Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) Student Handbook

Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) Student Handbook

Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) Student Handbook California State University, Los Angeles College of Health and Human Services School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science

2 Table of Contents Page Program Contact Information 3 Introduction 4 Program Mission, Goals, and Objectives 5 History and Organizational Structure 6 Accreditation Status 6 Cost to Students 6 Requirements to Become a Registered Dietitian 7 Admission Requirements 7 Advisement 8 Nutritional Science Degree Curriculum 9 DPD Curriculum 9 Graduation Requirements 9 Suggested Course Sequencing 10 Applying for a Dietetic Internship Program 14 Issuance of a Verification of Completion Statement 14 Registration Examination for Dietetic Technicians 15 International Dietitians Seeking Registration in the United States 15 Transcript Evaluations 15 University Policies and Procedures 16 Student Grievance and Complaints 16 Code of Ethics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 16 Academic Honesty 17 Appendix A: Code of Ethics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics 23 Appendix B: DPD Course List 27 Appendix C: Organizational Chart 28

3 Program Contact Information College of Health and Human Services School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science Office: Fine Arts 130 Office: Physical Education 206 Phone: (323) 343-4600 Phone: (323) 343-4650 Didactic Program in Dietetics Director: Lewina Luk, MS, RD Office: Physical Education 223 Phone: (323) 343-4639 Email: lleung2@calstatela.edu Faculty: Lecturer; Clinical Site Coordinator, Coordinated Program in Dietetics: Victoria Buxton-Pacheco, M.S., RD Office: Physical Education 223 Email: vbuxton2@calstatela.edu Professor, Emeritus: Laura Calderon, Dr.P.H., RD Office: Physical Education 225 Phone: (323) 343-5439 Email: lcalder@calstatela.edu Assistant Professor: Mandy Graves Hillstrom, Ed.D., RD Office: Physical Education 225 Phone: (323) 343-4729 Email: kgraves@calstatela.edu Professor; Nutritional Science Program Coordinator; Director, Coordinated Program in Dietetics: Pera Jambazian, Dr.P.H., RD Office: Physical Education 234 Phone: (323) 343-4694 Email: pjambaz@calstatela.edu Assistant Professor; Coordinator, Food Science and Technology Program: Sunil Mangalassary, Ph.D.

Office: ASCL 114 Phone: (323) 343-5441 Email: smangal@calstatela.edu Professor: John Orta, Ed.D., RD, FADA Office: Physical Education 231 Phone: (323) 343-4031 Email: jorta@calstatela.edu Professor: Chick Tam, Dr.P.H. Office: Physical Education 231 Phone: (323) 343-4641 Email: ctam3@calstatela.edu

4 Introduction Lifetime wellness or health is dependent upon a myriad of factors, many of which are lifestyle related. In fact, close to 80% of the leading chronic illnesses may be prevented through lifestyle changes. The primary mission of the Nutritional Science Program is to educate and train individuals to become entry level health professionals.

In this capacity, graduates can promote positive, personal behavior changes and environmental changes which impact upon the health of the individual. The Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) enables students to complete the academic requirements needed to qualify for a dietetic internship or supervised practice needed to qualify to take the examination to become a Registered Dietitian (R.D.). The DPD may be completed as part of the baccalaureate degree program in Nutritional Science or may be completed by students in the Nutritional Science graduate program. Students who already hold a baccalaureate degree must be admitted into the graduate program in order to complete the DPD.

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Nutritional Science prepares students for careers in nutrition, dietetics, food service administration, food technology, food science, and community nutrition. Students can also prepare to study for advanced degrees in nutritional science, food science and technology, or an allied health profession. The Master of Science Degree Program in Nutritional Science is an individualized program designed to develop specialized professional competence in the selected areas of food science, dietetics and nutrition, while also providing breadth in related areas. The program is designed for persons preparing for positions as public health nutritionists or supervisors in dietetics and food production and service, or doctoral study in nutrition and dietetics.

5 Program Mission, Goals, and Objectives The mission of the DPD at California State University, Los Angeles is to prepare students to be competent for acceptance into a dietetic internship program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics. The DPD also prepares students for entry-level careers related to food and nutrition or graduate level education. Program Goal 1: Prepare students to be competent for entry into a dietetic internship program and/or a post-baccalaureate program.

Program Objectives for Goal 1: 1. Over a five year period, at least 80% of the DPD graduates will pass the Registered Dietitian (RD) registration exam the first time taking the exam or within the first year after taking the first exam.

2. Over a five year period, at least 75% of students enrolled in the professional courses in the third year of an undergraduate-level DPD or first year of a graduate-level DPD will complete the program/degree requirements within three years, or 150% of the time planned for completion.

3. Within twelve months of program completion, 50% of DPD graduates will apply to dietetic internship programs and 50% of those who apply will be accepted into a dietetic internship program. 4. Within twelve months of program completion, 25% of DPD graduates will apply to post-baccalaureate programs and 50% of those who apply will get accepted into the program. 5. Over a five year period, at least 75% of the dietetic internship directors of the DPD graduates will rank the graduate as being “prepared” or “very prepared” in all aspects of nutrition knowledge.

Program Goal 2: Prepare students to be competent for entry into nutrition-related careers and to be capable of working in culturally diverse community setting.

Program Objectives for Goal 2: 1. Over a five year period, at least 75% of DPD graduates who apply to dietetic internship programs, but were not accepted will obtain employment in nutrition or a related field. 2. Over a five year period, at least 75% of the employers of DPD graduates will rank the graduate as being “prepared” or “very prepared” in all aspects of nutrition knowledge.

