Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar

 
Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar
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                                  Hibiscus x moscheutos
                                   ‘Carafe Bordeaux’
                                       North American Native Cultivar

                                          Hibiscus
                                          (hi-bis-cus)
                                          From Greek for
                                          mallow.

                                          moscheutos
                                          (mos-kew-tas)
                                          meaning musk-
                                          scented.

                                         Zones: 5 – 9        Flower Color: Red     Height: 3’     Spacing: 24”
Carafe Series ‘Bordeaux’ has red, softened with an infusion of pink, 9-10” flowers in mid summer through
fall. The Carafe Series boasts more flowers, a denser, fuller habit and average 3’ in height.

About the Species:
Common Name: Hardy Hibiscus, Marsh Mallow                                                  Family: Malvaceae
Hibiscus moscheutos can be considered a sub-shrub. The woody stems will grow 3 to 6 feet high depending
on the cultivar. Mother’s Day is a good time to start looking for sprouts as Hardy hibiscus is late to emerge in
the spring. The large, up to 8 inches across, flowers run the gambit from pure white, with eye zones, to solid
dark, dark red depending on the cultivar. The straight species flowers are either white or pink. Each flower
only lasts one day. Flowering will start in mid-summer and last through fall. Remove spent flowers for
appearance as flower petals will turn slimy when left on the pla nt. Some reseeding will occur, although most
will not breed true from the seed. The thick stalks should be cut down after a heavy frost after the leaves have
turned black.

Habitat: Hardy Hibiscus can be found in moist areas,
brackish marshes, swamps, and along lakeshores.

In the Garden: Hardy Hibiscus will like to be in a warm
and sunny location with moisture retentive, rich soil with
plenty of organic matter. Well-drained soil and a
protective cover of mulch are beneficial. Hardy Hibiscus
can be grown in containers and moved around on the
patio or garden. Winter proof pots can be left outside
with minimal protection during the winter months.
Butterflies and hummingbirds visit Hardy Hibiscus on a
regular basis. Japanese beetles can be a concern.
                                                                                                USDA Plants Database

   The Perennial Farm, 12017 Glen Arm Road, Glen Arm, Maryland 21057; Phone: 410-592-6106; Fax: 410-592-8338
Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar
www.whatsnative.com
                                  Hibiscus x moscheutos
                                    ‘Carafe Chablis’
                                       North American Native Cultivar

                                          Hibiscus
                                          (hi-bis-cus)
                                          From Greek for
                                          mallow.

                                          moscheutos
                                          (mos-kew-tas)
                                          meaning musk-
                                          scented.

                                         Zones: 5 – 9        Flower Color: White     Height: 3’      Spacing: 24”
Carafe Series ‘Chablis’ has large 9-10 inch white flowers with the faintest hint of pink surrounding the center.
Only 3 feet high, the flowers will cover the dense mounding habit of this plant mid summer through fall.

About the Species:
Common Name: Hardy Hibiscus, Marsh Mallow                                                  Family: Malvaceae
Hibiscus moscheutos can be considered a sub-shrub. The woody stems will grow 3 to 6 feet high depending
on the cultivar. Mother’s Day is a good time to start looking for sprouts as Hardy hibiscus is late to emerge in
the spring. The large, up to 8 inches across, flowers run the gambit from pure white, with eye zones, to solid
dark, dark red depending on the cultivar. The straight species flowers are either white or pink. Each flower
only lasts one day. Flowering will start in mid-summer and last through fall. Remove spent flowers for
appearance as flower petals will turn slimy when left on the pla nt. Some reseeding will occur, although most
will not breed true from the seed. The thick stalks should be cut down after a heavy frost after the leaves have
turned black.

Habitat: Hardy Hibiscus can be found in moist areas,
brackish marshes, swamps, and along lakeshores.

