Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group

Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group

Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group

Local Disaster Management Group Local Disaster Management Plan V3.0 January 2014 Prepared under the provisions of the Queensland Disaster Management Act 2003 Controlled Copy Plan No: MASTER

Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 2 Foreword Despite its idyllic lifestyle, the Tablelands Region is vulnerable to both natural and non-natural disaster events. Whilst such events are relatively infrequent, their potential to significantly disrupt social, economic and environmental systems highlights the importance of having effective and coordinated disaster management arrangements in place. In accordance with legislation, Tablelands Regional Council has established a Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG) to assist with this function.

Tablelands Regional Council provides a diverse range of services to the community of the Tablelands. In recognition of the importance of these services and the commitment to their continued delivery, Council has included disaster management issues and mitigation strategies in its Corporate Plan and implements a program of Business Continuity Management to ensure continued delivery of essential services during disruptive events. It is recognised that all of us need to be resilient in the face of disaster. It is unrealistic to expect one community, one agency or one level of government to be able to respond and recover effectively from the magnitude of such disasters. Effective disaster management requires a collaborative approach with responsibilities shared by individuals, families, communities and all levels of government.

In the event of a disaster affecting the region, Council will coordinate the response and manage the impacts within its administrative boundaries in accordance with the Local Disaster Management Plan, which provides a framework for multi-agency response and recovery operations. Council is committed to ensuring available resources are deployed and will endeavour to provide a high level of support for people affected by disasters by ensuring a coordinated effort by all levels of government and non-government entities. The Local Disaster Management Plan, supported by a range of functional and specific plans outlines the disaster management system in operation, the arrangements for the coordination of multi-agency resources and specifies the roles and responsibilities of partner agencies. The Local Disaster Management Plan is a dynamic, risk-based document that is subject to continuous review ensuring its content reflects current legislation, the region’s risk profile, and learning from disaster events both within and outside of the region to ensure the region is capable of responding to and recovering from any disaster event which may occur. Mayor Rosa Lee Long

Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group
Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group
Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 3 Endorsement The preparation of this Local Disaster Management Plan has been undertaken in accordance with the Disaster Management Act 2003 (the Act), to provide for effective disaster management in the Tablelands Regional Council area. In accordance with a resolution on 19 December 2013 the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Plan is endorsed for distribution by Tablelands Regional Council and becomes a live operational document from January 1 2014. Ian Church, Chief Executive Officer Tablelands Regional Council . Date: In accordance with the provisions of the Disaster Management Act 2003, The Tablelands Local Disaster Management Plan is approved by the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group. Mayor Rosa Lee Long Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group . Date:

Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 4 Amendment Register The following plan updates have been issued and recorded Reference Version Outline of Revisions Date Approved 001 V2.0 Version 2.0 presented to Council for approval. 01/11/12 SD 002 V2.1 Minor changes relating to governance processes. 14/08/13 SD 003 V3.0 Updated for de-amalgamation purposes and presented to Council for approval from January 1 2014. 19/12/13 SD

Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 5 Contents Foreword . . 2 Endorsement . . 3 Amendment Register . . 4 Contents . . 5 Section 1: Administration & Governance . . 8 Authority to Plan . . 8 Purpose . . 8 Objectives . . 8 Scope . . 9 Structure of the Local Disaster Management Plan . . 10 Operational Sub Plans . . 10 Specific Disaster Plans . . 10 Review and Renew Plan . . 11 Document Control . . 11 Distribution . 12 Disaster Management Structure in Queensland . 13 SDMG Disaster Management Strategic Policy Framework . 13 District Disaster Management Arrangements . 14 Local Disaster Management Arrangements . 14 Section 2: Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG . 15 Establishment . 15 Functions of the LDMG . 15 Membership . 16 LDMG Executive . 17 Agency Roles & Responsibilities . 17 LDMG Sub-Groups . . 24 LDMG Task Groups . . 25 Meetings . . 28 Reporting . . 28 Linkages to TRC Corporate Plan . . 29 TRC Disaster Management Strategic Direction - Priorities . . 29

Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 6 Section 3: Disaster Risk Assessment . 31 Risk Assessment . 31 Community Context . . 32 Geography . . 32 Climate & Weather . . 33 Population . . 34 Social Support Infrastructure . . 36 Community Preparedness & Capacity . . 36 Industry . . 37 Critical Infrastructure . . 37 Essential Services . . 38 Medical Facilities . 40 Proposed Future Development . 41 Hazards . 41 Storms & Cyclones . 41 Wildfire . . 42 Flooding . . 42 Dams . . 43 Epidemic / Pandemic . . 43 Pest & Animal Diseases . . 43 Earthquakes . . 44 Major Infrastructure Failure . . 44 Hazardous Materials Incidents . . 45 Regional Events impacting on TRC area . . 45 Cost to the Community of Disaster Events . . 45 Risk Treatment Plan . . 46 Section 4: Capacity Building . . 47 Community Awareness . . 47 Training . . 47 Exercises . . 48 Post-Disaster Procedures . . 48 Section 5: Concept of Operations . . 50 Concept of Operations - Response Strategy . . 50 Activation . . 50 Disaster Declaration . . 52 Local Disaster Coordination Centre . . 53 Warning Notification and Dissemination . . 53

Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 7 Media Management . . 54 Financial Management . . 54 Impact Assessment . . 54 Resupply . . 55 Accessing Support and Allocation of Resources . . 55 Operational Reporting . . 56 Hazard Specific Arrangements . . 56 Concept of Operations - Recovery Strategy . . 59 Activation of Recovery Arrangements . . 59 Functions of Recovery . 60 Recovery Sub Plan . 61 Annexure A: Distribution List . . 62 Annexure B: Tablelands LDMG Contact List . . 64 Annexure C: Definitions, Abbreviations & Acronyms . . 65

Local Disaster Management Plan - Local Disaster Management Group

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 8 Section 1: Administration & Governance Authority to Plan The Tablelands Local Disaster Management Plan is prepared under the provisions of s. 57 of the Disaster Management Act 2003. Purpose This plan has been prepared by the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group to detail the arrangements within the Tablelands Regional Council area to plan and coordinate capability in disaster management and disaster operations. The overall purpose of the plan is to:  Save life, protect critical infrastructure and property and safeguard the environment.  Identify and assess hazards and take measures to mitigate or eliminate risk.  Serve the local community at the time of disaster whilst protecting the safety and well being of personnel involved in the disaster and people that live, work and travel within the region.

 Contain the disaster, prevent escalation and ensure speedy mobilisation and coordination of resources.  Ensure liaison with partner agencies and establish appropriate structures to ensure effective planning and a coordinated approach to response and recovery operations.  Ensure sufficient and timely information is provided to warn the public of the disaster and the necessary advice or information on the self-help actions they can take to protect themselves.  Protect Council's strategic goals and reputation by maintaining critical service functions and normal services at an appropriate level to ensure the impact on the community is minimised.

 Restore normality as far as practicable as rapidly as possible in a structured manner.  Lead long-term comprehensive recovery, involving social, economic, infrastructure and environmental reconstruction and rehabilitation.  Regularly educate, train and exercise staff in disaster management procedures.  Evaluate the response and recovery effort to learn lessons and to apply best practice gained from the experience of ourselves and others in dealing with major civil disasters. Objectives The objective of the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Plan is to facilitate the implementation of effective and efficient disaster management strategies and arrangements including:  the development, review and assessment of effective disaster management for the Tablelands Regional Council area including arrangements for mitigating, preventing, preparing for, responding to and recovering from a disaster  compliance with the State Disaster Management Group’s (SDMG) Strategic Policy Framework ; the State Disaster Management Plan; the Local Disaster Management

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 9 Guidelines; and any other Guidelines relevant to local level disaster management and disaster operations  the development, implementation and monitoring of priorities for disaster management for the local government area. Scope This plan details the arrangements necessary to undertake disaster management within the Tablelands Regional Council local government area (see map below).

