High School Course Offerings and Academic Planning Booklet 2020 2021

 
High School Course
Offerings and Academic
   Planning Booklet
      2020 – 2021

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COURSE SELECTION REQUIREMENTS
In the spring of each school year, students have the opportunity to request courses from the course
offering booklet. Students are not guaranteed that they will be enrolled in all classes requested. Priority
for student requests is granted based upon academic need for graduation requirements.

When making course requests, students should keep in mind the graduation requirements (see below).
While TIS does not guarantee enrollment in all requested courses, TIS does ensure that students will
have the opportunity to take classes that will fulfill graduation requirements.

Online course credits are permitted in the following cases, but are not included in GPA calculation:
transfer students needing to make up coursework to fulfill graduation requirements, courses desired
that are not offered at TIS, unavoidable scheduling conflicts, and acceleration of mathematics courses
(conditions must be met). Students are responsible for all fees involved with online courses. Students
and parents are responsible to provide proctors for these online courses as TIS does not have the
personnel to guarantee this service. If a student desires for the online class to be placed on a student
transcript they must process an online agreement and agree to work within the scheduling requirements
of TIS and the online course provider.

              GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
General Information

1. 24 credits are required for graduation
2. One-half credit is given for a course that meets full-time for one semester.
3. A failing grade (below 60%) does not earn credit.
4. The following credits are required for graduation:

       4.5 credits of English (includes one semester of Speech in grade 10)
       3 credits of Mathematics (Geometry and Algebra II required)
       3 credits of Science (Conceptual Physics, Chemistry, Biology required)
       3 credits of Social Studies
       3 credits of Philosophy
       2 credits of Foreign language (suggested two years of one language)
       2 credits of Physical Education/Health
       1 credit of Fine Arts (band, choir, visual arts)
       Elective courses as needed/desired

Course Load Requirements

1. Students must take a minimum of six credits per year.

Early Graduation

Students requesting early graduation must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 (calculated through
the middle of their junior year) and completed a minimum of 2 full years of high school study at TIS.
They must be able to complete the necessary graduation credit by the end of the 1st semester of the
following school year.

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Students must write a proposal to the high school principal stating the reasons they are requesting early
graduation. This proposal must be received by the administration a full year in advance (no later than
December 15th). The head of school will approve if the request is deemed to have merit.

Before approval can be granted, the school guidance counselor will meet with both parents and student
to inform them of the early graduation plan. The meeting will be a time to discuss any concerns
regarding the possible detrimental effect this could have in applying to universities. This plan will need
to be signed by the parent, student, and high school principal.

If approval is granted by the head of school, students will be required to complete outstanding
graduation credits during the summer. Summer credits will be obtained by doing approved courses
through an independent online study program. Before early graduation, the student will also be
required to present a senior presentation to a panel of school representatives.

To receive early graduation credits for the online courses, original transcripts from the independent
online study program must be submitted to the guidance office by August 31st during the final school
year.

If a student desires to participate in the graduation ceremony in June following their early graduation,
they must confirm that they will be attending, prior to their departure from TIS.

               SENIOR EXIT PRESENTATIONS
In order to graduate from TIS, all students will give their Exit Presentation to a panel of TIS
stakeholders. The TIS Senior Exit Presentation is a reflection done by the student on his/her
achievements in academic studies, personal growth, extracurricular activities, and worldview. This
presentation provides an authentic assessment tool for the students to evaluate their learning, for the
staff to review programs from the student perspective, and for the school community to witness the
demonstration of the school-wide Learner Goals.

    HONORS AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT
                          Honors and Advanced Placement Classes
Honors classes parallel the curriculum offered in the corresponding regular classes, but will cover
additional topics. Also, honors classes will move at a faster pace, and cover topics in greater depth.
Students in honors courses will receive 0.33 additional grade points for grades of C- or higher. In
order to register for honors and/or AP classes, prior teacher/principal recommendation must be given.

An Advanced Placement (AP) course is designed to prepare students to take the College Board
Advanced Placement (AP) exam in May. These national curricula are developed by both high school
and college teachers. Most American universities award college credit based on AP exam scores.
Students who are enrolled in an AP course must sit for the exam in May, and test fees will be paid
by the school (for a maximum of three exams, per student per year). If a student chooses to take an
AP test, but is not in that AP course, he/she must pay the exam fee. (Self-study is not encouraged by
TIS or college admissions personnel). Students in AP classes will receive 0.66 additional grade points
for grades of C- or higher. AP self-studied courses will be limited to those not offered by TIS, but

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needed for an intended major of study, or to those students who have taken a course we offer, but
would like to increase their previous year’s AP score.

Both honors and AP courses will require more homework than regular classes. Whereas a regular class
will require an average of 2.5 hours of homework per week, honors courses will usually require 3-4
hours per week, and AP courses approximately 6 hours per week.

Students taking either honors or AP courses must have demonstrated academic excellence in the
subject area, and receive teacher recommendation. It is advisable to take no more than three honors or
AP classes simultaneously. If students are involved in athletics or other extracurricular activities,
fewer than three advanced courses may be appropriate.

Advantages of AP/Honors classes:
   • Students have the opportunity to challenge themselves.
   • Students learn content they might not otherwise encounter in high school.
   • Students who do well on the AP exams may earn college credit.
   • May be helpful in college admissions process.
Disadvantages of AP/Honors classes:
   • A heavier workload and less time for other activities.
   • Taking multiple AP/honors classes while engaging in extracurricular activities is very
      demanding and is generally not recommended.

                      Criteria for Honors and AP Course Placement

1. Grades - “B” or better in the previous honors class or an “A” in the previous regular class.

2. Recommendation - by current teacher in the subject of interest.

3. Overall GPA of 3.0

All of the above criteria must be met for entrance and/or continuation in honors/AP courses. In the
case of extenuating circumstances, petition may be made on a case-by-case basis to the high school
principal (or designee) for review of criteria, to ensure proper course placement.