In the Garden: Hardy Hibiscus will like to be in a warm
and sunny location with moisture retentive, rich soil with
plenty of organic matter. Well-drained soil and a
protective cover of mulch are beneficial. Hardy Hibiscus
can be grown in containers and moved around on the
patio or garden. Winter proof pots can be left outside
with minimal protection during the winter months.
Butterflies and hummingbirds visit Hardy Hibiscus on a
regular basis. Japanese beetles can be a concern.
                                                                                                USDA Plants Database

   The Perennial Farm, 12017 Glen Arm Road, Glen Arm, Maryland 21057; Phone: 410-592-6106; Fax: 410-592-8338
Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar
www.whatsnative.com
                                 Hibiscus x moscheutos
                                  ‘Carafe Grenache’
                                      North American Native Cultivar

                                              Hibiscus
                                              (hi-bis-cus)
                                              From Greek for
                                              mallow.

                                              moscheutos
                                              (mos-kew-tas)
                                              meaning musk-
                                              scented.

                                              Zones: 5 – 9
                                              Flower Color: Pink
                                              Height: 3’   Spacing: 24”
                                               Carafe Series ‘Grenache’ has solid, pure pink flowers that
                                               measure 7-8 inches across and will bloom in mid summer. It is a
                                               sturdy Hibiscus with excellent branching and a dense mounding
                                               habit growing 3’ in height.
About the Species:
Common Name: Hardy Hibiscus, Marsh Mallow                                                  Family: Malvaceae
Hibiscus moscheutos can be considered a sub-shrub. The woody stems will grow 3 to 6 feet high depending
on the cultivar. Mother’s Day is a good time to start looking for sprouts as Hardy hibiscus is late to emerge in
the spring. The large, up to 8 inches across, flowers run the gambit from pure white, with eye zones, to solid
dark, dark red depending on the cultivar. The straight species flowers are either white or pink. Each flower
only lasts one day. Flowering will start in mid-summer and last through fall. Remove spent flowers for
appearance as flower petals will turn slimy when left on the pla nt. Some reseeding will occur, although most
will not breed true from the seed. The thick stalks should be cut down after a heavy frost after the leaves have
turned black.

Habitat: Hardy Hibiscus can be found in moist areas,
brackish marshes, swamps, and along lakeshores.

In the Garden: Hardy Hibiscus will like to be in a warm
and sunny location with moisture retentive, rich soil with
plenty of organic matter. Well-drained soil and a
protective cover of mulch are beneficial. Hardy Hibiscus
can be grown in containers and moved around on the
patio or garden. Winter proof pots can be left outside
with minimal protection during the winter months.
Butterflies and hummingbirds visit Hardy Hibiscus on a
regular basis. Japanese beetles can be a concern.
                                                                                               USDA Plants Database

   The Perennial Farm, 12017 Glen Arm Road, Glen Arm, Maryland 21057; Phone: 410-592-6106; Fax: 410-592-8338
Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar
www.whatsnative.com
                                   Hibiscus x moscheutos
                                         ‘Fantasia’
                                        North American Native Cultivar

                                             Hibiscus (hi-bis-cus)
                                             From Greek for mallow.

                                             moscheutos (mos-kew-tas)
                                             meaning musk-scented.

                                             Zones: 4 – 8
                                             Flower Color: Rose-Pink
                                             Height: 3’
                                             Spacing: 24”

                                             The 8-9 inch wide rose-pink
                                             flowers of ‘Fantasia’ have a
red eye that will bloom midsummer until early fall. This heavily flowering
hybrid is 3’ tall and is a mounded, compact, and shrub-like plant. ‘Fantasia’ has a distinctively lobed, maple like
leaves.                                                                               (A Fleming Brothers hybrid)

About the Species:
Common Name: Hardy Hibiscus, Marsh Mallow                                                  Family: Malvaceae
Hibiscus moscheutos can be considered a sub-shrub. The woody stems will grow 3 to 6 feet high depending on
the cultivar. Mother’s Day is a good time to start looking for sprouts as Hardy hibiscus is late to emerge in the
spring. The large, up to 8 inches across, flowers run the gambit from pure white, with eye zones, to solid dark,
dark red depending on the cultivar. The straight species flowers are either white or pink. Each flower only
lasts one day. Flowering will start in mid-summer and last through fall. Remove spent flowers for appearance
as flower petals will turn slimy when left on the plant. Some reseeding will occur, although most will not breed
true from the seed. The thick stalks should be cut down after a heavy frost after the leaves have turned black.

