences and explored for more
details using VR headsets with different VR 360 videos.
Students’ feedback was collected in various platforms like Google Form (for post-lesson survey).
Lessons observation, students’ feedback, and their pre- and post-tests marks revealed that using
VR technology and VT strategy helped to develop students’ content knowledge of specific situations
due to their newly gained experiences. This positively impacted their essay writing as they were able
to use more descriptive and emotive language in their descriptive essays. Students’ feedback
reflected that they enjoyed the VR lessons, and even suggested the use of VR technology for narrative
writing lessons.
One challenge faced when implementing this practice was the limited availability of VR headsets
for students. Students had to take turns using 8 VR headsets, which consumed more activity time
than expected.
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 2 SYNOPSES
                              31 May 2018, Thursday

             Fostering Future-ready Learners through Technology-infused
                                Team-based Learning

Author(s)           : Lee Zhi Ying, Tan Shu Yan Ginny
Presenter(s)        : Lee Zhi Ying, Tan Shu Yan Ginny
To contribute and thrive in the future economy, students need to develop 21st Century Competencies
(21CC) such as communication and critical thinking skills to solve complex and interconnected
real-world problems. There is therefore an increasing focus on constructivist pedagogies, because
it stimulates deep understanding and thinking among students and reinforces the development
of 21CC. It also encourages students to cultivate a disposition towards being self-directed and
reflective learners.
Team-based Learning (TBL) is one such example of a constructivist pedagogy. It incorporates three
different phases: preparation, readiness assurance conducted through a Readiness Assurance Test
(RAT) and lastly, application of concepts, which is done through small group discussions and various
group assignments that are specifically designed to improve learning and foster the development of
self-managed learning teams (Michaelsen, Sweet & Parmalee, 2009).
An effective TBL lesson requires students to be prepared for class so as to be actively engaged in
group discussions. However, teachers are often unable to gauge students’ level of preparedness prior
to the lesson. Based on students’ responses to the individual and group stages of the RAT, teachers
also need to quickly and accurately identify issues and concepts for discussion, as well as analyse any
shifts in responses between the individual and group stages, to facilitate learning.
These challenges could be overcome by leveraging technology in the various phases. In the preparation
phase, students viewed short curated videos or slideshows along with their assigned readings before
class. A Google Form quiz was used for teachers’ monitoring and for students to receive instantaneous
feedback for their self-assessment. In class, the RAT was administered through Socrative, using their
mobile devices or laptops. The use of such tools also provided teachers with immediate feedback
on the students’ responses (Wash, 2014). They could determine the best instructional approach to
achieve effective learning. Furthermore, the group RAT encouraged students to engage in meaningful
discussions. Lastly, to ensure transfer of learning, students completed an assignment for further class
discussion. These forms of penalty-free assignments and collaborative learning helped to develop
students’ 21CC and the joy of learning.
In this model lesson, participants will be given the opportunity to experience the three key phases
through hands-on activities and a lesson demonstration. Although the lesson is based on an accessible
topic in the GCE A-Level H2 Mathematics syllabus, this pedagogy and the technology can be applied
to different levels and different subjects.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 3 SYNOPSES
                               31 May 2018, Thursday