                                  Honors Academic Standing

In order to remain in good academic standing within the honor courses and/or advanced placement
courses, students must maintain an overall cumulative grade point average of 3.25 or higher. Students
whose GPA falls between 3.0 - 3.25 must consult with the school counselor to develop a plan of action
to raise their GPA to 3.25 or higher. Students whose GPA falls below 3.0 will risk dismissal from
honors courses. Students wishing to reapply to participate in honors courses may do so when the
minimum GPA is reached.

                                      TIS Honors Diploma
In order to qualify for an honors diploma, students must achieve the following, based on the ISC
learner goals; Learn, Love and Lead.

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Learn
 • Successfully complete the Honors Philosophy course
 • Successfully complete a Senior Presentation, including an explanation of personal worldview
 • Pass two or more AP exams with a score of 3 or higher.
 • Achieve a cumulative 11/12th grade GPA of 3.5 or higher.
 • Achieve a combined SAT score of 1200 (excludes writing score) or higher or combined
 • ACT score of 26 or higher.

Love
 • Design, carry out, and report on an independent service project under the guidance of a staff
    advisor

Lead
 • Fully engage in and complete at least three seasons of teamwork/leadership activities (any
    combination from the list below)
      o Team Sports
      o Model United Nations
      o Theater Arts Production
      o Student Council

The purposes of the honors diploma are:

     •to broaden students in areas beyond academics
     •to help students understand better how the different academic disciplines fit together
     •to help students focus deeply on an area of their gifting and study at the Advanced
      Placement level in that area.

The honors diploma may enhance prospects of college admissions. Senior students who are candidates
for the honors diploma will have this mentioned on transcripts that are sent to universities with their
college applications.

Students graduating with an honors diploma will wear double honors cords in the graduation ceremony.
Their honors status will also be noted on their diploma and on their college transcript. A description
of the honors diploma will appear on the school profile.

Students who do not qualify for the honors diploma, but obtain a GPA of 3.5 or higher, will wear a
single cord in the graduation ceremony to recognize their achievement.

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AP International Diploma

An additional offering for students applying to universities outside of the United States is called the
AP International Diploma (APID). The APID helps a student demonstrate their willingness and ability
to take college-level academic courses.

  The Advanced Placement International Diploma (APID) is a globally recognized certificate for
  students with an international outlook. The APID challenges a student to display exceptional
  achievement on AP Exams across several disciplines.

  Universities worldwide utilize the APID in admissions. AP teachers, counselors, parents, and their
  students may search our AP International Recognition database for universities outside the U.S.
  that acknowledge AP achievement. [http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/intad.html]

  The APID is available to students attending secondary schools outside the United States and for
  U.S. resident students applying to universities outside the country. The APID is not a substitute for
  a high school diploma, but rather provides additional certification of outstanding academic
  excellence.

  To earn an APID a student must earn grades of 3 or higher on at least five AP Exams in the
  following content areas:

Two AP Exams from two different languages selected from English and foreign languages.
A student may submit a letter from an administrator at his or her school verifying the student's mastery
of a language not currently available within the AP suite of exams. This verification, printed on school
letterhead, will satisfy the requirement for ONE AP Exam in the language category. However, a student
who utilizes this option must submit an additional AP Exam from another content area. Thus, all
students, however they satisfy the two-exam English and foreign language requirement, must submit
a total of five AP Exam grades of 3 or higher to qualify for the APID. [TIS offers AP Literature and
Composition, AP Language and AP Chinese. Students wishing to receive verification of another
language, as mentioned above, will be required to take the SAT II in that language.]

       1.   One AP Exam designated as offering a global perspective. [TIS offers AP
            Macroeconomics and AP World History]

       2.   One exam from the sciences or mathematics content areas. [TIS offers AP Calculus, AP
            Statistics, AP Biology, AP Chemistry, AP Physics C: Mechanics, and AP Computer
            Science] The Calculus and computer science courses may each count only once toward
            the APID.

       3.   One (or two) additional exam(s) from among any content areas except English and
            foreign languages. These include the content areas already described, as well as history
            and social sciences, and arts. [TIS offers AP Modern World History, AP Economics, AP
            Psychology, AP Comparative Government, and AP Art Portfolio.]*

While students planning to attend universities in the United States will not find the AP International
Diploma useful, there are other valuable forms of recognition from AP.

       AP Scholar
       Granted to students who receive grades of 3 or higher on three or more AP Exams.

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AP Scholar with Honor
           Granted to students who receive an average grade of at least 3.25 on all AP Exams taken, and
           grades of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams.

           AP Scholar with Distinction
           Granted to students who receive an average grade of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams taken, and
           grades of 3 or higher on five or more of these exams.

           AP International Scholar
           Granted to the one male and one female student attending an American international school
           that is not a DoDEA school outside the U.S. and Canada with the highest average grade on
           the greatest number of AP Exams. The minimum requirement is a grade of 3 or higher on
           three exams.*

          AP Capstone
          AP Capstone™ is a College Board program that equips students with the independent research,
          collaborative teamwork, and communication skills that are increasingly valued by colleges. AP
          Capstone comprises two AP courses—AP Seminar and AP Research—and is designed to
          complement and enhance the discipline-specific study in other AP courses.

More information regarding the Advanced Placement program can be found at
www.apcentral.collegeboard.com.

*Block quotes marked with an asterisk are taken from www.apcentral.collegeboard.com.

