2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub

 
2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub
Local Employment
        Planning Council

2018 Community
Labour Market Plan

            This program is funded in part by the Government
            of Canada and the Government of Ontario
2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub
2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

                                                    TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                                    Executive Summary
                                                    The Local Employment Planning Council Pilot
                                                            Background and context
                                                            Who we are and how we work
                                                            Key accomplishments and ongoing activities
                 Who lives in
              Ottawa and where                      Building the Community Labour Market Plan
                  they live
                                                    (CLMP)
                                                            Overview of data sources
                   Ottawa’s                                 Community consultations
                labour pool and
                  employment                        The Ottawa Picture in 2018
                                                            Perceptions of the local labour market
                                                            Who lives in Ottawa and where
                  Where people                              Ottawa’s labour pool and employment
                      work                                  A closer look at key talent pools
                  Industry view                             Where people work (industry view)
                                                            What people do (occupation view)
                                                            How we connect job seekers to jobs
                                                            Local workforce challenges and opportunities
                    What
                  people do
                                                    Key Considerations for Moving Forward
                Occupation view
                                                            Role of the Local Employment Planning Council
                                                            Executive Steering Group Priorities / Next Steps

               How we connect
                                                             Ottawa Employment Hub, your Local Employment Planning
              job seekers to jobs                            Council, would like to thank the 150 plus community partners
                                                             who have worked with us over the course of the LEPC pilot and
                                                             who provided valuable input into this Community Labour
                                                             Market Plan.

                                                                               This program is funded in part by the Government
                                                                                       of Canada and the Government of Ontario

                                                                                                       Page 1 │ OTTAWA 2018 CLMP
2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub
2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

 The Local Employment
                                                                            The LEPC pilots in Ontario
 Planning Council (LEPC) Pilot                                              Former ADM David Fulford, MAESD:
                                                                            “Expanding the activities of existing Local
                                                                            Boards…the new LEPC pilots will have
 BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT                                                     greater capacity to provide funding for
                                                                            community-based projects to support the
 Eight Local Employment Planning Councils are being piloted in Ontario,
                                                                            local workforce, improve coordinated
 running from December 2015 to March 2019, with funding from the
                                                                            planning of employment and training
 Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development (formerly Ministry
                                                                            services, and help employers, workers and
 of Colleges, Training and Universities).
                                                                            people looking for work make informed
                                                                            choices about training and careers. LEPCs
 Building on the work done over the past four years by Labour Market
                                                                            will also improve local labour market
 Ottawa, Algonquin College won the bid to administer an 24-month Local
                                                                            information to assist communities to
 Employment Planning Council (LEPC) pilot for the Ottawa community.
                                                                            better anticipate local labour gaps, and
 The Ottawa LEPC, branded as “Ottawa Employment Hub”, works with
                                                                            current and future employment
 three formal LEPC partners:
                                                                            opportunities.”
         Ottawa Chamber of Commerce
         Ottawa Community Coalition for Literacy                           Ottawa Employment Hub
         Employment Ontario Ottawa Network                                 The Local Employment Planning Council
                                                                            (LEPC) in Ottawa has branded itself as
                                                                            Ottawa Employment Hub to reflect the
 THE OTTAWA PILOT                                                           dynamic activities included in its mandate;
                                                                            those activities, and the desired client
 Who we are and how we work                                                 outcomes, are reflected in its credo:
 The LEPC is overseen by the Secretariat (eight staff) which is guided by
 the Executive Steering Group (ESG) in the Ottawa pilot. Working groups
 and the Central Planning Table feed into the ESG as advisory committees.

                                                                               Connect – we will connect with
                                                                                employers, service providers, and
                                                                                other stakeholders for mutual
                                                                                learning and leveraging each others’
                                                                                knowledge and expertise to connect
                                                                                job seekers and learners to jobs.
                                                                               Plan – we will collaborate as a
                                                                                community to identify local
                                                                                opportunities and challenges in the
                                                                                local labour market.
                                                                               Learn & Work – through our
                                                                                connecting and planning, we will
                                                                                connect job seekers and learners to
                                                                                the programs and services that they
                                                                                need to become the human capital for
                                                                                which local employers are looking.

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2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub
2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

                                            2017-18 Deliverables
The Community Labour Market Plan
ties in closely with two of the key         Working within its governance structure, the Ottawa LEPC published its
activity areas for all LEPCs                2017-18 business plan in May 2017 to outline the locally-identified priorities
                                            for the June 2017 to September 2018 period of the pilot.
Integrated Planning                         It is organized under five key activity areas:
The ministry expects LEPCs to serve as
key mobilizers of employers, service                 Integrated Planning
providers, other ministries and levels of            Labour Market Information and Intelligence:
government operating locally, and other              Service Coordination for Employers:
community groups to engage in more                   Research and Innovation:
collaborative local planning                         Sharing Best Practices and Promising Approaches

   Service planning (with Employment       The Community Labour Market Plan (CLMP) is a required operational activity
    Ontario and non-Employment              for each LEPC pilot.
    Ontario organizations) to identify
    and address service gaps and
    challenges for clients accessing
                                            OTTAWA LEPC - 2017-18 PERFORMANCE COMMITMENTS
                                                                                           Labour Market Information     Service Coordination for
    services.                                            Integrated Planning
                                                                                                   & Intelligence                Employers
   Workforce development planning           1. Career Gear school-to-work transition tool 3. LMI product suite review 4. Employer-tested on-line
                                                roll-out to schools in English and French     with end users,             tools to facilitate
    with local industry and community        2. A community action plan to address            refinement and roll-out to  employer access to local
                                                immigrant employment priorities               service providers and       LMI, programs and
    stakeholders, supported by local            developed in partnership with Ottawa          employers                   services
    labour market information, to               Local Immigration Partnership (OLIP)
    determine skills needs/future skills                     5. An expanded one-year Mentorship Pilot for persons in the criminal justice system
                                                             6. A dialogue session to share best practices in workforce planning/labour partnership
    requirements and/or prevent skills         Research
                                                                projects and identify a local project
                                              & Innovation
    shortages in growth sectors                              7. A dialogue session to share best practices in collaborations between industry
                                                                associations and workforce planning entities and identify a local project
                                                 Sharing Best      8. Multi-media products that capture success stories/practices, shared at annual
Labour Market Information &                  Practices & Promising    learning event to facilitate ongoing knowledge-sharing both locally and
Intelligence                                      Approaches          provincially
                                                             • Community Labour Market Planning Report – Identify local labour market challenges, opportunities
   Expanding current understanding of                         and recommendations
                                                             • LMI Strategy Report – LEPCs will work collectively to identify best practices relating to LMI products
    local labour market issues and            Operational      and develop a common LMI strategy with a roadmap for implementation
                                               Activities    • Magnet – Share insight dashboard findings and facilitate community-wide learnings
    needs and improving access to                            • Youth Entrepreneurship Networking Group of Ottawa (YENGO) lead
                                                             • Apprenticeship Workshops – Develop and deliver in partnership with MAESD and EOON, OCCL
    labour market information                                • ReNEW Project with OCLF – Exploring small business succession with newcomers
    resources for various community
    audiences (e.g., employers, service
    providers, levels of government,        BUILDING ON YEAR ONE ACTIVITIES
    and other community stakeholders).      Ottawa Employment Hub has worked with more than 150 community
   While analysing and interpreting        partners over the course of the pilot to advance on local priorities,
    current data sources is part of this    including:
    work, the ministry expects LEPCs to              Career Gear school-to-work transition tool development
    gather local labour market                       Ottawa this Quarter, LMI 101 for Service Providers and Employers,
    intelligence, and analyse and                     Sector Spotlights and other LMI publications
    interpret the impacts on their                   Annual Building Connections learning event for 400 service
    community.                                        providers and employers (with youth networking component)
                                                     Mentorship program inventory and funded mentorship pilot for
                                                      youth in the criminal justice system
                                                      Refugee 613 Pathways event and process evaluation; Funder
                                                      inventory; Magnet platform to connect job seekers to opportunities

                                                                                                                               OTTAWA 2018 CLMP │ Page 3
2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub
2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

