TOOLS - FOR DEVELOPING A STATEWIDE SAFER BARS ALLIANCE TO REDUCE SEXUAL

TOOLS - FOR DEVELOPING A STATEWIDE SAFER BARS ALLIANCE TO REDUCE SEXUAL

TOOLS - FOR DEVELOPING A STATEWIDE SAFER BARS ALLIANCE TO REDUCE SEXUAL

TOOLS FOR DEVELOPING A STATEWIDE SAFER BARS ALLIANCE TO REDUCE SEXUAL ASSAULT ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICES BUREAU OF WOMEN’S AND CHILDREN’S HEALTH AUGUST 2013 The development of this Arizona Safer Bars Alliance (ASBA) toolkit was supported by Sexual Violence Prevention and Education Cooperative Agreement 5VF1CE001128-05 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The contents of this toolkit do not represent the endorsement or official position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

TOOLS - FOR DEVELOPING A STATEWIDE SAFER BARS ALLIANCE TO REDUCE SEXUAL

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 2 Table of Contents Toolkit Purpose . . 3   Benefits of a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance . . 4   Methodology . . 5   How to Build Your Own Safer Bars Model . 5   How to Modify the Arizona Safer Bars Model . 9   Challenges and Solutions . . 10   Challenge 1: Limited Initial Statewide Bar Bystander Vision . 10   Challenge 2: Inadequate Funding, Commitment, and/or Leadership . 11   Challenge 3: Inadequate Bar Participation in ASBA Training . 13   Challenge 4: Inadequate Number of ASBA Trainers . 14   Final Note . . 16   References . . 17   Appendix A: Our Story . . 18   Who Are We . 18   What Did We Do . 18   Appendix B: Data Collection Processes . . 22   Appendix C: Arizona Delphi & Focus Group Questions . . 23  

TOOLS - FOR DEVELOPING A STATEWIDE SAFER BARS ALLIANCE TO REDUCE SEXUAL

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 3 Toolkit Purpose The purpose of this toolkit is to help other states develop their own safer bars alliances to reduce sexual assault in alcohol-serving establishments. This toolkit contains a detailed, step-by-step procedure that other states/territories can use to replicate Arizona’s model.

TOOLS - FOR DEVELOPING A STATEWIDE SAFER BARS ALLIANCE TO REDUCE SEXUAL

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 4 Benefits of a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance § Safer environments for patrons and staff members § A policy of zero tolerance for sexual aggression § Well-trained owners and staff who know how to intervene safely to prevent sexual assault § Patrons who know how to get help from bar staff if they need it § A coalition that can collaboratively link with other sexual violence prevention efforts § A statewide network of bars that support sexual assault prevention in their establishments Benefits of a safer bars alliance include:

TOOLS - FOR DEVELOPING A STATEWIDE SAFER BARS ALLIANCE TO REDUCE SEXUAL

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 5 Methodology How to Build Your Own Safer Bars Model These are the steps that Arizona recommends. See Appendix A: Our Story. Step 1. Make a list of the sexual violence prevention organizations, agencies, and networks in your state. This list will include Sexual Violence Prevention and Education Program (SVPEP) contractors. § Do you have regional/local sexual violence prevention organizations committed to “taking the lead” in organizing a statewide sexual violence prevention program in their local communities?

§ Do you have one or multiple contractors willing to spearhead a safer bars initiative? Step 2. Determine if there is community interest in preventing sexual assault in bars. § Do you have bar owners and managers interested in reducing sexual aggression in their establishments by joining a statewide alliance? § Are there at least one or two bars that are interested in participating in a specific geographic region?

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 6 Step 3. Decide that you want to create a statewide safer bars sexual violence prevention program for your state. This may be part of your multi-year plan for primary prevention of sexual violence. If it is not, develop a draft implementation plan and timeline for your safer bars project. § Do you have State leadership committed to developing a statewide alliance to reduce sexual aggression in alcohol-serving establishments?

