2007-2011 Dog and Cat Management Plan

2007-2011 Dog and Cat Management Plan
Dog and Cat
Management Plan
   2007-2011



     Approved 27 June 2007
2007-2011 Dog and Cat Management Plan
Contents

        EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                               3

1       INTRODUCTION                                    5
        1.1 Background                                  5
        1.2 Councils Role                               7
        1.3 Corporate Planning Structure                7

2       METHODOLOGY                                     9
        2.1 Consultation Phase 1                        9
        2.2 Data Analysis                               10
        2.3 Vision Statement and Strategy Development   11

3       SITUATION ANALYSIS                              12
        3.1 Demographic Profile                         12

4       LEGISLATIVE COMPLIANCE                          13
        4.1 Overview                                    13
        4.2 Legislative Obligations                     13
        4.3 By-laws                                     15
        4.4 Dogs Wandering                              15
        4.5 Dog Attacks                                 15
        4.6 Unregistered Dogs                           15
        4.7 Cat Management                              15
        Goal 1                                          16

5       MANAGEMENT OF DOGS                              17
        5.1 Responsible Dog Ownership                   18
        Goal 2                                          24
        Goal 3                                          25
        Goal 4                                          26
        5.2 Dogs in Open Spaces and Public Places       27
        Goal 5                                          31
        5.3 Education                                   33
        Goal 6                                          35

6       MANAGEMENT OF CATS                              38
        6.1 Responsible Cat Ownership                   38
        Goal 7                                          40

7       PROMOTION AND COMMUNICATION                     42
        Goal 8                                          43

8       IMPLEMENTATION ACTION PLAN                      44




Approved 27 June 2007                                        2
2007-2011 Dog and Cat Management Plan
Executive Summary


On the 1 July 2004 the Dog and Cat Management Act 1995 was amended with the
primary aim of reducing the rate of dog attacks particularly on children. 1 The Act
provides for Councils to manage day-to-day enforcement and administration of the
legislative provisions for the management of dogs and cats in the community.

Whilst continuing to administer the provisions under the Act, the amendments
provide an opportunity for Council to undertake a more strategic approach to dog and
cat management.

The most noteworthy amendment is the inclusion of a provision for Councils to
prepare a management plan for dogs and cats within its area. The Act also states
that each Council must differentiate between those parcels of open space where
dogs are prohibited or are to be kept on leash.


Purpose
The purpose of the City of Port Adelaide Enfield Dog and Cat Management Plan is to
set the strategic direction of the management of dogs and cats within the City whilst
also ensuring that the legislative requirements of the Act are being administered
appropriately by Council.

Methodology
The City of Port Adelaide Enfield Dog and Cat Management Plan has been prepared
through an eight step process involving desktop research, legislative review,
community focus groups, stakeholder consultation, preparation of a consultation
report and issues paper, data analysis, preparation of a discussion paper and broad
community consultation. Evaluation of the plan will occur annually and include a
review of the data to monitor progress. As per the requirements under Section 26A
(3) (a) (b) of the Dog and Cat Management Act 1995 the Plan in its entirety will be
reviewed every 5 years.

Themes and Vision
During the preparation of the Plan the combination of desktop research, identification
of issues and data analysis fashioned six key themes.

1.      Legislative Compliance
2.      Responsible Dog Ownership
3.      Education
4.      Open Spaces and Public Places
5.      Responsible Cat Ownership
6.      Council Profile




1
    News Release – Parliament of South Australia “A Dogs Day in Parliament” 2003

Approved 27 June 2007                                                                3
2007-2011 Dog and Cat Management Plan
The themes have been used as a framework for the creation and application of the
goals. These have also informed the formulation of the Council’s Vision for dog and
cat management within the City:

 Port Adelaide Enfield is a proactive City where dogs, cats and the community
            live in a harmonious, safe, and enriched environment.


Goals
The preparation of the goals evolved through the data analysis prepared for the
discussion paper. Using the key themes as a framework, eight goals were identified.

    1: The City of Port Adelaide Enfield will administer the relevant sections of the
       Dog and Cat Management Act 1995.

    2: The City of Port Adelaide Enfield will have 70% of the registered dog
       population de-sexed by 2012.

    3: The City of Port Adelaide Enfield will have 40% of the registered dog
       population micro-chipped by 2012.

    4: The City of Port Adelaide Enfield will have a 5% reduction in the number of
       dogs wandering by 2012.

    5: The City of Port Adelaide Enfield will encourage appropriate dog/human
       behaviour within the City’s open and public spaces.

    6: The City of Port Adelaide Enfield will implement education programs and
       initiatives that encourage responsible dog and cat ownership.

    7: The City of Port Adelaide Enfield will encourage the appropriate management
       of cats within the City.

    8: The City of Port Adelaide Enfield will increase the awareness of responsible
       dog and cat ownership in the community.


Implementation
Implementation of the Dog and Cat Management Plan will involve the incorporation,
prioritisation, and execution of the strategies identified in this plan through Council’s
Section (departmental) Planning process. This will assist in enabling strategies to be
implemented in line with Council priorities and provide the opportunity to be
incorporated into annual budget processes.

Another key factor in the implementation of this Dog and Cat Management Plan will
be working with identified partners to achieve outcomes for the community. Strategic
partnerships with key government agencies, community organisations and other
Councils will maximise resource expenditure within the community and prevent
duplication.




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                   4
2007-2011 Dog and Cat Management Plan
Introduction
                                                                                            1
1.1 Background
The City of Port Adelaide Enfield is located in the north-western region of Adelaide
and extends from the River Torrens to Outer Harbor and covering an area of
approximately 97 square kilometres. With a solid industrial and residential base, Port
Adelaide Enfield provides facilities and services to a culturally diverse and growing
population of 103,561residents and approximately 18600 registered dogs. 2

Pets are now recognised for their physical and mental health benefits, for their role in
development of children’s motor skills and self esteem, and for their importance as
companions, particularly for the aged and singles.

Dr Warwick Anderson of the Baker Institute in Melbourne indicated that pet owners
displayed lower blood pressure and were less at risk of heart attacks and strokes.
Pet owners also frequent the doctor less often, and fewer of them take medication for
high blood pressure, sleeping difficulties, high cholesterol, or heart problems. Dog
owners also showed better mental and physical health than non-dog owners. 3

Urban consolidation and densification is also impacting on animal ownership.
Problems such as barking and nuisance behaviour are more acute when houses are
in close proximity. This also raises the issue of animals, particularly dogs having less
private and public open space to relieve boredom. There are also issues with animal
behaviour, aggression and the problems of stray or unwanted animals. Improved Dog
and Cat Management is about ensuring that pets are well catered for with pet owners
able to maximise their enjoyment of companion animals whilst continuing to co-exist
with non-pet owners and the general community. 4

The Dog and Cat Management Act 1995 (the Act) provides for Councils to manage
day-to-day enforcement and administration of the legislative provisions for the
management of dogs and cats in the community. On the 1 July 2004 the Dog and
Cat Management Act 1995 was amended with the primary aim of reducing the rate of
dog attacks particularly on children. 5

Whilst continuing to administer the provisions under the Act, the amendments
provide an opportunity for Council to expand its current role by undertaking a more
strategic approach to dog and cat management.

The most noteworthy amendment is the inclusion of a provision for Councils to
prepare a management plan for dogs and cats within its area.