        Flipping the Paradigm of Learning with Flipped Team-Based Learning

Author(s)            : Tan Si Hua
Presenter(s)         : Tan Si Hua, Charlene Zheng Cuiyun
Global shifts in emphasis of 21st Century learning towards creativity and innovation (Tsai et al.
2013) provide impetus for schools to engage students in rigorous learning processes that build
learners’ capacity to create knowledge. Learning processes involving Self-Directed Learning (SDL)
and Collaborative Learning (CoL) have shown to enhance students’ efficacy in creating knowledge
(Scardamalia et al. 2012).
Funded by edulab, Flipped Team-Based Learning (Flipped-TBL) is a technology-enabled pedagogy
that affords students deeper learning experiences and opportunities to develop 21st Century
Competencies in their everyday classrooms. The pedagogy combines the merits of the “Flipped
Classroom (FC)” and “Team-Based Learning model (TBL)”. The FC provides students with the
autonomy to self-direct their learning. The TBL model, a collaborative learning structure that comprises
a specific sequence of individual work, group work and immediate feedback (Michaelsen, 2009),
promotes CoL and accountability in learning.
There are two big parts to Flipped-TBL. Occurring at the beginning of each instructional chapter is the
Readiness Assurance Process (RAP). It consists of 5 key stages: Pre-Class Preparation, Individual
Readiness Assurance Test (iRAT), Team Readiness Assurance Test (tRAT), Appeals and Mini-
Lecture. The RAP provided a structure for teachers to systemically follow-up and build on foundational
concepts acquired by students during the Pre-Class Preparation stage and hold students accountable
for their learning. Following the RAP, students harnessed the affordance of ICT and applied concepts
learnt to solve relevant, interesting and significant problems.
At each stage of Flipped-TBL, the phases of SDL (Gibbons, 2002) were explicitly unpacked and
delivered. Flipped-TBL also draws on the macro design principles of CoL (Scardamalia, 2002) to
create environments conducive to collaborative knowledge building. Appropriate edtech tools were
incorporated throughout Flipped-TBL to activate and monitor students’ learning, facilitate their
discussions and for them to demonstrate their learning.
Through this ICT-enabled pedagogy, the school witnessed a shift in students’ role – from passive
recipients of information to one of active learners taking charge of their learning. Preliminary findings
suggested a good extent of SDL and CoL demonstrated by the students. With more space and
flexibility in the curriculum, students explored deeper concepts and drew connections between
learning in class to real-world context, through learning experiences that foster the joy of learning.
In this model lesson, participants will have first-hand experience of the Flipped-TBL pedagogy. Other
takeaways include design principles of Flipped-TBL lessons and exploration of edtech tools used to
facilitate active learning in Flipped-TBL.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 3 SYNOPSES
                               31 May 2018, Thursday

     Active Learning through Enriched ICT Lessons to Foster the Joy of Learning

Author(s)            : Justin Ang, Lee Cher Kiak, Teh Khen Hian
Presenter(s)         : Justin Ang, Lee Cher Kiak
Science education has long been teacher-centered, with the teacher as the authority figure and
the one with all the right answers. Without a doubt, such a traditional science program – involving
authority-based, teacher-directed instruction – is inappropriate for young children (Johnson, 1999).
Young children engage in scientific thinking and actions long before they enter a classroom (Zeece,
1999). Unfortunately, when Science education is introduced in a formal setting, it often reflects the
understanding of science as the learning of facts. This approach has led some educators to suggest
that “most science learning that takes place in formal settings is not true science” (Zeece, 1999,
p. 161).
We embarked on the use of active learning to help pupils learn Science concepts better. The teacher’s
role was to promote thinking and discussion and facilitate demonstration of learning. By monitoring
pupils’ responses, the teacher was able to provide real-time feedback for pupils to work on. Pupils also
commented on one another’s responses to promote collaborate learning.
Through planned activities, students became owners of their own learning. As they investigated and
discussed, they became more engaged and found more joy as they build their own understanding of
the concepts. They also found more relevance in what they were studying, instead of just learning it
from slides or textbooks.
Our findings showed that these technology-supported lessons have deepened pupils’ understanding
and interest in Science. One of the teachers reflected, “The hands-on activities helped the pupils to
construct their Science concepts and helped them to make sense of what they were learning.” Through
the use of “TOSRA”, the survey showed that pupils in treatment classes demonstrated markedly better
attitude towards Science inquiry compared to non-treatment classes. It also proved that the pupils
enjoyed their lessons.
The Science teachers came together to plan the lessons at the start of the year and found that pupils of
different abilities handled the lessons differently. Teachers at times had to modify the lesson to clarify
any misconceptions. The use of tablets were sometimes limited by the infrastructure and connectivity.
Our future plan is to roll out to even non-core subjects.
In this model lesson, we will share how the Science teachers used Nearpod on mobile devices to
capture multi-modal presentations of pupils’ work, embed different types of activities to promote
thinking and use pupils’ responses for discussions.
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 3 SYNOPSES
                              31 May 2018, Thursday

