LICKING VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OFFERINGS

 
LICKING VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL
           COURSE OFFERINGS
               2021-2022

                 Counseling Office
 Website:​ ​http://www.lickingvalley.k12.oh.us/
         LVHSCounselingOffice.aspx

Courtney Lichtenauer (students last names A-K)
                740-763-3407
    Lichtenauerc@lickingvalley.k12.oh.us

    Shona Garver (students last names L-Z)
               740-763-2158
       Garvers@lickingvalley.k12.oh.us
Edited 1/2020
        Licking Valley School District Vision Statement
           “Every Adult helping every child learn and grow every day”

Course selection is among the most important choices that our students will make during the
course of their high school career. College and career paths begin here, and the foundation is
laid for future students. For 8th graders and freshmen, course selection is largely a process of
finding elective courses that meet student interest and aptitude. For 10th and 11th graders,
scheduling into an ​academic major ​allows students to survey their academic performance,
aptitude and career interest… and they select a major which prescribes the most rigorous
courses we have as they prepare for higher education.

Rigorous course-taking is among the best things that a student can do to prepare for college!
Neither the junior or senior years are the time to coast to the finish line. Students should take
advantage of our Advanced Placement classes and College Credit Plus classes.

Our school counselors stand ready to assist students in making great decisions that will benefit
their future.

FOR PARENTS:

Have a discussion with your student about their future, including what kind of post-secondary
education they might want or need for their career. We have information that can help you have
that conversation! You should also talk about how they have liked or disliked the high school
courses they've taken, as that can indicate aptitude for college study as well. Communication is
the key!

FOR STUDENTS:

High school is a time for learning. Take advantage of the opportunities available to you at LVHS!
Talk to your teachers and your school counselors about course selection, and even more
importantly, talk to your parents about your career and post-secondary aspirations. We want to
help you succeed.

LVHS operates on a 9 period day. All students must register for a minimum of 7 periods of
classes, per semester.
For Graduating Class of 2020 and Beyond:

Each student must earn at least twenty-two and three-quarters (22 3/4) credits in order to
graduate and receive a diploma. The distribution of such credits is to be as follows:

SUBJECTS                                        CREDITS

English Language Arts                           4

Health                                          1/2

Physical Education                              1/2

Mathematics                                      4 (including 1 unit of Algebra II or the equivalent)

Science                                          3 (including 1 in life science, 1 in a physical
                                                science, and 1 unit advanced study in one or more
                                                of the following sciences: chemistry, physics, or
                                                other physical science;advanced biology or other
                                                life Science: astronomy, physical geology, or other
                                                earth or Space science)

Social Studies                                  3

Electives                                       6 (including courses—with a course of study
                                                adopted by the board-adding up to six credits and
                                                not otherwise required)

Freshman Foundations                            1/2

Financial Literacy                              1/2

Journey to College/Journey Beyond               1/2

Service Learning                                1/4 (30 hours of community service)

__________________________________________________________________
TOTAL CREDITS                  22 3/4

Additionally, students are required to have successfully completed two semesters, or its equivalent, of
Fine Arts in any grades, seven through twelve. Students must also meet state testing requirements, which
are graduate year specific. Details can be found here:
http://education.ohio.gov/Topics/Ohio-s-Graduation-Requirements
Licking Valley Local School District
Bylaws & Policies
5460 - GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

Additionally, students are required to have successfully completed two semesters or its
equivalent of Fine Arts in any of grades seven through twelve.

Students who have participated in interscholastic athletics, marching band, or cheerleading for
at least two (2) full seasons as defined in the student/parent handbook, while enrolled in grades
9 through 12,and as documented by the school counselor may be excused from the high school
physical education requirement. Students electing such an excuse shall complete one-half (1/2)
unit of at least sixty (60) hours of instruction in another course of study which is designated by
the Board as meeting the high school curriculum requirements.

Credit may be earned by:
A. completing coursework;
B. testing out of or demonstrating mastery of course content; or
C. pursuing one or more educational options in accordance with the District's Credit
Flexibility Program.

Credit may be earned at an accredited postsecondary institution.
Every high school may permit students below the ninth grade to take advanced work for credit.
This work shall count toward the graduation requirements if it was both:
     A. taught by a person who possesses a license/certificate issued under State law
       that is valid for teaching high school;
     B. designated by the Board as meeting the high school curriculum requirements. An
       honors diploma shall be awarded to any student who meets the established requirements
       for graduation or the requirements of his/her I.E.P.; attains the applicable scores on the
       achievement tests required by the State Board of Education for graduation; and meets
       any additional criteria the State Board may establish.

Commencement exercises will include only those students who have successfully completed
requirements for graduation as certified by the high school principal or those students who have
been deemed eligible to participate in such exercises in accordance with the terms of their IEP.
No student who has completed the requirements for graduation shall be denied a diploma as a
disciplinary measure. A student may be denied participation in the ceremony of graduation
when personal conduct and/or failure to meet financial obligations so warrants.
The Board also shall grant a diploma of adult education to all District residents over the age of
twenty one (21) who meet the requirements established by the State Board of Education.

The Superintendent shall establish whatever administrative guidelines are necessary to comply
with State rules and regulations.