Pursuant to Section 26A of the Dog and Cat management Act 1995:

1)    Each council must, in accordance with this section, prepare a plan relating to
      the management of dogs and cats within its area.

2)    A plan of management must include provisions for parks where dogs may be
      exercised off-leash and for parks where dogs must be under effective control by


2
  Data taken up to 16 March 2006
3
  National People and Pets Survey 1994
4
  www.petnet.com.au/city/strategicplan/strategy2
5
  News Release – Parliament of South Australia “A Dogs Day in Parliament” 2003

Approved 27 June 2007                                                                  5
means of physical restraint, and may include provision for parks where dogs
      are prohibited.

3)    A plan of management must be prepared and presented to the Board as
      follows:

      a)     the first plan must cover a 5 year period and be prepared and presented 3
             years after the commencement of this section;

      b)     subsequent plans must cover subsequent 5 year periods and each plan
             must be prepared and presented at least 6 months before it is to take
             effect.

4)    A plan of management must be approved by the Board before it takes effect.

5)    A council may, with the approval of the Board, amend a plan of management at
      any time during the course of the 5 year period covered by the plan.

Subsequently the City of Port Adelaide Enfield commenced preparation of its plan of
management and completed initial community consultation in 2005.

The preparation of this Plan is underpinned by the principles of responsible dog and
cat ownership. Generally speaking, responsible dog and cat ownership means
encouraging dog and cat owners to be the best possible owner/caregiver for pets. It
is the obligation of pet owners to integrate their dogs and cats into the community, to
be a good neighbour, and to provide for the needs of their animals.

The following principles of responsible dog and cat ownership were observed during
the preparation of this plan:

•     The realisation that a pet is for life and the owner will commit to the pet for its
      entire life.

•     Putting effort into proper care of the dog or cat (proper veterinary care,
      vaccinations, worming, element protection (dry and warm in winter, cool and
      shade in summer, plenty of water and proper feeding).

•     Being educated about proper feeding, making relevant healthy choices.

•     Investing in proper health care throughout the life of the dog or cat.

•     Training the dog through gentle means to be a good canine citizen.

•     Training the dog not to be a nuisance, and helping them achieve that goal.

•     Teaching children to respect animals and not abuse them through play (this is
      also Responsible Parenting).

•     Obeying the laws established for pet owners’ protection and the protection of
      others.

•     Understanding that not everybody is fond of dogs and/or cats.

•     De-sexing the dog or cat to prevent unnecessary breeding and preventing
      future health issues.

Approved 27 June 2007                                                                   6
•     Educating people on how to interact with dogs and cats.

•     Providing an enriching environment for dogs and cats.

•     Minimising damage and destruction caused by the dog and cat population
      within the community environment.


1.2 Council’s Role
The City of Port Adelaide Enfield’s primary role in dog and cat management is
regulatory through the administration of the Dog and Cat Management Act 1995.

Its secondary role is to be an advocate for responsible dog and cat management and
ownership.

The reactionary and complexity of tasks associated with a sole regulatory role was
becoming increasingly resource intensive for Councils. In 2005 the State
Government undertook a more strategic approach to Council’s management of dogs
and cats, making it compulsory under the Act for Councils to prepare plans of
management for this purpose.


1.3 Corporate Planning Structure
The Corporate Plan follows the City Plan which established the goals (key result
areas) that are incorporated into the Organisation’s performance framework. The
Corporate Plan reflects the Council Administration’s commitment to meeting the
goals of the City Plan. The Corporate Plan in turn, establishes service area indicators
for each Council department which describe what needs to be achieved and the
results will be measured.

The Dog and Cat Management Plan sits within the context of the State of Society
Report and the State of Environment Report which are two of the three key strategic
information documents that inform the City Plan. This is demonstrated in Figure 1
below:




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                 7
Figure 1 - Corporate Planning Framework




               State of Society Report                                       State of the
                                                                         Environment Report




                                                City Plan




                                             Corporate Plan


          EXTERNAL PLAN
        Dog and Cat
        Management Act 1995                  Dog and Cat                   Section Plans
                                           Management Plan




                                              Internal Plans              Amended Budget
                                         Social Development
                                         Strategy
                                         Environmental Health
                                         Plan
                                         Open Space Plan
                                         Recreation Plan




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                 8
Methodology
                                                                                   2
2.1 Consultation Phase 1
A community, stake-holder and staff consultation occurred during May to July 2005
and subsequently a comprehensive consultation report was prepared.

The aim of the consultations was to identify key issues associated with dog and cat
management and the opportunities for addressing these. Throughout the consultation
a number of key themes were identified. An Issues Paper was prepared and a
summary of issues was placed on public exhibition for further comment.




                            Internal Consultation




                               Community and
                          Stakeholder Focus Groups
                                Consultation




                              Preparation and
                           Community Consultation
                              on Issues Paper


Figure 2 – Consultation Process




Approved 27 June 2007                                                             9
2.2 Data Analysis
Each year Council receives numerous complaints and/or customer requests relating
to dog and cat management. The data is categorised based on the specific areas of
complaint or request. For the purpose of the Dog and Cat Management Plan the
classifications were analysed in accordance with the principles of responsible dog
and cat ownership. This data coupled with the dog registration data was analysed,
taking into consideration the outcomes of the Consultation Report and subsequently
a Dog and Cat Management Plan Discussion Paper was prepared. The aim of the
document was to:

•      Review current changes to legislation;

•      Identify the meaning of responsible dog and cat management;

•      Create an awareness of new and current legislative requirements for Council;

•      Complete a comparative data analysis with the issues documented through
       community consultation, and

•      Identify where issues are more prevalent.




      Internal Consultation




         Community and                                Legislative Review
    Stakeholder Focus Groups
          Consultation




       Preparation and                                  Data Analysis
    Community Consultation
       on Issues Paper



                                                   Preparation of Discussion
                                                             Paper



Figure 3 – Data Analysis Process




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                 10
2.3 Vision and Strategy Development
The development of a Vision and draft Strategies was conducted post the
preparation of the Discussion Paper.

A Vision workshop was held with the General Inspectorate Team and Management
on 5 April 2006 and following the successful development of a vision, a series of
goals consistent with the themes identified in the Discussion Paper were prepared
and endorsed by the General Inspectorate Team and Management. Throughout
October 2006 regular meetings were held with key Council Staff to identify
appropriate strategies and performance indicators for each of the previously
endorsed goals which now form the Implementation Plan.

In February 2007 the Implementation Plan was presented to Elected Members in a
workshop and Council subsequently endorsed the draft Dog and Cat Management
Plan for public exhibition and comment.

The complete process is outlined in Figure 4 below.



                                                          Preparation and
                                                       Community Consultation
                                                          on Issues Paper




                                                           Data Analysis




                                                                                   ANNUAL
                                                                                   REVIEW
                                                      Preparation of Discussion
    Internal Consultation                                       Paper




       Community and                                      Preparation of
  Stakeholder Focus Groups                               Management Plan
        Consultation                                                                        Five Year Review



     Legislative Review                               Community Consultation




                                                      Endorsement by Council




                                                          Approval by the
                                                      Dog and Cat Management
                                                               Board



Figure 4 - Methodology



Approved 27 June 2007                                                             11
Situation Analysis
                                                                                             3

3.1 Demographic Profile

At the 2001 Census the resident population of the City of Port Adelaide Enfield
consisted of 98,569 people. The most recent estimated resident population (June
2003) is 103,561. Most residents live in a detached, semi-detached, row or terrace
dwelling. Almost 50% of the population over 15 years of age are employed.

