LAW Direct Entry Final Year Module Selection 2021-22 - The ...

 
LAW Direct Entry Final Year Module Selection 2021-22 - The ...
LAW

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              Direct Entry Final Year
              Module Selection 2021-22
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Information provided is correct at time of publication and is subject to change.
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LAW Direct Entry Final Year Module Selection 2021-22 - The ...
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       Introduction from the Head of Department
       Last year, despite our best planning, public health
       restrictions ultimately dictated that all our teaching and
       learning was delivered via purely online methods for our
       Malaysian students. We are proud of what we achieved
       have learnt some important lessons that we hope to bring to
       a more traditional, campus-based experience this year.

       In terms of our teaching provision for the academic year 2021-22, we are not planning that there will
       be any large group lectures, delivered either in person or via online substitutes synchronously. These
       will instead be replaced by asynchronous materials, which students can access via the excellent
       CANVAS Virtual Learning Environment. These asynchronous recordings are not simply replications
       of lectures, but will break topics into smaller, digestible chunks utilising active learning principles and
       we have received excellent student feedback on this provision as against the more traditional lecture,
       as it made material more accessible and easier to reference and digest. Alongside this, module
       delivery will take place through synchronous, seminar teaching sessions, delivered face-to-face, with
       new social distancing and hygiene measures in place. If needs dictate, we will be able to seamlessly
       transition these synchronous classes to purely online methods, without losing any of the learning
       experience, but we are all looking forward to being on campus, so hope the need to deliver seminars
       online does not arise.

       This guide includes details of all the modules you may select in your final year at Liverpool Law School.
       These include, as you will see, popular modules you would expect to see in a Law programme, such as
       Company Law, IP Law and Commercial Law, alongside more bespoke options considering Artificial
       Intelligence and the Future of Legal Practice, Debates in Charity Law and Public Health and Non-
       communicable Disease Prevention. You will find details below of the many, innovative assessment
       methods that we introduced in 2020-21 and have refined for module delivery in 2021-22.

       I am also delighted to let you know that, following approval by the Bar Standards Board (who regulate
       legal training), the University of Law will be offering the Bar Practice Course (BPC) at the School of
       Law and Social Justice from September 2021. Full details of the BPC offering will be available soon,
       from both the University of Law website and the Liverpool Law School webpages. This is a significant
       new arrangement, as we are aware that many of our Malaysian students go on to Bar training after
       their LLB, and they can now do so on the Liverpool campus.

       Best wishes and I look forward to welcoming you to Liverpool Law School

       Professor Warren Barr PFHEA (Head of Department, Liverpool Law School)

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       Your Year at Liverpool Law School

       Whether you commence studies with us in person at the Liverpool campus or online from Malaysia, you will
       follow the same basic pattern below, and you will have a choice of either 4 or 6 optional modules to choose
       from. A description of Equity& Trusts is provided below. The optional modules running in 2021-22 are
       provided from page 4 onwards, split by semester of study.

                                                                  SEMESTER 2
         SEMESTER 1

         Students are required to study 4 modules (60             Students are required to study 4 modules (60
         credits):                                                credits):

         1. LAW311 Equity and Trusts (Mandatory + Pre-            1. Law311 Equity and Trusts – (Mandatory + Pre-
         Registered)                                              Registered
         2. LAW310 Law of the European Union (30 credits)         2. LAW310 Law of the European Union (30 credits)
         (Strongly Recommended but compulsory if you              (Strongly Recommended but compulsory if you
         wish to study for the UK Bar)                            wish to study for the UK Bar)
         Or                                                       Or
         Other Optional Module (15 credits)                       Other Optional Module (15 credits)
         3. Optional Module (15 credits)                          3. Optional Module (15 credits)

         4. Optional Module (15 credits)                          4. Optional Module (15 credits)

       ...........................................................................................

       LAW 311: Equity & Trusts (Mandatory Module)
       30 Credits | Whole Session
       Module Leader: Dr John Picton (J.Picton@liverpool.ac.uk)

       ‘Equity’ has a language of its own and is a complete system of law, which supplements the common law and
       originally existed as a separate area of law, administered in a separate Court of Chancery. It contains important
       concepts, which underpin modern day life, such as the separation of property ownership into nominal (legal)
       and beneficial (equitable)through the concept of the ‘trust’, as well as many remedies, such as injunctions and
       specific performance. There is an emphasis on the contemporary social and fiscal significance of the trust
       mechanism, for example in resolving disputes over the family home. The module also explores the regulation
       of charitable trusts which is a research specialism within the school.

