2018 Honours Information Guide - Flinders University

 
2018 Honours Information Guide - Flinders University
2018
Honours Information Guide

                           Flinders University
                    College of Science & Engineering
2018 Honours Information Guide - Flinders University
2018 Honours Information Guide - Flinders University
CONTENTS

Contents ............................................................................................................................................................. 0
Welcome to Honours .......................................................................................................................................... 1
Why DO HONOURS? ........................................................................................................................................... 1
HONOURs COURSE STRUCTURE .......................................................................................................................... 2
Facilities available to Honours students .............................................................................................................. 4
Financial assistance to Honours students ............................................................................................................ 4
The Honours research project ............................................................................................................................. 5
    Choosing a topic ............................................................................................................................................. 5
    Allocation of supervisors................................................................................................................................. 5
    Role of the supervisor ..................................................................................................................................... 5
    Student responsibilities undertaking thesis research ...................................................................................... 6
    Plan and use your time wisely......................................................................................................................... 7
    Reporting on progress .................................................................................................................................... 7
    Seminar presentations .................................................................................................................................... 8
    Preparing a literature review .......................................................................................................................... 8
    Ethics approval ............................................................................................................................................... 8
    Laboratory and fieldwork safety ..................................................................................................................... 9
    The production of a thesis: formatting guidelines ......................................................................................... 10
    What to hand up for examination ................................................................................................................. 11
    The examination process .............................................................................................................................. 11
    Viva Voce ...................................................................................................................................................... 11
Honours assessment criteria and classifications ................................................................................................ 12
    CALCULATION OF THE FINAL HONOURS MARK ............................................................................................. 13
    Confirmation of Honours result .................................................................................................................... 13
    What happens to the thesis after it is marked? ............................................................................................ 13
Honours Awards................................................................................................................................................ 13
CONTACT A POTENTIAL SUPERVISOR ................................................................................................................ 13
Research Interests of Selected Academic Staff .................................................................................................. 14
Where to get more information ........................................................................................................................ 21
    Honours Coordinator Contact: ...................................................................................................................... 21
Appendix A Examination Criteria ....................................................................................................................... 22
2018 Honours Information Guide - Flinders University
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    WELCOME TO HONOURS

    We welcome you to the Honours program for environmental degrees.
    You will find the Honours degree to be quite a contrast to your ordinary Bachelor’s degree.
    It will involve more independent study with a closer relationship to one or more academics
    (your supervisor/s) and a major component of your study will be your research project. This
    will involve more intensive investigation and a more narrow focus; it may become a
    stepping stone to further postgraduate study. Many students find that their Honours year
    gives them research experience that can contribute to their subsequent career. It is
    important to make full use of your supervisor/s. Their job is to assist you in your studies and
    research project.
    We wish you the very best for this important next step in your study experience!!!
    This information booklet is only for courses that involve the topic ENVS7700. Here is a list:
          Bachelor of Science (Hons) with
               o Specialization such as Coasts & Oceans, Health & Environment,
                 Environmental Science, Hydrology, Geography, or Science Policy and
                 Communication
               o Major in Environmental Geology, Ocean & Climate Sciences, Environmental
                 Hydrology and Water Resources, or Environmental Management
          Bachelor of Applied Geographical Information Systems (Hons)
          Bachelor of Arts (Hons) with Major in Geography & Environmental Studies
          Associated Enhanced Programs for High Achievers

    WHY DO HONOURS?

    At many Australian universities, successful completion of the Honours degree is still the only
    pathway to postgraduate studies. Indeed, graduation with a PhD could open up a new
    universe of job opportunities for you – worldwide! Even without further postgraduate
    studies, to our knowledge, employers tend to prefer job applicants with an Honours degree
    over others, given the often advanced skills of Honours graduates in planning, critical
    thinking, communication, and independence.

     HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                               FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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HONOURS COURSE STRUCTURE

The Honours degree has two main components: a) coursework, and b) a research project.
Hence, most of your study will be informal, involving library searches, reading and writing.
The research project involves a lot of time spent preparing materials, making observations,
collating results, data analysis, discussing results and writing.

All environmental Honours courses referred to in this information booklet share the same
formal structure. Each student has to complete a total of 27 units of research and a total of
9 units of coursework.