                  Deepening Learning and Acquisition of 21st CC:
           Productive Failure Learning Design Supported by Google Forms

Author(s)           : Tan Qing Quan (Rion), Esther Boo Tuang Hock
Presenter(s)        : Tan Qing Quan (Rion), Esther Boo Tuang Hock
As the world moves towards becoming a digital economy, it has become increasingly vital to design
learning experiences that achieve deep learning and enable students to acquire 21st century
competencies. Designing such experiences may be challenging to educators who feel that curriculum
time is insufficient for such execution.
Kapur’s (2008) research on Productive failure (PF) is underpinned by the premise that learners can
develop deeper understandings while endeavouring to solve tasks that they may fail at solving in a
learning environment that encourages the students to persist in solving even when they reached an
impasse. PF can serve as a framework for educators in their conceptualisation and implementation of
learning experiences that achieve the aims stated above. PF is implemented via two phases. Phase
1 provides students with opportunities to generate and explore representations and solution methods
(RSMs), thus enabling them to take ownership of their learning by ideating and negotiating meanings
with one another in a collaborative manner. Phase 2 endeavours to make students’ thinking visible
by comparing and contrasting students-generated RSMs with canonical RSMs. By giving students
autonomy during the problem-solving process through the co-construction of knowledge from the
discussion of the RSMs instead of simply telling them what is right and what is wrong, PF can lead to
deeper engagement in learning and spark off a joy for learning.
Google Forms can support the implementation of PF. Google Forms is advantageous as an ICT tool
due to its efficient collation of students’ responses for open-ended questions and digital files such
as images and its simple presentation of data to facilitate rich classroom discussions. Evidence in
the form of lesson observations, student feedback and students’ assessments have suggested that
Google Forms can support the implementation of PF.
Participants will personally experience lessons based on the principles of PF supported by Google
Forms via lesson demonstration. Hands-on activities will be conducted to enable participants to (1)
conceptualise PF tasks so as to gain a better understanding of the design considerations involved
and (2) understand the technicalities involved in employing Google Forms to implement lessons
based on the principles of PF. The workshop will facilitate a discussion regarding how participants
can overcome potential challenges (e.g. the constraints of curriculum time and issues pertaining to
teacher’s facilitation) that might occur during the implementation of PF.
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 3 SYNOPSES
                              31 May 2018, Thursday

                  Leveraging Student Voices for CCE Lesson Discussions

Author(s)            : Ong Yun Ping, Tay Pei Yun
Presenter(s)         : Ong Yun Ping, Tay Pei Yun
In delivering Character and Citizenship Education (CCE) lessons, one key approach would be
the Narrative approach which uses stories to facilitate the internalisation of values. This approach
requires open-ended questioning, clarifying, summarising, building on each person’s responses
and encouraging students to respond to one another. Quaglia & Corso (2014) mentioned that
“when students believe their voices matter, they are more likely to be invested and engaged in their
schools. When students believe that teachers are listening to them, mutual trust and respect are likely
to flourish.”
The use of Google Classroom for CCE lessons gives students the opportunity to share with their
classmates their personal experiences and opinions. Students are hence exposed to different
perspectives which helps them to reflect on their existing assumptions and beliefs. The use of Google
Classroom also gives the quiet students an opportunity to air their thoughts and viewpoints. Teachers
can post questions, poll students or put up videos for students to comment before or during the lesson.
This increases students’ engagement in the topic of the CCE lesson. As students can reply to others’
posts, it is a good platform that supports collaborative learning. Using students’ responses in Google
Classroom to start discussion involves the students more as the topic is now related to them and not
just any topic that the teacher wants to talk about.
Surveys carried out with teachers in 2016 reflected that they learnt more about their students through
reading the students’ responses and getting them to elaborate on their responses. With 1:1 computing
programme, technology can be better harnessed to bring about lesson engagement through student
voice. Students of the 21st Century have to be equipped with skills to better prepare them for their
life beyond education. By placing a personal learning device in the hands of the students, educators
empower students to access their learning materials beyond the classroom and collaborate outside
of school.
In this model lesson, participants will experience first hand how Google classroom can be used to elicit
student voice, hence increasing students’ engagement and enhancing the depth of discussions for
CCE lessons. They will also discuss the possible challenges and the various considerations needed
to implement this cultural change.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 4 SYNOPSES
                                1 June 2018, Friday