Habitat: Hardy Hibiscus can be found in moist areas,
brackish marshes, swamps, and along lakeshores.

In the Garden: Hardy Hibiscus will like to be in a warm
and sunny location with moisture retentive, rich soil with
plenty of organic matter. Well-drained soil and a
protective cover of mulch are beneficial. Hardy Hibiscus
can be grown in containers and moved around on the
patio or garden. Winter proof pots can be left outside
with minimal protection during the winter months.
Butterflies and hummingbirds visit Hardy Hibiscus on a
regular basis. Japanese beetles can be a concern.

                                                                                                 USDA Plants Database

    The Perennial Farm, 12017 Glen Arm Road, Glen Arm, Maryland 21057; Phone: 410-592-6106; Fax: 410-592-8338
Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar
www.whatsnative.com
                                 Hibiscus x moscheutos
                                       ‘Fireball’
                                      North American Native Cultivar

                                              Hibiscus (hi-bis-cus)
                                              From Greek for
                                              mallow.

                                              moscheutos
                                              (mos-kew-tas)
                                              meaning musk-
                                              scented.
                                              Zones: 4 – 9
                                              Flower Color: Red
                                              Height: 4’
                                              Spacing: 24”

                                              True to its name ‘Fireball’ has huge 12-inch wide flaming red
                                              blooms with overlapping petals. The bloom time is mid to late
                                              summer. The finely textured dissected foliage has a purplish
                                              blush over green and sturdy stems displaying red veins and will
                                              grow to 4’ tall.                   (A Fleming Brothers hybrid)
About the Species:
Common Name: Hardy Hibiscus, Marsh Mallow                                                  Family: Malvaceae
Hibiscus moscheutos can be considered a sub-shrub. The woody stems will grow 3 to 6 feet high depending
on the cultivar. Mother’s Day is a good time to start looking for sprouts as Hardy hibiscus is late to emerge in
the spring. The large, up to 8 inches across, flowers run the gambit from pure white, with eye zones, to solid
dark, dark red depending on the cultivar. The straight species flowers are either white or pink. Each flower
only lasts one day. Flowering will start in mid-summer and last through fall. Remove spent flowers for
appearance as flower petals will turn slimy when left on the pla nt. Some reseeding will occur, although most
will not breed true from the seed. The thick stalks should be cut down after a heavy frost after the leaves have
turned black.

Habitat: Hardy Hibiscus can be found in moist areas,
brackish marshes, swamps, and along lakeshores.

In the Garden: Hardy Hibiscus will like to be in a warm
and sunny location with moisture retentive, rich soil with
plenty of organic matter. Well-drained soil and a
protective cover of mulch are beneficial. Hardy Hibiscus
can be grown in containers and moved around on the
patio or garden. Winter proof pots can be left outside
with minimal protection during the winter months.
Butterflies and hummingbirds visit Hardy Hibiscus on a
regular basis. Japanese beetles can be a concern.
                                                                                               USDA Plants Database

   The Perennial Farm, 12017 Glen Arm Road, Glen Arm, Maryland 21057; Phone: 410-592-6106; Fax: 410-592-8338
Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar
www.whatsnative.com
                                 Hibiscus x moscheutos
                                    ‘Kopper King’
                                      North American Native Cultivar

                                            Hibiscus (hi-bis-cus)
                                            From Greek for mallow.

                                            moscheutos (mos-kew-tas)
                                            meaning musk-scented.

                                            Zones: 4 – 9
                                            Flower Color: White
                                            Height: 3 – 4’
                                            Spacing: 24”

                                           The startling contrast of
                                           copper-red leaves and large
                                           white flowers with a red eye,
                                           (with some red streaking
                                            through its veination), made the trial crops of ‘KopperKing’ one
                                           of the most talked-about perennials. Blooming from late July to
About the Species:                         September at 3-4’.                      (A Fleming Brothers hybrid)

Common Name: Hardy Hibiscus, Marsh Mallow                                                  Family: Malvaceae
Hibiscus moscheutos can be considered a sub-shrub. The woody stems will grow 3 to 6 feet high depending
on the cultivar. Mother’s Day is a good time to start looking for sprouts as Hardy hibiscus is late to emerge in
the spring. The large, up to 8 inches across, flowers run the gambit from pure white, with eye zones, to solid
dark, dark red depending on the cultivar. The straight species flowers are either white or pink. Each flower
only lasts one day. Flowering will start in mid-summer and last through fall. Remove spent flowers for
appearance as flower petals will turn slimy when left on the pla nt. Some reseeding will occur, although most
will not breed true from the seed. The thick stalks should be cut down after a heavy frost after the leaves have
turned black.