R.C. 3313.60, 3313.603, 3313.61, 3313.611, 3313.614, 3313.647, 3323.08, R.C. 3301.07, 0710, 0711, A.C. 3301-41-01, 3301-13-01 to
07, Revised 6/14/04, Revised 6/8/09, Revised 11/9/09, Revised 5/14/12, Revised 1/14/13, Revised 5/11/15, Revised 9/12/16
Comparison of Diplomas with Honors Criteria
                                         0
tudents need to fulfill all but one of the applicable criteria for the Diploma
                                 with Honors.
      Subject            Academic Diploma with                          Career-Technical
                               Honors                                 Diploma with Honors
      English                       4 ​units                                   4​ units
   Mathematics            4​ units, including Algebra I,    4​ units, including Algebra I, Geometry,
                          Geometry, Algebra II or the      Algebra II or the equivalent and another
                      equivalent and another higher level higher level course or a four-year sequence
                       course or a four-year sequence of  of courses that contain equivalent content
                        courses that contain equivalent
                                      content
      Science           4 ​units, including physics and          4 units, including two units of
                                    chemistry                        advanced science ****
   Social Studies                   4​ units                                   4 ​units
 Foreign Language     3​ units (must include no less than                        N/A
                      2 units for which credit is sought),
                       i.e., 3 units of one language or 2
                          units each of two languages
     Fine Arts                      1​ unit                                      N/A
     Electives                       N/A                        4​ units of Career-Technical minimum.
                                                                   Program must lead to an industry
                                                             recognized credential, apprenticeship, or be
                                                             part of an articulated career pathway which
                                                                    can lead to post-secondary credit
Grade Point Average           3.5​ on a 4.0 scale                         3.5​ on a 4.0 scale
   ACT/SAT Score             27​ ACT / ​1210​ SAT                        27​ ACT / 1​ 210​ SAT
 [excluding scores
  from the writing
     sections]*
    Additional                       N/A                     Achieve proficiency benchmark established
    Assessment                                                 for appropriate Ohio Career-Technical
                                                               Competency Assessment or equivalent

Additional information about Diplomas with Honors can be found here:
http://education.ohio.gov/getattachment/Topics/Ohio-Graduation-Requirements/Gra
duation-Requirements-2014-2017/Criteria-for-Diploma-with-Honors/Honors-Diploma
-Revised-Grid.pdf.aspx
COURSE CREDIT

All final student grades for courses will be calculated with the grade scale
and as follows:​ Course credit will be issued on a full-year basis rather than by
semester for year-long courses. This means that students will not receive credit for one
semester in a year-long course. They must pass the class for the year in order to receive
credit for the course. If a student fails the course, he/she must repeat the entire course,
not just the semester he/she may have failed.

DROP / ADD COURSES

Students who would like to change their schedule should speak with their counselor
before the semester begins. Schedule changes are not made the first three days of the
semester unless there is an error on the schedule (missing period, assigned two classes
at the same time, etc.). Counselors will allow schedule changes after the three day
waiting period for two days. All schedule changes must be done at that time if they were
not done before the semester began. Students who choose to drop a class after this time
will receive a withdrawal failure for the class.

EARLY GRADUATION

There are two options for early graduation:

       1.​ ​Juniors can apply in the spring to complete high school early after the first
       semester of their senior year. If this option is selected students will be considered
       a non-attending senior for the second half of the year. They will graduate with
       the rest of their class during the spring commencement.
       2. Sophomores can apply in the spring to combine their junior and senior years
       and graduate from high school in three years.

Early graduates are encouraged to participate in the graduation ceremony; however, if a
student chooses to not participate they can pick up their diploma the next business day
after graduation at the high school. Final transcripts will be available three weeks after
the date of graduation. If documentation is needed to verify early graduation before that
date school counselors can provide a letter indicating students have met gradation
criteria.

Students who wish to graduate early must complete an application and submit it to the
counseling office prior to the deadline. Applications are available for students during
their grade-level scheduling meetings. Any late applications will not be considered.
The Early Graduation Application Process is as follows:

1.​ ​Submit an application and typed essay to the counseling office. Service learning
must be completed and credit is assigned on the transcript when the application is
submitted.
2.​ ​Attend a meeting with your parent(s) and school counselor to discuss your early
graduation application and determine your eligibility.
3.​ ​If you are eligible, you and a parent must meet with your school counselor in June
(after school is out for summer) to discuss your schedule and any summer
requirements.
4.​ ​Any summer requirements must be completed (with credit awarded) by the first day
of school.
5.​ ​Your early graduation application will then either be approved or rejected based on
whether deadlines and requirements were met by the first day of school. Students and
parents will be notified of the decision by mail no later than September 1.

Note: ​All School fees must be paid prior to graduation​.​ Students who intend to enroll in college
spring semester must complete all first semester high school course requirements.

ATHLETIC ELIGIBILITY

 ​All OHSAA (Ohio High School Athletic Association) regulations regarding academic eligibility
shall be followed. The athletic director shall be responsible for checking and certifying the
eligibility of all athletes. (Board Policy #2431) Students will have to achieve a 1.66 GPA for each
grading period. (Board Policy #2431) Students who have not achieved a passing score on one or
more state-mandated tests after the first attempt shall participate in all subsequent
administrations of the test(s) for which they have not achieved a passing score, including
summer administrations, until they achieve a passing score(s). Students who refuse or fail to
participate in the above described intervention programs and/or state-mandated test
administrations shall be ineligible to participate in any extracurricular activity, including
athletics.

PE WAIVER

Students who have participated in interscholastic athletics, marching band, show choir or
cheerleading for at least two (2) full seasons as defined in the Student/Parent Handbook, while
enrolled in grades 9 through 12, and as documented by the school counselor may be excused
from the high school physical education requirement. Students electing such an excuse shall
complete one-half (1/2) unit of at least 60 hours of instruction in another course of study which

is designated by the Board as meeting the high school curriculum requirements.
LVHS Credit Flexibility Policy
I.​         Existing Credit Flexibility Options
            ​

a.      Licking Valley currently offers several flexible credit options, including but not limited to
Physical Education exemption, correspondence courses, independent study, and Post-Secondary
Options. Under the new credit flexibility policy, these options will be handled the same as they
have always been handled, using existing policies.
b.      Questions about existing credit flexibility options should be addressed to a school
counselor.
c.      The principal retains the right – within board policies and guidelines – to administer
existing credit flexibility options and is the final authority in decisions about granting credit
based on those options. NOTE: Information about online courses is being evaluated at this time
and we anticipate including specific online course providers in an ‘acceptable options’ list in the
future. Until that time, inquiries about online courses should be directed to a school counselor
and will be evaluated individually.