3. At least 90% of DPD graduates will be able to work effectively in a culturally diverse setting.

6 History and Organizational Structure The Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) is housed in the School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science (KNS) in the College of Health and Human Services at California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA). The program was first housed in the Department of Home Economics in 1968 until 1984 when it became the Department of Family Studies and Consumer Sciences (FSCS). Then, in 1993, the department was restructured the Nutritional Science area joined the Department of Health Science to become the Department of Health and Nutritional Sciences.

In 2001 the department split, with Health Science joining the School of Nursing, and with Nutritional Science joining the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, now the School of KNS.

The DPD was initially approved by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics formerly the American Dietetic Association in the 1970s. The DPD requirements may be met by either BS or MS students in Nutritional Science. See Appendix C for the CSULA DPD organizational chart. Accreditation Status The Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) at California State University, Los Angeles is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics Education (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL. 60606, (312) 899-0040, ext.

5400.

Costs to Students An estimated cost of attendance for CSULA may be found at http://web.calstatela.edu/univ/finaid/COA.php. Additional fees will apply to students who wish to continue the educational pathway of becoming a Registered Dietitian. These fees consist of the cost for applying to and attending dietetic internship programs. Dietetic Internship Application Process and Programs: Eligible students who choose to apply to internship programs will need to submit an online application through the Dietetic Internship Centralized Application Services (DICAS) and register for the computer matching process through D & D Digital, a company that matches applicants and programs.

The first DICAS application costs $40 and $20 thereafter. The fee for D & D Digital is approximately $50. There may be supplemental internship application fees in addition to the DICAS and D&D Digital fees. The cost of the dietetic internship will vary by program.

Membership in the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics is optional for the students. The cost of student membership is $50/year (http://www.eatright.org/membershipinfo/).

7 Requirements for Becoming a Registered Dietitian After students have successfully completed the course work in a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) and a post-baccalaureate supervised practice program (dietetic internship program), they are eligible to take the registration exam to become a Registered Dietitian. Upon passing this registration exam, the students will earn their Registered Dietitian (RD) credential.

Upon successfully completing either the undergraduate or graduate degree DPD, students will receive a verification of completion statement, which will allow the students to be eligible to apply for a dietetic internship program. The dietetic internship program composed of a minimum of 1,200 hours of supervised practice will provide students with practical training in various aspects of dietetic practice.

Admission Requirement Undergraduate Program: Undergraduate degree applicants must meet the university requirements for admission. For general admission requirements, refer to the Office of Admissions and University Outreach at http://web.calstatela.edu/univ/admiss/. Graduate Program: Admission to the graduate degree program in Nutritional Science is limited to Fall Quarter only. Application is a two-step process. First, graduate degree applicants must meet the university requirements for admission. For general admission requirements for graduate programs, refer to the Office of Admissions and University Outreach at http://web.calstatela.edu/univ/admiss/.

After applying to the university, students must also submit a Nutritional Science Master of Science program application to the School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science. The Nutritional Science Master of Science program application can be found at http://web.calstatela.edu/academic/hhs/kns/pdf/ntrs_app_form.pdf. To be considered for admission into the Master of Science degree program in Nutritional Science, applicants must meet the following:  Grade point average of at least 3.0 in last 90-quarter units (60 semester units) attempted. An additional official transcript showing posting of bachelor’s degree must be submitted with the Nutritional Science Master of Science application.

 Appropriate undergraduate preparation for desired specialization within the discipline of nutritional science.

 Two letters of recommendation sent with the Nutritional Science Master of Science application.  Statement of goals for graduate study (page two of the Nutritional Science Master of Science application).

8  Submission of G.R.E. general test scores (completed within the past five years) with minimum scores of: Verbal-400 (146 on new test); Quantitative 500 (144 on new test); and Analytical Writing – 3.5 sent with the Nutritional Science Master of Science application.  Completion of the following prerequisites: o BIOL 200A,B – Human Anatomy and Physiology I, II o CHEM 151, 152 – Fundamentals of Chemistry I, II o CHEM 353 – Nutritional Aspects of Biochemistry o MICR 151 – Introductory Microbiology o NTRS 210 -- Foundations of Food o NTRS 317 -- Fundamentals of Human Nutrition Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD): No additional application is needed for the DPD.

Students who are admitted into the undergraduate program will complete the DPD with their degree curriculum. Students who are admitted into the graduate degree program will have to complete the DPD curriculum along with their graduate program curriculum.

Advisement Almost all Nutritional Science faculty serve as advisors. Undergraduate Program: Nutritional Science students are required to meet with their assigned advisor once a year, however, they are strongly encouraged to discuss their progress with their advisor more frequently. The advisement session also allows faculty and students to discuss the sequencing of courses, student performance and professionalism, and student concerns. Graduate Program: Graduate Nutritional Science students are assigned an advisor at the time they are admitted to the degree program. Each student is expected to work closely with his/her faculty advisor in a mentoring relationship throughout the time needed to complete work for the degree.

If students are having difficulty succeeding in the DPD, academically or professionally, the academic advisor will discuss a plan of action with the student to assist him/her in the program and/or discuss alternative career opportunities.

9 Nutritional Science Degree Curriculum Undergraduate Degree Program: To earn an undergraduate degree in Nutritional Science, students must successfully complete all the University’s mandated requirements which include General Education and Diversity courses and the Writing Proficiency Exam. The detailed list of the University mandated requirements can be found in the University catalog at http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/content.php?catoid=4&navoid=72. In addition, students must complete requirements for the major, which can be found at http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=4&poid=562.

Graduate Degree Program: To earn a graduate degree in Nutritional Science, students must successfully complete a required total of 45 units of which at least 23 units must be in 500-level courses. The detailed list of graduate degree requirements can be found at http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=4&poid=563. DPD Curriculum The DPD curriculum is incorporated into the undergraduate degree curriculum. For graduate students, they will need to take additional DPD courses to fulfill the DPD curriculum.