Habitat: Hardy Hibiscus can be found in moist areas,
brackish marshes, swamps, and along lakeshores.

In the Garden: Hardy Hibiscus will like to be in a warm
and sunny location with moisture retentive, rich soil with
plenty of organic matter. Well-drained soil and a
protective cover of mulch are beneficial. Hardy Hibiscus
can be grown in containers and moved around on the
patio or garden. Winter proof pots can be left outside
with minimal protection during the winter months.
Butterflies and hummingbirds visit Hardy Hibiscus on a
regular basis. Japanese beetles can be a concern.
                                                                                               USDA Plants Database

   The Perennial Farm, 12017 Glen Arm Road, Glen Arm, Maryland 21057; Phone: 410-592-6106; Fax: 410-592-8338
Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar
www.whatsnative.com
                                 Hibiscus x moscheutos
                                   ‘Lady Baltimore’
                                      North American Native Cultivar

                                                   Hibiscus
                                                   (hi-bis-cus)
                                                   From Greek for
                                                   mallow.

                                                   moscheutos
                                                   (mos-kew-tas)
                                                   meaning musk-
                                                   scented.

                                                   Zones: 5 – 9
                                                   Flower Color: Pink         Height: 4 – 5’      Spacing: 24”

                                              ‘Lady Baltimore’ has big deep pink flowers which sport a
red eye zone, blooming from July-September. Cut-leaf foliage is deep green. (A Robert Darby Hybrid)

About the Species:
Common Name: Hardy Hibiscus, Marsh Mallow                                                  Family: Malvaceae
Hibiscus moscheutos can be considered a sub-shrub. The woody stems will grow 3 to 6 feet high depending
on the cultivar. Mother’s Day is a good time to start looking for sprouts as Hardy hibiscus is late to emerge in
the spring. The large, up to 8 inches across, flowers run the gambit from pure white, with eye zones, to solid
dark, dark red depending on the cultivar. The straight species flowers are either white or pink. Each flower
only lasts one day. Flowering will start in mid-summer and last through fall. Remove spent flowers for
appearance as flower petals will turn slimy when left on the pla nt. Some reseeding will occur, although most
will not breed true from the seed. The thick stalks should be cut down after a heavy frost after the leaves have
turned black.

Habitat: Hardy Hibiscus can be found in moist areas,
brackish marshes, swamps, and along lakeshores.

In the Garden: Hardy Hibiscus will like to be in a warm
and sunny location with moisture retentive, rich soil with
plenty of organic matter. Well-drained soil and a
protective cover of mulch are beneficial. Hardy Hibiscus
can be grown in containers and moved around on the
patio or garden. Winter proof pots can be left outside
with minimal protection during the winter months.
Butterflies and hummingbirds visit Hardy Hibiscus on a
regular basis. Japanese beetles can be a concern.
                                                                                               USDA Plants Database

   The Perennial Farm, 12017 Glen Arm Road, Glen Arm, Maryland 21057; Phone: 410-592-6106; Fax: 410-592-8338
Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar
www.whatsnative.com
                                 Hibiscus x moscheutos
                                   ‘Lord Baltimore’
                                      North American Native Cultivar

                                          Hibiscus (hi-bis-cus)
                                          From Greek for mallow.

                                          moscheutos (mos-kew-tas)
                                          meaning musk-scented.