The research component comes which in 6 topics of 4.5 units each entitled ENVS7700A‐F
Honours Research Project in the Environment. Each student has to complete the topic
ENVS7720 Research Project Design and Conduct (4.5 units) and another topic from the
following list:

EASC7733 Measurement Techniques in Natural Systems (4.5 units)
ENVH7711 Environmental Health Concepts (4.5 units)
ENVS7722 Food Safety (4.5 units)
ENVH7731 Sustainable Development—Health Issues (4.5 units)
ENVH7742 Microbiology and Communicable Diseases (4.5 units)
ENVS7701 Coastal Management (4.5 units)
ENVS7711 Environmental Management (4.5 units)
GEOG7721 Population Issues of Developed and Developing Countries (4.5 units)
GEOG7711 GIS for Environmental Modelling (4.5 units)

*or another topic approved by the Honours Coordinator, appropriate to a student’s
program.

 HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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    Honours calendar
    (For full‐time students commencing in Semester I)

    Before beginning of Semester1 –   Consult with Honours Coordinator about thesis topic
    preferably before Christmas

    lst week of Semester 1            Commencement of first semester elective topics

    3rd week of Semester 1            Presentation of thesis proposal to supervisor
    at the latest

    Mid‐Semester 1                    Presentation of thesis proposal seminar

    Mid‐Semester 1                    Submission of thesis literature review to supervisor

    End Semester 1                    Examinations in elective topics

    1st week of Semester 2            Commencement of Second Semester elective topics

    Mid Semester 2                    Work‐in‐progress seminar

    End October                       Deadline for thesis submission

    Mid‐November                      Examinations in elective topics

    Late‐November                     Oral examination (viva)

    December                          Graduation

    HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                     FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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FACILITIES AVAILABLE TO HONOURS STUDENTS

Honours room Earth Sciences 233
Each student has a dedicated desk and computer.

Computing Facilities
Honours students are eligible for after‐hours access to the School’s PC computing
laboratories. Honours students wishing to use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) can
request access to the Geospatial Information Systems Laboratory (GISL), equipped with PC
Workstations running a range of GIS and remote sensing software programs including
ArcGIS, and ERDAS Imagine.

FLO
A shared site of all Hons students has been created: Shared ENVS7700 A‐F: Honours
Research Project in the Environment. Honours information, including the Statement of
Assessment Methods (SAM), due dates, links to ethics processes and so on, will be posted
here. There is also a ‘discussion lounge’ set up for you to post questions and answers about
Honours research.

FLO‐live
FLO‐live (a real time discussion tool) can be used for discussions with your supervisor and to
do presentations if you are an external student. Your supervisor can guide you through how
to do this.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO HONOURS STUDENTS

Funding arrangements for Honours students within the College of Science and Engineering
are currently under development. You should be able to have research‐related access to a
funding of $500, but up to $1500 may be available for justified requests. You should discuss
your requirements with your supervisor prior to making any purchases.

College Store
Certain items can be purchased via the centralised store and procurement facility of the
College of Science and Engineering. The College Store is located in Room 3211 Physical
Sciences Building (Bldg 54). Check available services from the following link:

http://www.flinders.edu.au/science_engineering/research/facilities‐and‐research‐
services/faculty‐store.cfm

Scholarships
Other potential sources of financial assistance include Honours scholarships. See the
University’s website for an up‐to‐date listing of what is on offer:
http://www.flinders.edu.au/scholarships‐system/

 HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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    THE HONOURS RESEARCH PROJECT

    All Honours programs include a 27 unit thesis. The formal requirements are that the thesis
    shall be of 15,000 to 20,000 words length. A thesis should give evidence of the student's
    ability to collect and evaluate information, construct, test and defend an argument and
    critically examine theories in the area of enquiry.

    Students are expected to collect, present, analyse, and interpret data relating to a specific
    research problem. Use may be made of data from archives and statistical sources or from
    field research. The thesis should provide evidence of the student’s ability to plan and
    execute research, using relevant concepts and techniques, with the guidance of a
    supervisor. It should also demonstrate the student's ability to communicate research results
    clearly and concisely in the conventional manner of scholarly dissertations.

    CHOOSING A TOPIC

    By the Friday of third week of Semester 1 at the latest (or third week of Semester 2 for
    students enrolling mid‐year) the student should have:
           selected a research subject, in association with advice from one or more members of
            staff;
           ascertained that the topic has not been previously studied; and
           provided your supervisor with a short thesis proposal setting out the provisional title
            and a brief description (up to two pages) of the proposed research.