                                Dual Credit Courses/Grand Canyon University

In collaboration with Grand Canyon University1, iSC is proud to offer Dual Enrollment college-level
courses for the 2020-2021 school year. Dual Enrollment courses enable eligible iSC students to
simultaneously earn university and high school credit and enhance their academic journey. Some of
the benefits to our students and families include:
      •   Earn transferable2 college credit towards your university degree, while simultaneously earning
          high school credit
      •   Accelerate your pathway to college graduation
      •   Save money on overall university cost
      •   Receive instruction from university level professors and instructors
      •   Enhance college-level academic skills while in high school
      •   Begin university transition in a familiar and supportive academic setting
      •   Display success in college-level course rigor on university applications
      •   Apply to university with proven university achievement and confidence
      •   Attend GCU, a Higher Learning Commission3 approved institution
(See counselor for more information)

  1       h"ps://www.gcu.edu/individual-courses/dual-enrollment
  2       Courses transfer into GCU degree programs, and high school students who a"end GCU will be eligible for freshman scholarships.
          GCU is regionally accredited, so in general, universi@es that accept transfer credits should accept dual enrollment credits. However,
          it is at the discre@on of the receiving university whether or not to accept credits for transfer.
  3       h"ps://www.hlcommission.org/
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TIS High School
                  24 credits required for graduation
                   9                 10                  11                    12       credits

             Introduction to    Philosophy in Popular Culture,       Worldview Survey     3
               Philosophy           Service and Leadership           and Development
Philosophy                                   Ethics

                                                           Honors Philosophy

               English I         English II          English III/IV American Focus
                  or                or                English III/IV British Focus       4.5
             Honors English    Honors English                AP Language,
                   I                II,                      AP Literature,
 English                          Speech                      AP Seminar

                                                                        AP Research

                                Chemistry
               Conceptual           or                          Biology                   3
 Science        Physics                                     AP Chemistry
                                  Honors
                                Chemistry               AP Physics C: Mechanics

             World History     World History      Economics/Comparative Government
                                    or                      AP Economics,                 3
  Social          or
             Honors Ancient     AP World                    AP Psychology
 Studies                         History:            AP Comparative Government
             World History
                                 Modern                       AP Seminar
               Algebra I,       Geometry,                 Honors Precalculus,
              Geometry, or     Algebra II or          College Math and Statistics,        3
  Math                            Honors                     AP Statistics,
             Honors Algebra
                   II           Precalculus                   AP Calculus

               Health &          Health &            One semester of HS Physical          2
   PE          Wellness I        Wellness II                 Education,
             (one semester)    (one semester)      One semester of PE elective sports

Fine Arts               At least one credit from Band, Choir, or Visual Arts              1

 Foreign            At least two credits of any Chinese levels or French I and II         2
Language              (many colleges require two years of the same language)

 Electives   Other courses as desired to reach 24 Credits – includes AP Computer Science, MUN,
                           Yearbook, Robotics, Independent Studies, Photography

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Philosophy Courses
TIS Graduates must complete three credits of Philosophy.

Introduction to Philosophy                                                                            grade 9
Full year course, 1 credit

Students will study the classical philosophers, ancient to modern, prioritizing the solutions to Life’s greatest
questions: Where did we come from? Why are we here? Where are we going? What’s wrong with the world?
For what may we hope?

Applied Ethics                                                                                grade 10 or 11
Semester course, 0.5 credit
    This class will introduce contemporary ethics, the discipline and its vocabulary. Philosophical foundations
    will be explored before we examine individual issues. Ethical debates will be introduced with differing points
    of view, and how these contrast with the other perspectives. Finally, we will explore some of today’s top
    issues such as right to life, sexuality and gender, marriage and family, relationships, social justice, religion
    and extremism, and the role of the media. The purpose of the class is to help students form a personal
    perspective that is well thought out and grounded in Truth. A classroom forum incorporating debate and
    discussion formats, will be typical in the course.

Worldview and Popular Culture                                                                 grade 10 or 11
Semester course, 0.5 credit
    This course aims to develop skills for actively engaging popular culture by analyzing film, TV, social media,
    art, and literature discussing the dominant messages and how they address life’s central questions. Students
    will compare and contrast this perspective with their own worldview. Students should be prepared
    for challenge and growth throughout this course.

Service and Leadership                                                                        grade 10 or 11
Semester course, 0.5 credit
   An elective course for high school students learning about poverty and the marginalized of society, personal
   strengths development, and service. The objectives of this class are twofold: to help students develop a
   coherent personal philosophy of service and to give them an opportunity to personally carry out this
   philosophy in a service project they design themselves. Students will learn to develop skills that are designed
   to grow them as servant leaders.

Worldview Survey and Development                                                     Required grade for 12
Full year course, 1 credit
          The Worldviews class helps the student develop and articulate their own worldview as a world citizen
          who understands people with differing worldviews. The course emphasizes class discussion and
          interaction with a selection of books covering six worldview categories.

Honors Philosophy                                                                        grade 11 or 12
Full Year Elective Course, 1 credit
Prerequisites: Teacher recommendation
          This is not a course about understanding philosophy so much as it is about falling in love with the art
          of philosophizing. We will consider the ultimate questions of life that have been asked for thousands of
          years by people great and small. The ultimate questions we consider include the following: Can we
          know anything? What is real? How can we know? Are we free to choose? What makes an act right?
          How should we live? Is there a God? What is the meaning of life? Do we survive death? By discussing
          these questions together, and with the writings of thinkers from ancient times to our own, you will
          develop a love of deep thinking and meaningful discussion. Both of these are a vital skill set for all
          other aspects of education and life. This course is one of the requirements for the honors diploma.

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English Courses

    Grade 9                                                              English I

   *Grade 10                                                             English II

    Grade 11             American Literature, British Literature, AP English Language, AP English
                                                Literature, or AP Seminar
    Grade 12
*10th graders take one semester of Speech equivalent opposite one semester of PE

English I                                                                                 grade 9
Required for grade 9 (unless taking Honors English I), 1 credit
         This course offers a systematic approach to the development of written skills, and is designed to give
         students the essential building blocks for expressing their own ideas. Students will sharpen their
         composition skills through an emphasis on writing good paragraphs in a variety of genres, focusing on
         persuasive writing. Students will also master the mechanics of research. In grammar, fluency, and
         punctuation lessons, students hone their understanding of parts of speech, phrases and clauses, sentence
         analysis and structure, agreement, punctuation, and other conventions.