More than 34% of dwellings are fully owned, with approximately 24% dwellings in the
process of being purchased. More than 33% of dwellings are rentals and of this
amount 16.7% are owned by Housing SA. 6

As of March 2006 one in three households owned a registered dog.

The City of Port Adelaide Enfield’s population is diverse with significant Indigenous,
Vietnamese and Italian populations. The City is also experiencing a significant
increase in the number of new migrants namely from Sudan and other African
nations.

The average weekly income for family households and non-family households is
outlined in Table X below.

                          $0-$299/wk                    $300-799/wk           $800+/wk
Family                   1,098          3.0%        11,506            31%   10,454   28.1%
households
Non-family               7,369         19.8%            5,028    13.5%       1,701       4.6%
households


Tenure type in the City of Port Adelaide Enfield is mainly Rental (41.1%) and
Owner/Occupier (35.3%)




6
    2001 Census Data, Australian Bureau of Statistics

Approved 27 June 2007                                                                       12
Legislative Compliance
                                                                                   4
4.1 Overview
The Dog and Cat Management Act 1995 (the Act) is the legislation that governs the
management of dogs and cats within South Australia.

The objectives of the Act are:

a)         To encourage responsible dog and cat ownership
b)         To reduce public and environmental nuisance caused by dogs and cats
c)         To promote the effective management of dogs and cats (including through
           encouragement of the de-sexing of dogs and cats)

Recent changes to legislation have provided Council with an opportunity to take a
long term approach to the management of dogs and cats.

4.2 Legislative Obligations

Council’s legislative obligations are set out within Section 26 of the Dog and Cat
Management Act 1995 as follows:
26—Council responsibility for management of dogs
     (1)     Each council is required to administer and enforce the provisions of this Act
             relating to dogs within its area and for that purpose must—
               (a)    maintain a register of dogs containing the information required by the
                      Board (which may be kept in the form of a computer record) that is to
                      be readily available for public inspection; and
               (b)    ensure that the Board is provided with information contained in the
                      register as required by the Board from time to time; and
               (b)    appoint a suitable person to be Registrar; and
               (c)    make satisfactory arrangements for issuing and replacing certificates
                      of registration and registration discs; and
               (d)    appoint at least one full-time dog management officer or make other
                      satisfactory arrangements for the exercise of the functions and
                      powers of dog management officers; and
               (e)    make satisfactory arrangements for the detention of dogs seized
                      under this Act; and
                (f)   make satisfactory arrangements for fulfilling other obligations under
                      this Act.
     (2)     The arrangements made by a council under this section must be satisfactory
             to the Board.
     (3)     Money received by a council under this Act must be expended in the
             administration or enforcement of the provisions of this Act relating to dogs.
     (4)     Each council must keep separate accounts of money received under this Act
             and of money expended in the administration and enforcement of the
             provisions of this Act relating to dogs.
     (5)     A council must pay into the Fund the percentage fixed by regulation of the
             dog registration fees received by the council.


Approved 27 June 2007                                                                         13
(6)     Councils may charge—
               (a)   fees for the provision of extracts from registers kept under this Act;
                     and
               (b)   fees (which may be differential) approved by the Minister—
                        (i)     for the registration of dogs or businesses under Part 5; and
                        (ii)    for late payment of registration fees; and
                        (iii)   for meeting any other requirement imposed on councils
                                under this Act.
    (7)     Without limiting the matters that may be taken into account when setting fees
            to be approved by the Minister, councils must provide for a percentage
            rebate of the fee that would otherwise be charged for the registration of a
            dog in the following cases:
               (a)   if the dog is desexed;
               (b)   if—
                        (i)     the dog has been implanted with a microchip for the
                                purposes of identification; and
                        (ii)    the information contained in the microchip is up-to-date;
               (c)   if the dog has passed a specified training program accredited by the
                     Board,
            (and, if more than one rebate applies in respect of a particular dog, the
            rebates are to be aggregated and deducted from the registration fee that
            would otherwise be charged).

In terms of meeting its obligations as set out in the Act the Council:

•         Maintains a computerised register of dogs within its area by utilising its property
          database;

•         Makes available the register of dogs to the public upon request for a nominal
          fee as set by Council from time to time;

•         Has established administrative procedures for the issuing of certificates of
          registration and registration discs;

•         Sets and periodically reviews dog registration fees in accordance with the
          requirements of the Act;

•         Has an arrangement with the Animal Welfare League to hold dogs seized under
          the Dog & Cat Management Act;

•         Has appointed the Director of Environmental Services as the Registrar;

•         Conducts an annual dog registration survey to maximise dog registrations;

•         Employs six General Inspectors and a Senior General Inspector who perform
          as part of their duties the role of dog management officers. In addition Council
          also provides an after hours service addressing dog and cat customer requests
          received 5-10:30pm Monday to Friday and 9:00am to 10:30pm Saturday,
          Sunday and Public Holidays and a call out service for requests received after
          10:30pm. Council has an appropriate organisational structure in place to
          support staff and provide professional development opportunities;

Approved 27 June 2007                                                                          14
•     and has the appropriate administrative procedures in place to meet the
      requirements of the Act.

4.3 By-Laws
The aim of By-Law Number 5 - Dogs is to limit the number of dogs kept on premises
and to provide for control of dogs on local government land. The By-Law stipulates
the number of dogs which shall be kept in a dwelling (according to dwelling size),
information pertaining to dog prohibited, dog on leash and dogs on foreshore and
signage.

The By-Law is reviewed every seven years

4.4      Dogs Wandering
A dog wandering can be a nuisance as well as being harmful to itself and to others. If
a dog is to be found wandering (including at large and found) and has the correct
identification (collar, registration disk, name tag with contact details) Council
endeavours to return the dog immediately. Where there is inconclusive or no
identification the dog is captured and taken to the ‘pound’ which is located at the
Animal Welfare League. Consequently the owner may be fined and is required to pay
an impound fee to secure the release of the dog. Approximately half of the dogs
detained are returned to their owners.

4.5       Dog Attacks
The definition of ‘dog attack’ is not lucid and can be confusing in reporting such
incidents. It is well known that the majority of dogs attacks occur in the home, making
it difficult for Councils to truly report on occurrences, type (dog-human, dog-dog, dog
– other) and veracity. Council can only respond to (and therefore is only aware of)
attacks which are reported directly or at the request of police.

4.6   Unregistered Dogs
Dogs over three months of age must be registered. A dog can be registered to any
persons aged 16 years and above. Each year Council conducts a Registered Dog
Survey where a contractor visits properties to ascertain whether a dog is on the
premises and if it is registered. If it is not registered, a fine may be issued. To
encourage registration of Dogs subsidised registration fees have been introduced.

4.7     Cat Management
The Dog and Cat Management Act 1995 does not provide well for the management
or control of Cats, particularly in urban areas. Part 7 of the Act primarily relates to the
appointment of a Cat Management Officer in Councils, and refers to cats in fragile
areas and cats in non residential areas. Unlike dogs, there are no laws that govern
wandering cats in public places (such as reserves, footpaths, people’s
dwellings/yards), the number of cats a person can keep or compulsory registration
and identification.