§ Do you have the financial, technical, and human resources to do this project? Step 4. Define the scope of your intended safer bars program. Consider the geographic region(s) you want to serve, types of establishments, density of bars, and volume of bar customers. § Geographic region. Where do you want to start the safer bars program? Do you want to expand from one locality to multiple regions and then statewide? Do you want to focus on areas near universities? § Type of alcohol-serving establishments. Which types of bars and alcohol-serving establishments should you target, e.g., lounges, wine bars, sports bars, pubs, clubs? What level of alcohol, e.g., beer and wine only, full bar? § Density of bars in area, volume of patrons. Are there bar or club corridors near a university? If there are, these establishments might be prime candidates to join your statewide safer bars alliance.

Step 5. Create your action team. This team’s job will be to take the idea of a safer bars program and shepherd it into a reality. You may want to hire a state contractor to help you and/or to assign personnel to this project. You may want to involve your state liquor department, local police, your

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 7 own SVPEP contractors, statewide and/or local coalitions, your statewide SVPEP advisory council, or others. Step 6. Do the research. Find out about existing bar bystander models and resources to prevent sexual assault in alcohol-serving establishments. A summary of programs and resources that Arizona found is included in the Arizona Bar Bystander Project Report, October 2011. Step 7. Get state and local input. Get ideas from sexual violence prevention experts, bar owners, managers, bartenders, wait staff, security personnel, and patrons about patron safety and sexual violence prevention in alcohol-serving establishments. You may want to capture their ideas by Delphi survey, focus group, or a combination of methods. See Appendix B: Data Collection Process and Appendix C: Arizona Delphi & Focus Group Questions.

Step 8. Design your safer bars program. § Basic criteria for membership in your statewide alliance. What commitment to sexual violence prevention do you want to require of members? Bar bystander training? Bar policy of zero tolerance for sexual aggression? Patron resources? Bar participation in local/regional coalitions to prevent sexual violence? Membership length of time and conditions for renewal? § Type of bar bystander training appropriate for your state. Some considerations: total hours of training, time length of session(s), number of training sessions, essential content to include, most effective instructional methodologies, maximum size of training classes.

§ Training development and pilot testing. You may want to look at the training materials from other existing bar bystander programs, including Arizona’s bar bystander curriculum.

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 8 § Statewide alliance name, logo, tagline development. What are your resources? Do you have funding to hire a professional to design these products? Do you have art students at community colleges, colleges, or universities who could design your materials? Do you want to involve your community in creating and/or selecting the final designs?

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 9 How to Modify the Arizona Safer Bars Model Step 1. Review the ASBA Training Manual. Please contact the ADHS SVPE Program Manager, Carol Hensell, at 602-542-7343 or Carol.Hensell@azdhs.gov or asbainformation@gmail.com to obtain a copy of the ASBA curriculum/training manual for your review. The ADHS Program Manager is available to discuss potential program modifications to the ASBA curriculum. Step 2. Adapt the ASBA Training Manual to meet your state’s needs. After reviewing the Arizona model, if you want to modify the Arizona Safer Bars Alliance Training and Curriculum for your state, here is a possible way to approach this work. § Intended training audience. Determine who should receive the training, e.g., bar owners, managers, bartenders, servers, security/door staff. § Training length. Determine how long the total training should be. What are the content areas you want to cover? What methodology will you use? How long should your training sessions be?

§ Intended trainers. Determine how you will train the bar staff. Will you directly provide the training? Contract out the training? Train trainers to deliver the training? What training experience and content knowledge is required? § Adaptation of ASBA curriculum. Review the Arizona curriculum and related PowerPoint® presentations and decide which parts you want to include as you craft your own statewide program. Determine what handouts you might wish to modify and use.