II.​    Credit Flexibility – Testing Out
        ​

The following guidelines shall apply to assessments that provide test-out options for students.
a.       Purpose:​ The purpose of the test-out credit flex option is to allow students to
demonstrate mastery of a course’s content, getting credit and a grade for the course by taking an
assessment that covers that content.
b.       Eligibility:​ Any student enrolled in the Licking Valley Local School District is eligible to
test out of a high school course for credit and a grade. Any student who has not yet progressed to
LVHS will receive the transcript credit and grade upon matriculating to the high school.
c.       Schedule for test-out opportunities:​ Testing-out will be offered twice per year, in
December and April. For the December test, all portions of the assessment must be completed
by January 7​th​ or one week prior to the end of the second quarter, whichever comes first. For the
April test, the assessment must be completed by May 1st.
d.       Application process:​ Students who wish to test out of a class must apply to test out,
using the forms in the back of this document, one month prior to the published assessment date.
Late applications will not be accepted. Deadlines will be displayed in the counseling office and in
classrooms.
e.       Impact on athletic eligibility:​ Grades and credits earned through testing out shall be
used to count toward minimum credits and grade-point-average for the purpose of athletic
eligibility. Upon a students’ completion of the assessment, the teacher of record will record the
date on the answer document, portfolio or rubric. The grade on the assessment will count
toward the student’s eligibility by becoming part of his or her nine-weeks’ grades.
f.​ ​Format and content:​ Licking Valley High School staff will design and implement
assessments that are used to test out of LVHS classes, using the following guidelines:
                         ​i.​ ​Assessments should reflect the content and scope of the course and be

aligned to the academic content standards or course of study for the course.
                       ​ii.​ ​Rubrics, scoring guides and grade sheets should be used to measure

how student work measures up to content standards, both in knowledge and skills.
​iii.​ ​Assessments should reflect best practices in assessment, including test

reliability and validity.
                       ​iv.​ ​Multiple ways of demonstrating knowledge and skills may be utilized,

including portfolio-based assessment, performance, and/or other means, with the goal of
creating an assessment that fairly reflects the mastery required of students in the actual class.
g.       Test phase-in:​ In accordance with the Ohio Department of Education guidelines, tests
are available now and will be developed as needed.
h.       Grading:​ Test-out assessments will be graded by fully-licensed Licking Valley teachers
who are the ‘teacher of record’ for the course for which the student is ‘testing out.’ For example,
the teacher who grades an Algebra 1 assessment will be a licensed Mathematics teacher, but they
may or may not be teaching Algebra 1 in the classroom at the time of the assessment.
                              ​i.​ ​Teachers: Assignment of ‘teachers of record’ is at the discretion of the

Principal.
                           ​ii.​ ​Reporting: Grades will be reported on the same timeline as other

grades are reported, as described above.
Grade scale: In recognition of the fact that testing out of a class reflects mastery of a course’s
content, the grade scale for test-outs is as follows:
A = 93% - 100%
B = 87% - 93%
C = 80% - 87%
F = 0% - 80%
                        ​iii.​ ​Appeals: Grade appeals shall be directed to the Principal within one

week of grade reporting.
                         ​iv.​ ​Grade recording: Grades from test-outs become part of a student’s

permanent record like any other grade. The opportunity to re-take the class (or the test) is
governed by the same rules that apply to re-taking any other class.
                            ​v.​ ​Pass-fail option: Under certain circumstances, LVHS students may take

courses graded as pass/fail. Using this option in conjunction with a test-out is discouraged, and
doing so will require approval of the principal.
i.​ ​AP Courses:​ Any LVHS student may test out of any Advanced Placement course offered at
LVHS by signing up for the test in the school office. As these tests are given on pre-defined dates
in May, those students desiring to take an AP test must sign up by Spring Break of the year in
which they desire to take the test. Any fees associated with the test (typical AP test fees are
approximately $80) are the responsibility of the student, and fees must be paid when the
student signs up for the test. AP test scores will be converted to LVHS grades according to this
grade scale: ​2 = C, 3 = B, 4 = A, 5 = A+​. Grade weighting for AP classes will apply to AP class
grades earned through credit flexibility.

III.    Credit flexibility – Independent Study
The following guidelines shall apply to independent study projects that provide credit flexibility
options for students.
a.      Purpose: ​The purpose of the credit-flex independent study option is to provide students
with a way to customize their learning through creative means outside the walls of LVHS.
Examples might include distance learning, educational travel, independent study, an internship,
music, arts, after school program, community service or engagement project, or in-depth
experience with an expert in a given field. Students, parents, teachers or community members
can design independent studies; it is up to students to create a proposal that meets the
guidelines below and submit it for consideration.
b.      Types: ​There are two types of independent study available:
                                ​i.​             ​Independent studies that emulate the experience of an existing LVHS

                                      course:
                            ​ii.​              ​Students who wish to pursue this option should work with a teacher

                                      or other subject-matter expert to craft an independent study that aligns
                                      with an LVHS Course of Study and/or Ohio Content Standards. For
                                      example, a student could propose an experience which will lead to them
                                      learning the knowledge and skills of a certain LVHS class.
                       ​iii.​                ​Independent studies that fall into a general field of study offered at

                                      LVHS, but don’t cover specific content standards for a class within that
                                      field: Students who wish to pursue this option should work with a
                                      teacher or subject-matter expert to design the course.
c.      Teacher of record: ​In the case of either type of independent study, a licensed Licking
Valley Local School District teacher who is Highly Qualified will serve as the ‘teacher of record’
for the independent study course. His or her role is defined below.
d.      Process for proposing an independent study: ​Students should follow these steps
to successfully propose an independent study for flex credit:
                                 ​i.​             ​Identify an area of interest or an opportunity for learning.