         Students also build on their language skills and improve their writing skills through close reading and
         critical analysis of classic and modern works of literature: short stories, poetry, drama, novels, and
         nonfiction. This course helps them appreciate the texts and the contexts in which the works were written.
         Literary selections range from classic works such as Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet to contemporary
         pieces by authors such as Maya Angelou.

English II                                                                                    grade 10
Required for grade 10 (unless taking Honors English II), 1 credit
Prerequisite: English I
         Students reinforce the connection between reading for meaning, and writing to communicate one’s own
         ideas through a focus on writing effective essays and research papers in a variety of genres, such as
         persuasive, expository, and literary analysis compositions. In writing each essay, students go through a
         process of planning, organizing, and revising while learning to examine their own writing with a critical
         eye, paying attention to ideas, organization, structure, style, while applying their understanding of parts
         of speech, phrases and clauses, sentence analysis and structure, agreement, punctuation, and other
         conventions during the editing process. Included in the course are SAT skills and writing style
         development.

         Students also will explore literary voices through time and many cultures in an attempt to discover the
         ideas and ideals that make people similar or that open doors to new ways of seeing and being. Students
         make connections to their own lives and times through writing response to literature essays,
         participating in threaded class discussions, using the writing process and making extensive use of
         internet resources to produce creative writing pieces and presentations.

Speech                                                                                        grade 10
Required for grade 10, semester course, 0.5 credit
         Speech is a course to help students learn to think clearly, and express themselves effectively, before a
         variety of audiences. Students are provided opportunities to increase their fluency as a speaker, and
         develop their self-confidence. The course introduces the beginning speech student to effectively use
         verbal and non-verbal communication skills. The class will cover multiple aspects of public speaking
         and give the students practical experience through participation.

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American Literature                                                                       grade 11
Full year course, 1 credit (Offered every other year)
         This course explores American literature and the pursuit of the American Dream. Students will go on a
         pilgrimage of religion and faith, relive a revolution of rebellion and conformity, redefine truth and
         human potential, and develop a deeper sense of self. Through students' explorations of classic American
         themes and ideals, they will deepen their awareness of political and social influences that have shaped
         American culture as it is known today. Selections of literature range from fiction (poetry, short stories,
         novellas, drama) to nonfiction (speeches, sermons, letters, journals, news articles). Students will not
         only think about literature and its connection to their lives, but they will learn to question it.

British Literature                                                                                 grade 12
Full Year Course, 1 credit (Offered every other year)
          Students read and analyze works of British and world literature that reflect the rich and diverse history
          of the Western world. As students progress through centuries of literature in a loose chronological
          arrangement, they will see how British literature has been shaped by concerns, values, and ideas that
          have intrigued, delighted, and challenged people throughout time. Throughout the course, poetry, short
          stories, novels, drama, and nonfiction provide opportunities for critical writing, creative projects, and
          online discussions. Students continue to develop vocabulary skills and refresh their knowledge of
          grammar, usage, and mechanics. With a focus on individual student needs they will prepare for study
          at the college level, including engaging in college entrance essay and resume writing, as well as
          revisions of their Worldview Manifestos.

                          Honors and Advanced Placement English Courses
Honors English I                                                                              grade 9
Prerequisite: High score on standardized tests and teacher recommendation, 1 credit
          This honors course is part of an accelerated program in which students develop written English skills
          that they will need for advanced course work as upperclassmen. Students learn to sharpen their
          writing skills by studying and practicing the techniques of writing effective sentences, paragraphs, and
          multi-paragraph essays in a variety of genres, and especially focusing on persuasive writing. This will
          develop the student’s sentence fluency skills. Students will also develop active reading skills to
          augment the critical analysis of classic and modern works of literature, short stories, poetry, drama,
          novels, and nonfiction. This will help students appreciate the texts and the contexts in which the
          works were written. Literary selections range from classic works such as Shakespeare’s Romeo and
          Juliet to contemporary pieces by authors such as Maya Angelou.

Honors English II                                                                       grade 10
Prerequisite: Honors English I or A in English I and teacher recommendation, 1 credit
         This honors course is part of an accelerated program in which students hone written English skills that
         they will need for advanced course work as upperclassmen. Students reinforce the connection between
         reading for meaning and writing to communicate one’s own ideas through a focus on writing effective
         essays and research papers in a variety of genres, such as persuasive, expository, and literary analysis
         compositions. In writing each essay, students go through a process of planning, organizing, and revising
         while learning to examine their own writing with a critical eye, paying attention to ideas, organization,
         and style. Students will focus on the revision and editing processes in their writing as they analyze their
         own word choice and voice while applying their understanding of parts of speech, phrases and clauses,
         sentence analysis and structure, agreement, punctuation, and other conventions. In addition students
         will actively work on SAT vocabulary and grammar skills. Finally, students will use their mastery in
         language usage and understanding to sharpen the analytical skills that they will need for advanced
         course work as upperclassmen. Students explore literary voices through time and many cultures in an
         attempt to discover the ideas and ideals that make people similar or that open doors to new ways of
         seeing and being. Students make use of reader response journals, participate in threaded class
         discussions, and utilize the writing process to analyze works from world-renowned authors. Students
         will also make extensive use of internet resources to produce creative writing pieces and presentations.

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Advanced Placement English Language & Composition                                                grade 11 or 12
Prerequisite: Honors English II and/or teacher recommendation. Students are required to sit for the AP English Language &
Composition exam. Full year course, 1 credit
         This course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical
         contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and
         their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience
         expectations, and subjects, as well as the way genre conventions, and the resources of language
         contribute to effectiveness in writing. A wide range of writing experiences, close readings of poetry
         and prose passages, in- and out-of-class essays, and objective testing sessions characterize the weekly
         procedures. Students can qualify for credit at many colleges upon satisfactory completion of the College
         Board Advanced Placement English Language and Composition exam.

