MILLER COMPREHENSIVE CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL - Regina Catholic School ...

 
Excellence and Opportunity

      MILLER COMPREHENSIVE
      CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL

                           Course Description Booklet
                                   2017-2018

                               On-line at www.rcsd.ca/miller

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Excellence and Opportunity

                                                 TABLE OF CONTENTS
PRINCIPAL’S MESSAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                    3
GENERAL INFORMATION:
        Catholic Distinctiveness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .             4
        Registration Policies & School Guidelines . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                       5
        Student Acceptable Computer Use Policy . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .                          8
        Advanced Placement Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
        Learning Resource Program                     . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
        Modified Courses             . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
        Alternative Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
        English as an Additional Language Support                            . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
        Miller Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
        Earning Credits-Planning for Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
        COURSE DESCRIPTIONS:
        Christian Ethics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
        English Language Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
        English as Additional Language Classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
        French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
        Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
        Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
        Native Studies/Social Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
        Social Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
        Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
        Fine Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
        Practical and Applied Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
        Technology Studies/Career & Work Exploration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
ACADEMIC AWARDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
EXTRA CURRICULAR AWARDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
LEARNING ONLINE COURSE SELECTION & REGISTRATION PROCESS . . . . . . . . 55

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Excellence and Opportunity

                                 PRINCIPAL’S MESSAGE
       Welcome to Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School where we believe that students, staff and the
community work together to create a positive, safe environment that is conducive to student learning. This
includes an environment that allows students to strive for excellence in both their academic and extra-curricular
endeavors.
       Student success is a shared responsibility among our school staff, students and parents/guardians. As
we work with our students to help them learn about the world around them through the prescribed curriculum,
to nurture their spiritual growth and to support their social development, we very much appreciate the
encouragement that parents/guardians give their children as they journey to reach their learning potential. The
foundation of a successful school is definitely a cooperative effort.
       This Program of Studies provides information and guidance, for our families, to gain an understanding
of the variety of programs, courses and supports provided at Miller Comprehensive Catholic. In an effort that
our students realize their full potential, we challenge all of our Marauders to strive to use their God-given gifts
and talents to assure their academic success. We ensure academic success for all of our Marauders if
students are committed to the following five areas:
      Enrol in the course pathway that best meets their learning needs.
      Attend regularly and punctually.
      Complete all work to the best of their ability and submit it by the due dates.
      Prepare well for major projects and exams.
      Come with a positive attitude and a willingness to work.

       Our entire Miller community looks forward to working with our students and their families, supporting
them and celebrating their anticipated successes.

Welcome to our Marauder family.

Mrs. Liza Donnelly
Principal

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Excellence and Opportunity

                                  GENERAL INFORMATION

                                       CATHOLIC DISTINCTIVENESS
As a Catholic community of learners, the students and staff of Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School make every
effort to promote academic excellence in an atmosphere in which the Gospel values of Jesus Christ are lived and taught.
Our wonderfully diverse community teaches us to value each individual and allows us to express and celebrate our faith in
creative and meaningful ways.

Liturgies
Celebrating our uniqueness is vital to the spiritual wellbeing of our school community. With the help of our school
chaplain, community leaders and parish priests, students and teachers gather to give praise and thanks to our God
though liturgies, prayer services and the Eucharist.

Retreats
As we journey to become people who are close to their God, to their community and solid in their integrity we need to
reflect on our successes as well as our struggles. We seek to make changes in our lives and as Catholic Christians; we
take time away to ponder our lives in relationship to our Creator, to one another and ourselves. Students participate in a
guided retreat at each grade level that corresponds to the content studied in their Catholic Studies/Christian Ethics
classes.

Catholic Studies/Christian Ethics Courses/Christian Action Projects
Completion of a Christian Action Project (CAP) is a required component of the compulsory Catholic Studies Grade 9 and
10, and Christian Ethics Grade 11 and 12 courses. CAP gives students the opportunity to develop self-confidence and
establish new friendships while learning the value of free, loving service to others in their community.

Youth Leadership
Students in grades 9 through 12 are invited to consider a position on our Liturgy Team. It is an opportunity for students to
experience a pastoral leadership role as they share their faith with their fellow students. The Liturgy team is called to be a
sign of Christ’s love in our school through presence and prayer.

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                                          REGISTRATION POLICIES
Grade 9 Registration: Miller Student Services personnel visit Miller’s elementary associate schools in February/March.
Registration forms along with information about our course offerings, programs, extra curricular activities and sports are
given. An evening informational meeting for parents and/or guardians of future grade nine students is held in February.
Completed grade 9 registration forms are due at Miller Comprehensive at the beginning of March.

Grade 10, 11 and 12: During February / March Student Services personnel will visit the classes of students in grades 9,
10 and 11. The goal of these visits is to: assist students in planning for post-secondary education and training, assist
students in planning for success in meeting graduation requirements, and to complete the process for grade 10, 11 and
12 registrations. An informational meeting for parents about course selection at the grade 10, 11 and 12 grade levels is
held in February.

New Students: When registering for the first time (this does not include those students from Miller’s associate schools
that are registering for grade nine) at Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School, students must complete the application
package available in the main office. When the completed application package is returned to the main office, an
appointment with an administrator will be scheduled.

Course Changes/Course Withdrawals: Withdrawal from a course is a serious consideration and may affect graduation
eligibility and/or requirements for post secondary education programs. Withdrawal from courses is not recommended,
however it will be considered if it is in the best interest of the student. Class withdrawal forms (green sheets) can be
obtained from a guidance counsellor. The student must continue to attend the class until the class withdrawal process has
been completed.

Spare Periods: Students in grade 9 and 10 must have a full timetable (no spares). Spares in grade 11 are discouraged.
However spare periods in grades 11 may be accommodated with parent/guardian and guidance counsellor input. Grade
11 students must select a minimum of eight credits, maintaining four per semester (excluding Band, Choral or Vocal
Jazz). Grade 12 students must ensure that they have appropriate and sufficient credits for graduation before considering
spare periods. If grade 11 or 12 students have spares, they should be in the library or concourse area. Otherwise, they
must be off school property. Grade 12’s must be enrolled in a minimum of 7 credit classes in order to be considered for
Honour Roll.