                             ​ii.​              ​Understand the criteria for independent study proposals (See

                                      criteria, below). Direct questions to a school counselor.
                        ​iii.​                ​Identify a mentor (a teacher or subject-area expert from outside the

                                      school) who can help design an educational experience that can serve as
                                      an independent study.
                         ​iv.​            ​(Recommended but not required) Identify a Licking Valley teacher to

                                      serve as the teacher of record for the independent study.
                              ​v.​          ​Fill out the attached application that details the proposed

                                      independent study and submit it to the counseling office.
                          ​vi.​            ​Propose the independent study to the LVHS review board. (Because

                                      the board will be different depending on the area of study, it will meet
                                      on a monthly basis, as needed.) The student, parent and mentor will
                                      meet with the review board, summarize the application, and answer
                                      questions about the independent study.
                     ​vii.​              ​The review board’s decision will be rendered within one week and will

                                      be one of two results: If the proposal is approved, work on the
                                      independent study can commence immediately. If the proposal is
                                      denied, the review board will indicate, in writing on the proposal, the
                                      basis for their decision and suggest modifications that would make it
                                      acceptable. It is up to the student and mentor to make modifications or
                                      address issues noted by the board and re-submit the proposal.
e.      Guidelines / Criteria for acceptance of proposal: ​While the Licking Valley School
District wishes to provide a number of options for students, a comparable academic rigor and
challenge must exist in the independent study proposal to ensure that it meets the criteria of
preparing the student for college and career. What follows are guidelines for proposals.
                              ​i.​          ​Rigor: The proposal must demonstrate a rigorous educational

                                   experience.
                           ​ii.​           ​Relevance: The proposal must show that it contains experiences that

                                   are aligned with the learning goals present in LVHS courses or fields of
                                   study.
                       ​iii.​             ​Mentor: The proposal contains all the information necessary for the

                                   teacher of record, counselor and principal to contact the student’s
                                   mentor. That mentor should have sufficient experience in the field of
                                   study, and that experience should be detailed in the proposal.
                        ​iv.​          ​Content standards: The proposal should detail what the student

                                   should know and be able to do by the end of the experience.
                            ​v.​         ​Credits requested: The proposal should detail the number of credits

                                   the experience will be worth. Most LVHS year-long classes are worth
                                   one credit, with semester-long classes being worth one-half credit.
                                   Judging the credit equivalency of an independent study is within the
                                   discretion of the review board, with the final decision resting with the
                                   principal.
                         ​vi.​          ​Grading: Each proposal should detail how a student will earn

                                   whatever grade will be assigned by the mentor and teacher of record.
                                   Clarity is important: what demonstration of knowledge and skill on the
                                   part of the student will earn an A? What will earn a B? What will earn a
                                   C? Communication between the teacher of record and mentor will be
                                   essential to produce objective criteria for grading. Taking independent
                                   study courses for pass/fail credit is discouraged.
                     ​vii.​           ​Timeline: Each proposal should specify the time that the project will

                                   take to complete, with special attention given to the grading timelines
                                   utilized at LVHS. The application shall specify the grading period in
                                   which the project will be submitted to the teacher of record. ​All
                                   submitted proposals with a time of completion longer than
                                   one academic quarter must include an acceptable method of
                                   assigning a grade at the end of each quarter.​ The proposal must
                                   specify how a grade will be assigned at the end of each quarter.
f.​ ​Role of the Teacher of record: ​The teacher of record is a key person in any independent
study because of his / her role of liaison in the school-student-mentor relationship. It is
expected that mentors will be able to offer expert guidance and leadership, bringing a wealth of
knowledge and skills – along with life experiences – to the independent study project. At the
same time, it is to be expected that they will not have the same academic background and
experience of school counselors or teachers. The teacher of record communicates with the
student and mentor, ensuring a quality experience for the student and serving as a resource for
the mentor. At the same time, the teacher of record fulfills the responsibility to the school of
making sure the experience is academically rigorous, aligning with LVHS educational goals and
state requirements. Most importantly, the teacher of record is responsible for assigning a grade
for the independent study, in conjunction with the mentor.
g.      Transcript credit for independent study:​ Independent study courses and a
student’s grades in those courses will be recorded in that student’s academic record in the same
way as traditional classes. Rules that govern the grade recording and academic history entry of
traditional classes are the same for independent study classes. The same applies to a student
retaking a class for a better grade. Grade weighting will not apply to grades earned through
independent study.
h.      Appeals: ​Two different decisions in the independent study process are appealable to the
principal:
                         ​i.​     ​Proposal denial: In the event of a denial of a proposal the student

                              must attempt to make the modifications suggested in the review board’s
                              written decision. Clarifying questions should be asked of the teacher of
                              record. In the event that the review board doesn’t accept the
                              modifications, the student and/or mentor may appeal that decision to
                              the principal in writing or request a hearing in person. The principal’s
                              decision shall be final.
                       ​ii.​     ​Grade appeal: Students may appeal their quarterly grade or final

                              independent study grade to the principal, whose decision is final. This
                              appeal must be made in writing or in person to the principal within one
                              week of the assignment of the grade.

IV.      Other important information
a.      Prior approval: Under no circumstances will credit be granted for ​any
flexible credit option retroactively. Pre-approval of any project or assessment is
necessary to get credit for that project.
b.      Reassignment:​ Licking Valley High School reserves the right to reassign a student
participating in a credit flex option to a traditional course or other placement at its discretion if
the student fails to meet the standards for ongoing participation and satisfactory progress as
defined in his or her plan.
c.      Courses required for graduation:​ It shall be the ultimate responsibility of the
student and his or her parents to ensure that traditional and independent study classes align
with LVHS graduation requirements, which are more stringent than those minimum
requirements in Ohio law. School counselors have the responsibility of advising students how
the courses they take and their success or failure in those courses impacts their progress toward
graduation. Decisions by the review board may be affected by students’ progress toward
graduation, or lack thereof, and the timing of the request. For example, the review board may
require more frequent grade reporting in a course required for graduation that a student
completes through independent study in his or her senior year.
d.​   ​Incentives:​
                 Licking Valley High School reserves the right to create incentives for students
to pursue independent study and award those incentives as it sees fit. At the same time, LVHS
school counselors and administrators bear the responsibility of ensuring fair treatment of all
students. Examples of incentives might include preferential scheduling of classes or granting
exemptions to our attendance policy.
ACADEMIC MAJORS

The Licking Valley academic majors program has been created to help students prepare for life
beyond high school. Junior and senior students may select a major based on their career of
interest and follow a curriculum aligned directly to their postsecondary and career goals.