    ALLOCATION OF SUPERVISORS

    On the basis of the thesis proposal, and after consultation with staff and the student, the
    Honours Coordinator will ensure that a supervisor, or supervisors, has been assigned to
    each Honours student by 1st April at the latest (or an equivalent date for students enrolling
    mid‐year). The assignment of supervisors is made on the basis of available staff resources:
    the selection of a particular topic does not automatically ensure a particular supervisor.

    ROLE OF THE SUPERVISOR

    As a general rule, every Honours student should see their supervisor at least twice a month
    at a pre‐arranged time. In some cases and at certain times of the year more frequent
    meetings may be necessary. The supervisor has three critical responsibilities:
    i)      To assist in delimiting a topic within your capabilities and resources of time and
            money, yet sufficiently demanding for a first research effort.
    ii)     To meet with you regularly, approve or transmit requests for travel and equipment,
            monitor progress, provide criticism and advice and refer you when necessary to other
            members of staff who may be able to offer specialist advice on particular problems.

        HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                              FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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iii)   To guide you through the writing up and presentation phase, to point out illogical
       argument, poor style or statistical error but not to correct these faults for you or to
       rewrite your work.

Also see the University Guidelines:
‘Guidelines on the Responsibilities of the Supervisor of a Student Enrolled in the Research
Component of an Honours Program’
http://www.flinders.edu.au/ppmanual/student/honours‐programs.cfm)
Whilst the supervisor will be the main guide and critic of the student's research, all
members of staff should be regarded as potential sources of advice and expertise to be
consulted by students.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES UNDERTAKING THESIS RESEARCH

According to University guidelines the responsibilities of students enrolled in the research
component of an Honours program include

1.     Becoming familiar and complying with the Rules governing the degree, and the
       University's student related policies and procedures, including the Policy on Honours
       Programs;
2.     Planning, with the supervisor, an appropriate research project within the time limits
       defined by the research component of the Honours degree;
3.     Discussing with the supervisor an agreed method of working and schedule of meetings;
4.     Drawing to the attention of the supervisor any problems or difficulties being experienced
       with the research and thesis writing and sharing responsibility for seeking solutions;
5.     Maintaining the progress of the work in accordance with the stages and time lines agreed
       to with the supervisor;
6.     Meeting with the supervisor at regular intervals and discussing the progress towards, and
       impediments to, maintaining the agreed timetable;
7.     Participating in research training opportunities provided in the Honours program, which
       may include attendance and presentations at seminars;
8.     Becoming familiar with, and adopting, safe working practices relevant to the field of
       research;
9.     Becoming familiar with, and adhering to, the ethical practices appropriate to the field of
       research;
10.    Becoming familiar with, and adopting, appropriate research practices relevant to the field
       of research for the retention and storage of research records and data;
11.    Becoming familiar and complying with the requirements of the University's intellectual
       property policies;
12.    Accepting responsibility for preparing the Honours thesis for examination, including the
       standard of presentation;
13.    Discussing with the supervisor, in the first instance, any difficulties with the supervision
       relationship, and if the concerns are not resolved satisfactorily, seeking advice from the
       Honours Coordinator (or equivalent).

 HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                   FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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    14.     Ensuring that all publications and presentations that arise directly from research
            undertaken for Honours at Flinders University, whether published or presented during
            the completion of Honours or subsequently, carry appropriate Flinders University
            attribution to other appropriate institutions.

            http://www.flinders.edu.au/ppmanual/student/honours‐programs.cfm

    PLAN AND USE YOUR TIME WISELY
    With the completion of coursework for the elective topics students should devote
    most of their energies to the thesis and to the submission of successive drafts of thesis
    chapters to their supervisor for comment. Data collection must be completed so as to
    allow sufficient time for data analysis and interpretation and for the writing and final
    preparation of the thesis.

    Most students, when asked at the conclusion of their Honours year, ‘what would you
    do differently?’ say, ‘I would have started sooner, and worked harder, earlier!’.

    Avoid procrastinating and leaving everything to the last minute!

    Procrastinate = delay or postpone action; put off doing something.