       Assessment Type: - 85% open book seen exam + 15% MCQ exercise
       ...........................................................................................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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Semester 1 Optional Module Choices
       LAW 383: Artificial Intelligence and the Future of Legal Services
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Mr Jeremy Marshall (J.Marshall@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module aims include to provide students with hands-on experience of a contemporary LegalTech
       application or process so that they can develop a practical understanding of the opportunities and risks of using
       technology to deliver or enhance legal services and help them develop a disruptive, innovative mind-set in
       students that will enhance their employability within the new legal marketplace. Syllabus content will vary year-
       by-year and will respond to emerging developments in the field of technology, artificial intelligence and the
       law. General topics will include:
           • Contemporary theoretical discourses on legal innovation, ‘access to justice’, and the role of technology
               and innovation within a competitive global legal sector
           • Fundamentals of machine learning and artificial intelligence in the context of legal services and legal
               decision-making.
           • Understanding a contemporary LegalTech software application or process. In 2020-21 this will include
               the IBM Watson Assistant tool, but in future sessions students may cover alternative LegalTech
               including the IBM Discovery tool, NeotaLogic, or Kira Systems machine learning software. The precise
               application or process which students will focus on each year will vary according to technological
               developments in the legal sector and the availability of partners from relevant LegalTech firms.
           • Legal, regulatory, and ethical constraints on the application of machine learning and artificial
               intelligence in the legal sector.
           • Government, professional, and judicial strategies, and policies for the development of AI enhanced
               legal services.

       Assessment Type: - Single Authored Reflective Essay (50%) + Group Project presentation (50%)
       ............................................................... ..............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 358: Children’s Rights Debates
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Prof Helen Stalford (Stalford@liverpool.ac.uk)

       Children's Rights Debates is a 15-credit module providing students with the opportunity to engage on a
       profoundly critical level with children's rights norms, theories and practices through the lens of contemporary
       children's rights debates. The module will begin with an overview of the basic normative, legal and theoretical
       framework at international, European and domestic (England and Wales) level. It will then move on to explore
       how this framework informs three key children's rights debates, using specific case studies. The first area of
       debate focuses on whether a universal framework for children's rights can adequately inform and be adapted
       to different cultural practices, with male circumcision, child marriage and child labour adopted as examples.
       The second area of debate will focus on the extent to which children can exercise decision-making autonomy,
       by reference to child euthanasia, gender dysphoria and political decision-making. The third area of debate will
       focus on the extent to which children are and should be expected to take responsibility for their actions. This
       will be considered in the context of the age of criminal responsibility and children's liability for sexual and civil
       offences against other children.

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (70%) + Debating (30%)
       ...................................................................... ........................

       LAW 029: Company Law
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Prof Anu Arora (Arora@liverpool.ac.uk)

       Company Law aims to give students an understanding of certain fundamental aspects of Company Law
       including the regulation of companies, the effect of separate legal entity, duties of directors and minority
       shareholder. At the same time the module will introduce students to some of the more essential, topical and
       developing areas of Company Law which have a national/international impact, including the recent reforms
       under the Companies Act 2006.This is a useful specialty option for students interesting in corporate careers.

       Assessment Type: - MCQ Exercise (10%) + Open Book Seen Online Exam (90%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 318: Commercial Law
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Prof Rob Stokes (R.Stokes@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module explores fundamental issues in Commercial Law with a particular focus upon Sale of Goods and
       the Law of Agency. Students will be introduced to certain key areas of importance, including legal issues
       stemming from the passing of property and title in sale transactions, implied terms within sale contracts and
       the role of agents in Commercial Law. Commercial Law is a very lucrative and popular area of legal practice,
       and this is a useful specialty option for students interesting in corporate and commercial careers.

       Assessment Type: - Open Book Seen Online Exam (90%) + Online Problem-Solving Exercise (10%).
       ............................................................... ...............................