           Designing a Discussion Learning Experience in a Primary English
          Language Classroom using the Singapore Student Learning Space
                         (Boon Lay Garden Primary School)

Author(s)            : Turinadevi Devarajan, Joy Amisha Keshyap, Norlita Muhamad Sah,
		                     Serena Ong (Tan Jia Yi), Ng Ee Noch
Presenter(s)         : Turinadevi Devarajan, Norlita Muhamad Sah
Boon Lay Garden Primary School designed an English Language Discussion Learning Experience
using the Singapore SLS to encourage students to read critically and comprehend texts at literal and
inferential levels for the Primary Five level. The team aimed to develop students’ inference skills based
on prior knowledge and contextual clues. The team recognises that this is an essential skill, especially
when not all information is made explicit by writers and students need to make inference about
the writer’s purpose and implied meaning to better appreciate the intent of the writers.
Interact with the practitioners and experience how the team evaluated the effectiveness of the learning
design using evidence of students’ learning. Participate in a hands-on experience to study the impact
of technology on learning. The affordance of using technology enabled students to articulate their
position about the main character’s perspective and to explain how they arrived at their inference.
Students were able to discuss with their peers about their different perspectives and their different
ways of making inference. At the end of the discussion, students rearticulated their positions, with
reasons. By studying the students’ posts, re-posts and peer comments, teachers were able to see the
shifts in students’ positions and reasons, along with what led students to make their shifts.
The team learned how to design a lesson using the active learning process with technology.
The lesson design focussed on promoting thinking and discussion in reading at an inferential level.
By harnessing technology, it enabled teachers to monitor students’ thinking and their learning
throughout the lesson using the evidence from the learning activities. The information provided useful
insights on the extent at which students were able to achieve the learning outcomes.
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 4 SYNOPSES
                               1 June 2018, Friday

        Applied Learning with Technology: Engaging Normal Course Students
                          with Smart Home Automation

Author(s)            : Mohamed Fahizel M Egueyamarecar, Enoch Tang
Presenter(s)         : Mohamed Fahizel M Egueyamarecar, Enoch Tang
Smart Electrical Technology (SET) is an applied subject customised for secondary school students
in the Normal (Technical) course. The subject provided students with foundational concepts
and principles of the operation of home automation systems. It considers the learning needs and
preferences of students by providing rich and authentic learning opportunities for hands-on exploration,
and application of knowledge and skills in real-world contexts.
Leveraging the affordances of technology, the Smart Home Automation Training Kit was specially
developed to concretise the understanding of abstract concepts such as home automation
programming, networking, communication protocols and testing. The Automation Training Kit was
inspired by the need to overcome physical constraints in the teaching of Home Automation Systems,
which are often housed in large-scale residential environments. Such environments limit the number
of users at any one point in time, and cannot be deployed or set up efficiently. The Smart Home
Automation Training Kit, in contrast, is portable and allows more students to interact with it. They can
take on different roles by enacting the real-life application of a smart home set-up, for example, as a
programmer manipulating graphical blocks to construct programmes governing the behaviour of home
systems. Additionally, students may also take on the role of an end-user when they interact with the
Smart Home Automation Training Kit through the use of smartphones and tablets. These experiences
facilitate the introduction of “Internet of Things” to students.
In SET, the use of the automation kit can help teachers create a more ‘learner centric’ learning
environment and employ applied learning pedagogies, such as learning by doing and real-world
problem solving, to help students enjoy learning through seamlessly blended theory and hands-on
practical experiences. Such authentic learning experiences can be effective in developing students’
interest and aspirations in areas of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).
This model lesson will allow participants to experience, through the use of graphical block programming
and the Smart Home automation Training Kit, how the learning of future technologies in a classroom
can take place and raise the learning motivation of Normal (Technical) Students. Specifically, it offers
valuable Educational and Career Guidance by exposing the students to STEM courses offered by
post-secondary educational institutions.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 4 SYNOPSES
                                1 June 2018, Friday