    REPORTING ON PROGRESS

    You will give at least two talks during the year. These talks are not assessable, but will be
    good practice and provide an opportunity to obtain feedback on your research from staff,
    postgraduates, and fellow students. Towards the middle of your first semester of study you,
    along with other Honours students, will present your research proposal verbally at a
    seminar, attended by members of staff and the other Honours students. The purpose of this
    is to facilitate a flow of information and ideas between staff and students. To this end, you
    are expected to present:
           an outline of the context and content of the research to be undertaken,
           the questions/issues to be addressed,
           the data to be collected,
           the methods of analysis to be used, and
           the evaluation procedures to be adopted.
    You will be required to give a second presentation in your second semester as a Work‐in‐
    Progress Seminar. The progress seminar will be an update of what you have undertaken and
    your initial findings. It will mid‐way through the second semester of your Honours
    candidature.
    There is a 15 minute time limit on your talks—this time should comprise 10 minutes
    talk/presentation and 5 minutes of question time.

        HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                            FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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SEMINAR PRESENTATIONS

The purpose of any talk should be made clearly and succinctly early in the presentation and
perhaps stated in the title. In your introduction briefly tell your audience what is the
problem you are investigating and what you intend to cover. The subject matter of your talk
should then follow a logical sequence. Rehearse and time your talk and try to get feedback
from your supervisor before the presentation. Ask the person running the presentation
session to give you a signal when you have two minutes of your talk remaining. This will
allow you to conclude with grace, even if you have not covered everything you intended to.
Speak to your audience, avoid a monotone by changing pace or lightness of your delivery.
Avoid reading from your notes. If you have to read, look up at your audience as often as
possible. When referring to figures or diagrams, physically point out the relevant details by
using the mouse on the computer, your hand to point to the theatre screen or a laser
pointer. Answering questions is an important part of giving a presentation and there will be
time made available at the end of your talk to give people the opportunity to ask you about
your presentation. Admit when you do not know the answer, or try to suggest ways in which
the answer may be found.

PREPARING A LITERATURE REVIEW

During your first semester, and in consultation with your supervisor, you should prepare a
literature review, which is to be submitted to your supervisor at a date to be negotiated.
The literature review is a comprehensive, but pithy, summary of publications and reports
related to the thesis research. The review is intended to encourage understanding of the
conceptual and disciplinary context of the study. It should consist of a critical analysis of
previous work with the aim of leading the reader to the point where it becomes clear why
the thesis research is of intellectual significance.

ETHICS APPROVAL

Students must obtain approval from the Social and Behavioural Research Ethics Committee
for research proposals that may involve or have an impact upon people. Students
contemplating topics that involve data collection through questionnaires and surveys should
discuss the ethics procedure with their supervisor. Final draft questionnaires and a covering
letter need to be submitted to the Ethics Committee at least four weeks before fieldwork is
due to commence. Further enquiries should be made to the Executive Officers, Social and
Behavioural Research Ethics Committee: human.researchethics@flinders.edu.au.
Guidelines and application forms are available on the Flinders web site. See
https://www.flinders.edu.au/research/researcher‐support/ebi/human‐ethics/applying.cfm
The Flinders University Animal Ethics Committee is responsible for considering and
approving all teaching and research activities which involves the use of animals. Visit their
website for application form and contact details:
https://www.flinders.edu.au/research/researcher‐support/ebi/animal‐ethics/animal‐
ethics_home.cfm

 HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                 FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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    LABORATORY AND FIELDWORK SAFETY

    Advanced planning for both Lab and Fieldwork is recommended. Email technical staff well in
    advance, if possible, to allow them time to properly assist you. Keep all the areas you use
    tidy and clean; clearly label all collected samples: Name, disposal date. When your project
    finishes, clear area and dispose of unwanted samples.
    Strict safety rules apply to all laboratory and fieldwork activities and must be observed at all
    times. Make yourself familiar with these rules.
    The safety rules regarding field trips and/or excursions must be observed. For each trip you
    must complete the Participant Safety on Field Trips form, including itinerary details and the
    Field Trip checklist.

     For more information, consult http://www.flinders.edu.au/whs/working‐safely/field‐
     trips.cfm. If you have any concerns or queries regarding field trips, contact your supervisor
     or College office staff.

     HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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THE PRODUCTION OF A THESIS: FORMATTING GUIDELINES

The final version of the thesis should be presented in the following format:

(a)    Typed on A4 paper, on one side of the paper only, 1½ or 2 line spacing, in an 11 or 12 point plain font
       (Times New Roman, Arial, or equivalent).