There is no mandate for an owner to ensure that a cat has appropriate identification
(collar and name tag or micro-chipped), nor does it attract a penalty. However not
having a cat easily identifiable (collar and name disk) has serious consequences. For
example if a cat is found outside the owner’s property it may be trapped and legally
destroyed.




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                    15
Goal 1: The City of Port Adelaide Enfield will administer the relevant sections of the Dog and Cat Management Act 1995 as
they relate to Local Government.
Indicator: Reports of Dog at Large (all); Dog Attack; Dog barking/nuisance behaviour; Cat Infestation request attended to within timeframe.

Strategies                                                                                                          Priority      Responsibility        Goal Cross Reference
1.1    ENSURE THE CITY OF PORT ADELAIDE ENFIELD POLICIES AND BY-LAWS                                                              Manager               5
       RELATING TO DOG AND CAT MANAGEMENT ARE CURRENT.                                                                            Environmental
                                                                                                                                  Services
Actions:
1.1.1 Review Council By-law 5 in accordance with Local Government Act 1999.                                         1
1.1.2 Review the PAE Dog and Cat Management Plan on an annual basis.                                                1
1.2    MANAGE REGISTRATION RENEWAL PROCESS TO TARGET KNOWN AND                                                                    Manager               1, 4, 6 and 8
       UNKNOWN DOG OWNERS, TO MAXIMISE THE TIMELY RENEWAL OF DOG                                                                  Environmental
       REGISTRATIONS.                                                                                                             Services

Actions:                                                                                                            1
1.2.1 Advertising and signage strategy to alert new dog owners to registration requirements                         1
1.2.2 Create ‘SMS’ (short messaging service) system to alert Dog Owners to due dates for
       Registration (supplement to current Dog Registration Renewal Notice)                                         1
1.2.3 Provision of reminder notices at expiry of registration period with the addition of late fees
       applied                                                                                                      1
1.2.4 Conduct annual door to door survey of random suburbs to identify and target owners of
       unregistered dogs                                                                                            2
1.2.5 Provision of registration information at point of sale (pet shops, breeders, vets and AWL
       etc.)
1.2.6 Investigate the feasibility of pro-rata dog registration.                                                     2
1.3    MANAGE RESOURCES TO PROVIDE AN EFFICIENT AND EFFECTIVE                                                                     Manager
       INSPECTORIAL SERVICES                                                                                                      Environmental
Actions:                                                                                                                          Services
1.3.1 Qualified staff are employed and developed to administer the Dog & Cat Management Act                         1
       in line with customer requests
1.3.2 Management of General Inspectorate After Hours Service                                                        1
1.3.3 Quarterly reports identifying trends in dog and cat customer requests                                         1
1.3.4 Customer satisfaction surveys are conducted on an ongoing basis                                               1
                                                                                                                                              Priority 1 High (1-2 years)
                                                                                                                                              Priority 2 Medium (2-4 years)
                                                                                                                                              Priority 3 Low (4-5 years)

Approved 27 June 2007                                                                                                                                                         16
Management of Dogs
                                                                               5
The City of Port Adelaide Enfield has approximately 18,634 registered dogs (as at
16.03.06) which equates to 6% of the State’s registered dog population. The average
number of registered dogs is .3 per household or every third household has a dog
registered on the site.

The City of Port Adelaide Enfield’s registered dog population has decreased by
around 11% since 2002/2003. In 2002/2003 there were approximately 20,000
registered dogs, whilst records in 2004/2005 indicated a lower figure of 17,685
registrations. Whilst the reasons for this are unknown possibilities may include more
mobile communities (people travelling), lack of private open space (due to increase in
density), cost and lapsing registrations.

The most registered breed is the Maltese-Cross whilst many other cross breeds are
the minority dog population in the City.

Suburbs with high numbers of registered dogs include North Haven (1198), Largs
Bay (843), and Taperoo (761). Suburbs with the lowest registered dog population
reside in Walkley Heights (40), Dernancourt (38) and Gillman (29).

A more accurate report of suburbs with high and low dog populations is based on the
number of dogs compared to the number of households. Suburbs such as Largs Bay,
Birkenhead and Taperoo show high number of dogs to household ratio, whilst Dry
Creek and Gillman have the lowest ratio.


                              TOTAL            TOTAL                DOGS PER
 SUBURB                       DOGS           HOUSEHOLDS            HOUSEHOLD
 OUTER HARBOR                         0                312                        0.00
 REGENCY PARK                         0                336                        0.00
 DRY CREEK                           54                438                        0.12
 GILLMAN                             29                227                        0.13
 ANGLE PARK                          84                602                        0.14
 PORT ADELAIDE                      353               1683                        0.21
Table 1 – Suburbs with lowest number of dogs per household



                               TOTAL            TOTAL               DOGS PER
 SUBURB                        DOGS           HOUSEHOLDS           HOUSEHOLD
 LARGS BAY                         843                 1582                       0.53
 BIRKENHEAD                        442                  891                       0.50
 TAPEROO                           761                 1542                       0.49
 OSBORNE                           445                  903                       0.49
 GLANVILLE                         179                  421                       0.43
Table 2 – Suburbs with highest number of dogs per household



In 2005/2006 The City of Port Adelaide Enfield spent approximately $890,000 on dog
Management. Income from dog registrations (approx $493,300) supplements this,
however this leaves a shortfall of $396,800 which is included as part of Council’s
annual budget process.


Approved 27 June 2007                                                               17
In 1999 BIS Shrapnel prepared a report that stated that national expenditure on Pets
is a $2.2 billion dollar industry. 7 It is estimated that Australian’s spent $1.3 billion
dollars on dogs alone, namely on nutrition and veterinary costs. Of this amount South
Australians spent approximately $235 million. On average Australian households
spend $531 per annum on dog ownership.

It is estimated that 60% of the 6.2 million households in Australia have one or more
pets with the major carer of the pet being female, married with children and living in
the suburbs. The most common pets are dogs. 8 Only 4% of Australians leave their
dogs for more than 40 hours a week alone.

Approximately four out of five dogs are purchased as puppies and more than half
were pedigreed. Gender preference is equal for dogs.

Nearly four out of five dogs belong to the toy to medium size range. Of interest is that
one in three dog owners also own a cat. 9

5.1         Responsible Dog Ownership

Dogs are the most popular companion animal with over 68% of Australians owning
and caring for one dog or more. 10 Owning a dog should be viewed as a privilege and
a responsibility taken seriously. Being a responsible dog owner is not only about the
provision of basic necessities such as food, water and shelter, but also providing an
enriching environment, care, love, attention, socialisation and ensuring that the dog
does not contribute to a decreased quality of life for others in the community. As part
of the concept of reducing the impact of the dog on others within the community there
are certain actions which can be undertaken which are also of benefit to the health
and well-being of the dog.

5.1.1 De-sexing
Every year the Council and Animal Welfare League are inundated with the
responsibility and associated cost of dealing with unwanted and excessive numbers
of dogs, cats, kittens and puppies. Organisations such as the Animal Welfare League
are faced with the cost and trauma of euthanasing significant numbers of animals per
year. In this context the de-sexing of pets would alleviate this problem and is
considered to be a responsible contribution to the welfare of the community.