Participation in the academic majors program is no longer required for all LVHS juniors and
seniors who do not attend C-TEC. Completion of the major is not required for graduation.
Students who complete their academic major will be recognized for their accomplishments at
graduation and it will be noted on their final transcript.

Academic Majors from which to choose:
   ● Information Technology
   ● Health Services
   ● Environmental / Agricultural
   ● Industrial / Engineering
   ● Business / Marketing
   ● Arts / Communications
   ● Human Resources / Services
   ● Research Science

PSAT/NMSQT

The PSAT/NMSQT is a rigorous, national assessment that measures critical reading,
mathematics, and writing skills that are important for success in college.

It gives students:
·​ ​Suggestions on how to improve academically. The PSAT/NMSQT score report gives students
personalized feedback on their test performance.
·​ ​Preparation for the SAT
·​ ​Opportunities to earn scholarships and academic recognition including the National Merit
Scholarship competition when taken in the junior year.
·​ ​Information from colleges and universities through Student Search Service.

PreACT
Each year nearly 3 million high school juniors and seniors take the ACT to gain insights into
their college and career readiness. PreACT, administered in grade 10, gives students practice
with the ACT test and empowers them, their parents, and educators with these valuable insights
even sooner.
PreACT provides:

   ●   Early indication of progress and ideas for improvement​—PreACT gives students
       an estimated ACT test score and can be used as an indicator of college and career
       readiness. Reports include data to help teachers and counselors target interventions,
       inform classroom instruction, and guide students in course selection.
   ●   Fast, robust reporting​—Reports are ready quickly, so teachers and students can get to
       work turning PreACT insights into action. Reports include information about student
       interests that counselors can use to advise students in thinking about college majors and
       careers.
   ●   Easy, flexible, and affordable administration​—PreACT encompasses paper-based,
       multiple-choice tests in English, math, reading, and science. PreACT can be
       administered on any date between September 1 and June 1 and is priced by ACT per
       student tested—making it a flexible and affordable way to give students low-stakes
       practice in a high-stakes environment.

PreACT provides students with a realistic ACT test experience
Each year nearly 3 million high school juniors and seniors take the ACT to gain insights into
their college and career readiness. PreACT, administered in grade 10, gives students practice
with the ACT test and empowers them, their parents, and educators with these valuable insights
even sooner.

PreACT provides:

   ●   Early indication of progress and ideas for improvement​—PreACT gives students
       an estimated ACT test score and can be used as an indicator of college and career
       readiness. Reports include data to help teachers and counselors target interventions,
       inform classroom instruction, and guide students in course selection.
   ●   Fast, robust reporting​—Reports are ready quickly, so teachers and students can get to
       work turning PreACT insights into action. Reports include information about student
       interests that counselors can use to advise students in thinking about college majors and
       careers.
   ●   Easy, flexible, and affordable administration​—PreACT encompasses paper-based,
       multiple-choice tests in English, math, reading, and science. PreACT can be
       administered on any date between September 1, 2016, and June 1, 2017, and is priced at
       just $12 per student tested—making it a flexible and affordable way to give students
       low-stakes practice in a high-stakes environment.

OHIO ACT TESTING
Adopting all or some ACT assessments on a statewide basis provides significant advantages for
educational and career planning, assessment, instructional support, and evaluation.

   ●   Students benefit from a longitudinal growth model that includes coordinated
       measurement in grades 8–9 (ACT Explore), grade 10 (PreACT), and grades 11–12 (the
       ACT).
●   The system focuses on the integrated, higher-order thinking skills students develop in
       grades K–12 that are important for success both during and after high school.
   ●   Norm and criterion-referenced assessments provide meaningful data for student and
       school improvement efforts.

In addition, statewide testing:

   ●   Raises awareness and exposure among all students, rather than just self-selected,
       college-bound students.
   ●   Is a great equalizer of opportunity. Primarily, it brings more men, more minorities, and
       more middle- and low-income students into the enrollment pipeline.

ACT assessment programs provide flexibility to meet state needs:

   ●   Testing window allows test administration either on designated weekdays or on
       weekends.
   ●   Utilize state-assigned IDs (instead of Social Security numbers) for students, protecting
       their personal information and facilitating easy integration of test results into state
       records system.
   ●   Quick turnaround means test results and follow-up materials are shipped within three
       weeks of testing for ACT Explore and ACT Plan, and four to six weeks for the ACT.
   ●   Provides opportunity for customized State-Allowed Accommodations.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CLASSES

Advanced Placement (AP) ​Are you ready for a unique learning experience that will
help you succeed in college? Through AP's college-level courses and exams, you can earn
college credit and advanced placement, stand out in the admission process, and learn
from some of the most skilled, dedicated, and inspiring teachers in the world.
A Different Kind of Class
From the moment you enter an AP classroom, you'll notice the difference—in the teacher's
approach to the subject, in the attitude of your classmates, in the way you start to think. In AP
classrooms, the focus is not on memorizing facts and figures. Instead you'll engage in intense
discussions, solve problems collaboratively, and learn to write clearly and persuasively.

Find Your Passion
In AP classes, you'll study fascinating topics and ideas that just might become the foundation of
your future college major or career.