                                          Zones: 5 – 9
                                          Flower Color: Red
                                          Height: 5 – 6’
                                          Spacing: 24”

                                          The huge 9-10” ruffled crimson-red, saucer-shaped flowers of
                                          ‘Lord Baltimore’ are spaced evenly among dark green cut-leaf
                                          foliage. You can expect this Hibiscus to grow to 5-6’ high.
                                          Bloom time is late July and it can continue blooming into
                                          September. (A Robert Darby Hybrid)
About the Species:
Common Name: Hardy Hibiscus, Marsh Mallow                                                  Family: Malvaceae
Hibiscus moscheutos can be considered a sub-shrub. The woody stems will grow 3 to 6 feet high depending
on the cultivar. Mother’s Day is a good time to start looking for sprouts as Hardy hibiscus is late to emerge in
the spring. The large, up to 8 inches across, flowers run the gambit from pure white, with eye zones, to solid
dark, dark red depending on the cultivar. The straight species flowers are either white or pink. Each flower
only lasts one day. Flowering will start in mid-summer and last through fall. Remove spent flowers for
appearance as flower petals will turn slimy when left on the pla nt. Some reseeding will occur, although most
will not breed true from the seed. The thick stalks should be cut down after a heavy frost after the leaves have
turned black.

Habitat: Hardy Hibiscus can be found in moist areas,
brackish marshes, swamps, and along lakeshores.

In the Garden: Hardy Hibiscus will like to be in a warm
and sunny location with moisture retentive, rich soil with
plenty of organic matter. Well-drained soil and a
protective cover of mulch are beneficial. Hardy Hibiscus
can be grown in containers and moved around on the
patio or garden. Winter proof pots can be left outside
with minimal protection during the winter months.
Butterflies and hummingbirds visit Hardy Hibiscus on a
regular basis. Japanese beetles can be a concern.
                                                                                               USDA Plants Database

   The Perennial Farm, 12017 Glen Arm Road, Glen Arm, Maryland 21057; Phone: 410-592-6106; Fax: 410-592-8338
Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar
www.whatsnative.com
                                  Hibiscus x moscheutos
                                    ‘Sweet Caroline’
                                       North American Native Cultivar

                                               Hibiscus
                                               (hi-bis-cus)
                                               From Greek for
                                               mallow.

                                               moscheutos
                                               (mos-kew-tas)
                                               meaning musk-
                                               scented.

                                               Zones: 5 – 9 Flower Color: Pink Height: 4 – 6’ Spacing: 24”

                                                Large bright pink flowers of ‘Sweet Caroline’ have some dark
                                                veination and a darker center. Swelling buds look like pink roses,
and when fully in flower the petals are ruffled. This will still be blooming in mid-September. Grows to 4-6’.
                                                                                       (A Harold Winters Hybrid)
About the Species:
Common Name: Hardy Hibiscus, Marsh Mallow                                                  Family: Malvaceae
Hibiscus moscheutos can be considered a sub-shrub. The woody stems will grow 3 to 6 feet high depending
on the cultivar. Mother’s Day is a good time to start looking for sprouts as Hardy hibiscus is late to emerge in
the spring. The large, up to 8 inches across, flowers run the gambit from pure white, with eye zones, to solid
dark, dark red depending on the cultivar. The straight species flowers are either white or pink. Each flower
only lasts one day. Flowering will start in mid-summer and last through fall. Remove spent flowers for
appearance as flower petals will turn slimy when left on the pla nt. Some reseeding will occur, although most
will not breed true from the seed. The thick stalks should be cut down after a heavy frost after the leaves have
turned black.

Habitat: Hardy Hibiscus can be found in moist areas,
brackish marshes, swamps, and along lakeshores.

In the Garden: Hardy Hibiscus will like to be in a warm
and sunny location with moisture retentive, rich soil with
plenty of organic matter. Well-drained soil and a
protective cover of mulch are beneficial. Hardy Hibiscus
can be grown in containers and moved around on the
patio or garden. Winter proof pots can be left outside
with minimal protection during the winter months.
Butterflies and hummingbirds visit Hardy Hibiscus on a
regular basis. Japanese beetles can be a concern.
                                                                                               USDA Plants Database

   The Perennial Farm, 12017 Glen Arm Road, Glen Arm, Maryland 21057; Phone: 410-592-6106; Fax: 410-592-8338
Hibiscus x moscheutos 'Carafe Bordeaux' - North American Native Cultivar
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