 Building the Community Labour
 Market Plan (CLMP)
 Ottawa’s approach
 The Community Labour Market Planning (CLMP) Report was submitted to
 MAESD in March 2018 for review, translation, and full publication by
                                                                               Overview of data sources
 May 31, 2018. In Ottawa, we will be validating the initial report in
 further round of local consultations with our advisory committees and         Statistics Canada
 formal governance components over the next two months to review the              2006 Census, 2011 NHS, 2016
 data.                                                                             Census
                                                                                  Labour Force Survey
 The validated, public report will identify local labour market challenges,
                                                                                  Annual migration estimates
 opportunities and recommendations to improve service coordination,
                                                                                  Estimates of population
 integrated local planning, collecting and disseminating local labour
                                                                                  Canadian business counts
 market knowledge, and addressing identified local labour market
 challenges and opportunities.
                                                                               Emsi Analyst 2017.3 dataset
                                                                               Compiles data from:
 Community consultations                                                          Canadian business counts
                                                                                  2001 and 2006 census, 2011 NHS
 During February 2018, Ottawa Employment Hub conducted more than                  Survey of Employment, Payrolls
 40 stakeholder interviews with members of our Executive Steering                  and Hours
 Group, Central Planning Table and Working Groups. We also held                   Labour Force Survey
 consultation sessions with each of these groups (five in total) to find out      Canadian Occupational Projection
 what our community wanted to include in the report. These interviews              System
 and consultations were also used to build the qualitative narrative              CANSIM demographics
 around the full investigation of the “numbers.”                                  Postsecondary Student
                                                                                   Information System
 Interviews focused on:
         Local workforce challenges and opportunities (the overall local      Other data sources
          labour market, industry trends, skills and occupations in demand        City of Ottawa
          or declining, challenges in recruitment and retention,                  MAESD (Employment Ontario data)
          opportunities that can be leveraged, barriers to employment).           Immigration, Refugees and
         LMI and local priorities/actions (LMI requirements, priorities and       Citizenship Canada
          key groups to engage).                                                  MDB Insight and Vicinity Jobs
         Role of the LEPC in moving forward (what we do well and what            Magnet Insight Dashboard
          we could do differently; how to best engage stakeholders).

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2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub
2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

                                     The Ottawa Picture
Most see Ottawa as a job seekers’    Perceptions of the Local Labour Market
market right now with low
unemployment and many                Ottawa is a “hot” job market right now
opportunities.
                                     There are still barriers for specific groups
                                            High number of students in Ottawa seen to impact on ability to
Some still see discrepancy
                                             find entry-level or low-skilled work for barriered clients and
between experience for which                 others who are new to the labour market
employers are looking and what              Bilingual requirements impact job seekers’ ability to find work,
job seekers have to offer.                   especially for those whose first language may not be English or
                                             French
                                            Some report that finding entry-level work in Tech sector can still
Ottawa considered a distinct and             be a challenge for new grads and those new to Ottawa
more complex, harder to predict,
labour market than rest of Eastern   Some labour shortages reported
Ontario.                                    Reports of difficulty finding workers with technical skills in the
                                             Construction sector
                                            Always seems to be demand for certified trades people
There is a growing tendency
                                            Manufacturing sector has hard time finding and retaining people
toward part-time work.                      Demand for experienced tech workers and both entry and senior
                                             level people in specialized areas (Big Data, AI cybersecurity)

More job seekers looking to
                                     Mixed perceptions on key sectors
starting their own business as an
                                            Some feel that the Tech sector has not fully recovered and that
option (many looking at self-
                                             finding entry level jobs can still be a challenge; several questions
employment versus a start-up).               the actual size of the Tech sector in Ottawa in terms of number
                                             of local jobs created
                                            Others see Tech sector growth as key to Ottawa’s success;
Millennials want to focus more on           Some perception that Public Admin jobs may decrease but
work-life balance.                           others see the fact that we are government town as offering lot
                                             of opportunities

                                     Challenges and opportunities
                                            Employers seem more ready to spend in money bringing in
                                             experience from outside Ottawa versus investing in local talent
                                            Funding should focus on increasing skills and job readiness of
                                             barriered clients (perhaps instead of wage subsidies)
                                            Credential recognition seen as key for immigrants
                                            Concern that automation will have impact on lower-skilled jobs
                                             that are most suitable for some barriered clients
                                            Non-profit sector (not government per se) could be leveraged
                                             more

                                                                                           OTTAWA 2018 CLMP │ Page 5
2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub
2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

Who lives in Ottawa (2017 population)                                                                                                                                          Change in population by age group1
                                                                                                                                                                                                    2012         2017 Change
                                                                                                                                                                                       All ages 924,466      994,837
      2012                                                                    2017                                                            2020                                 0 to 4 years 50,183        52,405      4%
                                       Past 5 years                                                    Next 3 years                                                                5 to 9 years 49,724        52,898      6%
   924,466                              8% increase                         994,837                         1% increase                    1,008,825*                            10 to 14 years 50,143        51,973      4%
                                                                                                                                                                                 15 to 19 years 59,289        57,817     -2%
                                      ONTARIO ↑ 6%                                                      ONTARIO ↑ 2%
                                                                                                                                      *Projection source: Emsi Analyst           20 to 24 years 73,141        74,542      2%
                                                                                                                                                                                 25 to 29 years 69,353        81,375     17%
                     Under                        15 to                           30 to                                                    55 &
                       15                          29                              54                                                      over                                  30 to 34 years 63,802        73,585     15%
                                                                                                                                                                                 35 to 39 years 63,260        67,242      6%
               157,276                        213,734                          343,229                                                280,598                                    40 to 44 years 66,156        65,090     -2%
 100,000
                                                                                                                                                                                 45 to 49 years 72,698        65,803     -9%
  75,000

  50,000                                         74,542
                                                          81,375
                                                                   73,585
                                                                            67,242 65,090 65,803 71,509 70,215
                                                                                                                                                                                 50 to 54 years 71,829        71,509      0%
                                                                                                               58,919
           52,405 52,898 51,973 57,817                                                                                            49,357                                         55 to 59 years 60,744        70,215     16%
  25,000
                                                                                                                                           37,919
                                                                                                                                                    25,931 18,359 19,898
      0                                                                                                                                                                          60 to 64 years 51,063        58,919     15%
           Under 5    5 to 9   10 to 14 15 to 19 20 to 24 25 to 29 30 to 34 35 to 39 40 to 44 45 to 49 50 to 54 55 to 59 60 to 64 65 to 69 70 to 74 75 to 79 80 to 84   85 &
                                                                                                                                                                        over
                                                                                                                                                                                 65 to 69 years 39,551        49,357     25%
                                                                                                                                                                                 70 to 74 years 28,140        37,919     35%
            Female                                                                                                                                     Male                      75 to 79 years 21,757        25,931     19%
            507,690                                                                                                                                  487,147
                                                                                                                                                                                 80 to 84 years 16,718        18,359     10%
             51%                                                                                                                                      49%                        85 to 89 years 10,804        12,064     12%
                                                                                                                                                                                  90 and over     6,111        7,834     28%

OVERALL POPULATION AND MIGRATION

Over the past five years, Ottawa’s population increased by 8%, surpassing the
                                                                                                                                                                               Migration by age group, Ottawa
growth rate for Ontario overall. Population growth is expected to slow down
                                                                                                                                                                               2011-20162
over the next 3 years in Ottawa, with only a 1% increase forecast. Growth is
also expected to slow in Ontario overall (2% increase forecast).                                                                                                               80,000

                                                                                                                                                                               70,000                        71,202
The background colours in the Change in population table on this page indicate                                                                                                 60,000
where the 2012 population numbers would end up five years later, assuming                                                                                                                                    55,324
                                                                                                                                                                               50,000
no migration. For example, there were 50,183 people aged 0 to 4 years in
2012; if all of these people continued to live in Ottawa in 2017 and no new                                                                                                    40,000
                                                                                                                                                                                                   27,525
                                                                                                                                                                                             30,288                   23,195
people arrived, you would expect the 2017 population number for those aged                                                                                                     30,000
5 to 9 years to match the 0 to 4 years figure from 2012. The table shows that                                                                                                                22,495 17,926            25,123
                                                                                                                                                                               20,000
the 2017 number was actually 52,898, indicating a net in-migration for that age                                                                                                                             15,878     10,445
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          9,223
cohort.                                                                                                                                                                        10,000
                                                                                                                                                                                         7,793 9,599
                                                                                                                                                                                    0                                1,222
Ottawa saw a net increase in population in the 15 to 29 year range that could                                                                                                                                  -1,928
                                                                                                                                                                               -10,000
be related to challenges around youth employment (as demand for jobs goes                                                                                                                0-17 18-24 25-44 45-64          65+
up with more people). This will be explored further when we look at Ottawa’s
employment and labour force in the next section.                                                                                                                                          In-migrants         Out-migrants
                                                                                                                                                                                          Net-migrants
The fact that Ottawa’s population is decreasing for those between 40 and 54
years may reflect some of the difficulty reported in finding mid-level workers for
some skilled occupations.