Advanced Placement English Literature & Composition                                                        grade 11 or 12
Prerequisite: Honors English II and/or teacher recommendation. Students are required to sit for the AP English Literature &
Composition exam. Full year course, 1 credit
         This course engages students in the careful reading and analysis of imaginative literature. Through their
         own writing and the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways
         writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students
         consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as elements such as the use of figurative language,
         imagery, symbolism, and tone. Reading assignments are typically from major writers of recognized
         literary merit, and from a variety of historical periods and genres. A wide range of writing experiences,
         close readings of poetry and prose passages, in- and out-of-class essays, and objective testing sessions
         characterize the weekly procedures. Students can qualify for credit at many colleges upon satisfactory
         completion of the College Board Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition exam.

Advanced Placement Seminar                                                                   grade 10, 11 or 12
Full year course, 1 credit
Prerequisite for grade 11/12 students: Advanced Comp/Lit II and/or teacher recommendation.
Prerequisite for grade 10 students: Advanced Comp/Lit I, demonstrated academic excellence, teacher recommendation AND AP
Seminar teacher interview. Students are required to sit for the AP Seminar exam
         AP Seminar is a foundational course that engages students in cross-curricular conversations that explore
         the complexities of academic and real-world topics and issues by analyzing divergent perspectives.
         Using an inquiry framework, students practice reading and analyzing articles, research studies, and
         foundational, literary, and philosophical texts; listening to and viewing speeches, broadcasts, and
         personal accounts; and experiencing artistic works and performances. Students learn to synthesize
         information from multiple sources, develop their own perspectives in written essays, and design and
         deliver oral and visual presentations, both individually and as part of a team. Ultimately, the course aims
         to equip students with the power to analyze and evaluate information with accuracy and precision in
         order to craft and communicate evidence-based arguments.

Advanced Placement Research                                                                             grade 11 or 12
 AP Seminar is a prerequisite for AP Research. Completing AP Seminar and all its required assessment components is necessary for
students to develop the skills to be successful in AP Research.)

AP Research, the second course in the AP Capstone experience, allows students to deeply explore an academic
topic, problem, issue, or idea of individual interest. Students design, plan, and implement a yearlong
investigation to address a research question. Through this inquiry, they further the skills they acquired in the AP
Seminar course by learning research methodology, employing ethical research practices, and accessing,
analyzing, and synthesizing information. Students reflect on their skill development, document their processes,
and curate the artifacts of their scholarly work through a process and reflection portfolio. The course culminates
in an academic paper of 4,000–5,000 words (accompanied by a performance, exhibit, or product where
applicable) and a presentation with an oral defense. (from apcentral.collegeboard.org)

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Mathematics Courses
TIS graduates must complete 3 credits of mathematics. The mathematics program at TIS is divided into two levels as
summarized in the chart below. Level 2 involves honors courses at the 9th and 10th grade levels, but both levels allow
students to take Advanced Placement courses in grades 11 and 12. Students in honors and AP courses are expected to
make A's or B's and demonstrate a strong work ethic. Should an honors/AP student’s mathematics course grade fall
below 80%, the student may be required to drop back to the regular level and retake the course the following year.
Graphing calculators are required for all courses starting with Algebra II. TIS will supply each student with a graphing
calculator to borrow.

                                        Level 1                                             Level 2
 Grade 9                      Algebra I or Geometry                                 Honors Algebra II
 Grade 10                    Geometry or Algebra II                                Honors Pre-Calculus
                       College Math and Statistics,
 Grade 11                                                                     AP Calculus     or   AP Statistics
                    Honors Pre-Calculus, or AP Statistics
                          College Math and Statistics,
 Grade 12              Pre-calculus, AP Statistics, or AP                     AP Statistics or AP Calculus
                                   Calculus

Algebra I                                                                                                grade 9
Required for grade 9 (unless taken in grade 7 or grade 8)
          Algebra 1 is a one-year course designed with the goal of building students’ arithmetic and algebraic
          concepts. Students will develop the knowledge and capabilities to analyze and solve problems, and
          create a solid foundation for the study of more advance topics. The majority of this course is focused
          on linear and quadratic functions.

Geometry                                                                                                grade 9
Required for grade 9 (unless taken in grade 8)
Prerequisite: Algebra I, full year course, 1 credit, graduation requirement
          Geometry is the study of the relationship between points, lines, curves, and surfaces in two and three
          dimensional space. Considerable attention is given to rays, parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles,
          quadrilaterals, circles, and prisms. An additional goal of the course is to develop a student’s ability to
          make deductions and to write proofs within an axiomatic system.

Honors Algebra II                                                                                       grade 9
Grade 9 course, Full year course, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra I
          Algebra II is the second half of a two-year study of the fundamentals of algebra. This course emphasizes
          facility with algebraic expressions and equations, especially linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic,
          and polynomial functions. The course includes a brief introduction to trigonometry. Graphing
          calculators are required for the course where they are used in graphing functions and modeling data.
          The honors section will cover more material during the year, and coverage will also be deeper.

Algebra II                                                                                              grade 10
Required for grade 10 (unless taken in grade 9)
Prerequisite: Algebra I, Full year course, 1 credit, graduation requirement
          Algebra II is the second half of a two-year study of the fundamentals of algebra. This course emphasizes
          facility with algebraic expressions and equations, especially linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic,
          and polynomial functions. The course includes a brief introduction to trigonometry. Graphing
          calculators are required for the course where they are used in graphing functions and modeling data.