The DPD courses can be classified as either DPD science or DPD professional courses, which is a required distinction on the dietetic internship application. The DPD course list can be found in Appendix B. Graduation Requirements Upon successful completion of the undergraduate degree curriculum and the university’s mandated requirements, students will receive their Bachelor of Science in Nutritional Science. Students, who earn their undergraduate degree, will have also successfully completed the DPD.

Upon successful completion of the graduate degree curriculum and the university’s mandated requirements, students will receive their Master’s of Science in Nutritional Science.

For graduate students to successfully complete the DPD, they will need to earn a minimum grade of a letter C or better for all courses listed in the DPD curriculum (Appendix B).

10 Suggested Course Sequencing For Undergraduate Students: FRESHMAN YEAR SOPHOMORE YEAR FALL QUARTER FALL QUARTER Course Number Course Title (Units) Course Number Course Title (Units) ENGL 101 FRESHMAN COMPOSITION (4) BIOL 200B ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II (5) MATH 100 INTRO. TO COLLEGE MATH (4) OR MICRO 151 INTRO. TO MICROBIOLOGY (4) HHS 101* INTRO. TO HHS (2) ANTH 250 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4) OR ECON 150 ECONOMICS FOR THE CITIZEN (4) SOC 201 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY (4) MATH 102 COLLEGE ALGEBRA (4) Total Units 13 Total Units 14 WINTER QUARTER WINTER QUARTER Course Number Course Title (Units) Course Number Course Title (Units) PSYCH 150 INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY (4) ENG 102 COMPOSITION II (4) BLOCK A3 CRITICAL THINKING - PICK 1 (4) COMM 150 ORAL COMMUNICATION (4) HIST 202A US CIVILIZATION (4) OR BLOCK C1,2,3 PICK 1 FROM GE LIST (4) HIST 202B US CIVILIZATION (4) CHEM 151 FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY I (5) UPPER DIV.

THEME CLASS (4) Total Units 17 Total Units 16 SPRING QUARTER SPRING QUARTER Course Number Course Title (Units) Course Number Course Title (Units) CHEM 152 FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY II (5) POLS 150 GOVERNMENT & AMERICAN SOCIETY (4) BIOL 200A ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I (5) UPPER DIV. THEME CLASS (4) BLOCK C1,2,3 PICK 1 FROM GE LIST (4) UPPER DIV. THEME CLASS (4) HHS 101 INTRO TO HHS (2) Total Units 12 Total Units 16

11 JUNIOR YEAR SENIOR YEAR SUMMER QUARTER SUMMER QUARTER Course Number Course Title (Units) Course Number Course Title (Units) NTRS 210 FOUNDATIONS OF FOOD (4) DE DIETETIC ELECTIVE NTRS 317 FUND. OF HUMAN NUTRITION (4) UPPER DIV. THEME CLASS (4) CHEM 353 NUTR. ASPECTS BIOCHEMISTRY (5) UPPER DIV. THEME CLASS (4) Total Units 13 Total Units 12 FALL QUARTER FALL QUARTER Course Number Course Title (Units) Course Number Course Title (Units) NTRS 312 CULTURAL CUISINE (4) COUN 406 BEHAV. COUNSELING & SELF-MGMT (4) OR NTRS 414A INSTITUTIONAL FOODSERVICE I (4) COUN 450 COUNSELING THEORIES (3) NTRS 417A ADVANCED NUTRITION I (4) DE DIETETIC ELECTIVE Total Units 12 UPPER DIV.

THEME CLASS (4) WINTER QUARTER NTRS 411 CURRENT NUTRITION CONCEPTS (4) Course Number Course Title (Units) Total Units 15 OR 16 NTRS 414B INSTITUTIONAL FOODSERVICE II (4) WINTER QUARTER NTRS 415A MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY (4) Course Number Course Title (Units) NTRS 417B ADVANCED NUTRITION II (4) NTRS 413 MATERNAL & CHILD NUTRITION (4) NTRS 417L NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT LAB (1) DE DIETETIC ELECTIVE Total Units 13 NTRS 479 PROF. INTERACTIONS & WRITING SKILLS (4) SPRING QUARTER Total Units 12 Course Number Course Title (Units) SPRING QUARTER NTRS 410 EXPERIMENTAL FOODS (4) Course Number Course Title (Units) NTRS 415B MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY (4) NTRS 418 COMMUNITY NUTRITION (4) NTRS 434 MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES IN DIETETICS (5) NTRS 451 NUTRITION AND AGING (4) Total Units 13 DE DIETETIC ELECTIVE Total Units 12 **Note:  Two diversity courses are required for graduation.

 HHS 101 or HHS 301 (2 units) should be taken during the first two quarters at CSULA.  Grad checks are due to advisor two quarter before graduation.

12 For Graduate Students: The course sequencing for graduate students will vary for their 500-level courses depending on their area of interest in nutrition. Students will work with their assigned academic advisor to determine the appropriate 500-level courses for their graduate degree program. A list of the 500-level courses can be found under Graduate-Level Course Offering. YEAR 1 YEAR 2 SUMMER QUARTER SUMMER QUARTER Course Number Course Title (Units) Course Number Course Title (Units) NTRS 210 FOUNDATIONS OF FOOD (4) NTRS 479 PROF. INTERACTIONS & WRITING SKILLS (4) NTRS 317 FUND. OF HUMAN NUTRITION (4) Total Units 4 CHEM 353 NUTR.