    Designing an Acquisition Learning Experience in a Secondary Mathematics
             Classroom using the Singapore Student Learning Space
                          (Edgefield Secondary School)

Author(s)            : Candice Ngau, Shasikumaran, Toh Siong Keong, Jolin Yong,
		                     Han Khim Yuan, Peter Ong
Presenter(s)         : Toh Siong Keong, Han Khim Yuan
Edgefield Secondary School designed a Mathematics Acquisition Learning Experience using the
Singapore SLS to encourage self-directed learning and collaboration amongst students for the
Secondary 1 level (Express and Normal Academic). The team of lesson designers aimed to provide
opportunities for students to learn and apply the concept of balancing to solve linear algebraic equation
through a student-centric guided exploratory approach.
During this session, you can understand about the lesson design considerations from the lesson designers
and they will share their experience in designing SLS lessons and how SLS Pedagogical Scaffold has
guided them in their lesson design process. You will also have the opportunity to experience how the
team evaluated the effectiveness of the learning design using various evidences gathered from the
lesson enactment in the classroom.You will get a hands-on experience to study the impact of technology
on learning.
Through the interaction with the lesson designers, you will gain insights into how the lesson was
designed and enacted with suitable tools and resources put up on SLS to support student-content,
student-student and student-teacher interactions during the lesson activities
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 4 SYNOPSES
                               1 June 2018, Friday

      Designing a Collaboration Learning Experience in a Secondary Chinese
        Language Classroom using the Singapore Student Learning Space
                        (Queenstown Secondary School)

Author(s)           : Tan Kah Geok, Lek Hui Ying, Tan Li Ming, Ang Meng Li
Presenter(s)        : Tan Kah Geok, Lek Hui Ying, Tan Li Ming
Queenstown Secondary School designed a Chinese Language Collaboration Learning Experience
using the Singapore SLS to encourage collaborative learning amongst Secondary Two students
enabling them to think critically by identifying and describing the issues when given a scenario. The
team aimed to enhance students’ knowledge and skills in writing. This collaborative process not only
refines thinking but also enhances the evolution of solution-development plan.
Interact with the practitioners and experience how the team evaluated the effectiveness of the learning
design using evidence of students’ learning. Participate in a hands-on experience to study the impact
of technology on learning.
You will be observing actual student artefacts to examine students’ development of ideas and
application of learning in crafting concise and specific problem statement in relation to the group
identified context. Student-student and student-teacher interactions in this natural setting enrich the
learning experience and add more dimensions to the content knowledge and skills learnt.
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 5 SYNOPSES
                               1 June 2018, Friday

      Designing an Acquisition Learning Experience in a Primary Mathematics
              Classroom using the Singapore Student Learning Space
                          (St Joseph’s Institution (Junior)

Author(s)           : Sharon Gan, Azlinda A. Aziz, Michele Fok, Winnie Ho,
		                    Owen Lau Quck Woon, Lim Huei Hsia Grace
Presenter(s)        : Azlinda A. Aziz, Michele Fok
St. Joseph’s Institution (Junior) designed a Mathematics Acquisition Learning Experience using the
Singapore SLS to encourage active learning and conceptual understanding of fractions amongst
students at the Primary Four level. The team aimed to help students understand the concepts of
improper fraction, mixed number, as well as their relationships and how fractions can be seen as
numbers on the number line through a teacher guided inquiry approach.
Interact with the practitioners and experience how the team evaluated the effectiveness of the learning
design using evidence of students’ learning. Participate in a hands-on experience to study the impact
of technology on learning of improper fractions and mixed numbers and their relationships. Technology
allowed students’ thinking to be made visible for teacher and students to have discussions to deepen
their understanding. It also supported students’ exploration to identify patterns on how fractions are
represented on number line.
Through conversation, you will gain insights on how practitioners designed and enacted learning
experience with suitable tools and resources in Singapore SLS to promote conceptual learning
and support student-content, student-student and student-teacher interactions during the
learning activities.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 5 SYNOPSES
                                1 June 2018, Friday

