South Fayette High School - Mr. Aaron T. Skrbin, Principal Dr. Laura M. Hartzell, Principal - southfayette.org

 
South Fayette High School - Mr. Aaron T. Skrbin, Principal Dr. Laura M. Hartzell, Principal - southfayette.org
South Fayette High School
3640 Old Oakdale Road, McDonald, Pennsylvania 15057
        Phone 412-221-4542/Fax 724-693-9843

        Mr. Aaron T. Skrbin, Principal
        Dr. Laura M. Hartzell, Principal
South Fayette High School - Mr. Aaron T. Skrbin, Principal Dr. Laura M. Hartzell, Principal - southfayette.org
TABLE OF CONTENTS

SCHOOL DISTRICT INFORMATION:
      School District Administration, Faculty and Staff ................................................... i
      High School Faculty and Staff ................................................................................ ii

ACADEMIC INFORMATION:
      Grading System ..................................................................................................... 1
      Honor Roll .............................................................................................................. 1
      Determination of QPA ........................................................................................... 2
      Class Rank .............................................................................................................. 2
      Weighted Quality Points ........................................................................................ 2
      Honors and Advanced Placement Courses Offered............................................... 3
      College in High School Courses Offered................................................................. 4
      Make-Up Work ...................................................................................................... 5
      Extra Credit ........................................................................................................... 5
      Return of Tests ...................................................................................................... 6
      PowerSchool ......................................................................................................... 6
      State-Mandated Assessments .............................................................................. 6
      Homework Policy .................................................................................................. 7
      Extracurricular Eligibility ....................................................................................... 7
      NCAA Eligibility .................................................................................................... 10
      Graduation Requirements .................................................................................. 11
      Scheduling ........................................................................................................... 11
      Student Online Scheduling................................................................................... 12
      Drop/Add Policy ................................................................................................... 12
      Math Tutorial Program ........................................................................................ 12
      Senior Graduation Project ................................................................................... 12

COURSE INFORMATION:
      Business Technology and Computer Science ..................................................... 14
      English Department ............................................................................................ 23
      Fine Arts and Early Childhood Development Departments .............................. 32
      World Language Department ............................................................................ 39
      Independent Study ............................................................................................. 44
      Mathematics Department .................................................................................. 46
      Parkway West Career and Technology Center .................................................. 53
      Physical Education Department ......................................................................... 58
      Science/Technology Department ....................................................................... 60
      Social Studies Department ................................................................................. 70
      Special Education Department .......................................................................... 81
SOUTH FAYETTE SCHOOL DISTRICT
                           School District Administration, Faculty and Staff

Table 1 - School District Board Members
         NAME AND PHONE EXTENSION
Dr. Jennifer Iriti, President (436)
Mr. Paul Brinsky, Vice President (432)
Mrs. Teresa Burroughs (443)
Mr. Alexander Czaplicki (435)
Mr. Leonard Fornella (433)
Mrs. Lena Hannah (438)
Mr. Todd Petrillo (434)
Mr. Arik Quam (440)
Mr. Alan Vezzi (431)

Table 2 - Listing of District Administration
        NAME AND PHONE EXTENSION                                             TITLE
Dr. Kenneth Lockette (413)                     Superintendent
Dr. Jeffrey Evancho (408)                      Assistant to the Superintendent for Secondary Education
Mrs. Stephanie DeLuca (348)                    Assistant to the Superintendent for Elementary Education
Mr. Brian Tony (406)                           Director of Finance
Mrs. Maria Brewer Aguilar (416)                Assistant Director of Finance
Mr. Aaron Skrbin (265)                         High School Principal (A thru K)/Director of School Safety
Dr. Laura Hartzell (242)                       High School Principal (L thru Z)
Ms. Kristin Deichler (224)                     Middle School Principal
Mr. Kevin Maurer (224)                         Assistant Middle School Principal
Mr. Tom Kaminski (336)                         Intermediate School Principal (3-5)
Ms. Kristen Johnson (328)                      Intermediate School Assistant Principal (3-5)
Mrs. Laurie Gray (612)                         Elementary School Principal (K-2)
Mr. Tyler Geist (337/328)                      Elementary School Associate Principal (K-2)
Dr. Mandi Skerbetz (429)                       Director of Student Support Services
Mrs. Gretchen Tucci (415)                      School Psychologist/Asst. Director of Student Support Services
Dr. Conchetta Bell (404)                       School Psychologist/Asst. Director of Student Support Services
Mr. Mark Keener (225)                          Director of Athletics
Mrs. Aileen Owens (402)                        Director of Technology and Innovation
Mr. Rob Warfield (245)                         Network Systems Administrator
Mrs. Lee Ann Jubas (662)                       Network Systems Specialist
Mrs. Kimberly Sahady (556)                     Technology/Staff Training Specialist
Mr. Brandon Soubie (452)                       Director of Transportation
Mrs. Tricia Wood (279)                         Director of Food Service
Mr. Steve Timmins (129)                        Director of Facilities
Mr. Reggie Hale (217)                          Maintenance Manager
Mr. Steve Lower (238)                          Custodial Manager

Table 3 - High School Guidance Department
         NAME AND PHONE EXTENSION                                           TITLE
Mrs. Chris Lane (252)                             Guidance Counselor (A thru K)
Mrs. Julia Martin (251)                           Guidance Counselor (L thru Z)
Mrs. Emily Sharro (254)                           College and Career Counselor
Mr. Tanner Jones (TBA)                            Social Worker
Mrs. Dana Bloom (250)                             Assistant for Guidance

                                                     i
Table 4 - High School Administrative Office Staff
         NAME AND PHONE EXTENSION                                                TITLE
Mrs. Kathy Demnyan (240)                            Assistant for Athletics and Student Activities
Mrs. Jodi Holley (221)                              Assistant to the Principal – Mr. Aaron Skrbin (A thru K)
Mrs. Alice Kamphaus (222)                           Assistant for Attendance and Student Center
Mrs. Julie Karabinos (241)                          Assistant to the Principal – Dr. Laura Hartzell (L thru Z)
Mrs. Penny Miller (223)                             Nurse
Mr. Joe Silhanek (235)                              Dean of Students
Sergeant Jeff Sgro (732)                            Security Resource Officer