ASPECTS BIOCHEMISTRY (5) FALL QUARTER Total Units 13 Course Number Course Title (Units) FALL QUARTER COUN 406 BEHAV. COUNSELING & SELF-MGMT (4) OR Course Number Course Title (Units) COUN 450 COUNSELING THEORIES (3) NTRS 312 CULTURAL CUISINE (4) EDFN 452 STATISTICS IN EDUCATION (4) NTRS 414A INSTITUTIONAL FOODSERVICE I (4) NTRS 500-LEVEL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE NTRS 417A ADVANCED NUTRITION I (4) Total Units 11 OR 12 Total Units 12 WINTER QUARTER WINTER QUARTER Course Number Course Title (Units) Course Number Course Title (Units) NTRS 413 MATERNAL & CHILD NUTRITION (4) NTRS 414B INSTITUTIONAL FOODSERVICE II (4) NTRS 500-LEVEL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE NTRS 415A MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY (4) NTRS 500-LEVEL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE NTRS 417B ADVANCED NUTRITION II (4) Total Units 12 NTRS 417L NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT LAB (1) SPRING QUARTER Total Units 13 Course Number Course Title (Units) SPRING QUARTER NTRS 418 COMMUNITY NUTRITION (4) Course Number Course Title (Units) NTRS 500-LEVEL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE NTRS 410 EXPERIMENTAL FOODS (4) NTRS 500-LEVEL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE NTRS 415B MEDICAL NUTRITION THERAPY (4) Total Units 12 NTRS 434 MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES IN DIETETICS (5) Total Units 13

13 Graduate-Level Course Offering: YEAR 3 FALL Course Title (Units) FALL QUARTER NTRS 511 RESEARCH CONCEPTS & METHODOLOGY IN NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE (4) Course Number Course Title (Units) NTRS 513 ADVANCED PROBLEMS & TOPICS IN NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE (4) NTRS 500-LEVEL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE NTRS 519 SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS IN FOOD AND NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE (4) NTRS 500-LEVEL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE NTRS 595 FIELDWORK IN NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE (2-4) Total Units 8 NTRS 597 GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-4) WINTER QUARTER Course Number Course Title (Units) WINTER Course Title (Units) NTRS 500-LEVEL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE NTRS 511 RESEARCH CONCEPTS & METHODOLOGY IN NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE (4) NTRS 500-LEVEL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE NTRS 513 ADVANCED PROBLEMS & TOPICS IN NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE (4) Total Units 8 NTRS 521 ADVANCED TOPICS IN EATING BEHAVIORS (4) SPRINGQUARTER NTRS 527 NUTRITIONAL EPIDEMIOLOGY (4) Course Number Course Title (Units) NTRS 595 FIELDWORK IN NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE (2-4) NTRS 500-LEVEL GRADUATE LEVEL COURSE NTRS 597 GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-4) NTRS 596 COMPREHESIVE EXAM (0) KIN 504 RESEARCH DESIGN IN KINESIOLOGY (5) NTRS 599 THESIS OR PROJECT (6) Total Units 4 OR 10 SPRING Course Title (Units) NTRS 521 ADVANCED TOPICS IN EATING BEHAVIORS (4) NTRS 523 ADVANCED TOPICS IN DIETETIC MANAGEMENT (4) NTRS 525 ADVANCED TOPICS IN FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (4) NTRS 595 FIELDWORK IN NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE (2-4) NTRS 597 GRADUATE RESEARCH (1-4) **Note:  Applications for advanced to candidacy are submitted to advisor after (1) the master’s degree program has been approved, (2) completion of 16 units on the graduate program with a B (3.0) or better average, and (3) the passage of the WPE.

 Grad checks are due to advisor two quarter before graduation.

14 Applying for a Dietetic Internship Program Students may apply to dietetic internship programs when they will graduate from their degree program and complete the DPD prior to the start of the internship program. Students are advised by DPD Director to research and obtain the information necessary to assist them in selecting suitable dietetic internship programs to apply. A list of the accredited dietetic internship programs may be found at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website at http://www.eatright.org/BecomeanRDorDTR/content.aspx?id=8473. The application for internships occurs twice a year.

For internship programs that begin between June and September, the application deadline for most programs is mid-February. For internship programs that start at the beginning of the year, the application deadline for most programs is mid-September.

Students applying to internships prior to completing the DPD will need to submit a form called the Declaration of Intent with their application. The Declaration of Intent, obtained from the DPD Director, lists DPD courses that the students still needs to complete. Students who successfully completed the DPD and their degree program will need to submit a Verification of Completion Statement with their application. This form can also be obtained from the DPD Director. The DPD Director holds an information session prior to each of the application deadlines to assist and guide students through the entire application process.

Students should contact the DPD Director if they are interested in attending the information session. Issuance of a Verification of Completion Statement (Verification of Completion Statement is also known as a Verification Statement) Upon successful completion of the DPD coursework and the university graduation requirements for either a Bachelor of Science or a Master’s of Science degree, students will be mailed the DPD Verification Statement. Prior to graduation, the students must provide the DPD Director with a permanent mailing address. Once the student’s degree is posted, the DPD Director will issue the Verification Statement and mail a minimum of three copies directly to the student.

An original copy of the Verification Statement must be given to the Dietetic Internship Director before starting a dietetic internship program or must be produced prior to applying to take the Dietetic Technician, Registered (DTR) exam.

15 Registration Examination for Dietetic Technicians Upon successful completion of the DPD coursework and the university graduation requirements for either a Bachelor of Science or a Master’s of Science degree, students will be eligible to sit for the Registration Examination for Dietetic Technicians. Once the student’s degree is posted, the DPD Director will issue the Verification of Completion Statement. The DPD Director will accept and process paperwork (application, DTRE mis-use form, and official transcript with posted degree) for the Registration Examination for Dietetic Technicians twice a year (spring and fall).