             Using Claim-Evidence-Reasoning (CER) as a Thinking Scaffold
                             for Scientific Argumentation

Author(s)            : Katherine Li Peishan, Kok Lin Jin
Presenter(s)         : Katherine Li Peishan, Kok Lin Jin
Promoting inquiry and critical thinking are important in science teaching and designing these seamlessly
into the learning experiences for students are critical skills that teachers require. Many students view
science as a collection of facts to be memorised and inquiry thinking can be difficult to nurture. Lesson
packages were designed to develop students’ competencies in scientific argumentation and critical
thinking in science learning through the use of real data and authentic situations. The CER (claim-
evidence-reasoning) framework was used by teachers throughout the lessons to scaffold science
disciplinary thinking for students.
Through the topics on Ecology, Acids and Bases, and Heat, a class of Lower Secondary Express
students learnt through purposeful scientific argumentative discussions. They were tasked to apply the
CER framework (based on Toulmin’s Argument Pattern) to craft claims, select suitable evidence and
develop reasoning using information from various sources. The backbone of this framework allows
students to place inquiry thinking at the heart of learning, develop skills to gather evidence and hone
the ability to reason for observations linked to the claims made.
Collaborative learning was enhanced through the use of an online platform to promote discussions
among students to develop and improve their arguments, take ownership of these arguments, provide
peer feedback and track their progress in the use of CER. This platform provided a safe environment
where students were unafraid to express their thoughts. Teachers could also monitor students’
progress real-time and evaluate their arguments using the teacher interface, where features can be
manipulated to suit different student profiles.
Evidence of student learning: A pre-post test on Ecology was conducted to assess conceptual
understanding and there was a significant improvement in the experimental class not observed in the
control class. There was also an increase in the quality of arguments produced by students. Students
moved away from being passive learners and took more ownership of their learning.
Learning gains for teachers: Teachers shifted from merely transmitting knowledge to facilitating
student discussions. The use of CER as a framework created a common language among teachers
and students, which can be used in the science classroom and beyond.
Challenges faced by teachers included time constraints and difficulty in crafting authentic and
interesting tasks pitched at the lower Secondary level. More chapters in the syllabus are being crafted
to enhance students’ use of CER through the usage of the same online platform.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 5 SYNOPSES
                                1 June 2018, Friday

        Designing an Acquisition Learning Experience in a Secondary English
         Language Classroom using the Singapore Student Learning Space
                         (East Spring Secondary School)

Author(s)            : Noreha Nordin, Muhammad Zulhilmi Bin Awaruddin, Lu Suxin, Jillian Chen,
		                     Daphne Ng
Presenter(s)         : Lu Suxin, Daphne Ng, Noreha Nordin
East Spring Secondary School has designed an English Language Acquisition Learning Experience
for the Secondary 3 level using the Singapore SLS to allow their students to see different perspectives
and build on them. The team’s aims were to improve students’ knowledge in the use of literary devices
-- to understand how the use of literary devices by a writer impacts the reader’s interpretation of a text.
Interact with the practitioners and experience how the team evaluated the effectiveness of the learning
design using evidence of students’ learning. Participate in a hands-on experience that looks at how
students unpacked the use of literary devices by making inferences to study the impact of technology
on learning.
Through conversations, gain insights on how the practitioners designed and enacted learning
experience with suitable tools and resources in Singapore SLS to support student-content, student-
student and student-teacher interactions during the learning activities. Hear how they facilitated the
blended learning in the classroom, where the teacher and technology co-exist, making use of thinking
routines to facilitate assessment for learning.
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 5 SYNOPSES
                               1 June 2018, Friday

          Designing an Inquiry Learning Experience in a Secondary Science
               Classroom using the Singapore Student Learning Space
                             (Yishun Secondary School)