       LAW 033: Criminal Evidence
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Dr Sacha Waxman (Sacha.Waxman@liverpool.ac.uk)
       This module seeks to introduce students to the law governing rules of evidence in criminal cases. The course
       briefly examines the development of the law on criminal evidence, including an assessment of the judge and
       jury’s functions, before focus switches to more substantive matters relating to the operation and admissibility
       of criminal evidence. Such matters comprise consideration of burden and standard of proof, both of
       fundamental procedural and human rights significance for the parties in a criminal case. Other topics
       addressed include examination of witnesses, specifically examination-in-chief, cross-examination,
       competence/compellability and corroboration/identification. Later in the module selected types of evidence
       are investigated, in particular character evidence, hearsay evidence and confessions.

       Assessment Type: - Essay plan (10%) + Engagement (5%) + Open Book Online Exam (85%)
       ........................................................... ...................................

       LAW 051: Medical Law and Ethics I
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Dr Paula Case (Paula.Case@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This includes a detailed consideration of medical negligence (both the law and some context, such as the
       number and cost of claims against doctors), consent to medical treatment (which considers the principles
       applied to competent adults and children, the position where adults or children do not have the capacity to give
       a valid consent, and the requirements to disclose information to patients) and the confidentiality of the doctor-
       patient relationship.

         Assessment Type: - MCQs (5%) + Problem Question Submission (20%) + Open Book Exam (75%).
         The Problem Question Submission is a contingent formative/summative i.e., it will only carry a summative weighting where it
           serves to improve the overall module mark. In the event the Problem Question Submission mark is lower than that for the
                         Open Book Exam, the Open Book Exam will revert to a 95% weighting for the module overall.
       ............................................................... ...............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 362: Law of the European Convention of Human Rights 1
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Prof Kanstantsin Dzehtsiarou (K.Dzehtsiarou@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module is intended to introduce students to the law of the European Convention on Human Rights.
       Students should develop an understanding of the basic doctrinal concepts adopted by the European Court of
       Human Rights.

       Assessment Type: - Open Book Seen Online Exam (80%) + Formative and Summative Essay (15%) +
       Participation Element (5%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

       LAW 308: International Human Rights Law
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Dr Amanda Cahill-Ripley (A.Cahill-Ripley@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module will introduce you to the field of international human rights law. The course will provide you with
       an overview of the historical and philosophical foundations of human rights, various substantive rights that are
       protected through universal and regional instruments, as well as providing a general introduction to
       the international mechanisms for human rights protection and promotion. The course aims to provide the
       student with both substantive and procedural knowledge of human rights protection, as well as knowledge and
       understanding of some of the key contemporary challenges in international human rights law.

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + Essay Plan (10%)

       ............................................................... ...............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 309: Further Tort
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Dr John Fanning (J.B.Fanning@liverpool.ac.uk)

       Further Tort broadens and deepens students’ knowledge and understanding of tort law. Assuming prior
       knowledge of the foundational aspects of this subject, Further Tort advances student learning in three ways.
       First, the module offers an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of tort law, introducing students to the
       concepts of corrective and distributive justice, torts-as-rights theories, utilitarianism, and feminist and critical
       approaches to tort law. Second, the module builds on students’ existing knowledge by examining special
       liability regimes, such as that governed by the Animals Act 1971, as well as the rules that govern the tortious
       liability of public bodies and employers. Thirdly, Further Tort expands on the LAW209 syllabus by introducing
       students to other civil ‘wrongs’, such as conversion, the ‘economic torts’, and misfeasance in public office. This
       module will be of interest to students who enjoyed the LAW209 module and would like to further their
       knowledge and understanding of tort law, perhaps as a prelude to a career in common law practice or advanced
       academic study.

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + MCQ Exercise (10%)

       ..............................................................................................

       LAW 310: Law of the European Union I
       30 Credits | Whole Session
       Module Leader: Stephanie Reynolds (S.Reynolds@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module introduces students to the constitutional and institutional law of the European Union. The focus is
       on building an understanding of how the EU came to be and how it has developed, which lays the foundations
       for analysis of the Union's institutions including their composition, their accountability and democratic
       legitimacy, and how they formulate EU legislation. The module then examines the Union's competence to pass
       such legislation and the extent to which principles, such as fundamental rights, operate as a constraint on the
       EU's rule-making power. Finally, the module explores how EU law applies in national legal systems: what
       happens if EU law and national law are in conflict or if a citizen wants to rely directly on EU law before national
       courts? Throughout the module, students are encouraged to think critically about the European integration
       process. The module also considers some areas of substantive Union law e.g., it examines the development of
       EU law relating to the free movement of goods, free movement of workers and free movement of economically
       inactive citizens (such as students and retired persons); explores doctrinal and policy problems as relevant to
       the three topics (above) under consideration.