Table 5 - High School Faculty
        NAME AND PHONE EXTENSION                                          DEPARTMENT
Mrs. Barth                                          Business Technology
Ms. Capelli                                         Special Education
Mr. Caprio                                          Business Technology
Mrs. Carranza-Wood                                  Instrumental Music
Ms. Cerchiaro                                       Social Studies
Mrs. Chaves                                         World Language - Spanish
Mrs. Clonan                                         World Language - Spanish/Department Chair
Ms. Crapis                                          Science
Mrs. Dennison                                       Early Childhood Development
Mrs. Dorsey                                         Mathematics
Mr. Eldridge                                        Physical Education and Health
Mrs. Elek                                           Vocal Music
Mrs. Endy                                           World Language - French
Mrs. Fink                                           English as a Secondary Language
Mr. Flannery                                        Business Technology/Department Chair
Mr. Fraser                                          English
Mr. Garlick                                         Technology Education
Ms. Grinko                                          Science
Dr. Gutshall                                        Science/Department Chair
Mrs. Habib                                          Science
Mrs. Hackworth                                      Social Studies
Ms. Hallett                                         Special Education
Mr. Hausman                                         English
Mr. Hobbs                                           Mathematics
Mr. Iagnemma                                        Physical Education/Department Chair
Mr. Isaac                                           Science
Ms. Jenkins                                         English
Mr. Jones                                           Guidance/Social Worker
Mr. Klein                                           Social Studies
Mrs. Lane                                           Guidance Counselor (A thru K)
Mrs. Lortz                                          Computer Science
Mrs. Lutz                                           Special Education
Mrs. Marchinsky                                     English
Mrs. Martin                                         Guidance Counselor (L thru Z)
Mrs. Matz                                           English
Mr. McAndrew                                        Art/Department Chair
Mr. McArdle                                         Social Studies
Mrs. McCafferty                                     Special Education
Mrs. McCullough                                     Computer Science
Mr. McGowan                                         Science
                                                       ii
Table 6 - High School Faculty Continued
        NAME AND PHONE EXTENSION                              DEPARTMENT
Ms. McGuire                               Science
Mr. Mikan                                 Social Studies
Mrs. Miller                               Nurse
Mrs. Okel                                 Science
Mrs. Palmer                               Mathematics
Mrs. Pappas                               Special Education
Mrs. Perry                                Business Technology
Mrs. Quirk                                Enrichment Coordinator
Mrs. Rabi                                 English and Theatre Arts
Ms. Reed                                  English
Mr. Reasey                                Mathematics
Ms. Roche                                 Mathematics
Mrs. Rogowicz                             Special Education
Mrs. Roth                                 Mathematics
Mrs. Rudy                                 Special Education
Mr. Salvucci                              Social Studies
Mrs. Scott (Rihtarchik)                   English
Mr. Sekelik                               Social Studies
Mr. Seybert                               Science
Mrs. Sharro                               College and Career Counselor
Mrs. Shrewsbury                           English
Mr. Silhanek                              Social Studies/Department Chair
Mrs. Simon                                Librarian
Mrs. Sirc                                 Mathematics/Department Chair
Mr. G. Smith                              English/Department Chair
Mr. T. Smith                              Social Studies
Mrs. Smyczek                              Special Education/Department Chair
Mr. Stewart                               Mathematics
Mrs. Surloff                              World Language – Spanish
Ms. Surunis                               English
Mrs. Tupper                               String Orchestra
Mrs. Ullom                                Mathematics
Mrs. Wiernik                              World Language - German
Mr. Winans                                Science
Mr. Yeager                                Business Technology
Dr. Yerace                                Social Studies

                                             iii
South Fayette High School
                                             PROGRAM OF STUDIES

                                                  GRADING SYSTEM

The evaluation of pupil progress and achievement is the responsibility of each member of the professional
staff of South Fayette High School. Grades will reflect a student's progress as to the quality of performance
and the educational growth of the student.

Grading will be by percentage points and based upon points earned for course requirements such as tests,
projects, reports and class participation. Grades will be reported as percentages.

Specific requirements established by each individual teacher for every course will be distributed to students,
discussed with each class, posted in classrooms, and will be on file in the Main Office for your review.

The grading scale is as follows:

                                   Table 7 – Grading Scale of Academic/Regular Courses
                              Grade                   Scale               Quality Points
                               A+                  100 - 98%                  4.25
                               A                    97 - 93%                  4.00
                               A-                   92 - 90%                  3.75
                               B+                   89 - 88%                  3.25
                               B                    87 - 83%                  3.00
                               B-                   82 - 80%                  2.75
                               C+                   79 - 78%                  2.25
                               C                    77 – 73%                  2.00
                               C-                   72 – 70%                  1.75
                               D                    69 – 65%                  1.00
                               F                   64 – Below                   --
                               I                  *Incomplete                   --

*Indicates that the student has not completed all course requirements. Course work must be completed
within ten (10) school days or the student will receive an "F" for any work not completed.

W-   Indicates the student withdrew from the course within the required time limit. No penalty accompanies
     this grade.
WF - Indicates course withdrawal after the established limit. The student receives a failure grade in the
     course. This does affect the QPA of a student.

                                                     HONOR ROLL

Honor Roll will be determined by grades earned during each of the four nine-week periods.
        Highest Honor:      Students who achieve a 4.00 Quality Point Average and above will be
                            placed on the Highest Honor Roll.
        High Honor:         Students who achieve a 3.75 Quality Point Average and above will be
                            placed on the High Honor Roll.
        Honor:              Students who achieve a 3.25 Quality Point Average and above will be
                            placed on the Honor Roll.
                                                           1
DETERMINATION OF QUALITY POINT AVERAGE

To obtain the Quality Point Average (“QPA”), divide the total number of quality points to date by the total
number of credits to date.

                                                     CLASS RANK

Class Rank is calculated at the end of the year only in grades nine and ten and at the end of each quarter in
grades eleven and twelve. Valedictorian and Salutatorian will be determined at the end of the third nine
weeks in grade twelve. Class rank is determined by ranking the students in order according to cumulative
quality grade point average.

Class rank will not be listed on transcripts and will not be disclosed by the District. Class rank will be
maintained internally.

Class rank will be kept privately for scholarship purposes. Students should mark “my school does not rank”
when completing college applications. South Fayette will continue to recognize the Valedictorian and
Salutatorian until the Class of 2023.