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                                         SCHOOL GUIDELINES
We are Miller MARAUDERS…

          Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School has a long tradition of promoting the academic, physical, social,
spiritual and emotional well-being of all students.
          We are the Miller Marauders and this is our Code of Honour:
                   Maturity
                   Attitude
                   Respect
                   Achievement
                   Unity
                   Diversity
                   Energy
                   Responsibility
                   Spirit
          This is evident in all that we do and say at Miller.
          This is how we are successful in every way:

Attendance
Students must strive to attend school regularly and punctually as prescribed in the Education Act, 1995, 150 (3). Regular
and punctual attendance is a prerequisite for successful completion of school studies. Under the present system of
continuous evaluation, regular class work and assignments from day to day count more than the end of semester final
assessments. Parents or guardians must report necessary absences such as illness or family emergencies to the school
prior to the absence by telephoning the school at 791-7230 or the attendance line answering service at 522-7233. This
service is available 24 hours a day. Students also have the opportunity to supply an explanatory note to the office or the
teacher. By means of the Syner-Voice system, on a daily basis, unexcused absences will be brought to the attention of
parents/guardians.

Student Conduct
Students are expected to abide by the rules, expectations and regulations of the Regina Catholic School Board. It is
expected that students behave in a manner that is congruent with the gospel values appropriate to a Catholic community.
The Miller community is challenged to live, grow, and internalize morals and values taught to us by Jesus Christ.

Student Behaviour
Students are expected to behave and speak to the school staff and fellow students with respect, courtesy, and honesty.
Students have a right to a caring school environment free of violence, prejudice, harassment, and other forms of abuse.
Negative behaviours such as vulgar, profane or obscene language or gestures, harassment, bullying, discrimination,
fighting, theft, and vandalism will not be tolerated. Students shall cooperate with and are accountable to staff of the
School Division for their conduct on school premises during school hours and during any school function or activity
sponsored or approved by the school and/or School Board. Rules apply to all going to, attending and returning from
school and/or approved activities. [Education Act, 1995, 150 (1) & (2)] Because students attend a Catholic school they
are expected to attend and to participate to the best of their ability in all liturgical events celebrated by the school
community. Students are to adhere to the standard of behaviour expected and appropriate in a classroom setting.

Respect for Property
Students shall treat school property and the possessions of all individuals with respect, care and consideration. If a
student violates this expectation the student will be expected to make restitution to the victim or the school division.

Dress Code
Miller is a Catholic School with a tradition that is based on respect, self-esteem, and modesty of dress. A moderate
approach to dress is most appropriate at the high school level. Students are expected to dress appropriately in keeping
with Catholic values, and to maintain appropriate personal hygiene. If clothing that is considered to be inappropriate is
worn the student will be asked to contact his/her parent or guardian. The student will return home to change into suitable
clothing before being re-admitted to class.

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Excellence and Opportunity

Head gear (caps, toques, bandanas, etc.) must be removed prior to entering the building. Head gear brought into the
building should be placed in lockers, along with jackets; outdoor clothing is to be kept in lockers; midriff type and bra type
tops, tank tops, halter tops, spaghetti strap tops, “short” shorts, muscle shirts and generally immodest clothing, as
determined by the administration of the school, are not permitted. Specifically, students are not to wear clothes portraying
drug, alcohol or messages of groups that promote anti-Catholic values. Health regulations require that students must
wear shoes in the building at all times.

Lockers
All students will be provided with a school locker for personal use. Students must use school-approved locks. School
lockers are the property of the school and may be subject to inspection by the principal or designate (Regina Catholic
School Division Policy IEF.) A locker will be assigned to each student. The fee for a lock is $7.50 and will be included in
the school fees. It is important that students keep this combination confidential and use the locker assigned to them.

Parking
The parking on the west side of the building is for student parking. However, there are parking stalls on the west side that
are used by the teachers. There are signs that indicate staff parking and students are not to park in these designated
stalls. Students are not to sit in cars after arriving at school, or at any time during the school day. Students are not to
park in restricted areas. Cars parked in restricted areas may be ticketed or towed away at the owner’s expense. The
speed limit on school property is 15 kmh. The school is not responsible for damages to cars in the school parking lot.

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                     MILLER COMPUTER ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY
Computers are to be used for educational purposes only. They are intended for student use; however, they are not the private property

of students. The following Guidelines have been established for student computer use:

   Students will use computer resources in a responsible, efficient, ethical, moral, and legal manner in accordance with the mission
    statements and values of Catholic schools.
   Students, parents, and the home room teacher must complete the Acceptable User form prior to access to computers being
    provided. Students must have their agenda present when accessing the computers.
   Computer games are NOT ALLOWED.
   Students are not allowed to download programs or files of any nature, including but not restricted to music, inappropriate pictures
    and/or video clips, chat and messaging programs, and various other items such as screen savers, and games.
   Students are expected to log on using their assigned user account. Passwords are to be kept confidential. Logging on under
    another student’s ID and password is not permitted.
   Students are not allowed to rearrange or change the computer desktop or reconfigure any part of the computer.
   Students are not allowed to access or attempt to access locked or restricted sites.
   Students are not allowed to access or attempt to access software or files on the network that have not been assigned to them on
    their desktop or home directory.
   Furthermore, as members of a Catholic educational institution, students are not allowed to access sites or send or save Email that
    would violate our Christian values and principles.

Misuse of the computer resources of the school including the Internet and Email, may result in loss of access to these
resources. (Regina Catholic School Division Policy)

The server is monitored on a regular basis.