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2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub
2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

                                   OTTAWA’S 2017 POPULATION PYRAMID4
Share of overall Ottawa
                                   Ottawa’s population pyramid shows that lower birth rates are being mitigated by
population, 20163
                                   increased immigration. Younger age groups tend to have slightly more males, while
2017 consultations pointed         females account for a majority share as the population ages.
to these key population
groups to explore further.
            Immigrants &
     23%     Newcomers
               (arriving in
      3%    previous 5 years)

       ?      Persons
                with
             Disabilities

             Indigenous
      3%       People

               Youth
     37%      Under 29

                Older
     28%     55 and over

Data challenges around
                                   A CLOSER LOOK AT SPECIFIC POPULATIONS6
Persons with Disabilities
A 2010 report5, referencing        Below we show trends over time. There are challenges in acquiring accurate counts of
2006 Census data, states:          persons with disabilities at the local level (explained in the note to the left).
Ottawa’s disability
prevalence increased during         Immigrants &         2006
                                                                    5 year trend
                                                                                        2011
                                                                                                   Past 5 years
                                                                                                                      2016
the period 2001-2006. In             Newcomers          178,540                       202,605                        216,505
                                       (arriving in                  13% increase                    7% increase
2006, 149,425 people in             previous 5 years)
                                                         29,650                        32,485                          30,075
                                                                    ONTARIO ↑ 6%                   ONTARIO ↑ 7%
Ottawa had disabilities,
representing                          Persons                      5 year trend                    Past 5 years
                                        with            149,425      x% increase        N/A          x% increase       N/A
17.7% of Ottawa’s                    Disabilities
                                                                    ONTARIO ↑ x%
population. This represents a                                                                      ONTARIO ↑ x%

20% increase since 2001                                            5 year trend                    Past 5 years
(25,625 more individuals).           Indigenous
                                       People
                                                        12,965*      40% increase     18,180        26% increase      22,955
                                                                    ONTARIO ↑ 24%                 ONTARIO ↑ 24%
LEPC Data Check
                                                                    5 year trend                   Past 5 years
Statistics                             Youth
Canada advises                        Under 29          309,225       8% increase     334,080        3% increase     345,220
                                                                     ONTARIO ↑ 3%                  ONTARIO ↑ 2%
that Census filter questions
                                                                   5 year trend                    Past 5 years
should not be used to estimate          Older
disability because of the large      55 and over        190,925      18% increase    224,735        18% increase     265,895
                                                                    ONTARIO ↑ 17%                 ONTARIO ↑ 16%
number of 'false positives.' See
the PWD section later in the
report for more information.

                                                                                                              OTTAWA 2018 CLMP │ Page 7
2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub
2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

IMMIGRATION TRENDS
                                                                                                   Immigrants make up 23% of the
In the past 5 years, the number of refugees landing in Ottawa is already at 67% of
                                                                                                   population (216,505) in 20168
the total who landed in the previous 10 years. While the current share is lower than
the 1980 to 1990 period (24% vs. 30%), this represents a much greater number of                       Established immigrants (>10
refugees than those who landed in 1980, due to overall immigration increases.                          years) make up 17% of the
                                                                                                       overall population
Immigrant population (of those who arrived since 1980), by admission category and                     Recent immigrants (5-10 years)
period of immigration, Ottawa, 20167                                                                   make up 3% of the population
                                                                                                      Very recent immigrants
  70,000
                                                                                    60,490             (newcomers here
2018 Community Labour Market Plan - Local Employment Planning Council - Ottawa Employment Hub
2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

                                   Where people live in Ottawa in 201713

Pop. Change - 2015 to 2017
 2,216   Barrhaven
 2,174   Gloucester-South Nepean   DATA HIGHLIGHTS
 2,101   Cumberland
                                   In 2017, Barrhaven continued to be Ottawa’s ward with the highest population.
 2,029   Stittsville
                                   This ward also saw the most growth with 2,216 more people in 2017 than two
 2,003   Rideau-Goulbourn          years previously.
 1,388   Kanata South
 1,363   Kanata North              Five wards showed relatively small population declines from 2015 to 2017.
 1,239   Somerset                  Orléans showed the biggest decline with a drop of 358 people. All five wards
 1,119   Kitchissippi              showing decline were Urban wards.
   977   Rideau-Rockcliffe
   809   Rideau-Vanier             All four Rural wards showed growth, with Cumberland showing the third highest
   801   Innes                     growth of all wards, with a 2,101 increase in population over the past two years.
   398   Capital                   Rideau-Goulbourn’s population also grew by more than 2,000.
   341   Osgoode
   164   Gloucester-Southgate      Ottawa showed a very slight increase in the percent of the population residing in
   105   Beacon Hill-Cyrville      rural wards (from 13.2% to 13.5%).
    36   Bay
    27   West Carleton-March
   -66   Knoxdale-Merivale                     In 2017, Ottawa had 416,217 households. As in 2016, Rideau-Vanier
   -76   River                                 had the most households with 28,317. West Carleton-March had the
  -157   Alta Vista                            fewest households with 9,129.
  -216   College
  -358   Orléans

                                                                                                   OTTAWA 2018 CLMP │ Page 9
2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

Labour pool and employment in Ottawa14
The graphic below pulls data from the Labour Force Survey (considered the most
                                                                                                                                    COMMON DEFINITIONS
accurate source of employment/unemployment data for the time periods between
census surveys).                                                                                                                    Labour pool
                                                                                                                                       Population 15 and over
                                                                                                                                        (considered working age)
                                                                                                                                    Labour force
                                                                                                                                       Number of persons 15 years
                                                                                                                                        of age and over who were
                                                                                                                                        employed or unemployed
                                                                                                                                        (actively looking for work)
                                                                                                                                    Not in the labour force
                                                                                                                                       Those of working age who
                                                                                                                                        were neither employed nor
                                                                                                                                        actively working for work
                                                                                                                                    Unemployed
                                                                                                                                       Number of persons who
                                                                                                                                        were without work, had
                                                                                                                                        looked for work in the past
                                                                                                                                        four weeks, and were
                                                                                                                                        available for work

A CLOSER LOOK AT EMPLOYMENT AND WORK ACTIVITY IN 201715                                                                             Unemployment rate
                                                                                                                                       The percentage of the labour
                                                                                                                                        force that is actively looking
                                                                                                                                        for work (unemployed)
                                                           2017                                                                     Participation rate
    2016                                                                                                                              The percentage of the labour
                                 Year-on-year
                                                                                                                                         pool (pop. 15 years of age
  543,400                        0.6% increase                  546,700                        81%
                                                                                                                                         and over) participating in the
                                 ONTARIO ↑ 1.8%                                                                                          labour force
                                                                                                                           19%
       Full-time                   Full-time               Full-time               Full-time                Full-time               Employment rate
                                                                                                                                      The percentage of the labour
                     Part-time                 Part-time               Part-time               Part-time                Part-time

                                                                                                                                        pool (pop. 15 years of age
         46%          54%           88%        12%          91%         9%          84%        16%           52%         48%            and over) who are employed
                                                                                                                                    Full-time employment
                                                                                                                                      Persons who usually work 30
                                                                                                                                          hours or more per week at
     Full-time                   FEMALE                                                MALE            Full-time
                                                                                                                                          their main or only job
                   Part-time                                                                                       Part-time
                                                                                                                                    Part-time employment
      75%          25%                                                                                     86%      14%              Persons who usually work
                                                                                                                                        less than 30 hours per week
                                                                                                                                        at their main or only job

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2018 OTTAWA COMMUNITY LABOUR MARKET PLAN │ OTTAWA EMPLOYMENT HUB (LEPC)