                                            WEIGHTED QUALITY POINTS

Students who enroll in Honors and Advanced Placement (“AP”) classes and receive a letter grade of "C-" or
above will earn quality points based on the following scales:

                                      Table - 8 - Grading Scale for Honors Courses
                              Grade                  Scale                Quality Points
                               A+                 100 - 98%                   4.75
                               A                   97 - 93%                   4.50
                               A-                  92 - 90%                   4.25
                               B+                  89 - 88%                   3.75
                               B                   87 - 83%                   3.50
                               B-                  82 - 80%                   3.25
                               C+                  79 - 78%                   2.75
                               C                   77 – 73%                   2.50
                               C-                  72 – 70%                   2.25
                               D                   69 – 65%                   1.00
                               F                  64 – Below                    --

                                                           2
Table 9 - Grading Scale for Advanced Placement Courses
                            Grade                 Scale              Quality Points
                             A+                100 - 98%                 5.25
                             A                  97 - 93%                 5.00
                             A-                 92 - 90%                 4.75
                             B+                 89 - 88%                 4.25
                             B                  87 - 83%                 4.00
                             B-                 82 - 80%                 3.75
                             C+                 79 - 78%                 3.25
                             C                  77 – 73%                 3.00
                             C-                 72 – 70%                 2.75
                             D                  69 – 65%                 1.00
                             F                 64 – Below                  --

                         HONORS AND ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES OFFERED

The following courses are identified as Honors and Advanced Placement courses for the 2019-2020 School
Year. This selection was based on the content of the curriculum and/or the consideration that the course was
above the requirements for graduation as outlined in the Student Handbook and Program of Studies.

Honor Courses:
Honors English 9
Honors English 10
Honors English 11
Honors English 12
Honors Geometry
Honors Algebra II
Honors Linear Algebra
Honors PreCalculus
Honors Calculus - CHS
Honors Statistics and Probability - CHS
Honors Human Anatomy & Physiology
Honors Biology
Honors Chemistry
Honors Physics
Honors Civics 9
Honors World Cultures 10
Honors American Cultures 11 - CHS
Honors Economics 12
World Language - 4th Level (Honors) - CHS
Honors Management and Marketing Applications - CHS
Honors Multi-Media III - CHS

AP Courses:
AP English 11: Language and Composition
AP English 12: Literature and Composition
AP Calculus AB - CHS
AP Calculus BC - CHS
                                                       3
AP Courses: (cont.)
AP Biology
AP Chemistry
AP Physics
AP U.S. History
AP Economics
AP U.S. and Comparative Government and Politics - CHS
AP European History - CHS
World Language - 5th Level (AP)
AP Music Theory
AP Computer Science
On-Line AP Courses as Approved

Prerequisites for admission to Honors and Advanced Placement courses for the 2019-2020 School Year will be
as follows:

    1. To stay on the same level of course (Honors to Honors, AP to AP), a percentage grade of 80% or above
       is needed in the previous course in that departmental area

    2. To move UP one level (Regular to Honors, Honors to AP), a percentage grade of 85% or above is
       needed in the previous course in that departmental area

    3. To move UP TWO levels (Regular to AP), a percentage grade of 93% or above is needed in the previous
       course in that departmental area, plus completion of a "skills packet" developed by the teacher to
       "bridge" any gaps that would be missing between a regular course and the highly significant rigor in an
       AP college-level course, as well as strong teacher recommendation

    4.   Overall QPA of 3.0 or better

    5.   Teacher recommendation (per Program of Studies)

Students who do not meet the overall QPA of 3.0 or better criteria but DO meet the other two criteria may file
an appeal through the Guidance Department to have their case reviewed.

                          COLLEGE IN HIGH SCHOOL COURSES OFFERED
The following courses are College in High School courses for the 2019-2020 School Year. This selection was
based on approval by the partnering college/university. Students enrolled in these courses can earn college
credit from the partnering college/university.

College in High School Courses:

Leadership Studies II – Advanced Leadership Studies - CHS
Honors Calculus - CHS
Honors Statistics and Probability – CHS
Honors Multi-Media III - CHS
Honors Management and Marketing Applications - CHS
Honors American Cultures 11 – CHS
World Language - 4th Level (Honors) - CHS

                                                      4
College in High School Courses: (cont.)
A.P. Calculus AB - CHS
A.P. Calculus BC - CHS
A.P. U.S. & Comparative Government & Politics - CHS
A.P. European History - CHS

                                                 MAKE-UP WORK

The following guidelines have been established for make-up work in the high school.
    1. If a student is absent from class for one (1) day, he/she upon return to school is required to submit all
       work due that was assigned prior to the day of absence and take test(s) assigned prior to the day of
       absence provided no new material on the test was taught that day.
    2. If a student is absent from class for more than one (1) day, the student has make-up days equivalent to
       the number of days absent from the day he/she returns to school to make-up all work (tests, quizzes,
       assignments, etc.). It is the responsibility of the student to meet with the teacher before or after class
       to make proper arrangements and secure the information needed regarding the tests, etc., that needs
       to be completed.
    3. In extenuating circumstances, when a student has been absent due to illness, accident, etc. for more
       than seven (7) consecutive days, provisions may be made to extend the timeline for make-up work.
    4. Students who fail to fulfill their responsibilities for make-up work will receive a "0" for the work, tests,
       etc. not completed.

*Students who are absent from class for excused reasons, including approved school activities, must be given
the opportunity to make up all work and cannot be penalized academically for not being present in class,
provided they complete all make-up work according to the above guidelines.

Students who participate in an approved school activity must check with their teachers to receive information
concerning classroom work previous to participating in the activity.

Approved school activities include those listed on the daily bulletin, field trips, school programs, athletic
events, etc. Visits to the Guidance Office, other teacher's areas, writing lab, etc., are not legitimate reasons to
be absent from a scheduled class unless previously approved by the scheduled classroom teacher.

                                                  EXTRA CREDIT

Each classroom teacher is expected to provide students with a clear understanding of the assessment practices
related to their individual course. Grades assigned should reflect the achievement based upon the specific
criteria expected in the course and outlined by the teacher. Individual extra credit assignments will not be
given by teachers so that a student may improve his/her letter grade. Teachers may at their discretion assign
projects, presentations, problems, etc. that result in bonuses. In this case, however, all students share equal
opportunities to participate.