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 10 Challenges and Solutions Arizona encountered several challenges while developing the Arizona Safer Bars Alliance concept. Challenge 1: Limited Initial Statewide Bar Bystander Vision When the Eight-Year Plan was developed in 2008, plan developers created a broad prevention vision. The concept for bar bystander programs came from the goal to increase Arizonans’ engagement in sexual violence prevention. The developers envisioned that bystander programs would be implemented locally. From this perspective, the Sexual Violence Prevention and Education Program Manager permitted existing contractors to resubmit their program proposals to select goals, objectives, and strategies identified by the Eight-Year Plan. Two contractors that responded to the solicitation chose to implement the bar bystander training in two distinct geographic areas. It was only when initial efforts were in place that Arizona examined the pros and cons of local/regional bar bystander programs.

Pros of local/regional bar bystander programs: • Logical, systemic method to implement the program • Autonomy, local commitment, pride in local efforts, and community involvement Cons of local/regional bar bystander programs: • Inconsistency in curricular content and program materials • No statewide guidelines for program, e.g., training content and length • No statewide branding recognition • Local proprietary conflict over state program jurisdiction The State became concerned that because of the autonomy granted to individual SVPEP contractors, there was a lack of consistency in dosage and approach to working with alcohol-serving establishments. It became evident that some essential sexual violence content was missing from local training sessions. In response to these issues, in 2011, the SVPE Program Manager convened focus groups and conducted Delphi surveys to identify core curricular content and programmatic features, including media support. Focus group and Delphi participants directed Arizona to develop and standardize a statewide initiative.

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 11 Had Arizona realized in 2008 that its goal was a statewide bar bystander program, contracts to SVPEP providers would have stated that local efforts would serve as pilot programs that would eventually be incorporated into a statewide initiative. Arizona’s solution was to work through the initial concept of local bar bystander programs and to expand the vision to a statewide program, learning from the original local/regional efforts. However, a better solution is offered. Statewide Vision Solution Think statewide from the start. If you know you are going to implement a statewide model, and if you are using state contractors to implement the model, you can write a contractual scope of work that delineates their specific responsibilities related to implementing your statewide safer bars program. You can specify how much time and staff resources will go into recruiting alcohol-serving establishments to become members of your state alliance, developing appropriate media, developing pilot curriculum and/or conducting the bar bystander training using a statewide curriculum. You can state which geographic areas and/or age of patrons contractors will target as well as how contractors will properly administer your statewide pre- and post-tests and use the data to meet program objectives. You can specify that contractors use skilled facilitators and trainers to provide the bar bystander training. There should be no proprietary issue with contractors who are developing and/or implementing materials under this program because their work belongs to the State and Federal funding source(s).

Challenge 2: Inadequate Funding, Commitment, and/or Leadership Funding. When Arizona embraced a safer bars strategy in its Eight-Year Plan, the SVPE Program Manager knew that in order to implement the goals and strategies in the new plan, she needed to issue contracts that reflected the SVPEP multi-year plan. Therefore, using existing financial resources, the State requested responses to a new scope of work based on the Eight-Year Plan. The State’s process permitted contractors to select the type and quantity of sexual violence prevention and education services they would provide if awarded funding. By reallocating funds and changing the scope of work, the State was able to launch the bar bystander program. Two contractors desired to work with alcohol-serving establishments to prevent sexual violence, including providing training to those establishments and received funding for this project.

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 12 In 2013, Arizona added funds to some existing contracts and tied some additional funds to specific ASBA-related duties, such as recruiting potential ASBA establishments, arranging times and dates for ASBA training, and providing multiple two 2.5-hour ASBA training sessions. An obvious lesson learned is that it is easier to obtain commitment and leadership when tying funds to the statewide safer bars project and when work on the safer bars project is part of staff members’ responsibilities and work day.