(b)    Margins at least 3.5 cm on the left hand side and 2 cm on the right hand side and sufficient at top and
       bottom to allow for trimming during binding.
(c)    Headings and subheadings in the thesis might be set out as follows:

           Example A                                                 Example B
           CHAPTER 1. TITLE                                          Chapter 1. TITLE

           First Heading                                             1.1 First Heading

                     Subheading One                                            1.1.1 Subheading One

                              Subheading Two                                            1.1.1.1 Subheading Two

Either of the examples illustrated above are possible and other logical systems may be
useful also, but try to avoid more than about four types of heading or you will tie yourself
(and the reader) in knots.

(d)    The thesis should incorporate, in the following order:

      A title page giving the title of the thesis in full, the name of the candidate, the name of the College and
       the University associated with the work, the date when submitted in partial fulfilment of the
       requirements for the degree.
      A table of contents including a list of chapters by title and with main subheadings given.
      A summary of not more than 200 words.
      An acknowledgement of help given.
      List of Figures.
      List of Tables.
      List of Plates (photographs).
      Abbreviations used in the text (include acronyms).
      The main text.
      Appendices, if any.
      Reference List.

(e)    Diagrams, figures, photos etc. should preferably be reproduced on A4 paper.

(f)    Wherever possible, tables should be inserted in the appropriate place in the text, except that lengthy or
       bulky matter should appear as an appendix.

(g)    Diagrams, etc. exceeding A4 size should be folded so as to read as a right hand page when open.

    HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                               FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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                                                                 For detailed information about
                                                                 referencing, footnotes, numbering
                                                                 of illustrative material and
                                                                 appendices, you may consult:
                                                                 Hay, I. 2014 , Communicating in
                                                                 Geography and the Environmental
                                                                 Sciences, 4th edn, Oxford University
                                                                 Press, Melbourne or
                                                                 Hay, I., Bochner, D. and Dungey, C.
                                                                 2012, Making the Grade, 4th edn,
                                                                 Oxford University Press,
                                                                 Melbourne.

     WHAT TO HAND UP FOR EXAMINATION

     One electronic copy of your thesis must be uploaded via FLO before the deadline specified
     in the Student Assessment Methods (or an equivalent date for students enrolling mid‐year).
     Extensions beyond this date will be granted only under exceptional circumstances beyond
     the control of the student. Submission for an extension must be made in writing to the
     Honours Coordinator before the deadline.

     THE EXAMINATION PROCESS

     The thesis will be read and assessed by an academic staff member (other than the
     supervisor) and by an external examiner (normally an academic staff member from another
     university). Flinders examiners will be chosen by the Honours Coordinator. External
     examiners may be nominated by the supervisor.

     VIVA VOCE

     Both assessors and the supervisor will hold an oral interview with you about your thesis. The
     aim of the viva is to allow your assessment panel to seek clarification about any aspect of
     your thesis. You should re‐read your thesis before the viva. If you find errors you will be
     given the opportunity to speak first to correct these. The honours coordinator or an
     appointed independent academic will chair your viva. The duration of the session for
     students is approximately 40 minutes. No specific assessment is given to the oral
     examination, although it may result in a revision of the thesis grade. Moreover, the viva
     panel may request corrections that need to be included in a revised thesis.

     The criteria for the different levels of Honours awarded to the thesis are explained in the
     next section.

      HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                               FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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HONOURS ASSESSMENT CRITERIA AND CLASSIFICATIONS

The criteria for assessment of Honours should include (but are not limited to):

      Originality and creativity of thinking or performance
      Evidence of ability to undertake independent research
      Critical awareness of scholarship within the discipline
      Breadth and depth of understanding
      Comprehensiveness of treatment of subject material
      Capacity for achieving objectives
      Accuracy and clarity of presentation.

Below is are thesis grading classes and criteria for each.

Honours First Class (H1)
Sustained excellence in quality of written, oral and, where relevant, performative work,
judged against stated criteria. This level of achievement should be rated as outstanding in
the sense that students clearly demonstrate advanced scholarship within the discipline and
a high level of ability to undertake independent research. A score in the range of 85 to 100
will be awarded.

Honours Second Class Division A (H2A)
An overall high level of scholarship judged against stated criteria, which may include
excellence in some areas. Students achieving this classification will have demonstrated the
ability to undertake independent research. A score in the range of 75 to 84 will be awarded.

Honours Second Class Division B (H2B)
A substantial level of scholarship judged against stated criteria. While showing some
variability in performance, students achieving this classification are assessed as competent
within the discipline. A score in the range of 65 to 74 will be awarded.