De-sexing is a safe surgical procedure that prevents pets from reproducing. The
obvious benefit is that fewer unwanted litters are produced, curtailing the potential for
ever increasing population levels.

Apart from managing the potential exponential increases in population levels,
additional benefits arise from de-sexing pets. These include reduction in significant
health risks and behavioural problems as de-sexed animals are less likely to:

•         wander, reducing incidents such as dog and cat altercations, injuries, lost
          animals and being struck by cars;



7
  “Aussies spend more on pets than foreign aid” Sydney Morning Herald, July 27 2004.
8
  National People and Pets Survey - Report to Urban Animal Management Coalition January 2005
9
  National People and Pets Survey - Report to Urban Animal Management Coalition January 2005
10
     National People and Pets Survey January 1995



Approved 27 June 2007                                                                          18
•       develop behavioural problems           such    as    territorial   marking,   barking,
        destructiveness and aggression.


In addition, research shows that de-sexed animals are less likely to contract cancers
when compared with animals that are not de-sexed.

De-sexed dogs also attract reduced registration fees.

The average percentage of de-sexed dogs in the City of Port Adelaide Enfield is
57%, which is 4% less than the State average. The National average is 61%.

More than half of the City’s suburbs (28) fall below this average.

Suburbs such as Exeter, Largs Bay, Semaphore, Semaphore South and Northgate
have the highest proportion of de-sexed dogs and sit well above the State and City
average.


Suburbs that have less than the City average of de-sexed dogs are shown in Table 3.

    SUBURB                   % Dogs Desexed
    Wingfield                     17%
    Angle Park                    31%
    Mansfield Park                31%
    Ferryden Park                 38%
    Woodville Gardens             38%
    Ottoway                       40%
    Kilburn                       44%
    Gillman                       48%
    Blair Athol                   49%
    Croydon Park                  49%
    Walkley Heights               50%
    Dry Creek                     52%
    Rosewater                     53%
    Greenacres                    53%
    Ethelton                      54%
    Port Adelaide                 54%
    Northfield                    54%
    Taperoo                       55%
    Queenstown                    55%
    Clearview                     55%
    Dudley Park                   55%
Table 3 – Percentage of registered dogs de-sexed less than City average.

Whilst as a region the Parks area has the lowest number of dogs not de-sexed
(based on percentage per suburb), the suburb of Wingfield has the least number of
de-sexed dogs when compared to the City average.

A comparison of de-sexed dogs by gender also showed that people are more likely to
de-sex female dogs (36% not de-sexed) rather than male dogs (50% are not de-
sexed), even though female dogs attract a higher fee for the service than male dogs.




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                       19
5.1.2 Micro-chipping
Micro-chipping is a non invasive process that involves injecting a sterile microchip
about the size of a grain of rice between a pet's shoulder blades. Both dogs and cats
can be micro-chipped.

Each chip has a unique code that can be read using a special scanner. The chip has
unalterable information pertaining to that animal such as the name of the pet, owners
name and address, any relevant medical information and a life long membership to a
national database such as Central Animal Records. A micro-chipped pet will always
be able to be identified. If the animal has lost its collar, registration disc and or
engraved name plate, the pet can be scanned and its owner identified therefore
quickening the return process of the animal. To ensure that the micro-chip data is
current and effective, owners of pets should ensure that the information on the micro-
chip is up to date.

The City of Port Adelaide Enfield has a total of 16% or 3053 out of 18,634 registered
dogs micro-chipped, 4% higher than the State average.

Ten suburbs within the City of Port Adelaide Enfield fall below the State average
number of registered dogs that have been micro-chipped.

The suburbs identified can be categorised into regions which are showing low
numbers of micro-chipped dogs. Such regions include:

•          The Parks (including Woodville Gardens, Kilburn and Blair Athol)

•          Port Adelaide and surrounding suburbs (including Port Adelaide, Alberton,
           Queenstown, Ottoway and Rosewater)

•          Northern Suburbs (including Hampstead Gardens, Holden Hill, Valley View,
           Dernancourt and Greenacres)

•          The Peninsula (including Birkenhead, Glanville, Ethelton, Taperoo and
           Osborne).

5.1.3 Barking/Nuisance Behaviour
Generally, a dog barks or creates nuisance behaviour for a reason such as playtime
enthusiasm, seeking attention or being territorial. Some of the more common reasons
being:

•          Lack of exercise
•          Inadequate yard space
•          Boredom
•          Not enough human companionship
•          Inadequate shelter from weather conditions
•          Hungry or thirsty
•          Medical condition
•          Provocation
•          Disturbances
•          Change to family structure
•          Change of territory
•          Anxiety 11


11
     http://www.portphillip.vic.gov.au/barking_dogs.html


Approved 27 June 2007                                                               20
There are a number of ways in which this problem can be alleviated, however this
can be quite difficult as this behaviour may occur when the owner is not at home and
therefore the behaviour is not challenged and addressed.

The figures outlined in the table below show a significant increase in complaints in
Northgate, Alberton and Ferryden Park whilst there has been a significant decrease
in dog barking/nuisance complaints in Queenstown and Windsor Gardens.


                              Total        Total         Total      Total Dogs
                              Dogs         Dogs          Dogs        Barking
                             Barking      Barking       Barking       over 3      Difference
 SUBURBS                      2003         2004          2005         years       2003-2005
 Northgate                           4            9            20            33         80%
 Alberton                            5           12            17            34         71%
 Ferryden Park                       9           10            20            39         55%
 Dudley Park                         0            3            10            13        100%
 Northfield                         11           24            19            54         42%
Table 4 – Increase in dog barking/nuisance complaints since 2003



                             Total         Total        Total       Total Dogs
                             Dogs          Dogs         Dogs         Barking
                            Barking       Barking      Barking        over 3      Difference
 SUBURBS                     2003          2004         2005          years       2003-2005
 Valley View                       12            14             7            33         -71%
 Clearview                         17            17            11            45         -55%
 Holden Hill                        9             4             3            16        -200%
 Mansfield Park                    21            15            15            51         -40%
 Windsor Gardens                   28            38            21            87         -33%
 Queenstown                        15             7             4            26        -275%
Table 5 – Decrease in dog barking/nuisance complaints since 2003



In 2003 Council received 509 complaints for barking/nuisance dogs. This figure
increased in 2005 to 537 complaints. This results in an additional 28 complaints
being received for the period 2003 to 2005.

Suburbs such as Largs Bay and Taperoo that have a high number of dogs per
household also rated highly for barking complaints.

The figures for dogs barking/causing a nuisance are based on customer requests
and therefore may or may not be an actual dog barking incident. Other factors such
as neighbourly disputes can also trigger a dog barking or nuisance complaint even
though this may not be entirely the issue. Other discrepancies include the inability to
identify whether the requests stem from an individual or various individuals or
whether the complaints are regarding one dog or numerous dogs.




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                     21
5.1.4 Dog Wandering/Found
A dog wandering at large is considered to represent a danger to itself and to others.
Owners are viewed as being responsible for their dogs’ actions and behaviour
regardless of where incidents may occur.

For the purpose of this analysis several sets of data have been combined to give a
more accurate representation of dogs wandering. This data also includes figures for
dogs found, dogs wandering, and dogs wandering and found after hours.