Arizona has found that additional funding sources continue to be needed to expand the cadre of ASBA trainers across the state. Arizona is presently exploring partnering with other state agencies and local entities to enhance its current ASBA project by identifying additional funding sources and/or donated services or products. Commitment and leadership. As stated in Challenge 1, the local bar bystander initiative evolved from a local/regional concept into a statewide effort. The commitment and leadership that had initiated the two regional programs needed to continue as the statewide Arizona Safer Bars Alliance was developed and continues to grow. One contractor continued to build on their long-standing local bar program and fully supported the evolution into ASBA. An additional contractor has been working with the State to advance ASBA in the Phoenix metro area. Moving forward, Arizona will require commitment to and full support of ASBA in future grant/contract solicitations. Funding, Commitment, and Leadership Solutions Think about the funds you control, the partnerships you have, the contractors currently in place, and their strengths. Determine how to use them to achieve your desired outcome: a statewide safer bars alliance or program. You may choose to initiate new contracts earmarked for a statewide safer bars program, to include it in larger sexual violence prevention and education contracts, or to develop partnerships with other agencies that want to work with you to create safer bars. The selection of your contractors can depend on many variables, including: geographic location in the state, types of services to be provided, age of potential clients, purpose of the programs being funded, effectiveness of funded programs. Some elements needed for effective programs are intangible but essential, such as commitment and leadership.

Be clear with your contractors that you need full commitment and leadership in your new program efforts, and that your goal is to have a statewide alliance. Thus, contractors need to know that they are part of a project bigger than their own

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 13 geographic service region, and that the work they do with the bar bystander program will be part of the statewide effort. This means that they will use state-provided materials, including curriculum, and give credit to your state and to your funding sources (e.g., CDC). Challenge 3: Inadequate Bar Participation in ASBA Training After training was developed, Arizona needed to obtain bar owner/staff participation in the five-hour training program, presented in two 2.5-hour sessions. It can be challenging to get bar owners and staff to attend ASBA training. This challenge is two-fold: • lack of bar awareness of the ASBA bar bystander program, and • percentage of bar staff needed to attend ASBA training in order for the alcohol-serving establishment to meet ASBA membership requirements.

Arizona is overcoming these challenges with these solutions. Making bars aware of ASBA. Arizona plans to use media, including press releases and PSAs. In addition, SVPEP contractor staff members are going door-to- door to alcohol-serving establishments and distributing brochures about ASBA. Also e-mails and regular mail have been sent and will continue to be sent to increase awareness among alcohol-serving establishments about ASBA. Making ASBA training requirements reasonable. For an alcohol-serving establishment to become an ASBA member, 80% of its owners, managers, and bar staff must participate in five hours of ASBA training. Eighty percent can be a large number of people in larger bars and clubs. Arizona is planning to re-set ASBA membership criteria so that a smaller percentage of staff is required to be trained. In addition, bars tend to have high employee turnover, and therefore, new staff members will need to be trained at some point. Arizona will be considering annual ASBA membership requirements, including training an establishment’s new staff members.

Participant attendance is an additional issue. Staff members come to the training on their own time, basically donating five hours. If establishments pay for their time, bars incur a cost for joining ASBA, yet ASBA membership is designed to be free.

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 14 Bar Participation Solutions 1. Develop and implement a media campaign to make the community and the bars aware of your new statewide bar bystander program. Develop a media plan. Use your department’s public relations personnel to write and issue press releases, contract a media agency, or use your community resources, such as community college/college/university talent to design your materials as part of class projects or for extra credit. 2. Develop incentives that will encourage bars to join your statewide program. You may want to poll bars in the state and ask them for their ideas. Some incentives might be reductions in state/local liquor license fees, free positive publicity on different web sites, free materials about sexual violence prevention (including posters, window clings, staff tee shirts). 3. Make your training requirements reasonable: reasonable amount of time for the training, flexibility in days for the training, and reasonable percentage of staff from an alcohol-serving establishment completing the training in order to fulfill your state membership training requirements.

Challenge 4: Inadequate Number of ASBA Trainers The ADHS SVPE Program Manager and the Arizona Department of Liquor Licenses and Control’s Communications and Special Projects Director conducted the 2012 ASBA pilot training. Since then, one SVPEP contractor has been trained and is conducting ASBA training in the Flagstaff area. The ADHS SVPE Program Manager is providing training in the Phoenix and Tucson regions. The State will need more ASBA trainers as more establishments learn about ASBA and want to become members.