For more information regarding the Registration Examination for Dietetic Technicians, students may go to the Commission on Dietetic Registration website at http://cdrnet.org/program-director/registration-eligibility- requirements-for-dietetic-technicians-new-pathway-iii.

International Dietitians Seeking Registration in the United States Dietitians who have completed their education and credentialing requirements outside of the U.S. may be eligible for reciprocity with the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (http://www.eatright.org/ACEND/content.aspx?id=5962). Individuals who do not qualify for reciprocity but would like to become a Registered Dietitian in the U.S. may work to obtain a Verification of Completion Statement by meeting the requirements for the issuance of a Verification of Completion Statement, as seen on page 14.

Transcript Evaluations Transcript evaluations may be conducted if students have completed almost all of the DPD course requirements from another university.

There is a $50 non-refundable fee for the transcript evaluation for non-CSULA students. Students who are interested in getting their transcripts evaluated should contact the DPD Director. Students who earned their degree(s) from foreign universities must first have their transcripts evaluated by an independent foreign degree evaluation agency. A list of the independent foreign degree evaluation agencies can be found at http://www.eatright.org/BecomeanRDorDTR/content.aspx?id=9725. The type of evaluation should be a course-by-course evaluation. The agency will provide an equivalency report that will detail the equivalent degree and coursework to an accredited university in the United States or its territories.

16 University Policies and Procedures The University has established policies and procedures to assist and guide students through their academic career at CSULA. Below are some University policies that students should be aware of and the link to the University catalog. Policy Link Academic Calendar http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/content.php?catoid=4&navoid=117 Academic Probation & Disqualification http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/content.php?catoid=4&navoid=121 Access to Personal File http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/content.php?catoid=4&navoid=90 Access to Student Support Services (Health Services, Financial Aid, etc.) http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/content.php?catoid=4&navoid=120 Faculty and Student Relations Policy http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/content.php?catoid=4&navoid=121 Graduate degree requirements http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=4&poid=563 Grievance Policy http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/content.php?catoid=4&navoid=121 Nondiscrimination Policy http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/content.php?catoid=4&navoid=116 Protection & Privacy of Student Information http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/content.php?catoid=4&navoid=86 Undergraduate degree requirements http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/preview_program.php?catoid=4&poid=562 Withdrawal & Refund of Tuition & Fees http://ecatalog.calstatela.edu/content.php?catoid=4&navoid=121#sche_fees Student Grievance and Complaints Most student complaints can be resolved on an informal basis by communication between the student and the faculty.

Students who believe they are subject to unfair policies or practices should first discuss their concern with the instructor directly. If necessary, they may then contact the Director of the School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science. Should the situation continue to be unresolved through these informal means, the student may file a formal grievance through the University’s Judicial Affairs Office, http://web.calstatela.edu/univ/stuaffrs/jao/.

If students have complaints related to the accreditation standards or the performance of the DPD, and after the DPD and the University have exhausted all options, then the students should contact the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics Education (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL. 60606, (312) 899-0040, ext. 5400.

17 Code of Ethics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics All CSULA Nutritional Science students are to abide by the Code of Ethics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

This Code of Ethics can be found in Appendix A on page 23. According to the Code of Ethics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics as published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, August 2009, the Code of Ethics applies to the following practitioners: a. In its entirety to members of AND who are Registered Dietitians (RDs) or Dietetic Technicians, Registered (DTRs); b. Except for sections dealing solely with the credential, to all members of AND who are not RDs or DTRs; and c. Except for aspects dealing solely with membership, to all RDs and DTRs who are not members of AND.

All individuals to whom the Code applies are referred to as “dietetics practitioners,” and all such individuals who are RDs and DTRs shall be known as “credentialed practitioners.” Academic Honesty The University in its quest for truth and knowledge embraces honesty and integrity. These fundamental values must not be compromised. The trust and respect among professors, students and the society need to be vigilantly protected. Cheating and plagiarism can be neither justified nor condoned as this would destroy the ideals and purposes of higher education. Students enter the University to gain the knowledge and tools necessary for participation in society.

Academic integrity is one foundation for a society based on trust and honesty. Therefore, the University takes seriously its responsibility for academic honesty.

I. Cheating At Cal State L. A., cheating is defined as the act of obtaining or attempting to obtain credit for academic work through the use of any dishonest, deceptive, or fraudulent means. The following examples are intended to be representative, but not all-inclusive: (a) Examinations/Tests Administered by Faculty or the University  Copying from another student’s paper  Employing signals to obtain answers from or provide answers to others  Stealing or arranging for the theft of an examination  Knowingly reviewing an unauthorized copy of an examination  Using lecture notes or textbooks during an examination when prohibited  Possessing crib notes at the location and during the time of the examination  Having someone else take an examination in your place  Feigning illness or telling falsehoods to avoid taking an examination at the scheduled time

18  Claiming falsely that you took an examination at the scheduled time  Storing and/or accessing course subject matter in a calculator, computer or recording device, without authorization from the instructor, when such instruments are otherwise permitted to be used during an examination period  Utilizing calculators and/or other learning aids forbidden by the instructor  Obtaining assistance in answering questions on a take-home examination, when such action is specifically prohibited  Attempting to use or using bribery to obtain an undeserved grade  Changing an answer on a graded test and claiming the student’s response to the question was incorrectly marked wrong (b) Papers/Reports, Laboratory/Homework  Copying the work of other persons in whole or in part and claiming authorship  Submitting a paper obtained from a any source that provides research/term papers  Using a ghost writer to compose a paper and claiming authorship  Claiming an assigned share of a team report, toward which insufficient or no contribution was made  Lying about the reason for not submitting a report on time  Pretending to have submitted a paper to an instructor  Stealing another student’s report and submitting it as one’s own work  Submitting the same term paper to two or more different instructors for credit in their courses without their prior permission  Inventing, falsifying, or altering data for a research survey or laboratory experiment  Misrepresenting the authorship of an experiment or exercise  Depending upon others to complete laboratory assignments or homework when instructions call for independent work  Sabotaging someone else’s laboratory work or other exercise  Fabricating bibliographic references Cheating on any academic assignment, including course work, comprehensive exams, or theses, is subject to discipline for academic dishonesty.