NOTE: The purpose of "extra credit" is not to allow students to gain enough points to significantly alter a final
or quarter grade. Extra credit allows a teacher to make an improved judgment of a student's academic
capability.

                                                         5
RETURN OF TESTS

The assessment practice of testing provides the student and teacher information regarding the level of
achievement. Testing provides the feedback to the teacher that is needed to revise teaching style, to reteach
material and to develop guidelines for pacing instruction. The student is able to view areas of proficiency and
deficiency and adjust appropriately.

All tests will be returned to and discussed with the students within one (1) week of the administering of the
test. It is the sole responsibility of the student to share the test results with the parent and also the sole
responsibility of the student to seek assistance in the event that he/she believes that a grade assigned was
inaccurate. Common assessments and major projects will not be sent home with students, but will be
available for review by parents/guardians within the school building.

                                                 POWERSCHOOL

South Fayette High School utilizes PowerSchool to record student’s grades and attendance. Students and
parents are expected to monitor their grades throughout the academic year. Concerns regarding grades
should be directed to the classroom teacher first and then to the student’s school counselor. In the event a
student is failing a class at the end of a quarter, semester or year, teachers will contact parents to discuss the
student’s progress in that particular course.

It is recommended that parents contact the teacher or make an appointment to meet with them if their child is
failing. In this way, the parent/guardian will know specific causes of the deficiency and may be given
suggestions for helping their child improve.

                                        STATE-MANDATED ASSESSMENTS

To graduate from South Fayette High School, the following is required:

        (a) Successful completion of all course work required by the School District.
        (b) Successful completion of a culminating Senior Graduation Project.
        (c) Demonstrated “Proficiency” on all state-mandated assessments.

Students may demonstrate Proficiency by:

        (a) Attaining a designation of “proficient” or above on all state-mandated assessment.
        (b) Attaining a designation of “proficient” or above on any re-take test in each area where they were
            not formerly proficient.
        (c) Completing the alternative pathway to proficiency as determined by the PA Department of
            Education (Class of 2017 and beyond) which are correlated to standards at an equivalent
            designation of Proficient or above.

For all students who do not meet “Proficiency” on state-mandated assessments by Grade 12, students must
complete a portfolio demonstrating evidence of proficiency in that subject and must participate in tutoring as
offered by the School District. Notification will be received in the form of a letter for students who need to
complete this requirement.

Students who have not demonstrated Proficiency in any of the ways indicated above will not be eligible to
receive a high school diploma at graduation. Consistent with our current procedure for graduation, students
who are one (1) or two (2) credits (or requirements) short of meeting graduation eligibility may participate in
the Commencement Ceremony but will not receive a diploma until such time that the requirements are met.

                                                         6
    Students who are not Proficient in Math will be considered to be one (1) requirement short for
         graduation.
        Students who are not Proficient in English will be considered to be one (1) requirement short for
         graduation.
        Students who are not Proficient in Science will be considered to be one (1) requirement short for
         graduation.
        Students who are not Proficient in three (3) requirements, as indicated above, may not participate in
         the Commencement Ceremony, even if they are eligible in all other areas.

In order to earn their diploma, the School District will offer in the summer, at parents’ expense, programs in
each subject area so that students may be provided the opportunity to obtain proficiency.

                                              HOMEWORK POLICY

Each student has the responsibility to develop good work and study habits. The student in preparing the
assignment should:

    1. Make sure he/she understands the assignment -- its purpose, when it is due, how it should be done.
    2. Ask for further explanation if original directions are not completely understood.
    3. Arrange to make up missed assignments as required by the teacher.
    4. Budget time for homework. Anticipate 90-120 minutes of cumulative homework daily. When study
       time is provided during the school day, the student should take advantage of it. Long-term
       assignments should be planned so they do not have to be done all at once. Honors or advance
       placement courses may require additional time for assignments.
    5. Analyze study habits and take advantage of available study helps.
    6. Write homework in a neat and legible manner on appropriate paper.

                                        EXTRACURRICULAR ELIGIBILITY

South Fayette Township School District encourages all students to participate in extracurricular activities. The
only activities in which ineligible students may participate are those that are written into and considered part
of the regular course curriculum. It is the responsibility of each individual coach or sponsor to prohibit
students who are ineligible from participating (this includes practice). Each coach or sponsor will be provided
with a list of all students who are ineligible. All students will be treated equitably. Students who are
suspended from school may not participate (play or practice) in any extracurricular activities. The following
Classifications of Eligibility are in effect at South Fayette High School:

Weekly Eligibility
*Grades of Students who participate in Athletics, and major activities, including Spring/Fall Drama
Productions, Marching Band, Choir, Select Choir, Spring Musical and other activities requiring multiple days
absent from school (i.e, DC Trip, Band/Chorus Trip).

    1. Teachers will be provided weekly with a list of students who are registered as a participant in each
       athletic activity. On Friday morning (7:45 a.m.) of each week, teachers will be required to indicate any
       students who are in danger of failing ("D" average) or failing their course for the current 9-week
       period. Students must receive one (1) warning during each grading period prior to being designated as
       failing a course.

                                                        7
2. The lists will be compiled by the Athletic Director. Any student who is failing two (2) or more courses
       will be considered ineligible for the following week (Monday through Saturday). The student will be
       notified by the coach. That student is not permitted to practice or participate during that time. The
       Athletic Policy recommends that athletes ineligible for this reason attend the Wednesday after school
       tutorial program (2:10-5:30 p.m.). This may be required by other activity sponsors at their discretion.

    3. As indicated by the ineligibility lists, students who are carrying a "D" average in one (1) or more
       subjects for two (2) successive weeks will be recommended by the Athletic Policy to attend the
       Wednesday after school tutorial program (2:10-5:30 p.m.). This student is not ineligible; however, the
       School District is making every attempt to promote support for the student who is encountering
       academic difficulty. If deemed necessary, the coach may waive this section at his/her discretion.

Nine-Week Academic Eligibility
*Grades of all students in Grades 9-12 are reviewed

At the end of each nine-week period, (at the end of the year, final average will be used) report cards for all
students will be reviewed.