                            PERSONAL ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY
                                  “ACCEPT” AGREEMENT
Regina Catholic School Division has established a student wireless network to enable students to bring their own personal
electronic technologies to school. Regina Catholic School Division provides the following conditions with the use of
personal electronic technologies:
         • Students must adhere to all Board Policies and the Student Code of Conduct when accessing mobile services.
         • Students are fully responsible for the set-up and maintenance of their device. Technical support will not be
         provided.
         • The school/division does not provide personal property insurance for any personal technology devices which
         includes but is not limited to physical damage, loss or theft of the device.
         • Student devices are to be used in class only with the teacher’s permission. Devices should be in silent mode
         when on school property.
         • Students may only use audio, video and/or cameras at school with permission from a classroom teacher or
         administrator and the individuals being recorded.
         • Students must demonstrate positive digital citizenship which includes respecting yourself and others, protecting
         yourself and others, as well as respecting intellectual property.
Technology resources are to be used for educational purposes that serve the school and division mission statements.
Adherence to the above policy ensures continued access to the division technological resources. I understand and will
abide by the above policy and guidelines. I further understand that any violation may result in the loss of privileges and/or
other disciplinary action.

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   REGINA CATHOLIC SCHOOLS DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP GUIDELINES

The Regina Catholic School Division provides access to technology for all teachers and students. Learning with
technology connects us locally and globally and requires all users to understand the responsibility to use technology
safely, legally, and ethically. This supports the vision of technology to enhance learning while stressing also the
importance of each user’s responsibility as a digital citizen.
The following points are to be discussed with the students to ensure that they understand the definition and practices of a
good digital citizen.

    1. Respect Yourself.
           Select online names that are appropriate.
           Be conscious of information and images that are viewed and posted online.
           Communicate in ways that reflect our school and division mission statements.
       Protect Yourself.
           Refrain from distributing private information about myself.
           Take full responsibility for any personal devices. The school is not responsible for safety, security, loss or
               damage to these devices.
           Maintain safe and secure passwords.

    2. Respect Others.
           Refrain from posting private information about other staff or students.
           Utilize school technology resources, including the internet, for educational purposes only.
       Protect Others.
           Not intentionally accessing, transmitting, copying or creating material that violates the school’s code of
               conduct (ie. messages/content which is threatening, rude, and discriminatory).
           Report any abuse or violations of technology resources.

    3. Respect Intellectual Property.
           Cite all sources in projects when referencing others’ work.
           Follow copyright laws.
       Protect Physical Property.
           Leave school equipment so that it is ready to be used by others.

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Excellence and Opportunity

                          THE ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM
The AP Challenge
Do you love to learn? Are you highly motivated? Would you like to challenge yourself academically and study with motivated
peers? Would you like to improve your critical thinking, organizational and writing skills? Are you interested in earning a
university credit while in high school? Would you like to enrich your high school experience and be very well prepared to meet
the demands of post-secondary education programs? Then, Advanced Placement (AP) may be for you!

All About AP
The Advanced Placement Program is sponsored by the College Board, in Princeton, New Jersey, and currently offers 36
university-level courses with over 4000 participating universities and colleges in 202 countries. AP courses are offered
internationally with over 2.34 million students writing approximately 4 million AP exams. Students who participate in the AP
Program and then challenge the AP exams have the opportunity to earn a credit or advanced placement in first year university
courses depending on their AP results.

AP Course Offerings at Miller
AP Calculus AB – In preparation for challenging the AP Calculus AB exam in Grade 12 it is recommended that students enrol in
the designated Mathematics classes at Grades 9, 10 and 11. Students should have a strong math background, and should have
a keen interest in mathematics and advanced problem solving.

AP Computer Science A – This course emphasizes object-oriented programming methodology with a concentration on problem
solving and algorithm development. Students will study data structures, design, and abstraction. It is recommended that
students take Computer Science 20 and Computer Science 30 in order to prepare to challenge the AP Computer Science exam.

AP English Literature & Composition – In preparation for challenging the AP English Literature and Composition exam in Grade
12, it is recommended that students enrol in the designated English Language Arts classes in Grades 9, 10 and 11. In addition
to completing the English Language Arts A30 and B30 requirements in Grade 12, enrichment is provided through in-depth
reading, writing, research and discussion to assist students in preparing for the AP exam. Students also receive a summer
reading list to be completed prior to Grade 12.

AP Psychology – In preparation for challenging the AP Psychology exam, it is recommended that students enrol in Psychology
20 in the first semester and Psychology 30 AP in the second semester of the year in which they plan to challenge the AP
Psychology exam. In this course, students will engage in the systematic and scientific study of the behaviour and mental
processes of human beings. Students will learn psychological theories, methods and principles associated with the major
subfields of psychology. This course requires a significant amount of independent study.

AP Exams & Results
AP teachers cover the Saskatchewan Learning Curriculum in each subject area and help students to meet the additional
demands of the AP course they are studying. AP exams are written in May of each year and are set and graded by the College
Board. Saskatchewan Learning recognizes Advanced Placement Calculus 30, Computer Science 30, Psychology 30, English
Language Arts A30 and B30, and Visual Art 30 courses on student transcripts. When students register to write AP exams they
can arrange to have their AP results sent from the College Board to the receiving post-secondary institution(s). Students need to
check the policy statements on acceptance of AP standing at the institution they plan to attend.

How to Register
If you are in Grade 8 and considering challenging AP courses in Grade 12 at Miller, consult your teachers and your parents to
determine if the extra demands of these courses are right for you. If so, check off the appropriate box or boxes on your
registration form. If you are in Grades 9, 10 or 11 and are not currently working toward AP course work at Grade 12 but would
like to, then discuss this option with your parents and teachers. See a guidance counsellor to discuss the possibilities.