II. Plagiarism At Cal State L. A., plagiarism is defined as the act of using ideas, words, or work of another person or persons as if they were one’s own, without giving proper credit to the original sources. The following examples of plagiarism are intended to be representative, but not all- inclusive:  Failing to give credit via proper citations for others’ ideas and concepts, data and information, statements and phrases, and/or interpretations and conclusions  Failing to use quotation marks when quoting directly from another, whether it be a paragraph, a sentence, or a part thereof

19  Paraphrasing the expressions of thought by others without appropriate quotation marks or attribution  Assembling parts from various works and submitting the synthesis or single paper as one’s own creation  Representing another’s artistic/scholarly works, such as musical compositions, computer programs, photographs, paintings, drawings, sculptures, or similar works as one’s own Plagiarizing on any academic assignment, including course work, comprehensive exam, or thesis, in whole or in part, is subject to discipline for academic dishonesty.

III. Misrepresentation Knowingly furnishing false academic information to a University official, faculty member, or campus office is subject to discipline for academic dishonesty. IV. Collusion Any student who intentionally helps another student perform any of the above acts of cheating, plagiarism or misrepresentation is subject to discipline for academic dishonesty.

V. Consequences and Sanctions Violations of academic honesty have a dual aspect, constituting both a breach of ethics and a form of academic non-performance. Hence the consequences of violating this policy may fall into two categories. Addressing the violation as an academic matter does not preclude the imposition of further administrative sanctions. Academic Consequences: Faculty have the right to establish the standards by which the academic performance of students will be evaluated, including the consequences of students not meeting some portion or all of the academic requirements of a course through acts of cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation or collusion.

These consequences may include but are not limited to assigning a lowered grade, zero or “F” on an individual assignment, or lowering the student’s grade or assigning an “F” in the course. Faculty may alternatively permit the student to repeat an assignment/test or complete and submit additional assignments. Furthermore, before these consequences can be effected, the faculty member must have verified instances of academic dishonesty by personal observation and/or documentation.

Administrative Sanctions: In addition to academic consequences, the University can impose administrative sanctions. As stipulated in Executive Order 970, Student Conduct Procedures, among other places, cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation or collusion, in connection with an academic program or campus may warrant, but are not necessarily limited to,  Expulsion  Suspension

20  Probation  Withdrawal of a degree  Restitution Although sanctions can be imposed for a single offense, repeat offenders will receive particular consideration for administrative sanctions.

Multiple offenses committed in more than one course, even when discovered simultaneously, shall be considered repeat offenses. VI. Reporting Procedures For the purposes of reporting findings of academic dishonesty, the ‘reporting party’ may refer to a probationary, tenured or temporary faculty member, a librarian, a person in an academic administrative position, a counselor, coach, administrator of a testing center or another person in a position of authority over a student’s academic work. Throughout this policy, the term ‘faculty member’ shall be used to stand in for any reporting party.

Teaching assistants, graduate assistants and staff should report allegations of academic dishonesty to their authorized university supervisor. Allegations shall be made against individual students rather than groups of students. When a faculty member suspects that a student has committed an academically dishonest act, it is the faculty member’s responsibility to take the following steps: 1. The faculty member must first carefully consider the evidence of the apparent dishonesty. A perception that is not supported by reasonable evidence, will not suffice. Examples (not necessarily comprehensive) of evidence sufficient to pursue action are:  Documentation regarding the source of text which the student has used without proper attribution or has attempted to represent as his/her own work  A demonstrably marked difference in the writing style of the student, as compared to his/her work on previous assignments  Testimony from others regarding a student’s use of dishonest means to fulfill the assignment at hand  Firsthand observation of the student engaging in a dishonest act, in a situation in which the student cannot effectively deny that the act took place  Admission by the student that he or she undertook a dishonest act in fulfillment of the assignment at hand  A suspicious degree of similarity in work done by different students Faculty members are encouraged to discuss any perception of dishonesty and the evidentiary basis for an action with their department/division chair or school director and/or associate dean prior to discussing perceptions of wrongdoing with the affected student.

21 2. When satisfied that a reasonable evidentiary standard has been met and as soon as possible after discovering the alleged violation, the faculty member should arrange an office conference in order to inform the student of the allegations and the intended academic consequences of the violations. At the conference, the student should be informed of the supporting evidence, the intended consequences, and the Academic Honesty Policy. In the event that the student disputes the findings of academic dishonesty, he or she shall be given the opportunity to respond (orally or writing). The faculty member must consider any information or evidence that the student presents during or after the conference, and determine whether or not such information or evidence mitigates or refutes the charge of academic dishonesty.

In every case the student shall have ten (10) days beyond the date of the conference to respond to the allegations, before a report is made (as outlined in #3, below). At the conference, the student should also be informed of the University’s Grade Appeals/Academic Grievance Policy. Under that policy, the student may appeal the determination that he or she has committed academic dishonesty, the academic consequences stemming from such a determination, or the administrative sanctions. 3. If after consideration of all evidence (including any provided by the student), it is determined that a preponderance of the evidence favors a finding of academic dishonesty, the faculty member shall proceed as directed below.