Prepare to Succeed in College
AP courses can help you acquire the skills and habits you'll need to be successful in college.
You'll improve your writing skills, sharpen your problem-solving abilities, and develop time
management skills, discipline, and study habits.
Earn College Credit and Placement
Most four-year colleges in the United States and colleges in more than 60 other countries give
students credit, advanced placement or both on the basis of AP Exam scores. By entering college
with AP credits, you'll have the time to move into upper level courses, pursue a double-major or
study abroad.

How Do I Enroll?
Once you've decided to take the AP challenge it's easy to enroll. Talk to an AP teacher or the AP
Coordinator at your school about the course you want to take. Discuss the course's workload and
any preparation you might need. Students register for AP classes during course registration
each winter at the same time they register for their other courses. Students should seek out their
school counselor or subject teacher if they have questions about a particular class.

KENYON ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP (KAP) PROGRAM

Kenyon College offers the KAP Program in coordination with teachers to teach a college
freshman level course for seniors. The KAP program will be offered to students taking KAP
English 12. Through Kenyon College, students will also be able to earn 8 college credit hours for
the yearlong course. At the semester, Kenyon will review the students’ work to determine if the
students stay in the class to earn college credit. A transcript and teacher recommendation must
accompany application to a KAP class, and admission to KAP classes is at the discretion of
Kenyon College. There is a course fee with this course that is similar to other College Credit Plus
classes.

COLLEGE VISITS

Juniors and seniors may use 3 days per semester for college visitation. College visitation
permission forms must be obtained in the counseling office or on the counseling office website
and submitted to Student Services prior to the visit. The 3 visitation days will not count against
students’ attendance records.

C-TEC PROCESS

Sophomore students interested in applying to C-TEC need to do so by the middle of January
(the specific date varies each year). Applications are made available to students after Sophomore
Hands On Day, which generally falls in the last week of November or the first week of December.
The C-TEC application is three-part: 1.) Student and Parent Information, 2.) Questionnaire, and
3.) Teacher Recommendation. Once a complete application is submitted to the counseling office,
an official Transcript is added along with the Counselor Recommendation. The counseling office
delivers applications to C-TEC by February 1. Students generally hear of acceptance during the
week of Spring Break, directly from C-TEC.

Applications will be reviewed by C-TEC based on the following courses completed by the end of
the sophomore year:
2 English Credits
2 Math Credits
2 Science Credits
2 Social Studies Credits
2 PE Credits
½ Health Credit
½ Freshman Foundations Credit

Please note​: Some C-TEC programs require a specific GPA. Please contact your counselor or
C-TEC for more information.

In April, accepted students are invited to attend Shadow Day. They will shadow a current C-TEC
student in their accepted program for one day. The goal of Shadow Day is to provide students
with a realistic day in their accepted program.

Students who choose to withdraw their application, need to contact C-TEC directly and will be
required to have parental permission.

LICKING COUNTY MENTORSHIP PROGRAM

What is a Mentorship?
A mentorship is a learning partnership between a student and an adult professional.

Who is eligible?
Mentorship is available to 11th and 12th grade students. Students must:
  ● Have a 3.5 GPA
  ● Demonstrate responsible behavior by exhibiting excellent citizenship and maintaining
      good school attendance
  ● Have parental consent to participate

What is the Mentorship program all about?
Students must:
   ● Commit to the mentorship experience
   ● Arrange transportation to and from the mentorship site
   ● Confer with the mentor to decide on objectives to achieve during the experience
   ● Conduct him/herself in an exemplary manner while at the mentorship site
   ● Complete the writing assignments which accompany the experience
   ● Communicate with the program coordinator or your school counselor should problems
      develop in the mentorship experience
   ● Know material covered in his/her scheduled classes at their high school
   ● Maintain above average grades while taking part in the program
   ● Design and complete a project related to the mentorship experience
   ● Complete a self-evaluation at the end of the program
●   Attend the sche=09==d seminars (considered an excused absence from school)

When does a Mentorship Occur?
Mentorships are often on a semester basis for a ½ credit per semester. A student may choose to
pursue one or more mentorships during his/her junior or senior year.

Where does a Mentorship Occur?
Students who have identified a career area to study in-depth are matched with an adult who is a
professional in the selected field of study. The student and mentor then decide on an individual
education plan which will guide the student toward realistic understanding of what challenges
are involved in that particular profession.

What time commitment does a Mentorship require?
For a student to earn a ½ credit they will spend 60 hours on activities related to the mentorship.
A minimum of 20 contact hours must be spent with the mentor. The student will earn the other
hours attending an all day seminar and a 2 hour seminar during the semester.

How is a student evaluated?
Each student will be evaluated by:
   ● The program coordinator
   ● A staff member from the student’s school
   ● Their performance during the program

SERVICE LEARNING

This is a board requirement for graduation. All students must complete 30 hours of community
service. The students will be able to select from a wide array of community sites which are
registered non-profit agencies. The school counseling office must approve all sites. The pass/fail
grade will be based on completion of the 30 documented hours of volunteer time and a final two
page typed reaction paper. Students have the option of earning up to a full credit by completing
120 approved volunteer hours and completing the reaction paper. Seniors who have not
completed this requirement by April 1 may lose privilege including but not limited to attendance
at prom and parking in the senior parking lot. Students who are applying for early graduation
must have their service learning complete when their application is submitted.
AGRICULTURE EDUCATION AND FFA

751 Agriculture Science 1 (AFNR)
1 1/4 Credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite- None

This first course in the career field is an introduction to Agricultural and Environmental
Systems. Students will be introduced to the scope of the Agricultural and Environmental
Systems career field. They will examine principles of food science, natural resource
management, animal science & management, plant & horticultural science, power
technology and bioscience. Students will examine the FFA organization and Supervised
Agricultural Experience programs. Throughout the course, students will develop
communication, leadership and business skills essential to the agriculture industry. A
home Supervised Agriculture Experience project and FFA membership required.