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 10 Structure of the Local Disaster Management Plan The Local Disaster Management Plan (LDMP) is an overarching document that details the structure, management arrangements and governance provisions which underpin the process. It gives an overview of the arrangements in place for dealing with disasters and sets out the role of the LDMG from the initial notification through the various stages of response and recovery until the disaster event is brought to a close. The plan is designed to be flexible so it can be adapted to any disaster event affecting the region to ensure an integrated, coordinated and timely response.

Operational Sub Plans This document is complemented by Operational Sub Plans which are designed to expand on information contained in the LDMP by providing detailed information for the activation and operation of specific functions. Operational sub plans are designed to operate on a stand alone basis or as part of a wider response integrating seamlessly with other functional and specific disaster plans. A generic Recovery Sub Plan has also been developed which will be tailored to the specific disaster as required.

 Activation of the Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG)  Activation & Operation of the Local Disaster Coordination Centre  Public Information & Warnings  Evacuation  Evacuation Centre Management  Impact Assessment  Logistics  Financial Management  Community Support  Public Health  Resupply Operations  Transport  Recovery Specific Disaster Plans Specific Disaster Plans are also available which document the detailed arrangements for dealing with specific types of disaster events e.g. Emergency Action Plans for Dams. Other legislation and the results of the Disaster Risk Assessment for the region determine that specific arrangements are required for particular hazards. Hazard specific plans have been prepared for the following: Tinaroo Dam Emergency Action Plan This plan is prepared by Sunwater detailing arrangements for emergencies that may arise as a result of the operation of the dam on behalf of the Local Disaster Management Group. A copy is held in the Local Disaster Coordination Centre.

Wild River Dam Emergency Action Plan This plan is prepared by Tablelands Regional Council detailing arrangements for emergencies that may arise as a result of the operation of the dam on behalf of the Local Disaster Management Group. A copy is held in the Local Disaster Coordination Centre.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 11 Crooks & Wyndham Dam Emergency Action Plan This plan is prepared by Department of the Environment & Resource Management detailing arrangements for emergencies that may arise as a result of the operation of the dam on behalf of the Local Disaster Management Group. A copy is held in the Local Disaster Coordination Centre. Koombooloomba Dam Emergency Action Plan This plan is prepared by the Stanwell Corporation detailing arrangements for emergencies that may arise as a result of the operation of the dam on behalf of the Local Disaster Management Group. A copy is held in the Local Disaster Coordination Centre.

Malanda Lion Factory Emergency Plan This plan is prepared by the Lion Factory detailing arrangements for emergencies that may arise as a result of on site operations. A copy is held in the Local Disaster Coordination Centre. Review and Renew Plan The Local Disaster Management Plan will be reviewed on at least an annual basis in accordance with s.59 of the Disaster Management Act to ensure changes in legislation, personnel, organisation, risk profile or other changes are incorporated. The Local Disaster Management Plan and Operational Sub Plans will be reviewed as follows:- April - June LDMG & Sub Groups review and amend (as required) the LDMP. July Draft plans submitted to full Local Disaster Management Group for acceptance or amendment.

August Reviewed plans submitted to Council for approval (if necessary). September Updated plan submitted to District Disaster Management Group for information. The Local Disaster Management Plan and associated Sub Plans will also be reviewed following any activation of the plan or following any exercises to test the effectiveness of the plans. The annual review process will incorporate any recommendations arising from the annual assessment of the plan by the District Disaster Coordinator. If at any time, it becomes apparent that an urgent amendment or review of the plan is required for operational effectiveness, then such a review must be implemented expeditiously. Document Control The Local Disaster Management Plan is a controlled document. The owner of the document is the Tablelands Regional Council Local Disaster Coordinator (LDC). Any proposed amendments to this plan should be forwarded in writing to: Sarah Dean, Local Disaster Coordinator PO Box 154 Atherton, QLD 4883 Email: disastermanagement@trc.qld.gov.au

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 12 The LDC may approve inconsequential amendments to this document. Any changes to the intent of the document must be approved and endorsed by Tablelands Regional Council. A copy of each amendment is to be forwarded to those identified in the distribution list. On receipt, the amendment is to be inserted into the document and the Amendment Register at the front of the document updated and signed. It is the responsibility of all plan holders to ensure their copy remains up to date, that amendments are incorporated quickly and recorded on the amendment sheet and that any restricted data is destroyed appropriately. The Local Disaster Coordinator is responsible for distributing amendments and will retain the master copy together with supporting documentation.