Honors Precalculus                                                                                    grade 10 or 11
Full year Grade 10 course, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Algebra II (at least a “B” average in Algebra II)
          Pre-calculus integrates the background students must have to be successful in calculus, including the analysis
          of functions, the modeling of equations, trigonometry, sequences, polynomials, conic sections, and limits. In
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addition, introductions are made into the derivative and the integral. Graphing calculators are required for
          the course where they are used in graphing functions, analyzing data, and simulating experiments. The
          honors section will cover more material during the year, and coverage will also be deeper.

College Math and Statistics                                                                        grade 11 or 12
Full Year Course, 1 credit
          This course is designed for students planning to major in college in programs, which do not require
          calculus. The goal of this course is for students to develop the ability to analyze situations and to decide
          and apply appropriate math skills to unravel diverse problems. Although the emphasis is on statistics,
          students will be working with a variety of mathematical disciplines.

Advanced Placement Calculus                                                                         grade 11 or 12
Full Year Course, 1 credit; Students are required to sit for the AP Calculus exam.
Prerequisite: Precalculus
          Isaac Newton’s discovery of Calculus toward the end of the 17th century changed history, and
          this course gives students a solid introduction to this “whole new world” of mathematical study.
          Topics include functions, limits, derivatives, and integrals, and their respective applications to
          real world problems. There is an emphasis on studying these topics from descriptive and visual
          points of view, as well as the traditional numerical and analytical viewpoints.

Advanced Placement Statistics                                                                       grade 11 or 12
Full Year Course, 1 credit; Students are required to sit for the AP Statistics exam.
Prerequisite: Algebra II and teacher recommendation (Source: apcentral.collegeboard.org)
          AP Statistics is designed to introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting,
          analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. The course is organized around four broad
          conceptual themes: exploring data by observing patterns and departures from patterns,
          planning a study by deciding what and how to measure, anticipating patterns by producing
          models based on probability theory and simulation, and using statistical inference to confirm
          models. Students should have a strong command of English to enroll this course.

Science Courses
Each TIS graduate must complete 3 credits of science: Physics, Chemistry, and Biology
          Grade 9                    Grade 10                                  Grades 11 & 12

                                 Chemistry or              Biology or AP Biology (3rd year requirement),
 Conceptual Physics*
                               Honors Chemistry               AP Physics C: Mechanics, AP Chemistry

Conceptual Physics                                                                              grade 9
Full year course, 1 credit, required for grade 9
Prerequisite: Algebra 1
          Physics is the most fundamental of all the sciences; before we ever truly learned about the complexities
          of life and the cell… we first learned about chemicals and eventually DNA… but before we ever learned
          about chemicals… we learned about atoms. Indeed, "what is matter?" was really the first major
          scientific question we asked. Deep foundational questions like these are handled in physics. Conceptual
          Physics introduces students to the major discoveries and classical knowledge that we have of our
          physical universe, but without being hindered by the intensely mathematical nature of the universe. The
          focus of this course is understanding and applying physics concepts to real life practical situations, and
          less about lengthy mathematical computation. Hands-on lab work will be an important part of testing,
          understanding and utilizing physics concepts. Key topics will include: motion, forces and Newtonian
          mechanics, fluid science, heat, light and optics, sound waves, atomic and nuclear physics. Conceptual
          physics will be an enjoyable first step into a the scientific journey that continues deeper and deeper into
          the startling complexity we see in our universe.

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Chemistry                                                                                                      grade 10
Full year course, 1 credit, required for grade 10
Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics
         Students will study the basic concepts of general chemistry, including scientific measurement, the
         history of atomic discovery, bonding, chemical nomenclature, reactions, the kinetics of matter,
         solutions, acids, and bases. An emphasis is placed on being able to understand and explain major
         concepts clearly, and to solve problems accurately. Laboratory experiences are used to help students
         visualize ideas and to gain proficiency with accurate lab techniques.

Honors Chemistry                                                                                                    grade 10
Full year course, 1 credit, required for grade 10
Prerequisite: Conceptual Physics
         Students will study the basic concepts of general chemistry, including scientific measurement, the
         history of atomic discovery, bonding, chemical nomenclature, reactions, the kinetics of matter,
         solutions, acids, and bases. An emphasis is placed on being able to understand and explain major
         concepts clearly, and to solve problems accurately. Laboratory experiences are used to help students
         visualize ideas and to gain proficiency with accurate lab techniques. This course will go deeper than
         regular level chemistry.

Biology                                                                                                        grade 11 or 12
Full year course, 1 credit, required for grade11/12 students who elect not to take AP Biology
Prerequisite: Chemistry
         This survey course includes an introduction to cell biology, cell chemistry, and genetics. The origin of
         life is discussed in light of both creation and evolution theories. The course includes a survey of the
         kingdoms of living organisms and viruses. Sample organisms such as fish and frogs are used in the
         laboratory for observation and dissection. Special attention is given to building a foundation for
         understanding current issues and research, especially in the areas of biochemistry and genetics.

Advanced Placement Physics C: Mechanics                                                                        grade 11 or 12
Full year course, 1 credit; Students are required to sit for the AP Physics C: Mechanics exam.
Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of AP Calculus, or taken concurrently, and teacher recommendation
          AP Physics C: Mechanics is equivalent to a one-semester, calculus-based, college-level physics
          course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or
          engineering. The course explores the topics of kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy
          and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and, oscillations
          and gravitation. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course.
          AP Physics aims to develop student’s physical intuition, creativity and investigative skills. Students
          will learn to:
          • Read, understand, and interpret physical information.
          • Use the scientific method to analyze a particular physical phenomenon or problem.
          • Use basic mathematical reasoning in a physical situation or problem.
          • Perform experiments, interpret the results of observations and communicate results, including
              uncertainty assessment.