       This module is not compulsory, but is strongly recommended for those students who may wish to study for
       the UK Bar.
       Assessment Type: - 47.5% coursework (Sem 1) + 2.5% MCQ exercise (Sem 1) + 47.5% coursework (Sem 2) +
       2.5% MCQ exercise

       ......................................................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 338: Intellectual Property Law I: Enforcement of IP Rights
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Dr Sujitha Subramanian (Sujitha.Subramanian@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module explores the exciting world of intellectual property rights which are all around us. This module
       focuses on copyright, designs and enforcement of IP rights. Copyright law covers the protection of traditional
       copyright protected works such as books, works of art, music and films. This module will also provide more
       insight into the challenges the digital age has brought for copyright protection (e.g., Google books, YouTube,
       peer-to-peer music sharing etc.).

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + MCQ Exercise (10%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

       LAW 367: International Arbitration
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Dr Jure Zrilic (J.Zrilic@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module introduces students with the fundamental principles of international arbitration as reflected in
       national laws, international law, arbitral rules, and arbitral and national court decisions. It concerns theoretical
       and practical aspects of international commercial, as well as investment arbitration.
       The module will cover the following topics: Introduction to international arbitration; Arbitration agreement;
       Arbitral tribunal; Jurisdiction of arbitral tribunal; Applicable law; the conduct of arbitral procedure; Arbitral
       award; Recognition and enforcement of the arbitral award and Investment treaty arbitration.

       Assessment Type: - Open Book Seen Online Exam (80%) + Formative/Summative Problem Question (20%)
       ..............................................................................................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 353: Principles of International Law
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Dr Vassilis Tzevelekos (V.Tzevelekos@liverpool.ac.uk)

       The module provides students with in-depth specialist knowledge of the principles and structure of
       international law, with a special emphasis on law-making processes. It offers a selected introduction to the field
       by placing the issues covered into the political and historical context of international relations. The module
       features discussions of some of today's most debated theoretical and practical international legal issues against
       the backdrop of multiple international, regional and domestic legal and policy frameworks. They include the
       evolving role of international law in international affairs, the forms of law-making, the ever-increasing number
       of actors involved, the expansion of international adjudication, the creation of states, the various faces of
       sovereignty, and the impact of international law on domestic systems.

       Examples of basic questions include: What is international law? Is international law really law? How did it
       develop as a body of rules separate from domestic law? What types of norms define the international legal
       order? What are the main international decision-making processes and who are the actors involved? What are
       the manifestations of state sovereignty and how do states exercise sovereignty from the perspective of
       international law and relations? How does international law affect domestic law? Or what is the status of
       international law within domestic legal orders?

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + MCQ Exercise (10%)
       ..............................................................................................

       LAW 373: Corporate Insolvency Law
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Dr John Tribe (J.Tribe@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This popular module aims to stimulate the academic and practical interest of students in the challenging area
       of the law of corporate insolvency. It will provide students with an understanding of the legal consequences
       of the inability of a company to meet its financial obligations and an understanding of the legal response to
       insolvency. The historical growth of these remedies is also explored.

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (75%) + MCQ Exercise (20%) + Participation Element (5%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
Semester 2 Optional Module Choices
   LAW 369: Access to Justice and Welfare Rights Advice Placements
   15 Credits | Semester 2
   Module Leader: Dr James Organ (James.Organ@liverpool.ac.uk)

   This module is an opportunity for students to gain an understanding and insight into issues relating to access
   to justice. Students will undertake a virtual placement in a public sector or non-profit organisation, develop
   skills and undertake tasks within a practical context, apply academic knowledge from your degree, and develop
   their personal and employability skills within a working environment. This experience will develop
   understanding of access to justice issues in a practical setting.

   Assessment Type: - Practical Skills Assessment (45%) + Coursework (45%) + Engagement (10%)
   ............................................................... ...............................

   LAW 317: Banking Law
   15 Credits | Semester 2
   Module Leader: Dr Matt Shillito (M.Shillito@liverpool.ac.uk)

   The Banking law module examines the role and functions of the Bank of England, particularly in respect of its
   financial and economic stability objectives. We therefore look at how the Bank works with the HM Treasury to
   safeguard the banking sector, including its role as Lender of Last Resort. We examine the Bank’s response to
   the financial and the Covid -19 crises. This is then followed by an examination of the banker and customer
   relationship and the duties between the parties. The module then focuses on attempts to stop the bank
   account being used as devise for illegal activity through the Anti-Money Laundering regulation. Finally issues
   around digital currencies will be explored.

   Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + Media Log (10%)
   ............................................................... ...............................

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       LAW 322: Clinical Legal Skills II (Law Clinic module)
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Ms Lucy Yeatman (Lucy.Yeatman@liverpool.ac.uk)

       Clinical Legal Skills aims to develop in students the key elements of the “Liverpool Law Graduate”, particularly
       "engagement" and "employability", through direct experience of legal practice. Students will have the unique
       and privileged experience of representing a real client in the Law Clinic under very close supervision and
       guidance from an experienced, qualified lawyer, akin to being a trainee solicitor or pupil barrister. The skills
       students will learn through engaging in a range of casework tasks are highly transferrable and provide
       students with an opportunity to sample legal practice whilst studying for their degree. Students will learn and
       apply skills in legal drafting, legal letter writing, interviewing, research, case analysis, professional conduct,
       ethics and file management. Our students find Law Clinic modules compelling and inspiring: this provides
       students with a chance to put their academic skills to practical use for perhaps the first time. The Clinic is a
       supportive learning environment, with Clinic staff on hand to support student learning and the legal casework.
       Important - please note:

       •   Law Clinic modules are very different to other modules students will have studied. Students should expect
           a steep learning curve as you work on a real case under the supervision of a qualified lawyer. Please also
           be aware that the real-life nature of the module means that there may well be unpredictable and uneven
           demands on time and students will need to be flexible with their timetable and workload.
       •   For insurance and professional conduct purposes, all teaching is registered and compulsory.

       Assessment Type: - Drafting portfolio (50%) + file management (10%) + reflective coursework (40%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

       LAW 377: Debates in Charity Law
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Dr Jennifer Sigafoos (Jennifer.Sigafoos@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module (one of only two charity modules offered across UK Law Schools and taught by members of
       Liverpool Law School’s internationally renowned research unit, the Charity Law and Policy Unit) is an
       opportunity for students to undertake further study of charity law. The team-taught module will offer
       interactive workshops covering a different current topic in charity law each week. Students will be expected to
       prepare and contribute to the debate and will enhance your understanding of a complex topic of law and have
       the opportunity to gain practical skills.

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + MCQ Exercise (5%) + Participation Element (5%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 316: Family Law
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Prof Helen Stalford (H.Stalford@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module provides students with an introduction to key aspects of family law in England and Wales in the
       context of both public and private proceedings. Students will begin by critically exploring the legal regulation
       of various family relationships (notably marriage, civil partnerships and cohabitation) in the light of human
       rights norms and recent reforms. This will involve consideration of the legal requirements for entering into
       regulated family relationships as well as the legal consequences when such relationships come to an end, both
       financially and in terms of the arrangements made for children.

       The module then moves on to explore the conditions under which the state can legitimately intervene in
       family life and the various orders at its disposal to protect children from abuse and neglect. All of this will be
       grounded in a detailed review of the statutory framework, the relevant case law and academic commentary.

       Assessment Type: - Open Book Seen Online Exam (80%) + Group Activities (20%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

       LAW 339: Intellectual Property Law II: Trademarks & Patents
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Dr Sujitha Subramanian (Sujitha.Subramanian@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module equally covers exciting intellectual property rights, i.e., trademarks and patents. Trademarks
       protect the name, shape, sound etc. of goods and is extremely important in marketing products. One can fill
       in the names of one's favourite brands and you realise the impact brand names and branding have on our
       lives. Patents protect technological innovations and are today to be found in virtually all products we use in
       our daily life (e.g., smartphones, tablet computers, electric toothbrushes, cars, medication, yes even make-
       up, etc.). This module will consider the rationale, requirements and enforcement of those rights.

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + MCQ Exercise (10%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 332: Jurisprudence
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Dr Adam Tucker (Adam.Tucker@liverpool.ac.uk)

       Jurisprudence aims to give students an understanding of the basic problems of legal theory: what is law? Why
       do we obey it? How is law related to morality? Is an unjust law really a law? How should judges decide cases?
       At the same time, the module will introduce students to the work of some of the most important modern
       legal theorists, in particular H.L.A. Hart, Lon Fuller and Ronald Dworkin. Students will also consider some of
       the crucial concerns of contemporary legal philosophy, such as the relationship between the rule of law, rights
       and democracy.