                                  A CLOSER LOOK AT FIVE-YEAR TRENDS
Comparing                         Ottawa Population & Labour Force, 5 years16
2016 Census                       The increased population has generally tracked against employment numbers, while
and Labour                        the labour force and unemployment numbers fluctuated. This could speak to older
Force Survey Data                 workers exiting the labour force.
Census data is                     900,000
                                                                                             836,800         850,700
                                                              814,800        825,300
considered more                                  802,800
                      OTTAWA
accurate than LFS      overall
                                   800,000
data due to              2006
increased sample                   700,000
size. 2016 Census      5.8%
                                                              571,800        566,900         580,000         578,900
data shows 7.1%                    600,000       559,600
                         2011
unemployment
rate, while 2016       6.9%        500,000                                                   543,400         546,700
                                                 523,500      533,800        531,100
LFS data shows           2016
6.3% for 2016.                     400,000
                       7.1%                      2013          2014          2015            2016            2017
                                                 Population over 15           Labour force              Employment

                                  EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT
Employment & training supports
                                  Labour force status by age, Ottawa, 201618
38,640 unemployed workers in
                                                   In the                        Not in the       Partici-   Employ-   Unemploy-
Ottawa in 2016; 14,196 were                        labour                        labour           pation       ment        ment
Employment Ontario clients (37%                    force     Employed Unemployed force               rate       rate        rate
of unemployed population)17        15 to 24         83,850     69,080      14,765      47,655    63.8%       52.5%       17.6%
   10,237 in Employment           25 to 34        114,650   106,320        8,330      15,985    87.8%       81.4%        7.3%
    Service                        35 to 44        114,440   109,335        5,100      14,305    88.9%       84.9%        4.5%
   2,013 in Literacy and Basic    45 to 54        128,630   123,440        5,190      18,820    87.2%       83.7%        4.0%
    Skills program                 55 to 64         82,780     78,705       4,075      46,225    64.2%       61.0%        4.9%
   1,528 new Apprenticeship       65 to 74         18,745     17,735       1,010      67,085    21.8%       20.7%        5.4%
    registrations                  75 and over       2,545      2,380         170      51,910     4.7%        4.4%        6.7%
   418 in Second Career
    program                       Unemployment rate by age and sex, Ottawa, 201619

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LABOUR POOL AND EMPLOYMENT FIVE-YEAR TRENDS
The Labour Force Survey is considered the most accurate source of LMI for the time
                                                                                                                                               A closer look at unemployment
periods between census surveys. Over the past five years, Ottawa’s labour force has
                                                                                                                                               trends over past five years
not kept pace with population increases, likely due to the aging population.
                                                                                                                                               While the number of unemployed
Five-year trends, # of people in labour pool, labour force, employment, Ottawa20                                                               has fluctuated, rates have tended
                                                                                                                                               to decrease because of general
 900,000                                                                                836,800        850,700                                 increases in the labour force.
                                                      814,800          825,300
                                       802,800
 800,000                                                                                                                                           Unemployment          Rate
                                                                                                                                                 2013        36,100       6.5%
 700,000                                                                                                                                                                  6.6%
                                                                                                                                                 2014        38,000
                                       559,600        571,800          566,900          580,000        578,900                                   2015        35,800       6.3%
 600,000
                                                                                                                                                 2016        36,600       6.3%
 500,000                                                                                543,400        546,700
                                       523,500        533,800          531,100                                                                   2017        32,200       5.6%
 400,000
                                        2013           2014              2015            2016          2017
                                      Labour pool (pop. 15 and over)            Labour force         Employment

A SPOTLIGHT ON THE PAST YEAR
                                                                                                                                               A closer look at
The chart below tracks month-to-month changes in Ottawa’s labour market over the                                                               the Labour Force
course of 2017. We see that both the labour force and employment generally trended                                                             Survey
downward until the final quarter (Oct. to Dec.) when there was a recovery in both. An
increase in employment in the first quarter meant that the lowest unemployment rate
                                                                                                                                               Methodology
was seen in March (when only 5.0% of labour force participants were unemployed).
                                                                                                                                                Conducted via telephone and
Meanwhile, July was the most difficult month for labour force participants (6.5%
                                                                                                                                                  in-person interviews. The
unemployment rate).
                                                                                                                                                  monthly LFS sample size is
                                                                                                                                                  approximately 56,000
Monthly labour force activity, Ottawa, 2017, seasonally adjusted 21
                                                                                                                                                  households nationwide,
                                585                                                                              7.5                              resulting in the collection of
                                580
                                                                                                                 7
                                                                                                                                                  labour market information for
  X1000 (seasonally adjusted)

                                575                                                                                                               approx. 100,000 individuals.
                                                                                                                       Unemployment rate (%)

                                                                          6.5
                                570                                                                              6.5
                                                                   6.1
                                565                                              5.9                                                           Seasonally adjusted
                                      5.7                    5.8                         5.8 5.8 5.9       5.7   6
                                560                                                                                                              Datasets that have been
                                555                                                                              5.5                               adjusted to remove annually-
                                            5.1 5
                                550                        5.1                                                   5                                 recurring fluctuations
                                545                                                                                                                attributable to climate and
                                                                                                                 4.5
                                540                                                                                                                regular events (e.g. vacations
                                535                                                                              4                                 and holiday seasons).

                                                                                                                                               Seasonally unadjusted
                                            Labour force         Employment            Unemployment rate                                         Datasets that have not been
                                                                                                                                                   adjusted to account for
                                                                                                                                                   seasonal variations.

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                                    COMPARATIVE TRENDS
A closer look at
commuting                           A closer look at unemployment rates show that while Ottawa consistently has lower
patterns22                          unemployment than Ontario and Toronto, the gap is closing. For example, in 2013
                                    Toronto’s rate was 1.6 higher than Ottawa’s, while this difference was only 0.8
Given that
                                    percentage points in 2017.
Ottawa is part of the Ottawa-
Gatineau Census Metropolitan
                                    Comparative five-year unemployment rate trends, Ottawa, Ontario, Toronto23
Area, it is important to
understand the commuter flow
between the two sides of the
provincial border.
   93% of Ottawans with a
    usual place of work stay in
    Ottawa
   5% (18,710) commute to
    Gatineau from Ottawa
   2% (10,010) commute
    elsewhere outside Ottawa
   37% of those residing in
    Gatineau with a usual place
    of work commute to Ottawa

                                    OTHER WORKFORCE COMPARATORS OF INTEREST (Toronto and Ontario):
Quick Employed Workforce Facts24
                                          Ottawa’s workers are less likely to use public transportation than workers in
   20% use public transportation          Toronto, and more likely than workers in Ontario overall (20% in Ottawa vs.
    to get to work                         24% in Toronto and 15% in Ontario)

   8% are self-employed                  Ottawans who work full year, full time are less likely than those in Toronto
                                           and Ontario overall to be self-employed (8% vs. 11% for Toronto and ON)
   55% work full year, full time         A slightly higher percentage of Ottawa’s employed labour force works full
   27% use both English and               year, full time (55%) than in Toronto and Ontario (both 52%)
    French regularly at work              Ottawa’s workers are much more likely than those in Toronto and Ontario to
                                           regularly use both official languages in the workplace (27% vs. 2% and 5%
   $52,798 average annual                 respectively)
    income
                                          Ottawa’s workers have a higher average annual income than those in
                                           Toronto and Ontario ($52,798 vs. $51,801 and $47,369 respectively)

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Education Trends
EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT AND PROGRAMS OF STUDY25
                                                                                                A closer look at those with no post-
                                                                                                secondary completion
                                                                                                While a similar proportion of males
                                                                                                and females in the labour pool have
                                                                                                no post-secondary completion, the
                                                                                                unemployment rate of females with no
                                                                                                postsecondary completion is 0.9 points
                                                                                                higher than their male counterparts.
                                                                                                 No Post-Secondary      % of
                                                                                                 Completion             pool    UE rate
                                                                                                  Ottawa overall        37%     11.4%
                                                                                                         Females        38%     11.8%
                                                                                                           Males        36%     10.9%