Advanced Placement Chemistry                                                                       grade 11 or 12
Full Year Course, 1 credit; (Offered every other year) Students are required to sit for the AP Biology exam.
Prerequisites: Honors Chemistry, Algebra II and teacher recommendation

The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced
coursework in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based
investigations, as they explore content such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical
reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium. (from apcentral.collegeboard.org

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Advanced Placement Biology                                                                                     grade 11 or 12
Full Year Course, 1 credit; (Offered every other year) Students are required to sit for the AP Biology exam.
Prerequisites: Honors Chemistry, and teacher recommendation
          This course provides students with a college level learning experience in biology. A minimum of eight
          laboratories is required for this course. The course and examination are organized around the four “big
          ideas” which encompass the core scientific principles, theories and processes governing living
          organisms and biological systems. Students will be trained in the following science practices: the
          inquiry approach to investigate problems, reasoning skills, designing experiments, collecting data from
          experiments, and applying mathematical concepts in data analysis.

Students enrolled in AP Science courses will be encouraged to participate in the TIS Science Fair in
the Fall. The science fair is an independent project that requires many hours of preparation and
planning. Interested students will be assigned a science fair advisor and will have access to the
school’s science lab, as needed.

Social Studies Courses
Each TIS graduate must complete 3 credits of social studies.

           Grade 9                        Grade 10                            Grades 11 & 12
                                                                      Economics/Comparative Government
   World History or                  World History or                          AP Economics,
 Honors Ancient World               AP World History:                          AP Psychology
        History                         Modern                           AP Comparative Government
                                                                                AP Seminar

Honors Ancient World History                                                                       Grade 9
Prerequisite: Teacher Recommendation, Full year course, 1 credit
           The course offers balanced global coverage, with Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe and Oceania all
          represented. This advanced course covers history from pre-history to 1300 A.D. Students will explore
          the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from ancient times until 1300 A.D. in
          terms of the impact on Global Civilization. Students will review and strengthen map and globe skills,
          skills in interpreting and using information, writing skills, and historical thinking skills. This course will
          prepare students for success in AP World History: Modern.

World History                                                                          suggested for grade 9 or 10
Full year course, 1 credit
          World history focuses on key concepts, patterns of interactions, and themes throughout history. The
          course begins with analyzing early river valley civilizations, the development of government and
          societies, then progresses through the rise and fall of empires and into modern times. Along with
          learning historical content, a goal of the course is to broaden student knowledge of history and to allow
          them to identify key themes, concepts, and patterns that helped create the modern world.

AP World History: Modern (1300-Present)                                                            available to grade 10
Full year course, 1 credit,
Prerequisite: Geography or Honors Ancient World History, Teacher recommendation and demonstrated academic excellence
          AP World History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about world history
          from approximately 8000 BCE to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the
          past. Five themes of equal importance — focusing on the environment, cultures, state-building,
          economic systems, and social structures — provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation
          throughout the course. AP World History encompasses the history of the five major geographical
          regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, with special focus on historical
          developments and processes that cross multiple regions.
          Note: 10th grade students are allowed to take two AP courses and may choose between AP
          World History, AP Computer Science, or AP Chinese.

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Comparative Government                                                                       grade 11 or 12
Half year elective course, .5 credit
          Comparative Government is a semester-long course that will examine the role of citizens and how they
          relate to a variety of political structures and institutions. If you are part of a group of people, it is likely
          that some system of rules is used to make decisions, give responsibilities, manage resources, or even
          define boundaries of the group's existence. This course examines the foundations of political structures
          and also your place within those structures. We will do a great deal of “real-life” analysis of government
          – particularly by following current news trends and developments. Students will also compare different
          government structures and explain how these governments provide for the needs of their people.

Economics                                                                                             grade 11 or 12
Half year elective course, .5 credit
          Economics is a semester-long course that will cover both microeconomic and macroeconomics concepts
          and theories. This is a rewarding course designed to help students understand the supply and demand
          world in which they live. Students in this course will develop their understanding of the economic
          principles and choices that shape the economic activities of the world while also developing their
          thinking and problem-solving skills. While this class will incorporate a wide variety of activities, the
          course will contain a large selection of simulations and activities to help the students apply economic
          principles.

AP Comparative Government                                                                             grade 11 or 12
Full year elective course, 1 credit
Prerequisite: A “B” or higher in Honors Ancient World History or AP Modern World History and Teacher recommendation
          AP Comparative Government and Politics is an introductory college-level course in comparative
          government and politics. The course uses a comparative approach to examine the political structures;
          policies; and political, economic, and social challenges of six selected countries: China, Iran, Mexico,
          Nigeria, Russia, and the United Kingdom. Students cultivate their understanding of comparative
          government and politics through an analysis of data and text-based sources as they explore topics like
          power and authority, legitimacy and stability, democratization, internal and external forces, and
          methods of political analysis.

AP Psychology                                                                                        grade 11 or 12
Full year elective course, 1 credit
Prerequisite: teacher recommendation
          The AP Psychology course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior
          and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field,
          students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such
          topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation,
          developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and
          social psychology. Throughout the course, students employ psychological research methods, including
          ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, evaluate claims and evidence,
          and effectively communicate ideas.

AP Economics                                                                                         grade 11 or 12
Full Year Course (one semester of microeconomics, one semester of macroeconomics),1 credit
Students are required to take at least one of the two AP exams
Prerequisite: World History, and teacher recommendation

          AP Microeconomics
          AP Microeconomics is an introductory college-level microeconomics course. Students cultivate their
          understanding of the principles that apply to the functions of individual economic decision-makers by
          using principles and models to describe economic situations and predict and explain outcomes with
          graphs, charts, and data as they explore concepts like scarcity and markets; costs, benefits, and marginal
          analysis; production choices and behavior; and market inefficiency and public policy.

          AP Macroeconomics
          AP Macroeconomics is an introductory college-level macroeconomics course. Students cultivate their
          understanding of the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole by using principles and

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models to describe economic situations and predict and explain outcomes with graphs, charts, and data
         as they explore concepts like economic measurements, markets, macroeconomic models, and
         macroeconomic policies.