To be eligible for attendance at school functions and/or participation in extracurricular events, a student must
pursue a curriculum approved by the principal and must not be failing two (2) or more courses. Evaluation or
subject credits shall conform with the standards established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. A
student ineligible for this reason will be denied participation in all extracurricular activities, school dances and
non-curricular events for a period of twenty (20) school days. Parents/guardians will be notified by mail of this
ineligibility.

Year-to-Year Eligibility
*Students’ eligibility will be reviewed after twenty (20) school days. Students may be declared eligible after
this period.
Students are ineligible to participate in interscholastic athletics and extracurricular activities if they fail two (2)
or more courses in the previous academic year. Students may participate if they complete the necessary
remedial course work over the summer. Seventh (7th) through twelfth (12th) grade students are governed by
these rules except in the case of the failure of two 6-week or 9-week courses. Students who fail two (2) of
these courses may participate in the following academic year. Seventh (7th) through twelfth (12th) grade
students who fail two (2) or more full year courses are ineligible to participate in interscholastic athletics
and/or extracurricular activities.

Attendance Eligibility
*Attendance reports for all students, Grades 9 - 12 are reviewed
A student who is absent from school during a semester for a total of twenty (20) or more school days shall not
be eligible for attendance at school functions and/or participation in extracurricular activities until he/she has
been in attendance for a total of sixty (60) days following his/her twentieth (20th) day of absence, except that
where there is a consecutive absence of five (5) or more school days, due to confining injury, death in the
immediate family, court subpoena, quarantine, or to attend a religious activity/function which the church
requires its members to attend, or an absence of five (5) or more school days due to the same confining illness,
such absence may be waived from the application of this rule by the School District Attendance Committee.
Parents/guardians of students in this category will be notified by mail of this ineligibility.

Substance Use/Abuse
Any activity participant known by his/her sponsor to use alcoholic beverages or stimulant-depressive drugs
during the course of his or her membership in that activity may be issued consequences that impact
                                                           8
participation in the activity and may lead to dismissal from that activity. Any decision relative to participation
in future activities will be left to the discretion of individual sponsors and the Administrative Staff. The
consequences of the Drug and Alcohol Policy as set forth by the Board of School Directors of the South Fayette
Township School District will be adhered to for this offense in addition to those described above if the
occurrence was at school, on school grounds, or at a school function.

Code of Ethics
It is the duty of all concerned with school activities:
    1.   To emphasize the proper ideals of sportsmanship, respect, and ethical conduct.
    2.   To stress the values derived from good citizenship.
    3.   To show cordial courtesy to fellow students, visitors, and others.
    4.   To establish a positive relationship among participants.
    5.   To encourage leadership, use of initiative, and good judgment among participants.

STUDENTS WHO VIOLATE THE CODE OF CONDUCT OF THE SOUTH FAYETTE TOWNSHIP SCHOOL DISTRICT
WILL BE DISCIPLINED ACCORDING TO ITS POLICY. ANY STUDENT WHO IS SUSPENDED FROM SCHOOL WILL
NOT BE PERMITTED TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITY DURING THE TIME OF
SUSPENSION OR OTHER DISCIPLINARY CONSEQUENCE.

                                                          9
NCAA DIVISION I ELIGIBILITY

As per the National Collegiate Athletic Association (“NCAA”) Initial Eligibility Clearinghouse, students must
meet the Core Course Requirements outlined by the NCAA prior to August 1, 2019. Note: Students enrolling
on or after August 1, 2019, please see below for new requirements. Visit websites www.eligibilitycenter.org
and www.ncaa.org for this information.
1. Graduate from high school.
2. Successfully complete a core curriculum of at least 16 academic courses.
3. Attain a grade-point average (based on a maximum of 4.000) and a combined score on the SAT verbal and
   mathematical sections or a composite score on the ACT based on the NCAA Division index sliding scale.
NOTE: To compete in Division I, students enrolling on or after August 1, 2019, must earn a minimum 2.300
GPA in 16 core courses, 10 of which must be completed before the start of the seventh semester (seven of
those courses must be in English, math or natural or physical science, and all 10 courses are “locked in” for
purposes of GPA calculation), and must earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches your core-course
GPA on the NCAA index sliding scale.

                          NCAA INITIAL ELIGIBILITY - CORE COURSE REQUIREMENT

16 Core Courses:
      4 years of English
      3 years of Mathematics (Algebra I or higher)
      2 years of Natural/Physical Science (1 year must be a Lab Science)
      1 year of additional English, Math or Science.
      2 years of Social Science
      4 years of additional core courses (from any area listed above, or from World Language, Non-Doctrinal
       Religion or Philosophy)

Students who do not complete all coursework at South Fayette High School may be in jeopardy of not
having enough core courses to meet NCAA Clearinghouse requirements. This includes students attending
Parkway AVTS, transfer students, etc. These students must notify the Guidance Department of their desire
to participate in intercollegiate sports so that proper course work can be planned.

*PLEASE CONTACT THE HIGH SCHOOL GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT FOR A COMPLETE DESCRIPTION AND
GUIDELINES FOR NCAA ELIGIBILITY. Also visit websites www.eligibilitycenter.org and www.ncaa.org for
more information.

                                                     10
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

*The requirements for graduation shall be the successful completion of all coursework and studies that
demonstrates expected levels of proficiency consistent with curricular objectives in grades nine (9) through
twelve (12).

The Board requires that each candidate for graduation shall have earned a minimum of:
           Twenty-five (25 credits)

The following courses are required:
           4.0 credits in English/Language Arts
           4.0 credits in Social Studies
           3.0 credits in Science (including Lab Science)
           3.0 credits in Mathematics (including Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II or their equivalency)
           1.0 - 2.0 credits of World language (students must successfully complete Level II)
           1.0 credit of Technology Literacy (Students must demonstrate proficiency in Courses 560
            and 592)
           .25 credits – Writing and Public Speaking
           .50 credits – College and Career Planning
           .75 credits of Senior High Health/Physical Education
           5 to 9 credits of Electives
           1.0 credit for successful completion of the Senior Graduation Project

*Students attending Parkway West Career and Technology Center will be required to have a total of 25
credits and World Language, College and Career Planning, and World Cultures will be waived.

                                                 SCHEDULING

Scheduling for the following school year will be done each spring. The Program of Studies will be made
available to all students for the South Fayette Township School District. Discussions of this curriculum guide
will be conducted for all classes by the Guidance Counselors and Principal. A “Parent/Guardian Scheduling
Night” will be scheduled so that parents/guardians interested in general explanations of courses of study may
hear them.