In 2005 a total of 961 dogs were identified as wandering at large/found, 113 less than
those for 2004. Since 2003 numbers have increased by 24. Increase in dog and
residential population would have played a significant part in the minor increase
between 2003 and 2005. Suburbs showing high numbers of dogs wandering include
Kilburn, Rosewater and Taperoo. Whilst Kilburn recorded the highest number (53) of
wandering/found dogs for 2005, the reduction in number of dogs wandering since
2003 also decreased significantly (72) and was amongst one of the highest recorded.
Greenacres (12) and Northgate (12) reported the highest increase in dogs wandering
at large since 2003, which could be due to factors such as increased dog and
residential populations.

In 2004/2005, 888 dogs were impounded, a 4% decrease since 2002/2003.

                              Dogs Wandering Total
 SUBURB                              2005
 Kilburn                              53
 Rosewater                            45
 Taperoo                              45
 Mansfield Park                       43
 Blair Athol                          41
 Windsor Gardens                      39
 Northfield                           37
 Enfield                              36
 Ottoway                              34
 North Haven                          33
Table 6 – Suburbs with High Numbers of Dogs Wandering in 2005




                                 Dogs               Dogs              Dogs           Difference
                               Wandering          Wandering         Wandering       between 2003
 SUBURB                        Total 2003         Total 2004        Total 2005        and 2005
 Greenacres                               13                27                 25             48%
 Northgate                                 5                15                 17             71%
 Rosewater                                35                31                 45             22%
 Port Adelaide                            16                15                 26             38%
 Taperoo                                  36                32                 45             20%
 Northfield                               28                49                 37             24%
 Ottoway                                  25                27                 34             26%
 North Haven                              27                20                 33             18%
 Birkenhead                               16                30                 22             27%
 Wingfield                                27                29                 32             16%
Table 7 – Suburbs with Highest Increase of Dogs Wandering in 2005




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                  22
Suburbs with above average dog to household population and high numbers of dogs
wandering were Taperoo (45) and Rosewater (45).
Of those dogs found in 2004, 34% of dogs were returned to their owners and in 2005
42% were returned to their owners.




Approved 27 June 2007                                                           23
GOAL 2: THE CITY OF PORT ADELAIDE ENFIELD WILL HAVE 70% OF THE REGISTERED DOG POPULATION DE-SEXED
BY 2012.
Based on a 3% increase per annum from the 2005 figure of 57%.

Strategies                                                                                                  Priority   Responsibility    Goal Cross
                                                                                                                                         Reference
2.1     PROMOTE THE REGISTRATION AND HEALTH BENEFITS OF DE-SEXING DOGS                                                 Manager           1, 4, 6 & 8
                                                                                                                       Environmental
Actions:                                                                                                               Services
2.1.1 Prepare brochure about benefits of de-sexing dogs.                                                    1

2.1.2   Utilise dog registration database for identification of non de-sexed dogs for targeted de-sexing    2
        campaign and inclusion of fact sheets with registration renewal notice.

2.1.3    In conjunction with local veterinary surgeons and the Animal Welfare League offer vouchers         1
        subsidising de-sexing.
        − Vouchers funded through reduction in rebate for de-sexing and concession card holders (from
             50% rebate to 40% rebate)
        − Vouchers offered to concession card holders of non de-sexed dogs (est. 500 @ $60)
        − Vouchers offered to owners of non de-sexed dogs found wandering at large (est. 200 @ $60)
        − Vouchers offered to owners of non de-sexed ‘nuisance’ dogs (dogs subject to barking complaints)
             (est. 100 @ $60)
2.2     PROMOTE AND SUPPORT RESPONSIBLE REGISTERED BREEDERS.                                                           Manager           6
                                                                                                                       Environmental
Action:                                                                                                                Services
2.2.1 Include information pertaining to registered breeders on Council’s Website.                           3

                                                                                                                          Priority 1 High (1-2 years)
                                                                                                                          Priority 2 Medium (2-4 years)
                                                                                                                          Priority 3 Low (4-5 years)




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                                                                           24
GOAL 3: THE CITY OF PORT ADELAIDE ENFIELD WILL HAVE 40% OF THE REGISTERED DOG POPULATION
MICROCHIPPED BY 2012.
Based on 4% increase per annum from the 2005 figure of 16%.

Strategies                                                                                                   Priority   Responsibility     Goal Cross
                                                                                                                                           Reference
3.1     PROMOTE THE BENEFITS OF MICROCHIPPING DOGS TO THE COMMUNITY                                                     Manager            6 and 8
                                                                                                                        Environmental
Actions:                                                                                                                Services
3.1.1 Conduct an annual Micro-chipping Day in conjunction with National Micro-chipping Day in the Parks      1
       area (2007).

3.1.2   In conjunction with local veterinary surgeries and pet stores offer vouchers subsidising micro-      2
        chipping dogs (in lieu of future microchipping days).
        Vouchers offered to concession card holders (est. 500 @ $20)
        Vouchers offered to owners of non micro-chipped dogs found wandering at large (est. 250 @ $20)

3.1.3   Utilise dog registration database for identification of non micro-chipped dogs for targeted micro-
        chipping campaign and inclusion of fact sheets with registration renewal notice.                     2

3.1.4   Purchase a minimum of 2 mobile scanners.
                                                                                                             3
3.1.5   Lobby State Government to:
        ƒ Introduce compulsory micro-chipping
        ƒ Introduce a ‘lifetime registration’ if a dog is micro-chipped, obedience trained and de-sexed      3

                                                                                                                             Priority 1 High (1-2 years)
                                                                                                                             Priority 2 Medium (2-4 years)
                                                                                                                             Priority 3 Low (4-5 years)




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                                                                              25
GOAL 4: THE CITY OF PORT ADELAIDE ENFIELD WILL HAVE A 5% REDUCTION IN THE NUMBER OF DOGS WANDERING
BY 2012.
Based on the 2005 figure collected of 961 dogs wandering.

Strategies                                                                                  Priority   Responsibility              Goal Cross
                                                                                                                                   Reference
4.1     CREATE A SAFE PUBLIC ENVIRONMENT FOR THE WHOLE COMMUNITY.                                      Manager Environmental       6&8
                                                                                                       Services
Action:
4.1.1 Produce brochures with the following information:                                     2
       − Appropriate garden and fencing design, style and material
       − Correct course of action when a dog is found or lost
       − Appropriate breed choices
       − Appropriate identification
       − SMS reminder to dog owners to secure their dogs prior to major fireworks events
         i.e. New Years Eve and Australia Day.
4.2    MAXIMISE STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS WITH EXTERNAL ORGANISATIONS                                     Manager Environmental       2, 4, 3, 6 & 8
                                                                                                       Services
Actions:
4.2.1 In conjunction with local veterinary surgeons and Animal Welfare League investigate   2
       the potential of compulsory subsidised de-sexing and micro-chipping of dogs found
       wandering.
4.2.2 Provide Housing SA and Local Real Estate Agents with New Dog Registrations Kits.      1
                                                                                                                        Priority 1 High (1-2 years)
                                                                                                                        Priority 2 Medium (2-4 years)
                                                                                                                        Priority 3 Low (4-5 years)




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                                                                           26
5.2      Dogs in Open Spaces and Public Places