Several possibilities are being considered in order to expand the ASBA trainer pool. Train existing SVPEP contractors. Arizona is developing an ASBA train- the-trainer model that can be used to train existing SVPEP contractors. Arizona did not require specific leadership, community collaboration, facilitation, and bar bystander training skills of SVPEP contractors, although these skills are essential in creating an effective bar bystander program. If Arizona can implement a train-the- trainer model, SVPEP service providers could learn the ASBA training and their

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 15 SVPEP contracts could be modified so that they can organize and deliver the ASBA training in their regions. Train staff members from other entities. Arizona’s ASBA train-the-trainer model can be modified, if needed, and used to train staff members from other state and/or community entities. Several local police departments have already expressed interest in providing the free ASBA training in their communities. Not only are the police departments interested, but they also have certified trainers on their police staff roster. Arizona’s planned approach in this training partnership includes ADHS/SVPE Program Manager observation of police trainers conducting ASBA training and provision of feedback to the trainers. Work with Arizona Department of Liquor Licenses and Control. Arizona may be able to work out an arrangement with the Arizona Department of Liquor Licenses and Control (ADLLC) and/or their Title 4 trainers. The SVPE Program Manager has considered the possibilities of working with ADLLC to have Arizona Title 4 Alcohol Training expanded to include ASBA training, or, alternately, to determine if the Title 4 trainers could be trained to become ASBA trainers as well. As this was explored, several problems were immediately evident: (1) there is no time in the Title 4 Training to add a five-hour course on sexual violence prevention, although a brief discussion about sexual violence prevention probably could be incorporated, and establishments could be referred to the full ASBA course; (2) Title 4 trainers might be interested in providing the ASBA training as a stand-alone course, but they are private contractors and would need to charge a fee for the training – and ASBA training is provided free to the establishments. However, there may be other options to explore with ADLLC.

Trainer Solutions If possible, use your existing funds to obtain knowledgeable, skilled trainers to facilitate your new safer bars program training. One method is to redefine your scope of work to include development of a statewide safer bars program. Require those applying for safer bars program training funding to have extensive knowledge in sexual violence prevention and skills in teaching, training, and/or facilitation. If necessary, expand your pool of trainers through a train-the-trainer methodology. Be sure that you have at least one knowledgeable, skilled trainer, either at the state or at the contractor level. This individual can work with community or state partners to train other skilled trainers using a train-the-trainer model.

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 16 Final Note The State of Arizona is pleased to share our materials with you without asking for a contribution or charging a fee. Please credit Arizona Department of Health Services, Sexual Violence Prevention and Education Program, if you use or adapt all or a portion of any Arizona Safer Bars Alliance materials. If you have questions or want to learn more about ASBA, please contact the ADHS SVPE Program Manager, Carol Hensell, at 602-542-7343 or Carol.Hensell@azdhs.gov. Or contact asbainformation@gmail.com

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 17 References Arizona Bar Bystander Project Report, October 2011. A copy can be obtained here: http://www.azrapeprevention.org/sites/azrapeprevention.org/files/AZBarBysta nderRe port.pdf Arizona Safer Bars Alliance Report, October 2012. Note: Whimsical tool graphics were provided royalty-free from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 18 Appendix A: Our Story Who Are We? Carol Hensell, Program Manager, Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS), Sexual Violence Prevention and Education Program (SVPEP) Suzy Seibert and Cindy Turner, Aha! Inc., an Arizona State Contractor that provides facilitation, strategic planning, organizational development, and training development. What Did We Do? 2008. In 2008, we developed a comprehensive statewide sexual violence prevention needs assessment process. The findings from focus groups, Delphi surveys, and research were used to assist a 25-member Sexual Violence Prevention Planning Committee (SVPPC) in the development of the Arizona Sexual Violence Primary Prevention and Education Eight-Year Program Plan (Eight-Year Plan). The SVPPC developed an “increasing Arizonans’ engagement in sexual violence prevention” goal that included sexual violence prevention efforts in alcohol-serving establishments.