       Jurisprudence provides an opportunity for reflection on the philosophical foundations of law and should
       appeal to students who are interested in understanding more about the essential nature of legal systems and
       legal practice.

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (85%) + Essay Plan (15%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

       LAW 379: Law of the European Convention On Human Rights 2
       15 Credits | Semester 1
       Module Leader: Prof Kanstantsin Dzehtsiarou (K.Dzehtsiarou@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module is intended to provide students with an understanding of the key concepts determining the
       effectiveness of the European Convention on Human Rights such as legitimacy, sovereignty, authority and
       responsibility, as well detailed outline of substantive rights, such as freedom of expression and association, right
       to private property, right to free elections and prohibition of discrimination. Students will be encouraged to
       critically analyse the reform of the European Court of Human Rights.

       Assessment Type: - Open Book Seen Online Exam (80%) + Formative and Summative Essay (15%) +
       Participation Element (5%)
       ..............................................................................................

       LAW 384: Law and Gender
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Dr Firat Cengiz (Firat.Cengiz@liverpool.ac.uk)

       The primary aim of this module is to create a gender awareness in students’ understanding of and approach to
       law. Through new critical thinking and analysis skills, students will be able to identify how individuals from
       disadvantaged groups in terms of their gender and sexuality as well as other characteristics, such as race, class,
       migration and minority status, can face inequalities and be in a disadvantaged position before the law even
       when the law is designed in a seemingly impartial way.

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + Written Presentation Element (10%)

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 052: Medical Law and Ethics II
       LAW 051 is a prerequisite for this module.
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Dr David Horton (D.Horton@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module introduces students to key ethical principles as they relate to the legal regulation of medical
       practice. This module will look at controversial areas such as abortion and the regulation of reproduction,
       mental health, medical research and organ transplantation. This module will also look at the latest
       developments in these areas and how fundamental principles of medical law and ethics are developed and re-
       shaped in light of novel technological and medical developments. The module encourages students to
       develop reasoned perspectives on legal, ethical and scientific developments and to argue for these in a
       constructive manner, accepting the likelihood of diverse views.

       Assessment Type: - MCQs (5%) + Problem Question Submission (20%) + Open Book Exam (75%).
         The Problem Question Submission is a contingent formative/summative i.e., it will only carry a summative weighting where it
           serves to improve the overall module mark. In the event the Problem Question Submission mark is lower than that for the
                         Open Book Exam, the Open Book Exam will revert to a 95% weighting for the module overall.
       ............................................................... ...............................

       LAW 341: Privacy Surveillance and the Law of Social Media
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Mr Joseph Savirimuthu (Joseph.Savirimuthu@liverpool.ac.uk)

       Who should take this Module? Students interested in using social media or learning about data protection and
       privacy risks should take this Module. This Module will also be of interest to those seeking to demonstrate to
       future employers their commercial and practical awareness of the policy and compliance developments in
       both the UK and EU.

       What are the Issues? The Module will adopt a thematic approach to the study of the challenges posed by
       social media and new technologies to individual identity and privacy. These include privacy, data protection,
       surveillance, hacktivism, and freedom of expression. Topics covered include: Surveillance Trends, Facebook
       and Privacy; Social Networking and Online Data Surveillance; Data Protection; Topical issues and Emerging
       Legal Developments. No prior knowledge of Technology is needed.

       What students will gain from taking this Module? with the module will provide instruction and guidance on
       the latest developments in the law and share with you some emerging legal challenges and help bridge
       “theory” and “practice”. These aim to give you an insight into the wider practice of Social Media Law and
       Privacy. Students will be provided with a challenging and positive learning experience. Finally, a good
       understanding of social media will provide students with an opportunity to maximise the potential of gaining
       professional and personal benefits as well as to recognise the risks involved.

       Assessment Type: - Remains Coursework (85%) + MCQ Exercise (15%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 368: Public Health Law and Non-Communicable Disease Prevention
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Prof Amandine Garde (Amandine.Garde@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module to develop a critical understanding of a number of topical issues of public health law, with a specific
       focus on non-communicable disease (NCD) prevention, in a global context as an appreciation of the legal and
       ethical issues that arise when utilising law as a public health tool for NCD prevention. It will critically assess the
       legal interventions that public policymakers have at their disposal for contributing to NCD prevention and
       students will reflect on how evidence derived from related fields of study, such as epidemiology, psychology,
       behavioural economics and other social sciences can be used to support the development of effective NCD
       prevention strategies.