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                               Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School Course Description Booklet
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                              LEARNING RESOURCE PROGRAM
Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School offers a Learning Resource Program for those students needing extra support
in order to meet success in their classes. The Learning Resource Teacher may provide in class support or individual and
small group support. Students in grade 9 through 12 completing regular courses may access the Learning Resource
Program. Students in grades 10, 11 and 12 may have the option of receiving support from the learning resource teacher
through a daily scheduled tutorial period (scheduling one of their class periods as daily tutorial) or a less frequently
scheduled tutorial period (students meet in tutorial a few times a week for assistance).

                                           MODIFIED COURSES
Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School offers modified courses at the grade 9, 10, 11 and 12 levels. Modified
courses are identified by the numeral one – Grade 9 modified courses are numbered 91, Grade 10 modified courses are
numbered 11, Grade 11 modified courses are numbered 21 and grade 12 modified courses are numbered 31. Modified
courses follow many of the unit topics of their regular course counterparts; however, curricular objectives are modified to
meet the needs of the learner. Students enrolled in modified courses do graduate with a grade 12 standing. However, it
is important to note that modified courses may limit post secondary educational opportunities.

                                       ALTERNATIVE COURSES
Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School offers an Alternative Education Program. This special education program
allows student to continue to develop academic skills and important life skills. Courses in this special education program
are locally developed. After formal educational assessments and referrals have been completed, students may be
enrolled in alternative education courses. Students that complete the Alternative Education program receive an
Alternative Grade12 Education standing.

              ENGLISH AS AN ADDITONAL LANGUAGE - SUPPORT
Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School offers support for students whose first language is not English. Academic and
vocational assistance for English Language Learners (ELLs) is provided and may be required based upon the individual
needs of the students
A student’s academic success is dependent on the acquisition of appropriate levels of English language proficiency. High
school students who are new to the English language can benefit from explicit, targeted instruction in EAL. Targeted
instruction focusing on ELL’s needs will help students to improve English language proficiency, which will positively impact
academic success in all subject areas.

For complete descriptions of the Credit and Non-credit EAL course offerings, please see the English As An Additional
Language Course Description section of this booklet.

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                                       MILLER STUDENT SERVICES
Student Services personnel are available to support students in a variety of ways as they progress through their academic
program at Miller. Counsellors will visit classes throughout the year to provide students with academic and career
information. Students are also invited to meet with a counsellor for additional information and support.

CAREER - counsellors provide information and facilitate processes on:

       career exploration
       scholarships, awards and bursaries
       letters of reference
       resume writing / portfolio development
       student loans and financial aid
       campus visits
       post-secondary application workshops
       on and off site post-secondary information sessions

ACADEMIC - counsellors offer support in areas such as:

       course selections and pre-requisite checks
       entrance requirements for post-secondary programs
       study skills
       referrals for learning assistance
       graduation status
       providing high school (unofficial) transcripts

PERSONAL - personal counselling is available to all students regarding:

       personal decision making
       developing positive relationships
       managing time
       managing stress
       referrals to outside agencies as required

First Nations Inuit and Metis Advisors provide information and facilitate processes on:

       student counselling in the areas of academic, personal and career
       advocate for services that will help with student success
       provide opportunities for students to develop leadership skills
       when appropriate, students and/or families are referred to outside agencies

Drug and Alcohol Educator – Mr. Rand Teed, Regina Catholic Schools’ Drug and Alcohol Educator, is available at Miller
one day a week to support students, offer information sessions, and work with teachers to integrate drug and alcohol and
wellness education into the curriculum

School Resource Officer – A constable is assigned to Miller, as well as several elementary schools in the area. The
Resource Officer is available to assist students and parents with legal issues.

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                               Miller Comprehensive Catholic High School Course Description Booklet
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                       EARNING CREDITS – PLANNING FOR GRADUATION

Once students begin Grade 10, they should start to keep track of the credits they earn. Students earn one credit for each
class they pass at the Grade 10, Grade 11 and Grade 12 levels. Students require a minimum of 24 credits to graduate
from high school.

Although the guidance counsellors check credits for graduation, it is the responsibility of each student to make sure that
she/he has the requirements for graduation. In Grade 10 students can begin to access the High School Planner in My
Blueprint, a career exploration program used by Regina Catholic Schools. It is an excellent tool for planning high school
courses and ensuring graduation eligibility.

 Compulsory Grade 10 Subjects:                             Compulsory Grade 12 Subjects:
 ELA A10 / A11                                             ELA A30 / 31
 ELA B10 / B11                                             ELA B30 / 31
 Catholic Studies 10                                       Christian Ethics 30
 Math 10 / 11                                              Social Studies 30 / 31 or Native Studies 30
 Science 10 / 11
 Social Studies 10 / 11 or Native Studies 10               In order to be eligible for graduation students
                                                           must have 24 credits. Of those 24 credits
 Grade 10’s can take 4 elective subjects. Taking           students must the compulsory subjects at each
 Wellness 10 is recommended.                               grade level and have the following:

                                                                  5 credits must be at the 30 level
                                                                  Wellness 10 or a Phys. Ed. 20/30
 Compulsory Grade 11 Subjects:                                     Math at the 20/21 level
 ELA 20 / 21                                                      1 Science at the 20/21 or 30 level
 Christian Ethics 20                                              1 Social Science at the 20 or 30 level:
 Math 20 / 21                                                      (Psychology 20/30, Social Studies 20,
 Science 20 / 21                                                   Native Studies 20, Law 30)

 Grade 11’s can take up to 6 electives and/or
 continue taking Grade 11 and 12 Math and
 Science courses. Students should plan to take       Note: Completion of graduation requirements will ensure a
 their Social Science requirement in Grade 11.       recognized Grade 12 standing, however post-secondary programs at
                                                     universities, colleges and technical schools may have specific entry
                                                     criteria that must be met in order to be admitted to a particular
                                                     program. As students make their course selections in Grades 10, 11
                                                     and 12 they should investigate the entrance criteria for specific post-
                                                     secondary programs. See a guidance counsellor for assistance.