Schedule Changes
    1. Students will be permitted to make any adjustments in their course selections according to the
       timetable that accompanies the scheduling information. Changes in Honors or AP classes should also
       follow the timetable. **HONORS AND AP COURSES MAY NOT BE DROPPED ONCE STUDENT ONLINE
       SCHEDULING IS COMPLETED!

    2. All course selections will take place by completing a “Schedule Change Request Form” and/or
       requesting the counselor to schedule an appointment to discuss options. AFTER THE DEADLINE,
       CHANGES WILL ONLY BE MADE FOR THE FOLLOWING REASONS:

        (a) A computer scheduling error occurred.
        (b) You failed a course, need to repeat it and the change did not occur. (Usually this change will
            automatically occur).
        (c) You desire to add an additional elective course in place of a resource/study period. (This will only
            be considered if the course you desire to schedule is not full.)

                                                       11
If a student believes that he/she has a unique situation that warrants a schedule change, the student may
schedule a conference through the counselor that must include the student's parent/guardian, counselor,
principal and teacher. The information related to the request should be presented and a final decision will be
made. Absolutely no changes will be considered without this conference being held.

                                         STUDENT ONLINE SCHEDULING

Students in Grades 10, 11, and 12 will have an opportunity to schedule their classes online according to the
schedule set forth for Student Scheduling. The administrative/guidance team will schedule incoming ninth
grade students.

                                                DROP/ADD POLICY

All students will receive a tentative schedule before leaving school for the summer or during the summer
months. Because students in Grades 10-12 select their schedule, NO courses may be dropped or added after
Student Online Scheduling. Beyond that time and for students in Grade 9, changes will only occur IF:

    (a) there is an error in the schedule that affects graduation requirements or
    (b) students would like to drop a study hall and take an elective class offered during that same period,
        providing the elective class is not closed due to enrollment capacity

No schedule changes of any kind will be made after the first five (5) days of a semester.

If a student drops a course after the first five (5) days of a semester, he/she will receive a “WF” indicating
withdrawal failing for the final grade. This grade will be included in calculating QPA and class rank.

A student may not drop a course if he/she is unable to select another course that maintains his/her enrollment
in a minimum of 6.5 credits (juniors and seniors) or 7.0 credits (freshmen and sophomores).

Administrators may have a need to change schedules to balance class sizes, balance lunches, or for other
reasons as needed.

                                           MATH TUTORIAL PROGRAM

Each Wednesday after school, for 3.25 hours, math tutorial services are offered to students in grades 9-12.
Bus transportation is provided, if necessary. Students must remain in the tutorial session the entire time
unless signed out by a parent/guardian.

                                         SENIOR GRADUATION PROJECT

The faculty and administration of South Fayette Township School District believe that a Senior Graduation
Project will challenge our students to go beyond what is learned in the regular high school curriculum. The
Senior Graduation Project is a learning process with student-centered research revolving around a career
interest and ending with a formal presentation. Projects will provide an avenue for creativity and
demonstration of individual talents. It is our goal to significantly improve student achievement and to help all
students explore career paths and become lifelong learners.

                                                        12
Working individually under the direction of a faculty advisor and student-chosen mentor, the Class of 2000 was
the first class required to complete a Senior Graduation Project. This project is in compliance with the
Regulations of the State Board of Education which state, "In order to graduate from high school, a student shall
complete a project in one or more areas of concentrated study under the guidance and direction of the high
school faculty." Although each student will be given direction during this four (4) year project, the
responsibility for completion of it lies with the student.

The Senior Graduation Project will demonstrate competencies in oral communication, written communication,
information-gathering research skills, and technology utilization. All projects will be evaluated by review
panels that will assess if the student is able to apply, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information and then
communicate significant knowledge and understanding.

It is our hope that each student will derive a sense of accomplishment by completing a Senior Graduation
Project that reflects his/her interests and abilities. The opportunity to explain one's knowledge, explore
possible career paths, and apply learning to real-life situations will help our students grow and promote their
skills long after they leave South Fayette.

Parents are strongly encouraged to work with the school and their child's advisor and mentor. We can work
together and can jointly assist your child in becoming a caring, productive, and well-educated adult.

                                                       13
BUSINESS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT

                             Table 10 - Business, Computer, Info. Tech. Dept. Courses
                    COURSE #                          BUSINESS COURSES
                      070         Multi-Media I
                      071         Multi-Media II
                      865         Honors Multi-Media III - CHS
                      074         PhotoShop
                      199         International Business
                      201         3D Modeling
                      560         Excel – Office 2016 – 10th Graders
                      561         Web Page Design
                      562         Business Management and Entrepreneurship
                      568         GameMaker Programming I
                      800         Podcasting
                      569         Accounting 1A
                      570         Accounting 1B
                      582         College and Career Planning – 11th Graders
                      585         Sports and Entertainment Marketing
                      192         Honors Management and Marketing Applications - CHS
                      592         Presentation Applications – 9th Graders

                    COURSE #                   COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES
                      583        Introduction to Java Programming
                      589        AP Computer Science P (Principles)
                      586        AP Computer Science A
                      859        Introduction to Python Programming
                      781        Cyber Security
                      782        Data Science
                      783        Python II
                                     *CHS – College in High School course

                    Note: For all Honors and AP courses, a summer assignment is required.

                                                   BUSINESS

070 - MULTI-MEDIA I
Prerequisite: None
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Have you always wanted to make movies, but were unsure just how to put one
together? This elective course introduces students to digital video and editing techniques. The focus of the
course will be on using technology to enhance video productions by using the Adobe Premiere Pro editing
software.