The faculty member shall use the Academic Dishonesty Report Form to report the finding of academic dishonesty. This report shall be the statement of charges against the student and the record of the academic consequence(s) imposed; all supporting documentation shall be attached to the form and submitted to the University Judicial Affairs Office and made available to the student. If a student appeals a grade or other adverse consequence of an allegation of academic dishonesty, this report and the related documentation shall be subject to review. In cases where the student fails to attend the scheduled conference to discuss the alleged dishonesty, or when the alleged dishonesty is detected at the close of the quarter and the faculty member has not been successful in a good-faith effort to contact the student, an Academic Dishonesty Report Form describing the alleged incident and documents supporting the allegation shall be sent to the University Judicial Affairs Officer and made available to the student.

In cases where the faculty member cannot, for serious and compelling reasons, participate in any one or more parts of the above process, the department/division chair or school director shall represent the reporting party.

22 VII.Confidentiality All parties to the initial conference between a faculty member and a student accused of academic dishonesty and all subsequent deliberations regarding incidents of academic dishonesty have the right to expect that such deliberations will occur in a setting of strictest confidentiality. Concomitant with this right of confidentiality is the obligation of all parties to refrain from any discussions of these issues regarding cheating, plagiarism, misrepresentation or collusion outside of the informal and formal conferences and meetings as outlined elsewhere in this document and in related policies (including the Grade Appeal/Academic Grievance Policy).

Confidentiality shall be maintained unless a legitimate need to know is established by the department/division chair or school director in order for the faculty to complete their responsibilities as University employees or in any legal action, and in a manner consistent with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (Student Records Administration - 011, Sec 5.8) and any other applicable law. The department/division chair or school director may consult with, or request documentation of a student’s history of academic dishonesty from the Judicial Affairs Officer only on a strict need to know basis.

Violators of this principle of confidentiality are themselves subject to university disciplinary action. In the matter of student records and according to Federal and State privacy laws, students have the right to protections against improper disclosure of personal information. However, it is permissible for transcripts of student academic records to contain information regarding a student’s academic status including such disciplinary actions as suspension or expulsion. Being a temporary action, suspension may be expunged from the record upon the student’s reinstatement. Threats/Retaliation: Any threats or acts of retaliation against any member of the faculty or staff as a consequence of implementing this policy on Academic Honesty will be cause for disciplinary action under section 41301, Title 5, California Code of Regulations, in addition to civil and criminal liabilities.

23 Appendix A: Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics Below are the 19 Principles of the Code of Ethics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics as published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association, August 2009. Fundamental Principles 1. The dietetics practitioner conducts himself/herself with honesty, integrity, and fairness. 2. The dietetics practitioner supports and promotes high standards of professional practice. The dietetics practitioner accepts the obligation to protect clients, the public, and the profession by upholding the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Dietetics and by reporting perceived violations of the Code through the processes established by AND and its credentialing agency, CDR.

Responsibilities to the Public 3. The dietetics practitioner considers the health, safety, and welfare of the public at all times. The dietetics practitioner will report inappropriate behavior or treatment of a client by another dietetics practitioner or other professionals. 4. The dietetics practitioner complies with all laws and regulations applicable or related to the profession or to the practitioner's ethical obligations as described in this Code. a. The dietetics practitioner must not be convicted of a crime under the laws of the United States, whether a felony or a misdemeanor, an essential element of which is dishonesty.

b. The dietetics practitioner must not be disciplined by a state for conduct that would violate one or more of these principles. c. The dietetics practitioner must not commit an act of misfeasance or malfeasance that is directly related to the practice of the profession as determined by a court of competent jurisdiction, a licensing board, or an agency of a governmental body. 5. The dietetics practitioner provides professional services with objectivity and with respect for the unique needs and values of individuals.

a. The dietetics practitioner does not, in professional practice, discriminate against others on the basis of race, ethnicity, creed, religion, disability, gender, age, gender identity, sexual orientation, national origin, economic status, or any other legally protected category.

b. The dietetics practitioner provides services in a manner that is sensitive to cultural differences. c. The dietetics practitioner does not engage in sexual harassment in connection with professional practice. 6. The dietetics practitioner does not engage in false or misleading practices or communications.

a. The dietetics practitioner does not engage in false or deceptive advertising of his or her services. b. The dietetics practitioner promotes or endorses specific goods or products only in a manner that is not false and misleading.

24 c. The dietetics practitioner provides accurate and truthful information in communicating with the public. 7. The dietetics practitioner withdraws from professional practice when unable to fulfill his or her professional duties and responsibilities to clients and others. a. The dietetics practitioner withdraws from practice when he/she has engaged in abuse of a substance such that it could affect his or her practice.

b. The dietetics practitioner ceases practice when he or she has been adjudged by a court to be mentally incompetent.

c. The dietetics practitioner will not engage in practice when he or she has a condition that substantially impairs his or her ability to provide effective service to others. Responsibilities to Clients 8. The dietetics practitioner recognizes and exercises professional judgment within the limits of his or her qualifications and collaborates with others, seeks counsel, or makes referrals as appropriate. 9. The dietetics practitioner treats clients and patients with respect and consideration. a. The dietetics practitioner provides sufficient information to enable clients and others to make their own informed decisions.

b. The dietetics practitioner respects the client's right to make decisions regarding the recommended plan of care, including consent, modification, or refusal. 10. The dietetics practitioner protects confidential information and makes full disclosure about any limitations on his or her ability to guarantee full confidentiality. 11. The dietetics practitioner, in dealing with and providing services to clients and others, complies with the same principles set forth above in “Responsibilities to the Public” (Principles #3-7).