                                     Model United Nations (MUN)
Model United Nations I                                                                                        grades 9-12
First semester elective course, 0.25 credits, meets one day a week after school from 3:30 to 5:00 pm
Prerequisites:
                   1. A demonstrated motivation for and commitment to the MUN program.
                   2. Sufficient potential in verbal and written communication skills.

         The MUN I course is designed to expose students to international issues, policy making and the
         activities of the United Nations. Students will also gain skills in public speaking, research & writing,
         negotiation and powers of persuasion, leadership, organization, and interpersonal communication.
         Students will apply this knowledge and skill in the role of United Nations delegates at TIANMUN and
         one additional MUN conference. Students will pay for transportation, lodging and food.

Model United Nations II                                                                            grades 9-12
One semester elective course, 0.25 credits, meets one day a week after school from 3:30 to 5:00 pm.
Prerequisites: MUN I
                   1. Satisfactory completion of at least one MUN conference.
                   2. A demonstrated motivation for and commitment to the MUN program.
                   3. Sufficient competence in speech and writing skills.

         MUN II will extend and refine the knowledge and skills learned in MUN I. Students will focus on
         analyzing world issues and identifying root causes of the issues. Students will gain experience in
         developing solutions to these world issues and presenting their findings. Through this process, students
         will hone their speaking, debating and writing skills. They also will participate in TIANMUN and one
         or two additional MUN conferences. Students will pay for transportation, lodging and food for
         conferences.

                                                     Important Note:
MUN students who fail to maintain exemplary standards of attendance, attitude, and effort will risk removal
from the program (both the course and conferences) and a failing grade for the semester. In particular, three
unexcused absences from MUN class will result in removal from the program.

Foreign Languages Courses
TIS graduates must successfully complete 2 credits of foreign language.

Chinese Language
Students must take 2 years of Chinese unless they have previously completed 2 years of Chinese
Language studies. The table below illustrates the sequence of Chinese language courses.

   HS Chinese       HS Chinese        HS Chinese           AP              Chinese                Chinese
    Novice          Intermediate      Advanced           Chinese            HSK                  Literature

Chinese Novice                                                                                                   grades 9-12
Full Year Course, 1 credit
Prerequisite: none
         Chinese Novice encourages interpersonal communication through speaking and writing. This course
         provides opportunities to make and respond to requests and questions in context, participate

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independently in brief conversations on familiar topics, and write sentences and descriptions using
         characters. This course also emphasizes the development of reading and listening comprehension
         skills, such as using contextual clues to guess meaning and recognizing words and characters through
         stroke order and stroke count. Additionally, students will describe the practices, products and
         perspectives of Chinese-speaking culture; report on basic family and social practices of the target
         culture; and describe contributions from the target culture. This course emphasizes making
         connections across content areas and the application of understanding Chinese language and culture
         outside of the classroom. Students who satisfy the requirements of this course will be eligible to
         advance to Chinese Intermediate.

Chinese Intermediate                                                                             grades 9-12
Full Year Course, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Chinese Novice or entrance test
         Chinese Intermediate builds upon the knowledge gained in Chinese Novice. It continues to encourage
         interpersonal communication through speaking and writing, providing opportunities to initiate, sustain
         and close conversations; exchange detailed information in oral and written form; and write simple
         paragraphs using characters. This course also emphasizes the continued development of reading and
         listening comprehension skills. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of
         Chinese-speaking culture through recognition of the interrelations among the practices, products and
         perspectives of the target culture; discussion of significant events in the target culture; and
         investigation of elements that shape cultural identity in the target culture. This course further
         emphasizes making connections across content areas as well the application of understanding Chinese
         language and culture outside of the classroom. Students who satisfy the requirements of this course
         will be eligible to advance to Chinese Advanced (Pre-AP Chinese).

Chinese Advanced                                                                                    grades 9-12
Full Year Course, 1 credit
Prerequisite: Chinese Intermediate or entrance test
         Chinese Advanced will place emphasis on strengthening Chinese listening, writing, reading and
         conversational skills as well as introduction to preparation for the Advanced Placement Chinese
         Language and Culture Exam. It provides opportunities for students to interact and exchange
         information in culturally and socially authentic and/or simulated situations to demonstrate integration
         of language skills with understanding of Chinese-speaking culture. This course emphasizes the use of
         appropriate formats, varied vocabulary and complex language structures within student
         communication, both oral and written, as well as the opportunity to produce and present creative
         material using the language. Additionally, students will continue to develop understanding of
         Chinese-speaking culture through investigating the origin and impact of significant events and
         contributions unique to the target culture, comparing and contrasting elements that shape cultural
         identity in the target culture and the student‘s own culture, and explaining how the target language
         and culture have impacted other communities. Students who satisfy the requirements of this course
         will be eligible to advance to AP Chinese.
AP Chinese Language & Culture                                                        grades 9-12
Full Year Course, 1 credit, students are required to take the AP exam.
Prerequisite: Chinese IV and/or teacher recommendation
         The AP Chinese Language and Culture course is designed to be comparable to a fourth semester
         university course in Mandarin Chinese. Coursework reflects the proficiencies exhibited throughout the
         Intermediate range, as described in the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages
         (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines. The AP course prepares students to demonstrate their level of Chinese
         proficiency across the three communicative modes (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and
         the five goal areas (communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities) as outlined
         in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. The aim of the course is to provide
         students with varied opportunities to further develop their proficiencies across the full range of language
         skills within a cultural frame of reference reflective of the richness of Chinese language and culture.
         Students who satisfy the requirements of this course will be eligible to advance to Pre-Chinese
         Literature.
         Note: Students who are non-native Chinese speakers and are in a higher Chinese level will be permitted to take
         the AP Chinese class. Native Chinese speakers are generally not permitted to take this course, but should take
         Chinese Literature instead. Such students should be able to self-study for the AP Chinese exam, if they wish.

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