                                                                                                Program of Study
                                                                                                Males more likely to have STEM
Programs of study and work status26                                                             education and more likely to have a
The table below shows the # of those over 15 with and without                                   trades postsecondary completion
postsecondary credentials in Ottawa, as well as field of study for those with                    Females                         Males
postsecondary credentials. It also looks at the percentage of those individuals                            No postsecondary
working at the time of the 2016 Census.                                                          36%       completion
                                                                                                                                  38%
                               Postsecondary
                                educational         # Employed            % Employed
                                                                                                 9%        STEM                   22%
 Field of study                 attainment                                                       55%       BHASE (non-STEM)       40%
                              Females     Males   Females     Males Females   Males   Overall
                                                                                                           Trades, services,
 Total (all levels of
                              417,360   390,260   249,570   257,425   60%     66%      63%       6%        natural resources…
                                                                                                                                  11%
 education)
 No postsecondary
 certificate, diploma or      150,335   147,165    63,320    78,870   42%     54%      48%      A closer look at gender gaps
 degree
                                                                                                 Males have a higher rate of
 STEM                          36,850    86,420    26,265    63,910   71%     74%      73%          employment than females across
 Science and science
 technology
                               17,640    17,155    12,485    11,470   71%     67%      69%          six fields; the biggest gap is in
 Engineering and                                                                                    Mathematics and computer
                                8,585    45,895     6,230    33,560   73%     73%      73%
 engineering technology                                                                             information & science (10 points)
 Mathematics and
                                                                                                 Females have a higher rate of
 computer and information      10,625    23,370     7,545    18,880   71%     81%      78%
 science                                                                                            employment across two fields; the
 BHASE (non-STEM)             230,180   156,680   159,985   114,645   70%     73%      71%          biggest gap is in Science & science
 Business and                                                                                       technology (4 points)
                               51,950    41,090    36,355    31,020   70%     75%      72%
 administration                                                                                  Employment rates are equal for
 Arts and humanities           31,120    20,360    20,115    14,135   65%     69%      67%          males and females with
 Social and behavioural                                                                             Engineering and engineering
 sciences
                               46,775    28,695    35,275    21,645   75%     75%      75%
 Legal professions and
                                                                                                    technology and Social and
 studies
                                8,910     5,395     6,900     4,060   77%     75%      77%          behavioural sciences credentials
 Health care                   45,020     9,965    30,315     7,580   67%     76%      69%
 Education and teaching        21,935     6,335    13,670     4,010   62%     63%      63%
 Trades, services, natural
 resources and conservation
                               24,465    44,845    17,360    32,190   71%     72%      71%

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                                       REGIONAL PROGRAM COMPLETIONS (2014)27
                                       There is a delay in sharing education data. 2014 completions is the most recent data
A closer look at post-secondary
                                       available (note that it includes those who graduated in spring 2015).
graduation numbers
More people are graduating from        Regional Completions, Post-Secondary Public Institutions, 2014, Ottawa
Ottawa’s post-secondary                                                       Basic           Career,
institutions every year, with an                                           education       technical or
                                          Total
increase of 18% over the past                                              and skills     pre-university Bachelor’s        Master’s        Doctors
five years:                              in 2014        Institution         program          program      Degree           Degree          Degree
                                                         University of
                                            9,705                                    0                0        7,695          1,805             205
       2010    20,124                                         Ottawa
                                                            Algonquin
       2011    21,741                      7,499                                    0          7,303              70               0              0
                                                               College
       2012    22,982                                        Carleton
       2013    23,331                      5,366           University
                                                                                     0              18         4,095          1,118             134
       2014    24,436                      1,561
                                                        Cité Collégiale
                                                                                     4          1,545              12               0              0
                                                            Université
                                              215           Saint-Paul
                                                                                     0                0            62            144               9

                                          24,436*              TOTAL                 4          8,908        11,982           3,068             348
                                                       * Total includes 72 completions from University of Guelph - Kemptville College of Agricultural Technology

A closer look at post-secondary        TOP PROGRAMS (number of completions in 2014)28
graduation numbers                     The table below shows the percentage change in completions over the past three years for
Below we show the # of 2017 jobs (in   the top ten programs. All of these programs were also in the top ten for 2013, except for
occupations related to the program)    Security and protective services.
and the 2015-17 job growth rate for
the top ten programs                   Regional Completions, Post-Secondary Public Institutions, 2011 to 2014, Ottawa
   Business, management,               Total       TOP TEN PROGRAMS                                                Change % Change
    marketing and related support      in 2014         (# of completions)             2011        2012        2013 2011 -14 2011-14
    services 246,355 (4%)                          Business, management,
   Social sciences 59,033 (19%)         3,007     marketing and related              2,647       2,662       2,782          360            14%
                                                   support services
   Health professions and related                 Social sciences
                                         2,477                                        2,104       2,388       2,387          373            18%
    programs 100,406 (7%)
                                                   Health professions and
   Education 54,561 (6%)                2,339     related programs
                                                                                      1,722       1,768       1,694          617            36%
   Engineering 54,260 (-4%)             1,653     Education                          1,735       1,684       1,652          -82            -5%
   Legal professions and studies                  Engineering
                                         1,383                                           917      1,011       1,129          466            51%
    10,580 (11%)                                   Legal professions and
   Psychology 3,997 (85%)               1,221     studies
                                                                                      1,092       1,186       1,261          129            12%
   Engineering technologies and         1,025     Psychology                            910        911         957          115            13%
    engineering-related fields                     Engineering technologies
    76,599 (-5%)                         1,024     and engineering-related               739        750         858          285            39%
                                                   fields
   Communication, journalism and
                                                   Communication,
    related programs 25,492 (-4%)        1,015     journalism and related                857        903         869          158            18%
   Security and protective services               programs
    13,324 (-5%)                                   Security and protective
                                           810     services
                                                                                         690        768         668          120            17%

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Immigrant and newcomer labour pool in Ottawa
                                                                                               Ottawa’s immigrant labour pool of
                                                                                               208,695 has 132,200 participants
                                                                                               in the labour force (a participation
                                                                                               rate of 63.3% versus 69.4% for non-
                                                                                               Immigrants).29

                                                                                               A closer look at the Immigrant labour
                                                                                               force in Ottawa (showing those who
                                                                                               arrived between 1980 and 2016)30

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT
                                                                                               Employment & training supports33
Labour force status by age, Immigrant population, Ottawa, 201631
               In the                            Not in the   Partici-   Employ-   Unemploy-   10,635 unemployed immigrants in
               labour                            labour       pation       ment        ment    Ottawa in 2016; 2,002 newcomers*
               force      Employed Unemployed    force           rate       rate        rate   were Employment Ontario clients
 15 to 24      9,520      7,260      2,265       8,640        52.4%        40.0%      23.8%    *EO uses the term ‘newcomer’ which
 25 to 34      21,855     19,665     2,185       5,045        81.2%        73.1%      10.0%    does not include all immigrants; EO
                                                                                               newcomer data shown below
 35 to 44      31,335     29,110     2,230       6,005        83.9%        77.9%       7.1%
 45 to 54      38,370     36,290     2,085       6,635        85.3%        80.6%       5.4%       1,584 in Employment Service
 55 to 64      23,590     22,185     1,405       10,190       69.8%        65.7%       6.0%       358 in Literacy and Basic Skills
 65 to 74      6,605      6,220      385         20,255       24.6%        23.2%       5.8%        program
 75 and over                                                   4.5%         4.1%       9.2%       31 in Apprenticeship
               920        840        85          19,725
                                                                                                  29 in Second Career program
Unemployment rate by age, Immigrant population vs. Overall, Ottawa, 201632

                                                                                               A closer look at landing periods34
                                                                                               Unemployment rates decrease
                                                                                               for immigrants in Canada longer
                                                                                                  Before 1981          4.6%
                                                                                                  1981 to 1990         4.9%
                                                                                                  1991 to 2000         7.1%
                                                                                                  2001 to 2005         9.3%
                                                                                                  2006 to 2010         11.3%
                                                                                                  2011 to 2016         15.1%