2009-2010. In order to have SVPEP contractors’ program goals and objectives more closely align with Arizona’s first state plan on preventing sexual violence, the State severed the existing SVPEP contracts and permitted existing contractors to resubmit their program proposals to select goals, objectives, and strategies identified by the Eight-Year Plan. Two of the contractors chose to “implement proactive policies and practices in establishments that serve alcohol to decrease environmental factors that contribute to alcohol-related sexual violence.” These two contractors, Northland Family Help Center (Northland) in Flagstaff and Southern Arizona Center Against Sexual Assault (SACASA) in Tucson, developed and implemented training for bar staff as part of their SVPEP contractual responsibilities.

The Northland program was called the Bars Against Rape and Sexism (BARS) Program. Bar owners hung posters in their establishments and participated in a “We care about our patron’s safety” certification (multi-session trainings, completion of a facility assessment for safety, commitment to recruit other bar owners/staff to the campaign).

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 19 SACASA’s program was called the Nightlife Safety Project. Participating bars and clubs agreed to adopt a zero-tolerance policy for unwanted sexual aggression. If patrons were being harassed, they could ask bar staff for assistance. Goals of the project were to reduce the amount of sexual aggression experienced by young women in participating bars, encourage bars to proactively address sexual aggression with written policies and staff member training, to educate patrons about the risks of sexual assault, etc.

2011. In 2011, we researched statutory/regulatory/licensure efforts, bystander training programs, and bystander media. We conducted environmental scans, held focus groups, and conducted a Delphi investigation in order to determine: • core instructional components requisite in effective bystander intervention training for bar owners and their staff members and for bar patrons; • effective media strategies for alcohol-serving establishments and their patrons; • a comprehensive bar bystander program model that can be implemented in Arizona.

We selected a two-level Delphi survey approach, consulting sexual violence prevention experts statewide. We conducted regional focus groups to determine bar bystander training needs for alcohol-serving owners, managers, staff members, and patrons and to identify effective media strategies and resources for both alcohol-serving establishments’ personnel and patrons. The combination of the two techniques provided excellent, diverse data. As a result of the extensive data and research collected and analyzed, the Arizona Bar Bystander Project Report, October 2011 identified three objectives. These objectives were: • the development of a state bar bystander program; • the enhancement of current local bar bystander projects; • the sharing of Arizona’s Bar Bystander Program Model with other states. 2012. In 2012, we researched, coordinated, and developed the Arizona bar bystander training curriculum, developed the instructional materials/manual, coordinated the development of Arizona’s bar bystander program name and program materials (e.g., logo, posters, window clings), piloted the training program, and finalized all instructional and collateral program products.

Using information collected from focus groups, a small working team of ADHS (and, at different times, some of its SVPEP contractors), and the Aha! team and its subcontractor, Bolchalk Frey Marketing (BFM), developed the new program’s name, tagline, and logo. The BFM team led the design process.

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 20 In June 2012, BFM created a list of possible names for Arizona’s new bar bystander program, identified key words and possible brands/slogans, and generated taglines for consideration. Because of their comprehensive list of sample ideas, the small working team was able to identify some “must have” criteria for the bar bystander program: • “Arizona” must be part of the name because this project is statewide. • In the tag line, reference must be made to preventing/reducing sexual assault. One of the outgrowths of the regional focus groups was the creation of an informal focus group network to respond via e-mail to ideas for the Arizona bar bystander program development. Participants from the focus groups agreed to help the State and consultants finalize the statewide name, tagline, logo, and various program products, including posters. The Aha team coordinated the process.

By the end of 2012, we had established the infrastructure of the Arizona bar bystander program. Media professionals had developed choices of names, logos, tag lines, posters, and more. Members of the community – bar owners, managers, wait staff, patrons, and community members (including police, county attorneys, university police, Arizona Department of Liquor Licenses and Control) selected the final group name, logo, tag line, and poster designs. The Arizona Safer Bars Alliance (ASBA) was created!