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                                 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
                                         CHRISTIAN ETHICS
                Catholic                Catholic               Christian              Christian
                Studies 9              Studies10               Ethics 20              Ethics 30
                                      10Ethics 10
CATHOLIC STUDIES
The aim of Catholic Studies is for students to understand, value, and engage in their faith so that they may hear an
invitation, or deepen their commitment, to live as followers of Jesus Christ. Throughout all grades, students investigate,
apply and reflect on various aspects of these actions which call upon the Church to:
    I.   proclaim Jesus Christ
   II.   worship Christ through the sacraments
  III.   form a communion of people
  IV.    give wtiness, and
   V.    serve

CATHOLIC STUDIES 9: Journeying in Faith with Community
The Catholic Studies 9 curriculum focuses in part on the importance of community in supporting and deepening one’s
faith. Students examine how the Catholic Church helps guide us in our ongoing faith journey.

CATHOLIC STUDIES 10: Understanding the Call to Evangelize
*Prerequisite* – Christian Ethics 09 or Catholic Studies 09
The Catholic Studies 10 curriculum focuses in part on the role and importance of evangelization. Students examine what it
means to be called to evangelize and consider how and why the Church evangelizes.
CHRISTIAN ETHICS 20
*Prerequisite* – Christian Ethics 10 OR Catholic Studies 10
Christian Ethics 20 is designed to provide students with a solid foundation of information about the life, death and
resurrection of Jesus Christ. Students explore Jesus as both a fully human historical person and discover how he has
become the Christ of Faith. As part of their faith journey, students must learn to serve, and so a Christian service
component of ten hours is a requirement for this course. The eight units covered include:
Unit One:        My Story
Unit Two:        Our Story
Unit Three:      Jesus’ Story
Unit Four:       Jesus of History
Unit Five:       The Christian Testament and Message of Jesus
Unit Six:        Mission of Jesus
Unit Seven:      Jesus Builds God’s Kingdom
Unit Eight:      Jesus the Healer
CHRISTIAN ETHICS 30
*Prerequisite* – Christian Ethics 20
Christian Ethics 30 is designed to help students live a Christian lifestyle in a secular world. Students are asked to look at a
variety of topics and apply a Christian context to them. The topics studied are love, relationships, identity, sexuality,
marriage, family life, suffering and death, vocations, and world religions. The ten hours of Christian service is a central
component of this course. The six units covered include:
Unit One:         World Religions
Unit Two:         Identity and Life Philosophies
Unit Three:       Dating, Relationships and Sexuality
Unit Four:        Marriage and Family Life
Unit Five:        Suffering and Death
Unit Six:         Vocations

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                                      ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

             ELA A9                      ELA A10                      ELA 20                   ELA A30
             ELA B9                      ELA B10                                               ELA B30

             ELA A9*                    ELA A10*                   ELA 20* and                 ELA A30AP
                                        ELA B10*                   Creative                    ELA B30AP
             ELA B9*                                               Writing 20 *

            ELA A91                      ELA A11                      ELA 21                    ELA A31
            ELA B91                      ELA B11                                                ELA B31

         Notes: Courses with an asterisk (*) are designed to lead to Advanced Placement English in grade 12.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS A9 and B9 / A9*and B9* / A91 and B91
The renewed ELA A9 and B9 (2008) courses utilize an integrated literature and language approach focusing on the
strands of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and representing. A variety of genre arranged thematically in the
forms of fiction and non-fiction – short stories, novels, modern plays, essays, poetry, and multi-media – are explored to
achieve the outcomes under the three course goals: Comprehending and Responding, Composing and Creating, and
Assessing and Reflecting. In the ELA B9 course a Shakespearean play is also studied.
ELA A9 themes:
Students will study a minimum of two of the following three thematic units:
Theme One:        Conflicts, Challenges, and Choices: Do the Right Thing
Theme Two:        Indigenous and Norse Narratives
Theme Three: All That I Am: The Search for Self
ELA B9 themes:
Students will study a minimum of two of the following three thematic units:
Theme One:        Exploring Love, Loyalty, and Relationships
Theme Two:        Surviving and Conquering
Theme Three: Exploring New Worlds, Imagining the Future
Note: The final mark for English Language Arts 9 is the average of ELA A9 & ELA B9.

The ELA A9* and ELA B9* courses serve as the first step in preparing students for the AP English Course at Grade 12. Enriched units
of study, as well as more challenging selections and opportunities for independent study are provided.

The ELA A91 and ELA B91 courses follow the same themes/units outlined above with modifications to foster student success.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS A10 / A10* / A11
*Prerequisite* – ELA 09
The renewed ELA A10 provides meaningful contexts that address “big ideas” and questions for deeper understanding.
There is a strong focus on language and an understanding of how it works as students learn through the use of powerful
cognitive and communication strategies. A variety of texts in oral, print and other forms are used to achieve outcomes
under the three course goals: Encouraging Student Inquiry, Social Responsibility/Personal Agency, and Self-Reflection.
Themes:
The Challenges of Life: Explaining the World through our Foundational Stories; Destiny and Challenges of Life; Human
Existence; Decisions
The Mysteries of Life: The Joys of Mind, Body, and Spirit; Mysteries of the Human Brain and Imagination; Mysteries of this
World and Beyond; The Fantastic
The ELA A10* and ELA B10* serve as the second step in preparing students for the AP English Course at Grade 12.
Enriched units of study, as well as more challenging selections and opportunities for independent study are provided.
The modified ELA A11 course follows the same themes as the ELA A10 course with modifications to foster student
success.
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ENGLISH LANGAUGE ARTS B10 / B10*
*Prerequisite* –ELA 09
The renewed ELA B10 provides meaningful contexts that address “big ideas” and questions for deeper understanding.
There is a strong focus on language and an understanding of how it works as students learn through the use of powerful
cognitive and communication strategies. A variety of texts in oral, print and other forms are used to achieve outcomes
under the three course goals: Encouraging Student Inquiry, Social Responsibility, Personal Agency and Self-Reflection.
Themes:
Equity and Ethics: Who and What is Right; Empowerment; Degrees of Responsibility; Rights and Responsibilities; Justice
and Fairness
The World Around and Within Us: Perspectives; Diversity of Being; The Natural and the Constructed Worlds; Individuals
and Communities; Stewardship

The ELA B10* and ELA A10* serve as the second step in preparing students for the AP English Course at Grade 12.
Enriched units of study, as well as more challenging selections and opportunities are provided.