Students will learn how to effectively use the high definition cameras and software to add appropriate digital
enhancements. Ultimately, students will demonstrate their knowledge of the technology by planning,
producing, and editing their own video projects, to possibly be used as programming on SF-TV 3.
                                                       14
071 - MULTI-MEDIA II
*This course can be taken multiple times and will be offered each semester throughout high school.
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Multi-Media I with a 75% and Teacher Recommendation
One Semester - Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit
COURSE DESCRIPTION: You have all seen SF-TV 3—why not create the videos that are shown on it each day?
This project-based elective course builds on the skills learned in Multi-Media I. Students will acquire or
enhance skills in the techniques of all facets of video production (including storyboards, filming, assessing, and
capturing raw footage), as well as audio and video editing via Adobe Premiere Pro. Students will not only
produce on-air programming for SF-TV 3, but also participate in local contests and create materials for the
district. Through their varied efforts working with video production, students will further develop important
life and career skills such as responsibility, organization, problem solving, and teamwork. This course does
require students to be self-sufficient and sometimes film outside of school. *This course can be taken
multiple times with a teacher recommendation and will be offered each semester throughout high school.

865 – HONORS MULTI-MEDIA III (HONORS LEVEL COURSE) - CHS
*Point Park University - College in High School Program Option
Prerequisites: Successful Completion of Multi-Media I and Multi-Media II and teacher recommendation
Full Year – Five Periods Per Week – 1.0 Credits
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Honors Media III is a project-based elective course that will allow students to advance
their video production skills, as they produce the major projects of the year viewed by both the School District
and community. Students will create various content including instructional videos, Public Service
Announcements, documentaries, commercials, short films, and more. Technical aspects of producing,
directing, cinematography, and film editing will be covered. Honors Media III students are expected to be self-
motivated, creative, goal-oriented, and willing to devote the necessary time to complete their projects. Due to
the various productions required of the course, students will need to be responsible, reliable, and self-
disciplined to complete the projects before the set deadlines. This course will be aligned with Point Park
University’s Cinema Arts curriculum and will give students the option to earn college credits. Students can
elect to register with Point Park and earn 3 credits for $250 if they complete the course with a 70% or better.
Students do not have to register with Point Park to take this course.

074 - PHOTOSHOP
Prerequisite: None
One Semester - Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Ever wanted to create your own magazine cover or place yourself on the red carpet
alongside your favorite actor/actress? This course gives you that opportunity! Adobe Photoshop is the favorite
image manipulation and editing tool of the professional graphics industry. It enables photographs, pictures,
and graphics files to be edited and offers a dazzling array of drawing, special effects, and filtering tools.
Knowing where to start with such a comprehensive and feature-filled program can be daunting. This course
aims to equip new users with the basics. Techniques will be explained and demonstrated, and participants will
then be given the opportunity to practice and create original projects to be displayed outside of the Media
Room and shared on SF-TV 3.

199 – INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
Prerequisite: None
One Semester - Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

                                                        15
COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students enrolled in this course will learn the foundations of international business
and how they differ from U.S. markets. The course will also include discussions on global business
environments and how they impact decision making in foreign markets as well as international banking,
finance and investments. The students will also explore international business communications and cultures as
well as ethical and social responsibilities in a global economy.

201 – 3D MODELING
Prerequisite: None
One Semester - Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: In 3D Modeling, students will learn 3D modeling techniques that professionals use.
They’ll use 3DS Max to manipulate and sculpt pure imagination into substantial digital art, resulting in a
portfolio of original projects that they can use when applying for an internship, higher education, or a job.
These items can be utilized in the gaming courses to incorporate the student created 3D models into gaming
software and animation programs.

560 - EXCEL - OFFICE 2016
*This is a required graduation course for all 10th Grade Students.
Prerequisite: None
One Semester - Five Periods per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will experience a critical-thinking, problem-solving approach in preparing to
master the latest edition of spreadsheet software. In-depth coverage will include spreadsheet concepts such as
order of precedence, function syntax (sum, count, average, minimum, maximum, median, payment, round,
and if statements), absolute and relative cell references, what-if analysis, and goal seek. New enhancement
features include themes, Live Preview, cell styles, and conditional formats. Additionally, students will learn
ways to manipulate data and construct graphs.

561 - WEB PAGE DESIGN
Prerequisite: None
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This elective course is an introduction to Microsoft Web Expression and Cascading
Style Sheets. Students will learn the fundamentals of building a basic Web site, including the planning and
decision-making process involved in creating Web pages, Web sites, and style sheets. Students will work with
styles, images, links, templates, data tables, inline frames, forms, and other elements to add interactivity to
Web sites.

562 - BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
Prerequisite: 10th, 11th and 12th Grade Students
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This one-semester academic/business course is designed for the 10th, 11th, and 12th
grade student who intends to study business in college, explore the possibility of owning/managing their own
business, or wants to gain an understanding of business operations.

                                                       16
The course will provide a critical understanding of the following topics:
       Types of businesses (sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation)
       Business communication
       Motivation & leadership
       Ethics
       Human resources
       Conflict and stress

Activities and assessments will promote critical thinking and decision making, while addressing the importance
of using technology effectively in business.

568 - GAMEMAKER PROGRAMMING I
Prerequisite: None
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will receive an introduction to basic programming by creating 2D executable
games with the Game Maker software. Students will design their games based on the Game Maker scripting
language. The game design process of planning, implementing, reviewing, and adjusting will be utilized as
students create and program their games. Problem-solving skills will be used and improved to debug
programming errors. Major topics include: Sprites (pictures), objects, rooms, backgrounds, instances, user
interface, managing variables, managing game iteration, creating the scores, play-test evaluation, game
evaluation, game timers, high scores, and sound.

800 - PODCASTING
Prerequisite: None
One Semester - Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Podcasting combines major skills emphasized by both the English and Business
Departments. The course will focus on students being able to work collaboratively within a group, write to an
audience, learn new forms of technology, and find a meaningful and positive voice. Students will listen to
popular podcasts, research different forms of this medium, and develop and record their own podcasts. This
will be done all while working with peers and learning the process of what it takes to make their effort
meaningful and successful.

                                            ACCOUNTING COURSES

Today, accountants are actively involved in the analysis and interpretation of financial data and they work with
other executives in decision-making and problem solving activities. Thus, many folks in top management have
accounting backgrounds. Accounting is an interesting and in-demand profession. It is an ideal platform for any
business career, and accredited accountants are highly employable and enjoy the benefits of an interesting
profession recognized throughout the world. What is interesting about accounting, unlike that of other fields
like engineering and science, is that accountants are needed in both booming economies and in recessionary
economies.