The small team worked together to draft membership requirements of this new statewide alliance. Basic components were: bar bystander training for bar owners and employees, house policy of zero tolerance for sexual assault, posting ASBA posters and window cling in ASBA bars, and active participation in local sexual violence prevention activities and efforts. Once an alcohol-serving establishment meets membership criteria, the establishment becomes a member of the alliance and receives a decal. The decal, which is a window cling, is placed inside of a glass door or windowpane identifying the establishment as having zero tolerance for sexual aggression. Alliance membership is valid for one year and can be renewed. The establishment also receives ASBA posters and flyers to promote the message of ZERO tolerance for sexual aggression. In 2012, the pilot training was conducted, in Flagstaff, in September and October. Carol Hensell, SVPEP Program Manager, and Lee Hill, Communications Director, Arizona Department of Liquor Licenses and Control, conducted the training, with flip-chart support and training analysis conducted by the Aha team of Suzy Seibert and Cindy Turner. The five hours of training (two 2.5-hour sessions) were developed based on extensive research and frequent consultation with sexual violence prevention experts. The curriculum is interactive, based on adult learning theory and the nine principles of prevention. With input from the pilot training participants, the curriculum was finalized. The ASBA Training Manual was produced.

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 21 2013. Having a healthy membership roster is critical to ASBA success. The more ASBA members there are in the alliance, the greater the coverage of well-trained bar staff and owners who are working to prevent sexual assault in their establishments, and the safer the environment is for patrons. In 2013, bars are being contacted and ASBA trainings are being conducted throughout the state. Although the ADHS/SVPEP Program Manager will conduct a limited number of additional trainings throughout the State in 2013, it is imperative that others conduct the training as well. Several possibilities include: • training existing SVPEP contractors and expanding their contracts so that they can arrange and deliver the ASBA training in their regions; • training other state and/or community entities (such as local police departments) that may want to provide the free ASBA training in their communities; • determining with the Arizona Department of Liquor Licenses and Control if BASIC 4 training could be expanded to include ASBA training, or if BASIC 4 trainers could be trained to become ASBA trainers as well. In order to expand the pool of trainers, a train-the-trainer protocol for ASBA training will be developed and piloted with ADHS/SVPEP, the Arizona Department of Liquor Licenses and Control, and police departments or other community group. This procedure will include the ADHS/SVPEP Program Manager conducting the initial ASBA training with the potential ASBA teachers as participants; observing the new instructors delivering the training themselves; and debriefing with the new trainers. The ASBA membership requirements include active participation in local coalitions to prevent sexual violence. It is important for ADHS/SVPEP to better define this requirement and to develop a blueprint for creating and building local alliances, starting in Flagstaff and expanding to other regions. ADHS/SVPEP may want to brainstorm with key players to determine and support possible ways to assist regional areas in forming and/or participating in local sexual violence prevention alliances.

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 22 Appendix B: Data Collection Processes The Delphi investigation survey process is an information collection method well suited for evaluations that focus on “What do we need?” Named after an oracle who predicted the future, Delphi is ideally suited for needs assessments or analyses of future directions. Delphi investigations are multi-level. Level One presents a broad perspective of questions for written response from participants. A large invitee pool of potential participants is selected. Invitees who respond in writing to the Delphi One survey questions become Delphi participants in the subsequent Delphi levels. The Level One Delphi also performs an important function in the Delphi design process. Data from Level One becomes the information basis for creation of subsequent Delphi Investigation surveys. From Delphi One data, a Level Two survey is developed. Level Two data is used to develop Level Three. Each Delphi level narrows the scope of questions in order to solicit more detailed and specific information. This process is demanding and time-consuming for participants and has the potential of losing participants at each level.