752 Agriculture Science II (Animal and Plant)
1 1/4 Credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite- Passing grade in Ag 1

Students will apply knowledge of animal and plant science to the agriculture industry.
They will be introduced to the value of production animals relative to the agricultural
marketplace. Students will engage in animal classification and selection, body systems,
along with animal welfare and behavior in relation to the production of animals.
Students will learn principles of plant anatomy and physiology, and the role of nutrition,
deficiencies and growing environment on plant production. Throughout the course,
business principles and professional skills will be examined. A home Supervised
Agriculture Experience project and FFA membership required.

753 Agriculture Mechanics
1 ¼ Credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-Juniors and Seniors who have passed Ag 2.

Students will engage in the mechanical principles utilized in animal and plant
production systems. They will learn electrical theory, design, wiring, hydraulic
and pneumatic theory, along with metallurgy in relation to hot and cold metals.
Students will apply knowledge of sheet metal fabrication applicable to the
agricultural industry along with identify, diagnose, and maintain small
air-cooled engines. Throughout the course, students will learn critical
components of site and personal safety as well as communication and
leadership skills.A home Supervised Agriculture Experience project and FFA
membership required.
756 Business Management for Agricultural and Environmental Systems
1-¼ Credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite- Passing Grade in Ag 2

Students will examine elements of business, identify organizational structures
and apply management skills while developing business plans, financial reports
and strategic goals for new ventures or existing businesses. Learners will use
marketing concepts to evaluate the marketing environment and develop a
marketing plan with marketing channels, product approaches, promotion and
pricing strategies. Throughout the course, students will apply concepts of ethics
and professionalism while implications of business regulations will be
identified.

757​ ​Agriculture Co-op
1 1/4 Credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-per instructor’s permission

With the Instructor and Administrative permission students enrolled in this course will
be permitted to have a modified schedule that will allow them to work in an Agriculture
related business and further their skills in the ag industry.

759 Natural Resources/Farm Management
1 ¼ Credit-Year/ Period
Prerequisite- Instructor Permission

This course is designed for students to learn the basics of natural resources, landscape
management, and management and maintenance of property. This class takes care of
the maintenance and upkeep of the park. Students will assist in the maintenance of the
property by mowing, weed whacking, seeding, tending to the fields, equipment care and
maintenance and any other duties as needed. Other topics of natural resources include
pond and woodlot management. Students will run tractors, chainsaws, log splitters and
other equipment needed to learn upkeep of a woodlot and farm.
ART

810 Sketch it Out​ : ​Sketchbook Approach to Art Foundations
1/2 Credit-Semester/Period
Prerequisite-none

This course delves into using basic elements & principles of design to communicate
visually. Assignments are delivered in bite size chunks in the form of sketchbook
prompts. Exploration of techniques will range from simple sketching to painting,
printmaking and mixed media. Prompts will be driven by the creativity and interests of
the student.

811​ ​Art 101
1/2 Credit-Semester/Period
Prerequisite-none

Learn the beginnings of the creative process along with being inspired by some of the
masters. This course centers on the enjoyment of making work while also learning about
historical and contemporary artists and their process. Along with drawing students will
choose from a variety of creative techniques such as painting, printmaking, and mixed
media exploration.

812​ ​Drawing and Painting I
1/2 Credit-Semester/Period
Prerequisite-none

Value, value, value! The course concentrates on space, shape, form, line, surface and
texture using a variety of media including pencil, charcoal, ink (printmaking) and paint.
Geared toward the students excited to learn to draw and paint more realistically, this
course challenges students to find and depict contrast and detail using a variety of
drawing and painting techniques.

813​ ​Drawing and Painting II
1/2 Credit - Semester/Period
Prerequisite-Passed Drawing I

This course explores the drawing process through, ink, pencil, paint, charcoal and
printmaking along with a mixed media approach. Drawing and observational skills are
further developed through style, theme, and concepts. Focus will be on pushing the
growing artist to use their art to speak about their journey.
*Out of class work and exploration will be required to complete some assignments.
​814​ ​Art Portfolio Review
1/2 Credit- Arranged with instructor
Prerequisite- Drawing I and instructor permission

I​n this course, advanced students will focus on portfolio development as they continue
to develop skills in producing high quality works of art. Emphasis is placed on creating
more complex visual statements. A wide range of materials and processes will be further
explored, and students will have the opportunity to focus on a chosen subject or
medium. The course is intended for advanced students creating a portfolio.

816 Ceramics I
1 Credit-Semester/Block
Prerequisite - None

This course involves ​exploring the handbuilding methods of working with clay such as
coiling, slab building, and also throwing on the wheel. In addition students will study
the history of ceramics along with becoming familiar with historical and contemporary
ceramicists and their process. Students are encouraged to explore individual styles
while producing a diverse body of three-dimensional work.

818 Digital Photography and Photo Editing
1/2 Credit Semester/Period
Prerequisite-none

In this course students will explore digital photography, composition, understanding of contrast
and imagery, history of photography and photographers and will utilize basic photo editing
techniques using Photopea via chrome book. Throughout the course students will work to
produce a digital photography portfolio.
CAREER AND COLLEGE EXPLORATION
001​ ​Freshman Foundations
1/2 Credit-First Semester/Period
Required for all freshmen

This is a board policy required course by all freshmen. This class is a one period
semester long 1/2 credit class. This course will ease the transition from middle school
and help assure success in high school. Topics of study will include study/computer
skills, test taking strategies, research, career education, conflict resolution, time
management, college and post-high school explorations.

011​ ​Financial Literacy
1/2 Credit-Second Semester/Period
Required for all juniors

Financial literacy is a board-policy-required course that focuses on teaching students to
read, analyze, manage and communicate about the personal financial conditions that
affect material well-being. It includes the ability to discern financial choices, discuss
money and financial issues without (or despite) discomfort, plan for the future and
respond competently to life events that affect everyday financial decisions, including
events in the general economy. ​As these personal financial matters are driven by the
choice of future careers the course will focus on career exploration and college
preparation.