The modified ELA B11 course follows the same themes/issues as the ELA B10 course with modifications to foster student
success.

ELA A10 and ELAB10 *online* option

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS 20 / 20*
*Prerequisite* – ELA A10 and ELA B10
This course is organized around themes that are of interest to adolescents and focuses on self and society. Literature is
selected to relate to the themes presented and to include the strands of reading, writing, listening, speaking, viewing and
representing. The two themes covered include:
Theme One:       Starting Out – Beginning and Becoming (The Past and the Present; Triumphs and Trials; Discovery and
                 Disillusionment; Relationships with Family and Others; Celebrations and Rites of Passage)

Theme Two:        Moving Forward – Establishing and Realizing (Turning Points and Transitions; Evolving Roles and
                  Responsibilities; Opportunities and Obstacles; Risks and Rewards; Beliefs and Goals)

The course ELA 20* serves as the third step in preparing students for the AP English Course at Grade 12. Enriched units
of study, as well as more challenging selections and opportunities for independent study are provided. Students are
encouraged to enrol in Creative Writing 20 in Semester One of their grade 11 year and ELA 20* in Semester Two.

The modified ELA 21 course follows the same themes as the ELA 20 course with modifications to foster student success.
English 20 *online* option

CREATIVE WRITING 20
*Prerequisite*- ELA A 10 and ELA B10
Creative Writing is a 20 level elective primarily for students with a desire to develop a more sophisticated and thorough
writing style, in a more creative manner. Students explore a variety of artistic writing styles (poetry, short stories, etc.) as
well journalistic styles (feature news articles, and headline articles). Review writing and opinion essays are also explored.
Students are required to submit writing portfolios on a regular basis and are encouraged to submit their work for
publication. The four modules covered include:
Module One: Portfolio Submission
Module Two: Creative Genres
Module Three: Non-Fiction Genres
Module Four: Self- Editing/Peer Editing
Module Five: Electronic Journalism
Creative Writing 20 is offered *online*

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ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS A30 / A31
*Prerequisite* – ELA 20/ELA 21
This course utilizes Canadian Literature to explore the issues that influence Canadian culture and Canadian identity. The
students practice their language skills including comprehending and responding, composing and creating, assessing and
reflecting within the context of a variety of literary genres. Two units are explored:
Unit One:         Canadian Perspectives: Distinct and Rich (Define the Individual, Negotiate the Community; Celebrate the
                  Glorious, Acknowledge the Scandalous; Shift Centres, Blur Margins; Understand Beliefs, Initiate Action)
Unit Two:         Canadian Landscapes: Diverse and Dynamic (natural and Constructed; Psychological and Physical;
                  Historical and Contemporary; Personal and Societal)

The modified ELA A31 course follows the same themes as the ELA A30 course with modifications to foster student
success.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS B30 / B31
*Prerequisite* – ELA 20/ELA 21
This course focuses on World Literature in a variety of forms. The students practice their language skills including
comprehending and responding, composing and creating, assessing and reflecting Themes are explored through a
variety of literary genres including a Shakespearean play, Two units are explored:
Unit One:          The Search for Self (Sense of Self; Joy and Inspiration; Doubt and Fear)
Unit Two:          The Social Experience (Dealing with Universal Issues; Ambition, Power, and the Common good; Social
                   Criticism; Addressing the Issues)

The modified ELA B31 course follows the same themes as the ELA B30 course with modifications to foster student
success.

ELAA30 and ELAB30 *online* option

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS A30 AND B30 ADVANCED PLACEMENT
*Prerequisite*- ELA 20 (ELA 20* and Creative Writing 20 recommended)
The AP course in English Literature and Composition is an extension of the regular ELA A30 and ELA B30. Students will
complete the regular ELA A30 and B30 courses and do additional work in order to prepare for the AP exam written in
May. The marks for ELA A30 and B30 will be derived from similar content, assignments and exams that the regular
Grade 12 English classes contain. Students in the AP program will be expected to do a significant amount of reading,
writing, research, and discussion in preparation for the AP exam. This includes a reading list to be completed over the
summer between grade 11 and grade 12. Students should, therefore, have an interest in literature, writing, and be willing
to do the extra work. The eight units covered are:

Unit One:       Introduction to Poetry
Unit Two:       Inquiry Paper (Independent Reading)
Unit Three:     Short Fiction (Prose)
Unit Four:      American Literature
Unit Five:      British Literature
Unit Six:       Specialized Poetry – Sonnets and Ballads
Unit Seven:     Canadian Literature
Unit Eight:     Advanced Placement Exam Preparation

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Excellence and Opportunity

                         ENGLISH AS AN ADDITONAL LANGUAGE
The individual objectives for each course allow the development of the students’ skills in representing, speaking, listening,
reading, and writing. Students are also expected to assess and reflect on their own skills.

English levels within each language skill determine a student’s Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB), Common
European Framework of Reference (CEFR), and their Locally Developed Language Proficiency Levels as stated in the
Saskatchewan curriculum. These are used to determine which class options are the best for the student’s placement.