Honours Third Class (H3)
A satisfactory level of scholarship judged against stated criteria. Students achieving this
classification are seen as having met the minimum requirements for the award. A score in
the range of 50 to 64 will be awarded.

Fail
An unsatisfactory level of scholarship judged against stated criteria. Students awarded this
classification are seen as not having met the minimum requirements for the award. A score
in the range of 0 to 49 will be awarded.
See also http://www.flinders.edu.au/ppmanual/student/assessment‐policy.cfm

    HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                            FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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     CALCULATION OF THE FINAL HONOURS MARK

       Topic                                                    Unit value        Percentage of overall
                                                                                  mark
       ENVS7700 (A‐F) Honours Research Project                         27                  75

       ENVS7720 Research Project Design and Conduct                    4.5                12.5

       Elective                                                        4.5                12.5

       TOTAL                                                           36                 100

     CONFIRMATION OF HONOURS RESULT

     The overall Honours result (coursework and thesis) obtained by each student will be given
     to them, along with a report on their thesis, after it has been confirmed by the College
     Examination Board meeting in early December (or an equivalent date for students enrolling
     mid‐year).

     WHAT HAPPENS TO THE THESIS AFTER IT IS MARKED?

     Under College of Science and Engineering Regulations, an electronic copy of the thesis will
     be placed in the University Library. Another electronic copy will be retained by the College
     as part of the thesis collection.

     HONOURS AWARDS

     Awards are offered by the university (such as the Murray McCaskill Medal) and by various
     external professional societies and institutes. Contact your supervisor form for more
     information.

     CONTACT A POTENTIAL SUPERVISOR

     The following pages list potential academic staff and their research interests to facilitate
     your choice of a suitable supervisor. While the university is trialling a generic online
     application process, we urge you to still contact potential supervisors in person. Have a chat
     and try to formulate one or more possible research themes that could underpin your
     Honours project.

      HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                               FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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RESEARCH INTERESTS OF SELECTED ACADEMIC STAFF

DR DAVID BASS david.bass@flinders.edu.au

David’s research interests:

        Biogeography
        Environmental weed invasion ecology
        Weed impact and weed management. Target species include asparagus weeds, olives, African
         boxthorn and broom
        Seed dispersal ecology.

For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/david.bass

PROFESSOR OKKE BATELAAN okke.batelaan@flinders.edu.au

Okke’s research interests:

        Regional groundwater modelling
        Catchment hydrology and distributed hydrological modelling
        GIS and Remote sensing applications in hydrological modelling
        Groundwater dependent ecosystems
        Groundwater recharge and discharge estimation
        Groundwater/surface water interaction
        Ecohydrology.

For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/okke.batelaan

DR ERICK BESTLAND erick.bestland@flinders.edu.au

Erick’s research interests:

        Surface water‐groundwater interactions
        Landscape evolution
        Catchment‐averaged erosion rates
        Understanding landscapes responses to tectonic and climatic conditions.

For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/erick.bestland

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     ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BEVERLEY CLARKE beverley.clarke@flinders.edu.au

     Beverley’s research interests:

             Coastal management
             Australian coastal policy development
             Community participation in environmental management
             Development of performance indicators for participation
             Environmental Impact Assessment
             Natural Resource Management Policy
             Natural Resource Management Program evaluation.

     For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/beverley.clarke

     PROFESSOR PETER COOK peter.cook@flinders.edu.au

     Peter’s research interests:

             Groundwater recharge from losing streams
             Groundwater discharge to gaining streams
             Hyporheic exchange
             Groundwater interaction with estuarine rivers, lakes and wetlands.

     For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/peter.cook

     ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR GOUR DASVARMA gour.dasvarma@flinders.edu.au

     Gour’s research interests:

             Women's health (including reproductive health)
             Child mortality
             Fertility and Family Planning
             HIV I AIDS research
             Human resource development and population policies.

         For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/gour.dasvarma

      HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                         FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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PROFESSOR HOWARD FALLOWFIELD howard.fallowfield@flinders.edu.au

Howard’s research interests:

        The design and operation of integrated aerobic–algal systems for the treatment of piggery waste
        The evaluation of the performance of high rate algal ponds for the treatment of wastewater
        Mechanisms of pathogen removal from wastewaters treated in high rate algal ponds using culture and
         molecular technologies
        Composition of biomass produced in high rate algal ponds treating wastewater, for fuel, feed and
         fertilizer
        Evaluation of the performance of a pilot scale biological filter for the treatment of drinking water.