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                                              EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT AND PROGRAMS OF STUDY
A closer look at those with no post-
                                             100%
secondary completion35
                                              90%
The immigrant unemployment (UE)                                                                                                 9,150
                                              80%                                                       16,810
rate is similar to that of the overall        70%                               20,475
population when looking at those              60%        23,155                                                                 8,175
with no postsecondary credentials.            50%                                                        9,795                  2,075
                                              40%                                6,435                   2,270
 No Post-Secondary       % of                 30%                                 855                                           9,225
 Completion              pool      UE rate                                                              10,110
                                              20%         4,755                  8,375
      Ottawa overall     37%       11.4%      10%          835                                           7,530                   7,675
                                                          2,350                  3,610
          Immigrants     33% 12.6%             0%           1,020
                                                    Economic - Principal Economic - Secondary Sponsored by family               Refugees
    Economic (Primary)   10%        3.4%                applicants            applicants
           Economic
                         30%       18.8%                        University certificate, diploma or degree at bachelor level or above
         (Secondary)                                            College, CEGEP or university certificate or diploma below bachelor
        Sponsored by                                            Apprenticeship or trades certificate or diploma
                         38%        9.5%
               Family                                           Secondary (high) school diploma or equivalency certificate
            Refugees     47%       13.7%                        No certificate, diploma or degree

 Immigrants by Program of Study36            Programs of study and work status
 Immigrants are more likely to have          The table below shows the # of immigrants with and without postsecondary
 STEM education and less likely to           credentials in Ottawa, as well as field of study for those with postsecondary
 have a trades completion                    credentials. It also looks at the percentage of those individuals working at the time
  Immigrants          Ottawa overall         of the 2016 Census and compares that to the overall Ottawa population.
            No postsecondary                                                         Postsecondary
                                                                                                            #
    33%     certificate, diploma     37%                                              educational                             % Employed
                                                                                      attainment
                                                                                                         Employed
            or degree                         Field of study
                                                                                                                                       Ottawa
    22%     STEM                     15%                                            Immigrants          Immigrants      Immigrants
                                                                                                                                       overall
            BHASE (non-                       Total (all levels of education)             208,695         121,565             58%          63%
    45%     STEM)
                                     48%
                                              No postsecondary certificate,
            Trades, services,                                                               68,670          27,920            41%          48%
                                              diploma or degree
    7%      natural resources         9%      STEM                                          46,195          32,700            71%          73%
            and conservation                  Science and science technology                11,600            7,290           63%          69%
                                              Engineering and engineering
 A closer look at gaps in % working                                                         22,045          15,680            71%          73%
                                              technology
                                              Mathematics and computer
     For those with trades-related                                                         12,550            9,725           77%          78%
                                              and information science
      education, the employment               BHASE (non-STEM)                              93,830          60,940            65%          71%
      rate of immigrants is 11
                                              Business and administration                   25,490          17,850            70%          72%
      percentage points lower than
      for the overall population              Arts and humanities                           12,100            6,845           57%          67%
     The gap for those in non-STEM,          Social and behavioural sciences               16,380          10,950            67%          75%
      which includes trades, was 6            Legal professions and studies                   2,855           1,940           68%          77%
      points, with the smallest gap
                                              Health care                                   16,475          11,230            68%          69%
      seen in Health care (1%)
     The gap for those with STEM             Education and teaching                          6,425           3,615           56%          63%
      credentials is 2%, with a 1% gap        Trades, services, natural
                                                                                            14,100            8,520           60%          71%
      in Mathematics and computer             resources and conservation
      and information science

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WHERE IMMIGRANTS WORK IN OTTAWA (Industry Sectors)37                         2016 Share of sector jobs (average 24%):
                                                                                     48-49 Transportation and
The chart below and table included here show the industry sectors with        31%    warehousing
more than 1,000 overall jobs in Ottawa; the chart shows the # of              30%    31-33 Manufacturing
immigrants working in the sector at the time of the 2016 Census (May                 62 Health care and social
                                                                              30%
2016) and the table shows the share of immigrants in the sector.                     assistance
                                                                                     72 Accommodation and food
                                                                              29%    services
                                                                                     81 Other services (except public
                                                                              28%    administration)
                                                                                     54 Professional, scientific and
                                                                              27%    technical services
                                                                                     56 Administrative and support,
                                                                              27%    waste management …
                                                                              24%    52 Finance and insurance
                                                                              24%    41 Wholesale trade
                                                                                     51 Information and cultural
                                                                              23%    industries
                                                                              23%    61 Educational services
                                                                                     53 Real estate and rental and
                                                                              22%    leasing
                                                                              20%    44-45 Retail trade
                                                                              20%    91 Public administration
                                                                              16%    23 Construction
                                                                              15%    22 Utilities
                                                                                     71 Arts, entertainment and
                                                                              14%    recreation
                                                                                     11 Agriculture, forestry, fishing
                                                                              14%    and hunting

WHAT IMMIGRANTS DO IN OTTAWA (Occupations)38
                                                                             2016 Share of occupation group jobs
These figures show # and share of immigrant workers by occupation group at
                                                                             (average 24%):
the time of the 2016 Census (where occupation group was identifiable).
                                                                              36%    9 Manufacturing and utilities
                                                                                     2 Natural and applied sciences
                                                                              33%    and related
                                                                              33%    3 Health occupations
                                                                              25%    6 Sales and service
                                                                                     4 Education, law and social,
                                                                              22%    community and government
                                                                                     services
                                                                                     7 Trades, transport and
                                                                              21%    equipment operators and related
                                                                              20%    0 Management
                                                                                     1 Business, finance and
                                                                              20%    administration
                                                                                     5 Art, culture, recreation and
                                                                              17%    sport
                                                                                     8 Natural resources, agriculture
                                                                              11%    and related production

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Skill level of intended occupation (2017)   2017 INTENDED OCCUPATIONS OF NEW PERMANENT RESIDENTS40
    Of those who plan to work:             Newly admitted permanent residents that specified an intended occupation in
    11% plan to work in a                  2017 (note that this data does not include Refugees)
     Managerial position                                                                                      # of new permanent
                                             TOP TEN Intended Occupations (Ottawa)                     residents intending to work
    61% plan to work in a Skill Level
     A occupation (usually requires          Software engineers and designers                                                180
     university education)                   Computer programmers & interactive media developers                              80
    26% plan to work in a Skill Level       Information systems analysts and consultants                                     75
     B occupation (usually requires          Electrical and electronics engineers                                             50
     college education or                    University professors and lecturers                                              40
     apprenticeship training)                Computer engineers (except software engineers and designers)                     35
    2% plan to work in a Skill Level C      Electrical and electronics engineering technologists and                         30
     occupation (usually require             technicians
     secondary school and/or                 User support technicians                                                        30
     occupation-specific training)           Administrative assistants                                                       25
    None plan to work in a Skill            Retail and wholesale trade managers                                             20
     Level D occupation (on-the-job
     training is all that is required)
                                            2016 IMMIGRANT EMPLOYMENT (by Occupation)41
Occupations with the most immigrants                                                            Highest share of immigrants
                                             Highest number of immigrants                       *occupations with 500+ overall jobs
    Information systems analysts and                  Information systems analysts               Electronics assemblers,
                                             3,625     and consultants                   fabricators, inspectors & testers  79%
     consultants top the list with
                                                                                           Taxi and limousine drivers and
     3,625 immigrants.                       3,430     Light duty cleaners                                                  72%
                                                                                                                chauffeurs
    3 of the top 10 occupations fall in               Nurse aides, orderlies and       Nurse aides, orderlies and patient
     the Sales & service category; 3         3,275     patient service associates                        service associates 60%
     fall in Natural & applied sciences.     3,270     Retail salespersons                              Light duty cleaners 55%
                                                       Computer programmers and
Highest share of immigrants                  2,965     interactive media developers
                                                                                          Software engineers & designers     51%
                                             2,885     Software engineers & designers                        Pharmacists     51%
   Immigrants hold 79% of Electronics                 Food counter attendants,
    assemblers, fabricators, inspectors                                                   Estheticians, electrologists and
                                             2,605     kitchen helpers and related
                                                                                                     related occupations     50%
    & testers jobs.                                    support occupations
   Occupations split between low            2,255
                                                       Retail and wholesale trade
                                                                                                                 Dentists    49%
    paying and highly skilled, perhaps                 managers
                                                       Registered nurses and                  University professors and
    reflecting immigration policy            2,235     registered psychiatric nurses                           lecturers     46%
    around refugees and skilled                                                             Computer engineers (except
    workers.                                 1,955     Administrative officers
                                                                                        software engineers & designers)      46%
   Those in bold made both lists.
                                            OTHER WORKFORCE COMPARATORS OF INTEREST:
Quick Employed Workforce Facts39
                                                    Immigrant workers are more likely than the overall employed
   24% use public transportation to                 workforce to use public transportation to get to work (24% vs. 20%)
    get to work                                     Immigrant workers are more likely to be self-employed (10% vs. 8%)
   10% are self-employed                           Immigrant workers are slightly less likely to work full year, full time (51%
   51% work full year, full time                    of employed immigrants vs. 55% of overall employed)
   17% use both English and French                 Immigrant workers are less likely to regularly use both official languages
    regularly at work                                in the workplace (17% vs. 27%)
   $49,441 average annual income                   Immigrant workers have a lower average annual income ($49,441 vs.
                                                     $52,798)