Accounting is an invaluable tool that enables students to understand business! It is truly the language of
business. Accounting helps people understand business in their careers and in their personal lives. If you like
business and are going to college for a business-related major, accounting is a great foundation for almost
any business career! It is highly recommended that all students who are pursuing a business-oriented field of
study in college enroll in at least one semester of Accounting.
                                                        17
569 - ACCOUNTING IA
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Algebra I
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Accounting IA is a one-semester business course designed to familiarize students with
the “language of business.” It is designed for nearly all students who wish to further their knowledge of
business management and decision-making. This course introduces the student to careers in accounting and
to positions where accounting knowledge is useful. The course will help students understand complicated
issues in the business world and provide working knowledge of business structure and characteristics of
proprietorships, corporations, and partnerships.

In Accounting IA, students will work with a sole proprietor as a service business completing the first nine (9)
textbook chapters. Students become aware of how financial data is processed and will be able to process this
data within the Accounting Cycle, which includes: journalizing, posting, preparing a worksheet, preparing
balance sheets and income statements, recording adjusting and closing entries, and preparing a post-closing
trial balance. The semester will conclude with an introduction to Automated Accounting showing the student
how data can be manipulated via the computer.

570 - ACCOUNTING IB
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accounting IA
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Accounting IB is a continuation of the material covered in Accounting IA. This second
semester of accounting is strongly recommended for the college-bound student majoring in accounting or a
business career.

Students will work with a partnership as a merchandising business completing eight (8) additional textbook
chapters. Students will be able to work with subsidiary ledgers and controlling accounts, process transactions
involving credit card sales and sales tax, work in an expanded journal to record transactions, prepare payroll
records, and prepare all steps in the accounting cycle for a partnership. In addition, heavy emphasis will be
placed on giving the student exposure to the automated and spreadsheet software used to record data and
build financial statements and graphs.

Current events in the business world will be discussed. Students may use the Internet to acquire current,
relevant material.

582 - COLLEGE AND CAREER PLANNING
*This is a required graduation course for all 11th Grade Students. A requirement for course credit is
completion of the “Senior Portfolio”.
Prerequisite: None
One-Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: The focus of this course will be to provide viable skills for:
       career development through the clusters while adding career- and college-based documents to
        individual senior career portfolios
       selecting the post-secondary educational program to best fit the student’s career choice
       preparing required real-life applications for college acceptance and seeking financial assistance
        possibilities
                                                       18
   producing competitive interviewee candidates for employment
       financial literacy awareness
       educational/professional goals, motivation, and insight for beyond the first five years of high school

Writing assessments will be completed after units modeling the appropriate writing style based on the unit
concepts. At least four (4) writing assessments will become part of the student’s senior portfolio.

585 - SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING
Prerequisite: None
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This course will use the world of sports and entertainment to teach the foundations of
marketing. Each basic marketing function will be incorporated throughout the class with an emphasis on how
these functions relate to sports and entertainment.

This course will provide a critical understanding of the following topics:
       The four P’s of marketing (product, place, price, promotion)
       Industry history
       Consumer behavior
       Technology in marketing
       Product placement
       Primary marketing functions
       Social media as a marketing tool

Lectures, activities and assessments will promote critical thinking and decision making while using technology
to demonstrate the ever-changing world of marketing.

192 - HONORS MANAGEMENT AND MARKETING APPLICATIONS (HONORS LEVEL COURSE) – CHS
*Point Park University - College in High School Program option
Prerequisite: Successful Completion of “Business Management and Entrepreneurship” and “Sports and
Entertainment Marketing” with an 85% or better in both courses and teacher recommendation
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: This honors-level course will be aligned with Point Park University’s Sport Art and
Entertainment Management curriculum and will provide students, who complete the course with an 80% or
better, with college credit. Students, who successfully complete this course and elect to attend Point Park
University, will receive three (FREE) college credits for Point Park’s SAEM 101 course.

This course will provide a critical understanding of the following topics:
       Current events
       Event management and event marketing
       Banking and financial systems
       Sport and entertainment law
       Event and live music management
       Promotion and distribution of an event
       Ticketing
       Product development and pricing strategies
       Corporate sponsorship and fundraising

                                                        19
This course will feature a project that utilizes Point Park University’s resources and facilities. There will be an
emphasis on using technology as tool to plan, manage and market an actual event.

592 - PRESENTATION APPLICATIONS
*This is a required graduation course for all 9th Grade Students.
Prerequisite: None
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Students will manipulate this presentation graphics software package to create
professional-quality visual presentations on paper and as on-screen slide shows. Focus will be placed on
incorporating effective and appropriate elements of design, such as tables, SmartArt graphics, bitmapped
images, AutoShapes, themes and templates. Videos, sound clips, and animations will also be used to enhance
the quality and creativity of presentations. In addition, students will sharpen their oral presentation skills by
giving informative and persuasive speeches.

                                                     WHAT IS FBLA?
Future Business Leaders of America (“FBLA”) is a nationally-recognized organization that gives students the
opportunity to enhance communication, decision-making, problem solving, technology, and leadership skills.
Students in FBLA participate in a variety of competitive events. The club is open to all students in grades 9th
through 12th.

                                                  COMPUTER SCIENCE

583 – INTRODUCTION TO JAVA PROGRAMMING
Prerequisite: None
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Java programming will provide the opportunity for students to learn an object-
oriented language and to learn object-oriented programming. The course is aimed at learning how to program
in Java and developing Java applications. The major topics to be covered are: Basic Elements of Java;
Introduction to Objects and Input/Output; Control Structures Using Selection; and Control Structures Using
Repetition.

589 - AP COMPUTER SCIENCE P (PRINCIPLES) (ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSE)
*It is recommended that a student in the AP Computer Science Principles course should have successfully completed a first-
year high school algebra course with a strong foundation in basic linear functions and composition of functions, and
problem-solving strategies that require multiple approaches and collaborative efforts. In addition, students should be able
to sue a Cartesian (x, y) coordinate system to represent points in a plane. It is important that students and their advisors
understand that any significant computer science course builds on a foundation of mathematical and computational
reasoning that will be applied through the study of the course.
Prerequisite: None
One Semester – Five Periods Per Week - .5 Credit

COURSE DESCRIPTION: AP Computer Science Principles introduces students to the central ideas of computer
science, instilling the ideas and practices of computational thinking, and inviting students to understand how
computing changes the world. Students develop innovative computational artifacts using the same creative
processes artists, writers, computer scientists, and engineers use to bring ideas to life.

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