Responsibilities to the Profession 12. The dietetics practitioner practices dietetics based on evidence-based principles and current information.

13. The dietetics practitioner presents reliable and substantiated information and interprets controversial information without personal bias, recognizing that legitimate differences of opinion exist. 14. The dietetics practitioner assumes a life-long responsibility and accountability for personal competence in practice, consistent with accepted professional standards, continually striving to increase professional knowledge and skills and to apply them in practice.

15. The dietetics practitioner is alert to the occurrence of a real or potential conflict of interest and takes appropriate action whenever a conflict arises. a. The dietetics practitioner makes full disclosure of any real or perceived conflict of interest. b. When a conflict of interest cannot be resolved by disclosure, the dietetics practitioner takes such other action as may be necessary to eliminate the conflict, including recusal from an office, position, or practice situation.

25 16. The dietetics practitioner permits the use of his or her name for the purpose of certifying that dietetics services have been rendered only if he or she has provided or supervised the provision of those services.

17. The dietetics practitioner accurately presents professional qualifications and credentials. a. The dietetics practitioner, in seeking, maintaining, and using credentials provided by CDR, provides accurate information and complies with all requirements imposed by CDR. The dietetics practitioner uses CDR-awarded credentials (“RD” or “Registered Dietitian”; “DTR” or “Dietetic Technician, Registered”; “CS” or “Certified Specialist”; and “FADA” or “Fellow of the American Dietetic Association”) only when the credential is current and authorized by CDR.

b. The dietetics practitioner does not aid any other person in violating any CDR requirements, or in representing himself or herself as CDR-credentialed when he or she is not. 18. The dietetics practitioner does not invite, accept, or offer gifts, monetary incentives, or other considerations that affect or reasonably give an appearance of affecting his/her professional judgment. Clarification of Principle: a. Whether a gift, incentive, or other item of consideration shall be viewed to affect, or give the appearance of affecting, a dietetics practitioner's professional judgment is dependent on all factors relating to the transaction, including the amount or value of the consideration, the likelihood that the practitioner's judgment will or is intended to be affected, the position held by the practitioner, and whether the consideration is offered or generally available to persons other than the practitioner.

b. It shall not be a violation of this principle for a dietetics practitioner to accept compensation as a consultant or employee or as part of a research grant or corporate sponsorship program, provided the relationship is openly disclosed and the practitioner acts with integrity in performing the services or responsibilities. c. This principle shall not preclude a dietetics practitioner from accepting gifts of nominal value, attendance at educational programs, meals in connection with educational exchanges of information, free samples of products, or similar items, as long as such items are not offered in exchange for or with the expectation of, and do not result in, conduct or services that are contrary to the practitioner's professional judgment.

d. The test for appearance of impropriety is whether the conduct would create in reasonable minds a perception that the dietetics practitioner's ability to carry out professional responsibilities with integrity, impartiality, and competence is impaired. Responsibilities to Colleagues and Other Professionals 19. The dietetics practitioner demonstrates respect for the values, rights, knowledge, and skills of colleagues and other professionals. a. The dietetics practitioner does not engage in dishonest, misleading, or inappropriate business practices that demonstrate a disregard for the rights or interests of others.

26 b. The dietetics practitioner provides objective evaluations of performance for employees and coworkers, candidates for employment, students, professional association memberships, awards, or scholarships, making all reasonable efforts to avoid bias in the professional evaluation of others. For further information, please refer to the following link: http://www.eatright.org/healthprofessionals/content.aspx?id=6868.

27 Appendix B: DPD Course List DPD Professional Courses DPD Science Courses NTRS 210: Foundations of Food BIOL 200A: Human Anatomy & Physiology I NTRS 312: Cultural Cuisine BIOL 200B: Human Anatomy & Physiology II NTRS 317: Fundamentals of Human Nutrition CHEM 151: Fundamentals of Chemistry I NTRS 410: Experimental Foods CHEM 152: Fundamentals of Chemistry II (Organic) NTRS 413: Maternal & Child Nutrition CHEM 353: Nutritional Biochemistry NTRS 414A: Institutional Food Service A MICRO 151: Introductory Microbiology NTRS 414B: Institutional Food Service B NTRS 415A: Medical Nutrition Therapy NTRS 415B: Medical Nutrition Therapy NTRS 417A: Advanced Nutrition I NTRS 417B: Advanced Nutrition II NTRS 417L: Nutritional Assessment Lab NTRS 418: Community Nutrition NTRS 434: Management Principles in Dietetics NTRS 479: Professional Interactions and Writing Skills ECON 150: Economics for the Citizen COUN 406: Behavioral Counseling and Self- Management (4) or COUN 450: Counseling Theories PSYCH 150: Introductory Psychology SOC 201: Principles of Sociology or ANTH 250: Cultural Anthropology

28 Appendix C: Abbreviated Administrative Organizational Chart for Academic Programs California State University, Los Angeles Board of Trustees Chancellor CSU System Dr. Timothy P. White President CSU, Los Angeles Dr. William A. Covino Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Ashish Vaidya Dean College of Health and Human Services Dr. Beatrice Yorker Associate Dean College of Health and Human Services Dr. Farrell Webb Director School of Kinesiology and Nutritional Science Dr. Nazareth Khodiguian Undergraduate Program Dr. Pera Jambazian Coordinator Graduate Program Master of Science Dr.

Pera Jambazian Coordinator Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) Lewina Luk, MS, RD DPD Director Coordinated Program in Dietetics (CDP) Dr. Pera Jambazian CDP Director

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