 English Level          CLB                        CEFR / CFR    Curriculum Level       Class Options
 Beginner               1 – Beg. Initial           A1.1          1                      EAL B10L and/or
                                                                                        EAL Tutorial
 Upper Beginner         2 – Beg.                   A1.2          2                      EAL B10L and/or
                        Developing                                                      EAL Tutorial
 Pre-Intermediate       3 - 4 – Beg.               A2.1          2 or 3                 EAL A20L and/or
                        Adequate and                                                    EAL Tutorial
                        Fluent
 Lower Intermediate     4 – Int. Initial           A2.2          3                      EAL A20L
 Intermediate           5 - 6 Int. Initial and     B1.1          4 or 5                 EAL B20L
                        Developing
 Upper Intermediate     7 - 8 Int. Adequate        B1.2          5 or 6                 SK Context for
                        and Fluent                                                      EAL Learners
 Advanced               9 – 12 Advanced            B2.1 – C2.2   N/A                    No Support

Non-Credit Courses offered:

GRADE 9 WRITING FUNDAMENTALS CLASS (EAL LITERACY or EAL TUTORIAL 9)
Students work on numerous aspects of literacy; some of which include: grammar, thematic vocabulary, speech and oral
presentations, reading strategies, stages of writing, and parts of speech.

EAL TUTORIAL
Students from grade 9 to 12 may be required to receive extra assistance and take this course. Students work on
numerous aspects of literacy and other coursework. Students focus on language skills in order to gain strategies to assist
them in daily living and in their academic credited subjects.

Credit Courses offered:

EAL B10L: LEVELS 1 AND 2
Module 1:        Basic Communication
Module 2:        Elements of Time and Place
Module 3:        Focus on Health and Wellness
Module 4:        Cross-Cultural Connections

EAL A20L: LEVEL 3
(Elective Credit Course)
*Prerequisite* EAL B10L or a CFR level of A1.2 or higher.
Module 1:        School and Community
Module 2:        Canada
Module 3:        Customs and Cultures
Module 4:        Planning for the Future
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EAL B20L: LEVEL 4
(Elective Credit Course)
*Prerequisite* EAL A20L or a CFR level of A2.2 or higher.
Module 1:        School and Community
Module 2:        Canada
Module 3:        Customs and Cultures
Module 4:        Planning for the Future

SASKATCHEWAN CONTEXT FOR EAL LEARNERS 20L
(Elective Credit Course)
*Prerequisite* EAL B10L or a CFR level of A2.1 or higher; although, it is recommended that the student attain a CFR
level of B1.1.
This locally developed course is meant to give newcomers to Canada and Saskatchewan important skills and content with
regards to being productive, contributing citizens. The course is designed to provide many opportunities for real-life
situations and authentic based tasks within your community.
Module 1:        Recreation, cultural events, and my own culture in SK.
Module 2:        Community Resources and Laws in SK.
Module 3:        Democracy and My Rights and responsibilities in SK.
Module 4:        My Environmental Responsibilities in Canada

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Excellence and Opportunity

                                                            FRENCH

                     French 9                 French 10                  French 20                 French 30

                    PIF III (9)               PIF IV (10)               PIF V (11)                PIF VI (12)

FRENCH 9
This course is designed to allow students to learn the language by means of themes that focus on student experiences.
Much of the instruction is in French, and students participate in individual, pairs and group activities to provide them with
many opportunities to communicate orally in French. Students will develop listening, reading, comprehension and
grammatical skills as they progress through the given thematic units.

POST- INTENSIVE FRENCH (PIF) III (9)
Prerequisite* - Intensive French (6), Post-intensive French I (7), Post-intensive French II (8).
The Post-Intensive French III program is designed for students who have previously participated in the prerequisite classes in
elementary school. The goal of the program is to further develop literacy skills in oral communication, reading and writing using a
communicative project-based approach.
***While it is extremely difficult, students, who can meet the required level of oral proficiency at this grade level, may take the PIF-III
with the approval of the principal and a parent/guardian.
        Unité 1: Le mode de vie d’autrefois
        Unité 2 : Une revue pour ados, par des ados
        Unité 3 : Les sports extrêmes
        Unité 4 : Un album souvenir de la classe

FRENCH 10
*Prerequisite* – French 9
In this course students build on their skills of oral communication. The units studied are based on experiences familiar to
the students. Students are taught to write, read, listen to and comprehend language that can be used in real life situations.
Each unit leads to a final task that requires students to use the vocabulary and linguistic components introduced
throughout each unit.

French 10 *online* option

POST-INTENSIVE FRENCH IV (10)
Prerequisite* - Post-intensive French III (9).
The Post-Intensive French IV program is designed for students who have previously participated in the prerequisite class in grade 9.
The goal of the program is to further develop literacy skills in oral communication, as well as reading and writing using a communicative
project-based approach.
        Unité 1: La musique
        Unité 2 : Mystères et énigmes
        Unité 3 : La responsabilité sociale
        Unité 4 : Le petit écran : la télévision

FRENCH 20
*Prerequisite* – French 10
In this course students continue to practice speaking French orally in their interaction with the teacher, a partner or a
group. Grammar and vocabulary are taught in a communicative context, in situations which might be duplicated in real life.
Each unit is structured to prepare students for a final task or project. The language functions and linguistic components
that are necessary to accomplish the final tasks, determine what is covered in each unit.

French 20 *online* option

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Excellence and Opportunity

POST-INTENSIVE FRENCH V (11)
Prerequisite* - Post-intensive French IV (10).
The Post-Intensive French IV program is designed for students who have previously participated in the prerequisite class in grade 10.
The goal of the program is to further develop literacy skills in oral communication, as well as reading and writing using a communicative
project-based approach.
        Unité 1: Le grand écran : le cinéma
        Unité 2 : Impact des TIC dans la vie quotidienne
        Unité 3 : Moyens de déplacement et pollution
        Unité 4 : Les relations personnelles chez les ados

FRENCH 30
*Prerequisite* – French 20
In this course students continue to develop their reading, comprehension, speaking, listening and writing skills. Units
concentrate on themes familiar to students and lead to a final task that requires students to demonstrate their level of
understanding and ability. Students can be expected to have a good grasp of basic French structures and vocabulary
which can be further developed in university or by living in a French environment.