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Persons with disabilities (PWDs) labour pool
Data for persons with disabilities is collected via the Canadian Survey on Disability (see   Ottawa’s population of persons with
note below). There is more data available at the provincial and national levels than the     disabilities aged 15-64 in 2012
local level – thus, we look at all thee geographies in this section.                         included a labour pool of 73,100
OTTAWA                                                                                       (11% of the overall 15-64 labour
                                                                                             pool), of which 45,900 were
                                                                                             participating in the labour force (8%
                                                                                             of the overall 15-64 labour force and
                                                                                             representing a participation rate of
                                                                                             63% versus 81% for the overall
                                                                                             population).43
                                                                                             *See note to the left for an explanation
                                                                                             of why we look at 2012 data.
                                                                                             Employment & training supports44
                                                                                             1,193 persons with disabilities
                                                                                             accessed Employment Ontario
                                                                                             services in 2016-17
                                                                                              630 in Employment Service
                                                                                              254 in Literacy and Basic Skills
                                                                                                 program
                                                                                              197 in Employment Assistance
                                                                                                 Service
                                                                                              92 in Youth Job Connection
                                                                                              20 in Second Career
                                                                                              None in Apprenticeship
Highlights from the Social Planning Council of Ottawa’s ‘Disability Profile of the City of
Ottawa’ (2006 data)                                                                           Ages 20-64,Ottawa, 2006          %
In 2010, SPCO published a report42 on people with disabilities living in Ottawa, based on      % reporting disability (of
2006 Census data. As noted above, Statistics Canada warns that disability data collected            overall population)
                                                                                                                             16%
from the Census based on its activity limitation questions should be used with caution due           Participation rate      63%
to the large number of ‘false positives’ (i.e. over-counting). Any data collected this way       Unemployment rate            7%
should not be compared to the Canadian Survey on Disability (CSD), which uses a                % of Full-time/full-year
different methodology. Given the limited local data available from the CSD, however, the      PWDs workers that were
comprehensive SPCO report is useful for providing some general insight into what the           working poor (ages 25-
                                                                                                                              6%
local labour market for people with disabilities looked like in 2006. It found that 85,700                          64)
people aged 20-64 (16%) reported having a disability in 2006. Some highlights from the                                       57%
report are included in the table to the right.                                                      Not in labour force     (vs. 31%
                                                                                                                             overall)
Highlights from United Way Ottawa’s analysis of 2011 Census data
United Way Ottawa conducted an analysis of data from the 2011 Census, using the               Ages 15+, Ottawa, 2011           %
activity limitations questions as a filter (same methodology as the SPCO report cited          % reporting disability (of
                                                                                                    overall population)
                                                                                                                             20%
above). The two main differences between the United Way analysis and the SPCO report
are that United Way looked at 2011 data (instead of 2006) and looked at the entire 15+               Participation rate      45%
age bracket (rather than breaking it down to look at 20-64). The two datasets should not           Unemployment rate          8%
be compared, as a greater portion of those 65+ have a disability than those under 65, and                                    55%
so the labour market indicators in the United Way data will be more negative. Highlights            Not in labour force     (vs. 30%
from the United Way analysis are included in the table to the right.                                                         overall)

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ONTARIO
                                                                                                       A closer look at labour force status
Labour force status by age, PWDs, Ontario, 201245
               In the   Employed    Unemployed     Not in the      Partici-   Employ- Unemploy               46% employment rate for 15- to
               labour                              labour force    pation     ment    -ment                   64-year-olds with disabilities;
               force                                               rate       rate    rate                    73% for the population without
 15 to 24 87,700          22,670       9,900      47,830         40.5%    28.2%    30.4%                      disabilities
 25 to 34 103,160 49,480               N/A        43,630         57.0%    48.7%    N/A                       Labour force status varies by
 35 to 44 174,230 83,160               N/A        48,910         68.8%    53.1%    N/A                        severity of the disability;
 45 to 54 295,510 147,400 13,130                  116,980        57.9%    53.1%    8.2%                       specifically, the percentage
 55 to 64 374,490 130,100 12,510                  191,910        42.6%    38.9%    8.8%                       employed decreases as the
CAUTION: Statistics Canada warns that this data should be used with caution, due to                           global severity class increases
reliability issues; also, all rates in the table are calculated excluding non-response
categories ("refusal", "don't know", and "not stated") in the denominator

CANADA
Employment rate by age, PWDs vs. those without disabilities, Canada, 201246
                                                                                                       Lower rates of employment
                                                                                                             Looking at the prime working
                                                                                                              ages of 25 to 54, PWDs have
                                                                                                              notably lower rates of
                                                                                                              employment than those without
                                                                                                              disabilities
                                                                                                             The gap is greatest for men aged
                                                                                                              25-34 (34 percentage point gap
                                                                                                              in employment rate)

NOTE: At this level of analysis, much of the unemployment data collected via the CSD is
considered unreliable. For that reason, we look at the employment rate in this chart.

Labour force breakdown by disability type, Canada, 201247
 Disability type                   Total labour     % of overall    Participation    Employment               10% of all Canadians in the
                                           force   labour force              rate           rate               labour force report having at
 Overall population                 23,187,350            100%               81%           76%                 least one disability
 All disability types                2,338,240              10%               54%           47%               The most common type of
 Seeing                                472,220                2%              45%            38%               disability of those in the labour
 Hearing                               424,840                2%              56%            48%               force is Pain (7% of overall
                                     1,083,500                5%              42%            36%
                                                                                                               Canadian labour force)
 Mobility
                                                                                                              Persons reporting having a
 Flexibility                         1,244,570                5%              45%            39%
                                                                                                               Developmental disability have
 Dexterity                             575,520                2%              38%            32%
                                                                                                               the lowest participation (28%)
 Pain                                1,706,080                7%              53%            46%               and employment (22%) rates
 Learning                              490,230                2%              37%            29%               of all disability types
 Memory                                410,160                2%              38%            31%              Those with a Hearing disability
 Developmental                         141,500                1%              28%            22%               have the highest participation
 Mental &/or psychological             852,910                4%              45%            36%               (56%) and employment (48%)
                                                                                                               rates of all disability types

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WHERE PWDs WORK IN CANADA (Industry Sectors)48                              2012 Share of sector jobs (average 9%)52:
The chart below and table to the right show the employment of persons               56 Administrative and support,
with disabilities aged 15-64 in industry sectors across Canada; the chart    17% waste management and
                                                                                    remediation services
shows the # of PWDs working in the sector at the time of the 2012
                                                                             11% 44-45 Retail trade
Canadian Survey on Disability and the table shows the share of PWDs.                48-49 Transportation and
                                                                             11% warehousing
                                                                             11% 71 Arts, entertainment & rec.
                                                                                    62 Health care and social
                                                                             10% assistance
                                                                                    51 Information and cultural
                                                                             10% industries
                                                                                    81 Other services (except public
                                                                             9%     administration)
                                                                             9%     53 Real estate & rental & leasing
                                                                             9%     31-33 Manufacturing
                                                                             9%     23 Construction
                                                                                    72 Accommodation and food
                                                                             8%     services
                                                                             8%     61 Educational services
                                                                                    11 Agriculture, forestry, fishing
                                                                             7%     and hunting
                                                                             7%     41 Wholesale trade
                                                                             7%     91 Public administration
                                                                                    54 Professional, scientific and
                                                                             6%     technical services
                                                                                    21 Mining, quarrying, and oil and
                                                                             6%     gas extraction
                                                                             5%     52 Finance and insurance
                                                                             5%     22 Utilities
                                                                                    55 Management of companies
                                                                             N/A    and enterprises