         Topics covered include:
                - The role of law in preventing NCDs
                - The ethics of NCD prevention
                - NCD prevention as a human rights and trade issue. - Tobacco control policies
                - The prevention of alcohol related harm
                - Obesity prevention
                - Preventing NCDs in the digital age

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + MCQ exercises (10%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

       LAW 320: Security, Conflict and the Law
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Michelle Farrell (farrellm@liverpool.ac.uk)

       Security, conflict and the law engages students in critical learning about the role of law in the context of crises
       to national security caused by conflict and political violence. The module explores the meaning of concepts
       such as security, terrorism and emergency. Further, it examines the history and genesis of emergency powers,
       the law relevant to terrorism and the challenges posed by counterterrorism laws, policies and practices.
       Students will gain an appreciation of the intersections between security, conflict and law from a UK and an
       international law perspective. Therefore, the module requires students to engage with and to see the links
       between different branches of law such as public international law, international human rights law,
       immigration laws and constitutional law. Students will be required to develop reasoned viewpoints on the
       effects of conflict and counterterrorism on human rights, for example, on the right to life, on the principle of
       non-refoulement and on liberty.

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + Blog Entry (10%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 319: World Trade Law
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Dr Niccolò Ridi (Niccolo.Ridi@liverpool.ac.uk)

       The module will address key topics concerning the formation, application, and evolution of world trade law.
       These will be grouped into three main themes: (1) institutions (2) rules, and (3) global challenges. Some of the
       topics to be covered in the module are as follows (not all topics may necessarily be taught in any given
       semester).
               - Normative and institutional foundations of world trade law, including the history of the World Trade
               Organization
               - The relationship between the WTO and regional institutions of trade such as the EU and NAFTA.
               - Dispute settlement in trade law, in particular at the World Trade Organization
               - The meaning and scope of non-discrimination principles in trade law
               - Disciplines on the use of tariffs and quantitative restrictions
               - Disciplines on the use of non-tariff barriers to trade, including regulations, taxation, and subsidies.
               - Challenges confronting world trade law such as potential conflicts with human rights, public health,
               and environmental protection.

       Assessment Type: - Open Book Seen Online Exam (80%) + Case Note (20%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

       LAW 335: Immigration and Asylum Law
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Dr Eleanor Drywood (E.W.Drywood@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module will be of interest to students who wish to learn about the way in which borders operate within the
       UK and in Europe, as well as how asylum seekers, refugees and migrants living in the UK and the EU are treated
       under the law. The course will also be of interest to students who wish to study topics related to human rights
       issues. The course focuses broadly on the area of asylum and immigration and is also intended to be responsive
       to current developments in the area. Examples of topics that will be covered include international refugee law
       and the UK asylum system, the enforcement of immigration rules through detention and deportation, and
       rights to family reunification and family life.

       Assessment Type: - Assessed Essay (90%) x 2 MCQ Exercises (5% each, 10% total)
       ............................................................... ...............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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       LAW 382: Contemporary Issues in the Law of Business Enterprise
       15 Credits | Semester 2
       Module Leader: Prof Rob Stokes (R.Stokes@liverpool.ac.uk)

       This module offers students the opportunity to delve deeper into the law as it affects the strategies and
       operations of corporations, both internationally and domestically. Existing legal frameworks surrounding
       businesses are complicated and, in many respects, limited, and at times contradictory, especially with respect
       to the operation of multinational corporations. The module will examine specific areas of particular modern-
       day relevance with recent case studies including (i) corporate social responsibility and corporate human rights
       violations (such as the death of 1,000 people in the collapse of the Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh supplying
       many multinational apparel firms; the severe mistreatment of migrant workers building stadiums in Qatar for
       the 2022 World Cup) and (ii) corporate corruption and bribery (such as the £671 million settlement paid by Rolls
       Royce to settle corruption cases across the globe). The specific areas we will cover in 2020-21 will be confirmed
       nearer to the start of term. This is currently a very fluid area of the law that is becoming of pivotal importance
       for companies, governments and civil society actors.

       Assessment Type: - Coursework (90%) + Essay Plan (10%)
       ............................................................... ...............................

www.liverpool.ac.uk/law
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