French 30 *online* option

POST-INTENSIVE FRENCH VI (12)
Prerequisite* - Post-intensive French IV (11).
The Post-Intensive French IV program is designed for students who have previously participated in the prerequisite class in grade 11.
The goal of the program is to further develop literacy skills in oral communication, as well as reading and writing using a communicative
project-based approach.
        Unité 1: C’est injuste!
        Unité 2 : Le pouvoir de la photo
        Unité 3 : Moi, dans dix ans
        Unité 4 : Semblables, mais différents

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Excellence and Opportunity

                                                   MATHEMATICS
* Any Grade 10 students who are considering AP Calculus for Grade 12 must take Foundations & Pre-Calculus 10 Pre-AP and Foundations
20 in their Grade 10 year, and Pre-Calculus 20 Pre-AP and Pre-Calculus 30 Pre-AP in their Grade 11 year.

                                Workplace &                        Workplace &                      Workplace &
                              Apprenticeship 10                  Apprenticeship 20                Apprenticeship 30

                             Apprenticeship                       Foundations 20                    Foundations 30
                             Math 10
                                  Foundations
   Math 9                           &
                              Pre-Calculus 10
                                                                  Pre-Calculus 20                   Pre-Calculus 30        Calculus 30

                             Foundations & Pre-                   Pre-Calculus 20
                             Calculus 10 Pre-AP                       Pre-AP
                                                                                                     Calculus 30 Advanced Placement /
                                    AND                                AND
                                                                                                            Integral Calculus 30
                              Foundations 20*                     Pre-Calculus 30
                                                                                                         Two Semesters/Two Credits
                                                                     Pre-AP *

   Math 91                          Math 11                            Math 21

Mathematics Pathways
The renewed secondary mathematics program, based on the Western and Northern Canadian Protocol, consists of eight
courses in three pathways as outlined above. Each course is one credit (100 hours), consistent with all secondary level
courses in Saskatchewan.
Calculus 30 is not part of the Western and Northern Canadian Protocol. It will continue to be offered in Saskatchewan and
could be taken after Pre-Calculus 30.
Graduation requirements for mathematics will be any 20-level course, however many post secondary programs often
demand higher level mathematics courses or calculus.

Workplace & Apprenticeship Pathway
     Content in this pathway was chosen to meet the needs of students intending to pursue careers based on post-
       secondary education at SIAST, or non-math oriented faculties at university.
     Students who require basic “real-life” mathematics would be well suited for this pathway. Careers as an
       elementary school or high school PAA teacher, social work, care assistant, graphic communications, hotel &
       restaurant administration, law enforcement, office work, paramedics, pharmacy technician or many of the trades. .
     30% - 40% of all Grade 12 graduates are entering fields for which the mathematics in this pathway is appropriate.
Foundations of Mathematics Pathway
     Content in this pathway was chosen to meet the needs of students intending to pursue careers in areas that
       typically require university, but are not math intensive (e.g., the humanities, fine arts, social sciences and nursing)
     40% - 60% of all Grade 12 graduates are entering fields for which the mathematics in this pathway is appropriate.
Pre-Calculus Pathway
     Content in this pathway was chosen to meet the needs of students interested in pursuing careers in science-
       related or math-related areas.
     10% - 20% of all Grade 12 graduates are entering fields for which the mathematics in this pathway is appropriate.

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Excellence and Opportunity

MATHEMATICS 9 / 91
Grade 9 Mathematics extends material covered in elementary school, introduces new concepts and provides a foundation
for future high school math courses. The units of study in math include integers, rational numbers, polynomials, circles
and prisms, linear relations/equations/inequality, and statistics and probability.
The modified Math 91 course follows the same units of study as the Grade 9 course with modifications to foster student
success.

FOUNDATIONS & PRE-CALCULUS 10
*Prerequisite* – Mathematics 9
This course is the pre-requisite for both the Foundations Math and the Pre-Calculus at the Grade 11 level. It introduces
and focuses on the following concepts: factoring, rational and irrational numbers, laws of exponents, operations with
polynomials, trigonometry, relations and functions, slope, linear relations, graphing, linear systems the metric system and
imperial measurements.

Foundations & Pre-Calculus 10 *online* option

FOUNDATIONS & PRE-CALCULUS 10 Pre-AP
*Prerequisite* – Mathematics 9
This course is the first step on the Pre-AP mathematics path and should be selected by students who are planning to
pursue AP Calculus in their Grade 12 year. All of the Pre-Calculus units of study are covered; however topics are studied
in greater depth. Students who select this course are those who were highly successful in their Grade 9 Mathematics
courses.

WORKPLACE AND APPRENTICESHIP 10
*Prerequisite* – Mathematics 9
This course is the pre-requisite for Workplace and Apprenticeship 20. It focuses on both the metric and imperial systems
of measurement. Concepts include area of 2-D shapes and 3-D objects, games involving spatial reasoning, the
Pythagorean Theorem, polygons, and an introduction to trigonometry ratios (sine, cosine and tangent), angles, pricing and
currency exchange, and income. The seven units covered are:
Unit Pricing and Currency Exchange
Earning an Income
Length, Area and Volume
Mass, Temperature and Volume
Angles and Parallel Lines
Similarity of Figures
Trigonometry of Right Triangles

Workplace & Apprenticeship Mathematics 10 *online* option

MATHEMATICS 11
Mathematics 11 is a modified course with a major emphasis on consumer math. This course focuses on the skills and
knowledge necessary for and applicable to everyday situations.
The Units Covered Include:
Geometry
Algebra Skills
Consumer Math
Linear Equations
Linear Functions and Variations

FOUNDATIONS OF MATH 20
*Prerequisite* – Foundations & Pre-Calculus 10
This course is a pre-requisite for Foundations of Math 30. It introduces and/or focuses on the following concepts:
inductive/deductive reasoning, proportional reasoning, angles and triangles, sine and cosine laws, data analysis, linear
inequalities and basic quadratic functions. As well, students research and present an historical mathematical event or
area of interest.
Foundations 20 *online* option

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