Author(s)           : Tan Ee Cheng, Maung Soe Nyunt Zaw, Poh Meng Leng
Presenter(s)        : Tan Ee Cheng, Maung Soe Nyunt Zaw
Yishun Secondary School designed a Science Inquiry Learning Experience using the Singapore
SLS to build scientific literacy amongst the Secondary 2 students on the topic of pressure. The team
aimed to make use of students’ questions as means of supporting real-world inquiry and formative
assessment. Through the process of asking questions and seeking explanations to those questions
using K-W-L and POE (Predict-Observe-Explain) strategies, students would be able to understand
cause-effect, process, mechanisms, or relationships involved in the concept.
Interact with the practitioners and experience how the team evaluated the effectiveness of the
learning design using evidence of students’ learning. Through conversation, you will gain insights on
how practitioners designed and enacted learning experience with suitable tools and resources in
Singapore SLS to support student-content, student-student and student-teacher interactions during
the learning activities.
MODEL LESSONS
                         CONCURRENT SESSION 6 SYNOPSES
                                1 June 2018, Friday

        Designing a Collaboration Learning Experience in a Primary Science
              Classroom using the Singapore Student Learning Space
                             (Ai Tong Primary School)

Author(s)            : Theresa Ng Gek Yin, Christina Peh Sway Gek, Phua Zhi Yu Joanna,
		                     Mohamed Hanif, Wendy Tan
Presenter(s)         : Theresa Ng Gek Yin, Christina Peh Sway Gek
Ai Tong School designed a Primary Science Collaboration Learning Experience using the Singapore
SLS platform to create a suitable lesson package embedding various Google collaborative tools for
more effective collaboration amongst students. The experience aimed to provide an opportunity for
Primary 6 students from mid to high academic readiness to enhance critical thinking and co-create
new knowledge through contributing towards the production of a solution for a potential energy crisis
in Singapore. Students carried out self-directed research, applied their understanding of alternative
energy sources from the P6 syllabus to take a stand on whether Singapore can harness any of the
alternative energy sources that they need to research on. Indirectly, through this experience, students
were more aware of the latest developments with respect to energy conservation efforts and the
need to reduce energy usage in their daily lives. Finally, the ICT tools were also used to facilitate the
synthesis of learning and the provision of peer assessment.
Interact with the practitioners and experience how the team evaluated the effectiveness of the learning
design using evidence of students’ learning. Participate in a hands-on experience to understand the
impact of technology on learning using heat maps and collated free response answers on SLS and
linked Google Slides.
Through conversation, you will gain insights on how practitioners designed and enacted learning
experience with resources in Singapore SLS as well as suitable tools embedded within the
lessons to support student-content, student-student and student-teacher interactions during the
learning activities.
MODEL LESSONS
                        CONCURRENT SESSION 6 SYNOPSES
                               1 June 2018, Friday

    Designing an Acquisition Learning Experience in a Primary Mother Tongue
        Language Classroom using the Singapore Student Learning Space
                           (Fengshan Primary School)

Author(s)           : Clement Lim, Fauziah Muhd Fadzillah, Hazliana Mahat,
		                    Theivanai Palanisamy, Guo Liyan Veronica
Presenter(s)        : Clement Lim, Fauziah Muhd Fadzillah, Hazliana Mahat, Guo Liyan Veronica
Fengshan Primary School designed a Mother Tongue Language Acquisition Learning Experience
using the Singapore SLS for the Primary Three and Four levels. The team aimed to develop students’
cognitive thinking and language skills in Oracy - to identify appropriate themes and apply relevant
vocabulary to elaborate views during oral conversation.
Interact with the practitioners and experience how the team evaluated the effectiveness of the learning
design using evidence of students’ learning. Participate in a hands-on experience to understand
the impact of technology on learning. You will be observing actual student artefacts to examine
students’ development of ideas and application of vocabulary to elaborate their views in relation
to a given context.
Through conversation, you will gain insights on how practitioners designed and enacted learning
experience with suitable tools and resources in Singapore SLS to support student-content, student-
student and student-teacher interactions during the learning activities.
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