In 1966 when market research figures were first collected, the total number of owned
dogs in Australia was estimated to be 1.3 million. By 1988 there were an estimated
3.04 million. From 1978 to 1988, the number of dog owning households increased
from 1.74 million to 2.13 million households (Morgan Research 1988). A recent
survey conducted by Reark Research identified that in 1994, there were 3.8 million
dogs in Australia. 12

With the continuation of urban consolidation, increase in density, reduction in
average housing allotment size and the increase in dog ownership the reliance on
public places and open spaces are intensifying. The National People and Pets
Survey conducted in 1994 identified that the most common places where people
exercise dogs are (in ranking order) on local streets and parks with the coast being
the fourth most common place. On average most people exercise their dog
approximately 6 times per week. Whilst exercising their dogs 42% of respondents
indicated that they do not pick up their dog’s waste. People are also more likely to
exercise their dog seven times a week on public streets and in reserves and parks
than anywhere else. It is also more common for males to exercise their dogs more
than once daily than females. 13

Exercising dogs in public is of benefit to both the dog and its owner. The owner
spends quality time with their pet, participates in physical activity, and becomes
involved in socialising with other people in the community, particularly other pet
owners. The fundamental benefit for the dog is the experience of a wide range of
benefits, such as exercise, training, socialisation, relief of pent-up energy, as well as
the companionship with the owner. 14

Whilst exercising a dog in the public realm is a favourite pastime activity of many
residents, consideration must also be given to those who do not own dogs or who are
frightened or intimidated by dogs. The potential for conflict in open spaces and public
places is high and many conflicts are the result of inappropriate behaviour. The most
unpleasant although easily avoided conflict is the defecation caused by dogs. This
can pose a significant health risk for both other dogs and small children as the
primary transmission pathway is through contamination of the hands and accidental
ingestion. Other behaviours of the dog such as aggression to humans and other
animals, barking and other nuisance behaviour can also decrease the quality of the
recreation experience of others in the community.

Reaching a balance between users is a priority for the City of Port Adelaide Enfield.
Pursuant to Section 26(A)(2) of the Dog and Cat Management Act 1995 (The Act) the
plan of management "must include provisions for parks where dogs may be
exercised off leash and for parks where dogs must be under effective control by
means of physical restraint, and may include provisions for parks where dogs are
prohibited.” 15

Changes to the Act in July 2005 identify that a dog must be on a lead at all times in
public areas (not including open space (reserves/parks/foreshore)). On open space


12
   Public Open Space and Dogs, 1995. Harlock Jackson Pty Ltd, Associate Professor Judith K. Blackshaw and Jane
Marriot.
13
   National People and Pets Survey - Report to Urban Animal Management Coalition January 2005
14
   Public Open Space and Dogs, 1995. Harlock Jackson Pty Ltd, Associate Professor Judith K. Blackshaw and Jane
Marriot.
15
   Dog and Cat Management Act 1995



Approved 27 June 2007                                                                                       27
the dog must be under effective control (as defined by The Act) but not necessarily
on a lead unless the open space is a designated ‘on leash’ area.

The City of Port Adelaide Enfield currently has 365 reserves, (land that is available to
the public for recreation or sport or has a conservation, aesthetic or buffer purpose)
of which nine have been identified as a ‘dog on leash’ place.

In the interest of creating a safe and enjoyable environment for all of the community,
a number of Council reserves were assessed during the preparation of the plan. The
function of reserves plays a crucial role in determining the desired type of activity or
experience the reserve offers to the community. Table 8 provides a brief summary of
the reserves which are identified as possible dog prohibited or dog on lead reserves,
including those already identified in accordance with By Law 5.


Table 8 – Additional and Existing Dog on Lead or Dog Prohibited Reserves

Function/               Reserve          Location             Current            Proposed
Facility                                                      Classification     Classification
Conservation/Wet        Barker Inlet     Salisbury Hwy,       N/A                Dogs Prohibited
lands                   Wetlands         Wingfield
Conservation/Wet        Magazine Creek   Whicker Road,        N/A                Dogs Prohibited
lands                   Wetlands         Gillman
Conservation/Wet        Range Wetlands   Hanson Road Nth      N/A                Dogs Prohibited
lands                                    Wingfield
Conservation            Folland Park     Turnball Road        N/A                Dogs Prohibited
                                         Enfield
Natural Area            Northgate        Folland Avenue       N/A                Dog on Lead
                        Reserve          Northgate
Natural Area            Roy Amer         Sir Ross Smith       Dog on Lead        Dog on Lead
                        Reserve          Blvd, Oakden
Natural Area            Stockade Park    Cnr Twin Street      Dog on Lead        Dog on Lead
                                         and Howard
                                         Street, Northfield
Conservation/Lin        Torrens Linear   Various              Dog on Lead        Dog on Lead
ear Park                Park
Conservation            Thomas Turner    Geraldine Street     Dog on Lead        Dog on Lead at
                        Reserve          Valley View                             certain times.
                                                                                 (Weekends
                                                                                 8.30am -
                                                                                 6.30pm and
                                                                                 Weekdays from
                                                                                 4.30pm –
                                                                                 5.30am)
Golf Course             Regency Park     South Road           Dog on Lead        Dog on Lead
                        Golf Course      Regency Park
Conservation/Nat        EP Nazer         Swan Terrace         Dog on Lead        Dog on Lead
ural Area               Reserve          Semaphore Sth
Conservation            Foreshore        Various              Dog on Lead at     Dog on Lead at
                                                              certain times.     certain times.
                                                              10.00am to         10.00am to
                                                              8.00pm During      8.00pm During
                                                              Daylight           Daylight
                                                              Savings            Savings



Approved 27 June 2007                                                                 28
Function/               Reserve           Location             Current            Proposed
Facility                                                       Classification     Classification
Foreshore Linear        Coast Park        Various              N/A                Dog on Lead at
Park                    (Bower Road,                                              certain times.
                        The Esplanade,                                            10.00am to
                        Lady Gowrie                                               8.00pm During
                        Drive)                                                    Daylight
                                                                                  Savings
Greyhound Track         Harold Tyler      Days Road            Dog on Lead        Dog on Lead
                        Reserve           Angle Park
Natural Area            T K Shutter       Fourth Avenue        Dog on Lead        Dog on Lead
                        Reserve           Klemzig
Conservation            R B Connolly      Grose Crescent       N/A                Dog on Lead
                        Reserve           North Haven


There is also growing concern regarding dogs in and around play spaces. Play
spaces refer to a specific area with play ground equipment designed for the purpose
of play through formal activities or the creation of play value.

It is anticipated that dogs will be prohibited within fenced play spaces in the following
reserves:

•     Semaphore Foreshore
•     Semaphore South Foreshore Play Space
•     Largs Foreshore Play Space
•     One and All Drive Reserve
•     Roy Amer Reserve
•     Regent Gardens Reserve
•     Conrad Leopold Reserve
•     Vickers Vimy Reserve

This will include prohibition of dogs within a 5 metre radius of any other play space.

Implementation of the changes to dog on lead and dog prohibited areas will occur
following a review and subsequent commencement of By-law 5 - Dogs.

To continually support and encourage people to participate in dog owner recreation,
it is acknowledged that supplementary infrastructure will be required adjacent to play
spaces. Items such as drinking fountains, tether poles, seating and tables can be
placed at the required distance from the play space creating a dog friendly area.