For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/howard.fallowfield

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR HUADE GUAN huade.guan@flinders.edu.au

Huade’s research interests:

        Terrestrial ecohydrology, particularly on plant water use, environmental stress, drought tolerance,
         and water use efficiency
        Spatial and temporal analysis of climate variables, in the context of climate variability and changes,
         topographic influence, and land use changes
        Environmental tracers, including chloride, water and carbon isotopes in the soil (groundwater)‐
         vegetation‐atmosphere continuum
        Groundwater recharge estimation, particularly in mountainous areas
        Urban climate, summer heat mitigation, and energy consumption.

For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/huade.guan.

DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR IAIN HAY iain.hay@flinders.edu.au

Iain’s research interests:

        Cultural geography
        Geographical education
        Geographies of domination and oppression
        Geographies of the super‐rich
        Human‐environment relations
        Inequality
        Postmodern approaches to geography and environmental management
        Radical/political economic geography & social geography

For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/iain.hay

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     PROFESSOR PATRICK HESP patrick.hesp@flinders.edu.au

     Patrick’s research interests:

             Aeolian geomorphology
             Coastal dune initiation and dynamics
             Coastal Geomorphology, ecology and management
             Desert dune geomorphology and dynamics
             Surfzone‐beach‐dune interactions
             Coastal dune archaeology.

     For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/patrick.hesp

     DR DYLAN IRVINE dylan.irvine@flinders.edu.au

     Dylan’s research interests:

          • Groundwater‐surface water interactions
          • Use of heat to trace fluid movement in aquifers, streambeds and the sea floor
          • Influence of heterogeneity (aquifer or streambed) on transport of chemicals and heat
          • Groundwater modelling including heterogeneous properties, groundwater‐surface water interaction
            and heat or solute transport
          • Writing computer software to automate analyses of groundwater problems
          • Climate reconstructions using down borehole temperature logs.
     For more information, please visit http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/dylan.irvine

     ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR JOCHEN KAEMPF jochen.kaempf@flinders.edu.au

     Jochen’s research interests:

             Physical oceanography
             Upwelling
             Transport timescale analysis (e.g. flushing time)
             Suspended sediment transport
             Hydrodynamic modelling.

     For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/jochen.kaempf

      HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                           FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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DR MARK LETHBRIDGE mark.lethbridge@flinders.edu.au

Mark’s research interests:

        Population Viability Analysis (PVA)
        Modelling movement in pests and native animals (wallabies, goats, camels, wombats)
        Spatial stochastic simulation modelling—applied in crime analysis and animals
        Habitat modelling
        Using advanced Kriging analysis techniques for population and distribution prediction
        Carbon methodologies for pest animal removal
        Whisker identification as a way to collect mark‐recapture data (population parameters) of animals
         using movement‐triggered cameras
        Research applications using precision mapping drone technology.

For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/mark.lethbridge

DR GRAZIELA MIOT da SILVA graziela.miotdasilva@flinders.edu.au

Graziela’s research interests:

        Beach and nearshore dynamics
        Sedimentology of coastal environments
        Wind and wave driven sediment transport and coastal evolution
        Coastal erosion Impacts of climate change on coastal environments.

For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/graziela.miotdasilva

DR KIRSTIN ROSS kirstin.ross@flinders.edu.au

Kirstin’s research interests:

        Methamphetamine contamination of houses used to cook meth
        Worm infections in Indigenous Australian communities
        Bushfires and their effect on drinking water – tanks, dams and other water sources
        Dog faeces and the diseases found in different dogs
For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/kirstin.ross

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     ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR UDOY SAIKIA udoy.saikia@flinders.edu.au

     Udoy’s research interests:

             Human wellbeing and sustainable development
             Demographic dynamics in Asia and the Pacific region
             Population growth and sustainable development
             Climate change and environmental refugees
             Measuring multidimensional poverty.

     For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/udoy.saikia

     DR MARGARET SHANAFIELD margaret.shanafield@flinders.edu.au

     Margaret’s research interests:

             Groundwater/surface water interaction
             Temporary stream hydrology
             Streambed dynamics and nutrient cycling
             Groundwater recharge and discharge estimation
             GIS and Remote sensing applications in hydrological modelling

     For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/margaret.shanafield

     PROFESSOR CRAIG SIMMONS craig.simmons@flinders.edu.au

     Craig’s research interests:

             Groundwater/surface water interaction in rivers, lakes and wetlands
             Groundwater dependent ecosystems
             Groundwater discharge in coastal aquifers, seawater intrusion, coastal hydrogeology
             Aquifer storage and recovery
             Fractured rock hydrogeology
             Groundwater flow and solute transport modelling, benchmarking and testing groundwater models
             Laboratory scale flow tank and column experimentation of groundwater processes
             Field scale groundwater investigation and modelling
             History of groundwater hydrology.