The focus group format brings together a group, generally of 6 to 12 people, to participate in a guided discussion led by a trained facilitator. Participants are chosen because of the relevance of the topic and their relationship to the topic being discussed. For example, bar owners, managers, and staff members can provide valuable insights into what is important for them to be taught in order to help them prevent sexual assault. The Delphi captures individual ideas, and the focus group shares ideas in a small group. Group dynamics can bring out aspects of the topic that may not have emerged from individual Delphi responses; Delphi responses are not affected by others’ influence. The use of both Delphi and focus group methodologies provides a wealth of data for developing your statewide safer bar alliance and training curriculum. In Arizona, we conducted Delphi surveys statewide and facilitated focus groups in multiple locations in Arizona, basically in areas near the three state universities. Our survey and focus group findings gave us the insights and direction needed for building ASBA.

Your SVPEP contractors working throughout your state may be able to recommend key participants (SVP experts, bar owners/staff) for you to contact to obtain their ideas through Delphi or focus group. You should not have an individual complete both a Delphi survey and also participate in a focus group.

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 23 Appendix C: Arizona Delphi & Focus Group Questions Level One Delphi Survey Questions 1. What information and skills should be the core of a comprehensive sexual violence prevention bystander intervention training program for owners and staff of bars and alcohol-serving establishments? Please explain. Provide details (and examples, if appropriate). 2. What information and skills should be the core of a comprehensive sexual violence prevention bystander intervention training program for patrons of bars and alcohol- serving establishments? Please explain. Provide details (and examples, if appropriate).

(Note: after the surveys were received from Level One Delphi, they were compiled and grouped into broad categories. The Level Two Delphi investigation instrument was developed using the broad categories from Delphi One responses.) Level Two Delphi Survey Questions Part A: Please rank from 1 to 9 the following core training content in the order of their importance in a bar bystander training program for bar/alcohol-serving establishments’ owners and staff members in Arizona. Please use 1 as most important and 9 as least important. Provide a rationale for your ranking.

Part B: Please rank from 1 to 9 the following core training content in the order of their importance in a bar bystander training program for bar/alcohol-serving establishments’ patrons in Arizona. Please use 1 as most important and 9 as least important. Provide a rationale for your ranking. Focus Group Questions for Bar Owners and Employees 1. What is your definition of sexual harassment? 2. While working, have you ever seen a situation where a patron was being sexually harassed or in danger of sexual violence? Did you intervene? How? 3. What kind of things do you think your bar could do to create a safe, comfortable place where customers want to come and enjoy themselves and be free from sexual harassment?

4. Thinking about a bar bystander program for Arizona, what kind of information and skills would you want to learn to help you create a place where you and your customers feel safe from sexual harassment and aggression?

Tools for Developing a Statewide Safer Bars Alliance to Reduce Sexual Assault, August 2013 24 5. Should training on sexual violence prevention be part of the state’s liquor licensing process and/or part of the mandatory alcohol certification class for owners and staff members? 6. If there was a bystander training session for customers, what kind of information do you think would be important for their safety? 7. What kind of media support (e.g., posters, napkins, coasters, etc.) do you think would help your customers be more watchful of potentially dangerous situations and seek help?

8. What kind of incentives/support would encourage bars/alcohol-serving establishment to want to participate in a bars bystander project? Focus Group Questions for Bar Patrons 1. What is your definition of sexual harassment? 2. How would you define a “bystander”? 3. Have you ever watched a situation or been part of a situation in a bar where drinking led to sexual harassment or aggression? 4. What happened after you saw or were part of the situation? 5. What kind of things do you think a bar owner could do to create a safe, comfortable place where you and your friends would want to come and be free from sexual aggression?

6. Thinking about a bystander training session for you as a patron, what kind of information and skills would you want to learn to help keep you, your friends, and others safe from sexual aggression while drinking at a bar? 7. Thinking about a bystander training session for all bar staff, what kind of information and skills would you want them to learn to help keep you, your friends, and others safe from sexual aggression while drinking at their bar? 8. What kind of media support (e.g., posters, napkins, coasters, etc.) do you think would help you and other patrons be more comfortable to intervene if you saw sexually aggressive behaviors while drinking at a bar? 9. What kind of incentives would encourage customers to participate in a bystander training program?

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