WHAT PWDs DO IN CANADA (Occupations)49
These figures show # and share of PWDs by occupation group at the time of
                                                                            2012 Share of occupation group jobs
the 2012 CSD (where occupation group was identifiable).
                                                                            (average 9%)53:
                                                                             11% 9 Manufacturing and utilities
                                                                             11% 6 Sales and service
                                                                                    5 Art, culture, recreation and
                                                                             10% sport
                                                                                    7 Trades, transport and
                                                                             9%     equipment operators and related
                                                                                    8 Natural resources, agriculture
                                                                             9%     and related production
                                                                             8%     3 Health
                                                                                    1 Business, finance and
                                                                             8%     administration
                                                                                    4 Education, law and social,
                                                                             8%     community and government
                                                                                    services
                                                                                    2 Natural and applied sciences
                                                                             7%     and related
                                                                             6%     0 Management

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Modifications for labour force participation for adults with disabilities, 201250
                                                                                               The most common type of work
                                                                                                modification needed by PWDs in
                                                                                                Canada is reduced work hours –
                                                                                                while 71% who need this
                                                                                                modification have had it made
                                                                                                available to them, 80,870 (29%)
                                                                                                have not
                                                                                               Other common types of
                                                                                                modifications required include
                                                                                                special chair and/or back support,
                                                                                                job redesign, and modified and/or
                                                                                                ergonomic work station
                                                                                               *NOTE: There was insufficient data
                                                                                                to determine the number of people
                                                                                                that need ‘handrails, ramps and/or
                                                                                                widened doorways’ and ‘adapted
                                                                                                washrooms’ and that HAVE NOT
                                                                                                had these modifications made
                                                                                                available to them

Educational attainment and impact of disability on labour force participation51
                                                                                               Even when the differences in age
                                                                                                composition of the two populations
                                                                                                were taken into account, persons
                                                                                                with disabilities were less likely than
                                                                                                persons without disabilities to be
                                                                                                high school or university graduates
                                                                                               Just under half (45%) of 25- to 64-
                                                                                                year-olds with disabilities whose
                                                                                                condition existed prior to school
                                                                                                completion reported that the
                                                                                                condition influenced their choice of
                                                                                                courses and careers
                                                                                               27% of workers with disabilities
                                                                                                indicated that their employer was
                                                                                                not aware of their limitation
                                                                                               Among those with current or recent
                                                                                                labour force experience: 43%
                                                                                                considered themselves to be
                                                                                                disadvantaged in employment
                                                                                                because of their condition, and 44%
                                                                                                felt that their current employer
                                                                                                would be likely to consider them
                                                                                                disadvantaged in employment
                                                                                                because of their condition

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 Self-reported median total income, persons with disabilities vs. persons without
 disabilities, Canada, 201254
                                                                                         PWDs earn less, with the greatest
                                                                                          wage gap being seen in the 25 to
                                                                                          44 and 45 to 64 age categories
                                                                                          (where people with disabilities
                                                                                          make 57% and 56% of those
                                                                                          without disabilities, respectively)
                                                                                         Among 15- to 64-year-olds with
                                                                                          disabilities, self-reported income
                                                                                          decreased sharply at higher levels
                                                                                          of global severity.
                                                                                         Regardless of age, men with
                                                                                          disabilities reported significantly
                                                                                          higher median total incomes than
                                                                                          did women with disabilities

“Persons with Disabilities in the Canadian Labour Market: An Overlooked Talent Pool”
In March 2013, the Library of Parliament published a Background Paper that stated that many barriers contribute to the
employment gap for people with disabilities; the following barriers were identified:

 Many people with disabilities lack access to education and training, and are not job-ready
 The social isolation of numerous people with disabilities limits their encounters with key contacts and their
    knowledge of opportunities to enter the workforce or access training
 Some employers have negative attitudes and misconceptions with regard to people with disabilities, which can lead to
    discriminatory practices; many such employers are unaware of the capacity and abilities of people with disabilities in
    the workforce
 Workplaces can be inaccessible, not only due to their physical location but also, for example, when it comes to a lack
    of workplace tools, “enabling” computer hardware and software, websites, etc.
 Employers lack knowledge about disability issues, including the duty to accommodate, how to accommodate and the
    cost of accommodations
 There are not enough recruitment and outreach strategies to make contact with people with disabilities
 Barriers tend to be greater in the private sector: “Barriers to employment can arise in both the private and public
    sectors. However, the two work environments are very different from one another. The public sector has the
    financial resources necessary to provide accommodations for people with disabilities, as well as policies to
    encourage their increased representation, such as the federal Employment Equity Act. Small and medium-sized
    businesses in the private sector face greater challenges when it comes to ensuring accessibility or accommodations,
    often due to limited resources.”
 Challenges often greater for women: “Women with disabilities are three times more likely than men with disabilities
    to be a lone parent, and even slightly more likely to be in that situation than women without disabilities. This
    precarious financial situation can limit their ability to accept a job opportunity that involves uncertainty, part-time
    work and so on. Other differences include lower average income levels in comparison to men with disabilities, as
    well as unstable work patterns.”

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Indigenous labour pool in Ottawa
                                                                                                                                                        Aboriginal identity population in
                                                                                                                                                        Ottawa includes a labour pool of
                                                                                                                                                        20,060, of which 13,840 were
                                                                                                                                                        participating in the labour force (a
                                                                                                                                                        participation rate of 69% versus
                                                                                                                                                        67.6% for non-Aboriginal identity).
                                                                                                                                                        *Note that the Census under-reports
                                                                                                                                                        Aboriginal identity.

                                                                                                                                                        A closer look at the Indigenous
                                                                                                                                                        labour force in Ottawa55

EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT                                                                                                                             Employment & training supports58

Labour force status by age, Aboriginal identity population, Ottawa, 201656                                                                              1,335 unemployed Indigenous
                                                                                                                                                        people in Ottawa in 2016; 290 were
                        In the          Employed Unemployed                    Not in the     Partici-           Employ-        Unemploy
                        labour                                                 labour         pation             ment           -ment rate              Employment Ontario clients (22% of
                        force                                                  force          rate               rate                                   unemployed)
 15 to 24                2,665            2,135                     535         1,570          62.9%              50.4%                20.1%               212 in Employment Service
 25 to 34                3,490            3,205                     285           730          82.6%              75.9%                 8.2%               48 in Literacy and Basic Skills
 35 to 44                2,790            2,575                     215           570          82.9%              76.5%                 7.7%                program
 45 to 54                2,910            2,745                     165           775          79.0%              74.5%                 5.7%               30 in Apprenticeship
 55 to 64                1,690            1,575                     115         1,220          58.1%              54.1%                 6.8%               No Indigenous clients in Second
 65 to 74                  255              235                      20           910          21.9%              20.2%                 7.8%                Career program
 75 and over                30               30                       0           450           6.2%               6.2%                 0.0%
                                                                                                                                                        A potential gender gap for educated
Unemployment rate by age, Aboriginal Identity vs. Overall, Ottawa, 2016                                                    57                           Indigenous women
                                                                                                                                                        The unemployment rate for
25.0 22.7
                                                                                                                                                        Indigenous women with university
         19.3
20.0        17.5                                                                                                                                        degrees is higher than for their male
                16.0
15.0
                                                                                                                                                        counterparts (6.8% versus 4.9%).
                                                                                                          11.5                                          This could indicate a gender gap in
                        9.0                             8.6                                                                                       8.9
10.0                          7.8 7.5
                                        6.7 6.8                     6.5                6.65.5 7.6            5.5
                                                                                                                                                        the ability to leverage academic
                                                                                                                         5.3
                                                                          4.0 4.94.1
                                                              4.9                                   4.3                               5.2
 5.0
                                                  4.0                                                                                                   credentials to obtain appropriate
                                                                                                                   0.0          0.0         0.0         employment and could help explain
 0.0
       15 to 24 years         25 to 34            35 to 44                45 to 54         55 to 64          65 to 74            75 and over
                                                                                                                                                        the higher unemployment rate for
                                                                                                                                                        women in the 35 to 44 age group.
                   Aboriginal identity                  Ottawa overall                 Aboriginal identity               Ottawa overall
                                           Males                                                            Females

                                                                                                                                                                 OTTAWA 2018 CLMP │ Page 25
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