Distribution This plan has been distributed to various individuals and organisations in accordance with the distribution list at Annexure A. A downloadable version of this document is available to members of the public free of charge at: Website: www.trc.qld.gov.au/disaster-management Reference copies of this document are available to members of the public at: Council Service Centres: Atherton, Herberton & Malanda. Libraries: All TRC Libraries Visitor Information Centres: All TRC Visitor Information Centres. Members of the public can download a free version of this plan from Councils website at http://www.trc.qld.gov.au/sites/default/files/Tablelands%20Local%20DM%20Pla n%20V2%20Octo ber%202012%20MASTER.pdf Members of the public can also request a printed copy of the LDMP. A nominal fee of $5.00 will be charged to cover the printing costs.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 13 Disaster Management Structure in Queensland The Queensland Disaster Management Arrangements are based upon partnership arrangements between Local and State Governments and operate on four distinct levels; Local Government, Disaster District, State Government and Australian Government. These arrangements enable a progressive escalation of support and assistance through each tier as required. If a Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG) requires additional resources to manage the event, they are able to request support through the District Disaster Management Group (DDMG). If District resources are inadequate, requests for assistance can be passed to the State Disaster Management Group (SDMG). When State resources are inadequate, Australian Government support can be obtained through the Attorney General's Department. SDMG Disaster Management Strategic Policy Framework The State Disaster Management Group Disaster Management Strategic Policy Framework is based on 8 key elements:  Research  Policy & Governance  Risk Assessment  Mitigation  Preparedness  Response  Relief and Recovery  Post-Disaster Assessment The Tablelands LDMG is committed to working within the provisions of the State Disaster Management Strategic Policy Framework and ensures disaster management and disaster operations in its local government area are consistent with this framework by:

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 14  ensuring a comprehensive, all hazards, all agencies approach by achieving the right balance of prevention, preparedness, response and recovery  supporting the mainstreaming of disaster preparedness and mitigation into relevant areas of activity of government, non-government, small business and corporations  aligning disaster risk reduction, disaster mitigation, disaster resilience and climate change adaptation policy and actions with international and national reforms  promoting a transparent, systematic and consistent approach to disaster risk assessment and management, based on the Australian/New Zealand Standard AS/NZS ISO 31000:2009 Risk management – Principles and guidelines  recognising the commitment of stakeholders and the need for collaboration across all levels of government, community, industry, commerce, government owned corporations, private and volunteer organisations, and local communities in all aspects of disaster management  emphasising building and maintaining sincere relationships, trust, teamwork, consultative decision-making and shared responsibilities among stakeholders  promoting community resilience and economic sustainability through disaster risk reduction.

District Disaster Management Arrangements Tablelands Regional Council is in the Mareeba Disaster District which also includes the Local Government areas of Mareeba Shire Council, Etheridge Shire Council and Croydon Shire Council. The District Coordinator is the Queensland Police Service (QPS) Inspector for the Mareeba Disaster District. The Mareeba Disaster District is within the Tablelands Patrol Group area of Queensland Police Service’s area of responsibility. The LDMG Representative on the District Disaster Management Group (DDMG) is the Mayor of Tablelands Regional Council in her capacity as Chairperson. The Deputy Chairperson of the LDMG attends this meeting as proxy for the Mayor when unavailable. The Local Disaster Coordinator is an advisor to the DDMG.

If the Representative changes, Tablelands Regional Council will as soon as practicable, inform the Executive Officer of the State Group, and the District Disaster Coordinator of the District Group, of the new appointment. Guidelines exist for the operation of District Disaster Management Groups. Local Disaster Management Arrangements The management of a disaster at the community level is conducted by the Local Disaster Management Group, who is responsible for the development and implementation of the Local Disaster Management Plan and associated Sub Plans.