945 Basic Financial Literacy
1/2 Credit-Semester/Period
Prerequisite-Teacher Approval

Financial literacy is a board-policy-required course that focuses on teaching students to
read, analyze, manage and communicate about the personal financial conditions that
affect material well-being. It includes the ability to discern financial choices, discuss
money and financial issues without (or despite) discomfort, plan for the future and
respond competently to life events that affect everyday financial decisions, including
events in the general economy. The resource room course will present material students
at a pace that meets their individual needs as well as differentiate the content to meet
students needs. *This course fulfills the requirement for juniors who have an IEP.
994-997 Work Study
Credits-1-4
Prerequisite-Teacher Approval

Students enrolled in high school special education classes take academic courses plus
enroll in the work-study program. Students can earn credit for working either in school
or in the community. Students who choose this option receive credits for graduation.
This course is designed to give high school students early work experience and possibly,
a full-time job. 160 hours equal 1 credit. Seniors can earn up to 4 credits in 1 year.

012​ ​Journey to College
1/2 credit-First Semester/Period
Senior Requirement: 1 of either Journey to College or Journey Beyond LV

If you are a senior, you may take this 1st semester class. This course will ease the
transition from high school to a 4 year college by providing students with information
on the college application process, ACT/SAT test prep, campus life, financial aid, etc.
Your Community Service obligation regarding hours and an essay will be monitored.
Requirements of the course include: completing The Common Application, taking the
ACT or SAT, independently visiting a college during the semester, updating a resume,
and obtaining a FSA ID.

014​ ​Journey to College B
1/2 credit- Second Semester/Period

This course provides additional support for seniors who have applied to 4-year college.
Students will continue to focus on financial aid and topics surrounding finding success
as a college student.

013​ ​Journey Beyond LV
1/2 credit-Second Semester/Period
Senior Requirement: 1 of either Journey to College or Journey Beyond LV

This course will ease the transition from high school to post-secondary options by
providing students with information on careers, vocational/technical schools, the
military, and job opportunities, etc.
ENGLISH
  ​Each grade level English class may require the purchase of a novel(s) and summer
                       reading assignments prior to the school year.

031​ ​English 9
1 credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-none

This course for freshmen focuses on literature and composition and the improvement in
the basic skills including reading, writing, speaking, thinking, listening, and conventions
of the English language. The course work follows the Ohio content standards.

032​ ​College Prep English 9
1 credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-B in 8th grade English

This course for college-bound freshmen is more rigorous with a greater focus on
literature, writing and conventions of the English language than the English 9 course.
The course work follows the Ohio content standards.

 896 Basic English 9
1 Credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-Teacher Approval

This course for freshmen focuses on literature and composition and the improvement in
the basic skills including reading, writing, speaking, thinking, listening, and conventions
of the English language. The course work follows the Ohio content standards and the
Ohio Extended Standards.

       ​ nglish 10
 ​ 41​ E
  0
1 credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-none

This course requires students to read and analyze literature and literary nonfiction, in
addition to maintaining an independent reading practice. Students will also write a
variety of genres and participate in small and whole group class discussions and
presentations while improving their command of English language conventions. The
course work follows the Ohio content standards.
042​ ​College Prep English 10
1 credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite- CP English 9 or B in English 9

This course for college bound students requires them to read and analyze literature and
literary nonfiction, in addition to maintaining an independent reading practice.
Students will also write a variety of genres and participate in small and whole group
class discussions and presentations while improving their command of English language
conventions. If you are a sophomore and received a B in English 9 then you may take
this one period yearlong course and earn 1 credit.

043 AP Prep English 10
1 Credit - Year/Period
Prerequisite Course: CP English 10

This course focuses on close reading, analytical writing, and language skills needed to be
successful. An emphasis on reading rigorous texts and writing will be at the forefront of
the AP Prep ELA 10 classroom, where students engage in close, critical reading of a wide
range of materials. The course trains the reader to observe the small details within a text
to arrive at a deeper understanding of the whole. It also trains the writer to focus on
crafting complex sentences as the foundation for writing to facilitate complex thinking
and communicate ideas clearly. Skills will be aligned to the demands of Advanced
Placement English Language courses.

897​ ​Basic English 10
1 Credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-Teacher Approval

This is a follow up course of English for those who took English 9 in the resource room.
This course continues the emphasis of literature and composition and the improvement
in the basic skills including reading, writing, speaking, thinking, listening, and
conventions of the English language. The course work follows the Ohio content
standards and the Ohio Extended Standards.

051​ ​English 11
1 credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-none

This course requires students to read and analyze literature and literary nonfiction, in
addition to maintaining an independent reading practice. Students will also write a
variety of genres and participate in small and whole group class discussions and
presentations while improving their command of English language conventions.
052​ ​College Prep English 11
1 credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite- CP English 10 or B in English 10

This course for college-bound students concentrates on American Literature,
conventions of the English language, and composition.

048 AP English Language and Composition
1½ credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-teacher approval

AP English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of
challenging texts (books, stories, essays, and poems). These challenging texts will
require students to analyze different ways authors make arguments and the choices
authors make with style and tone. Students will also become skilled writers who
compose works for a variety of purposes. Students will analyze what they read and
synthesize texts from multiple sources. An important part of this course is learning to
respond to writing prompts in preparation for the AP English Language and
Composition exam and college level writing.

898 Basic English 11
1 Credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-Teacher Approval

This course is for those who took English 10 in the resource room. This course
continues the emphasis of literature and composition and the improvement in the basic
skills including reading, writing, speaking, thinking, listening, and conventions of the
English language. The course work follows the Ohio content standards and the Ohio
Extended Standards.

 ​ 61​ ​English 12
  0
1 Credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-none

This is an integrated course of writing, reading, history and speaking concentrating on
British Literature.

062​ ​College Prep English 12
1 credit-Year/Period
Prerequisite-CP English 11 or B in English 11

This course for college-bound students concentrates on English Literature and
composition.
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