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                    29
Approved 27 June 2007   30
GOAL 5: THE CITY OF PORT ADELAIDE ENFIELD WILL ENCOURAGE APPROPRIATE DOG/HUMAN BEHAVIOUR WITHIN
THE CITY’S OPEN SPACES AND PUBLIC PLACES

Strategies                                                                                           Priority   Responsibility       Goal Cross
                                                                                                                                     Reference
5.1     PROVIDE HIGH QUALITY FACILITIES TO ENCOURAGE RESPONSIBLE USE OF THE                                     Manager Parks and    6
        CITY’S OPEN SPACES AND PUBLIC PLACES.                                                                   Gardens and
                                                                                                                Manager
Actions:                                                                                                        Environmental
5.1.1 Install facilities such as drinking fountains and tethering poles for dogs on Councils open    2          Services
       space including the following:
       - Coast Park
       - Torrens Linear Park
       - Adjacent Play Spaces
5.1.2 Install dog waste bag dispenser stations at key locations throughout the City.                 1
5.1.3 Provide adequate and appropriate signage in reserves.                                          2
5.1.4 On Council Linear Parks spray ‘dog on leash’ sign on the trail bitumen.                        2
5.1.5 Investigate the availability of dog play equipment and the feasibility of installing this on   2
       reserves in suburbs with high dog populations.
5.2    PROVIDE APPROPRIATE INFORMATION TO ENCOURAGE RESPONSIBLE USE OF                                          Manager              6
       THE CITY’S OPEN SPACES AND PUBLIC PLACES.                                                                Environmental
                                                                                                                Services
Actions:
5.2.1 Produce Dogs in Open Spaces and Public Places Brochure                                         1
5.2.2 Conduct targeted education programs on appropriate dog/owner recreation in open spaces         2
       and public places.
5.2.3 Planned education and enforcement programs to improve compliance with prescribed dog           2
       on-leash and dog prohibited spaces within the City.
                                                                                                                           Priority 1 High (1-2 years)
                                                                                                                           Priority 2 Medium (2-4 years)
                                                                                                                           Priority 3 Low (4-5 years)




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                                                                            31
Strategies                                                                Priority   Responsibility       Goal Cross
                                                                                                          Reference
5.3     ENSURE THE CITY OF PORT ADELAIDE ENFIELD COMPLIES WITH RELEVANT              Manager              1
        LEGISLATION.                                                                 Environmental
                                                                                     Services
Action:
5.3.1 Review Council By-Law 5 - Dogs with regards to the following:       1
       - Dog Prohibited Areas
       - Dog on Lead Areas
       - Carrying of Dog Waste Bags

                                                                                                Priority 1 High (1-2 years)
                                                                                                Priority 2 Medium (2-4 years)
                                                                                                Priority 3 Low (4-5 years)




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                                                 32
5.3          Education

 Education and access to educative materials is a key element in ensuring that the
 community is well informed of the responsibilities of owning a dog and dog attack and
 bite avoidance.

 The City of Port Adelaide Enfield recognises that compliance to legislation cannot be
 fully achieved without frequent education aimed at a variety of target audiences. It
 also recognises that in partnership with other organisations and agencies educative
 programs and initiatives can be held more frequently, be of a range of mediums and
 can reach a far wider audience.

 5.3.1 Dog Attack/Bite Avoidance
 PetPep is a recently developed program aimed at primary school aged children
 focuses on promoting general pet care, pet owner responsibility, positive interaction
 between children and animals and contact between children and other members of
 the community who are interested in responsible pet ownership, such as
 Veterinarians. The program encourages children to understand the responsibility of
 owning a pet and also the appropriate behaviours to engage in when around animals.
 The underlying focus being to reduce dog attacks on children.

 In South Australia between July 2001 and June 2003, 365 people were admitted to
 hospital as a result of a dog attack. Of these attacks, 95 of the victims were aged 6
 years and under and 45 of the victims were aged between 7 and 18 years of age. 16

 Over 36% of dog attacks occur in the victim’s house or yard and 24% occur at a
 friend or neighbour’s house or yard. Attacks are more likely to transpire when
 children are interacting directly with the dog (playing, feeding, patting). Those most at
 risk are children under the age of 12 years however children aged between 1 and 4
 have the highest injury rate, which occur mainly on the child’s face and head. 17

 In 2005 there were 180 reported dog attacks in the City of Port Adelaide Enfield, 26
 less than 2004, however 20 more than that recorded for 2003.

                                    Table 9 – Number of Dog Attacks 2003-2005

            250


            200                                     206
                              180
Number                                                                    160
            150

                                                                                     No. of dog attacks
            100


              50


               0
                            2005                 2004                   2003
                                                 Year

 In 2005, reported dog attacks in the City represented 6% of overall reports across the
 State. Suburbs recording higher numbers of reported dog attacks in 2005 included

 16
      Integrated South Australian Activity Collection (ISAAC) “Dog Attack Injuries” Parliament of South Australia 2003
 17
      Kidsafe Fact Sheet “Dog Attacks”, 2004 Kidsafe SA


 Approved 27 June 2007                                                                                                   33
Rosewater, Enfield and Greenacres, whilst suburbs such as Peterhead and Gillman
recorded no dog attacks for 2005.



 SUBURB                       Dog Attacks 2003           Dog Attacks 2004    Dog Attacks 2005
 Rosewater                                    2                          6                  18
 Enfield                                      5                          5                  14
 Greenacres                                   3                          7                  12
 Semaphore                                    5                          7                  12
 Mansfield Park                               3                          7                   9
 Largs Bay                                    9                         12                   8
 Kilburn                                     13                          9                   7
 Blair Athol                                 10                         11                   6
 Hillcrest                                    3                          3                   6
 Taperoo                                     12                         10                   6
Table 10 – Suburbs with the Highest Number of Reported Dog Attacks in 2005

Those suburbs with an increase in dog attacks include:

                               Total Dog Attack          Total Dog Attack    Difference 2003 &
 SUBURB                              2003                      2005                 2005
 Rosewater                                     2                        18                 89%
 Enfield                                       5                        14                 64%
 Greenacres                                    3                        12                 75%
 Sefton Park                                   1                        12                 92%
 Mansfield Park                                3                         9                 67%
Table 11 – Increase in reported dog attacks since 2003

Gillman was the only suburb with no dog attacks reported between 2003 and 2005.

On a dog per suburb ratio, no correlation was found between the number of dogs per
household and the number of dog attacks.

Whilst this data provides a good summary of the locations of the attacks it does not
provide specific information regarding the type of attack that has occurred; for
example whether the attack was dog to human, dog to cat or dog to dog. It would
also be beneficial to understand whether the incident was an actual attack or a
complaint about a dog approaching either an individual or another dog. It should also
be noted that these are the dog attacks that are reported to Council and may or may
not include those that are presented at hospitals or doctors surgeries.

5.3.2 Dog Owner Responsibility
The responsibility of owning a dog should be carefully considered prior to the
purchase or acquisition of a pet. Consideration should be given to the breed, size of
backyard, availability of time to exercise and interact with the dog, costs associated
with feeding, worming and keeping the dog in maximum condition.

The City of Port Adelaide Enfield actively promotes the fundamentals of responsible
dog ownership through fact sheets, Council website and registration notices. Council
also promotes other initiatives such as the Pet Net Website and programs which the
Animal Welfare League administer such as “mutts with manners”.




Approved 27 June 2007                                                                        34
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