     For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/craig.simmons

      HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                          FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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DR GERTI SZILI gerti.szili@flinders.edu.au

Gerti’s research interests:

        City marketing and place‐making
        Cultural geography
        Greenwash
        Higher Education
        Human – environment relations
        Sustainable development
        Urban and regional planning

For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/gerti.szili

DR PETER TANGNEY peter.tangney@flinders.edu.au

Peter’s research interests:

        Investigating the trans‐scientific content of climate science;
        Making climate science more useful for decision‐making;
        Environmental policy‐making under uncertainty;
        Comparing risk‐based and resilience‐based approaches to climate change adaptation;
        Investigating the politics of climate change expertise;
        Understanding the tensions between politics and scientific expertise.

For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/peter.tangney

DR ILKA WALLIS ilka.wallis@flinders.edu.au

Ilka’s research interests:

        Applied research in hydrogeology
        Flow/solute/reactive transport modelling in hydrogeologically and geochemically heterogeneous
         aquifer systems
        Development of reactive (bio)geochemical transport models
        Assessment and prediction of the variability of redox zonations in aquifers
        Water quality changes during managed aquifer recharge
        Incorporation of environmental tracer data into biogeochemical reaction networks
        Quantification of diffusive solute fluxes in engineered barrier systems (radioactive waste disposal)
        Impact of mining and agriculture on groundwater quality. Mobilisation and remediation of metals
         (such as arsenic) in aquifers
        Quantifying of feedback mechanisms between chemical reactions and physical flow in aquifer system

 HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                            FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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     For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/ilka.wallis

     PROFESSOR ADRIAN WERNER adrian.werner@flinders.edu.au

     Adrian’s research interests:

             Catchment hydrology & surface water‐groundwater interaction
             Coastal hydrogeology & water resources management
             Laboratory‐scale investigations of flow and transport in porous media
             Regional‐scale case studies of real‐world groundwater systems
             Evaluation of groundwater model calibration and modelling uncertainty
             Study of highly heterogeneous aquifers, including faulted and fractured aquifers

     For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/adrian.werner

     DR HARRIET WHILEY harriet.whiley@flinders.edu.au

     Harriet’s research interests:

             Health aspects of water quality (including Legionella, Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), drinking
              water, reuse water, distribution systems and biofilm)
             Human health risk assessment (e.g. Legionella longbeachae and potting mix; Human pathogens
              present in beach sand; Environmental sources of Campylobacter)
             Food microbiology (including Salmonella in eggs/raw egg products and Mycobacteria in milk)

     For more information, please visit: http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/harriet.whiley

     WHERE TO GET MORE INFORMATION

     More information can be found on the following Flinders University Website:
     http://www.flinders.edu.au/future‐students/undergraduate/honours/honours_home.cfm

     HONOURS COORDINATOR CONTACT:

     Associate Professor Jochen Kaempf, Honours Program Coordinator
     E‐mail: jochen.kaempf@flinders.edu.au
     Phone: (internal) 12214 (external) +61‐8‐8201‐2214
     Earth Sciences Building, Room 312

      HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                                             FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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APPENDIX A EXAMINATION CRITERIA

                                    FLINDERS UNIVERSITY
                            COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

HONOURS EXAMINER’S REPORT

CANDIDATE’S NAME:

RESEARCH TITLE:

EXAMINED BY:

                                               VERY

                                               POOR                   EXCELLENT

Clarity with which the aims are stated           1    2   3      4         5

Quality of the review of relevant literature     1    2   3      4         5

Clarity of Methodology                           1    2   3      4         5

Organisation and structure                       1    2   3      4         5

Quality of analysis                              1    2   3      4         5

Quality of conclusions/discussion of results     1    2   3      4         5

Writing style and clarity                        1    2   3      4         5

Appropriate use of tables, maps and figures      1    2   3      4         5

Quality of tables, maps and figures              1    2   3      4         5

Attention to detail                              1    2   3      4         5

 HONOURS INFORMATION GUIDE                                           FOR STUDENTS COMMENCING IN 2018
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