For further details see Section B: Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 15 Section 2: Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG) Establishment Tablelands Regional Council has established a Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG) in accordance with s. 29 of the Disaster Management Act. Guidelines exist for the operation of Local Disaster Management Groups. Terms of Reference for the LDMG are available at: \\Trc.local\data\Atherton\Pccommon\084 Sarah Dean\Disaster Management Groups\Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG)\Terms of Reference Functions of the LDMG In accordance with s. 30 of the Disaster Management Act, the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group has the following functions for the Tablelands Regional Council area:  To ensure that disaster management and disaster operations in the area are consistent with the State group’s strategic policy framework for disaster management for the State;  To develop effective disaster management, and regularly review and assess the disaster management;  To help the local government for its area to prepare a local disaster management plan;  To identify, and provide advice to the relevant district group about, support services required by the local group to facilitate disaster management and disaster operations in the area;  To ensure the community is aware of ways of mitigating the adverse effects of an event, and preparing for, responding to and recovering from a disaster;  To manage disaster operations in the area under policies and procedures decided by the State group;  To provide reports and make recommendations to the relevant district group about matters relating to disaster operations;  To identify, and coordinate the use of, resources that may be used for disaster operations in the area;  To establish and review communications systems in the group, and with the relevant district group and other local groups in the disaster district of the relevant district group, for use when a disaster happens;  To ensure information about a disaster in the area is promptly given to the relevant district group;  To perform other functions given to the group under this Act;

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 16  To perform a function incidental to a function mentioned above. Membership In accordance with s. 33 of the Disaster Management Act, Tablelands Regional Council has appointed persons it considers has the necessary expertise and experience to be a member of the Tablelands LDMG. All members have been selected based on their ability to assist the LDMG with all aspects of disaster management including prevention, preparation, response and recovery. The Tablelands LDMG has also considered which agencies are required to act in an advisory capacity to the LDMG based on experience gained from previous operations, exercises and assessments.

The composition of the Tablelands LDMG has been agreed by Tablelands Regional Council as follows: POSITION ORGANISATION DISASTER MANAGEMENT ROLE STATUS Mayor Tablelands Regional Council LDMG Chairperson Executive Member Councillor Tablelands Regional Council LDMG Deputy Chairperson / Recovery Chairperson Member Senior Advisor Disaster Management Tablelands Regional Council Local Disaster Coordinator Executive Member Chief Executive Officer Tablelands Regional Council Deputy Local Disaster Coordinator Deputy Deputy CEO & GM Organisational Services Department Tablelands Regional Council Tablelands Regional Council Liaison Officer Member GM, Infrastructure & Maintenance Tablelands Regional Council Tablelands Regional Council Liaison Officer Member GM Community & Regional Planning Tablelands Regional Council Tablelands Regional Council Liaison Officer Member Sergeant Queensland Police Service QPS Liaison Officer Member Area Director West Queensland Fire & Emergency Services QFES Liaison Officer (EMQ) Member Inspector (Urban Operations) Queensland Fire & Emergency Services QFES Liaison Officer (QFRS) Member Inspector (Rural Operations) Queensland Fire & Emergency Services QFES Liaison Officer (RFSQ) Member Officer in Charge (Atherton) Queensland Ambulance Service QAS Liaison Officer Member Manager Occupational Health & Safety Queensland Health QH Liaison Officer (Medical Services) Member Manager Regulatory Services Tablelands Regional Council Environmental Health Liaison Officer Advisor Manager Community Services Tablelands Regional Council Human-Social & Community Resilience Liaison Officer Advisor Industry Recovery Officer Queensland Dairy Farmers Organisation Economic Liaison Officer Advisor Environmental Health Officer Queensland Health QH Liaison Officer (Public Health) Advisor Media & Communications Officer Tablelands Regional Council Media & Communications Officer Advisor Community Development Officer Tablelands Regional Council Recovery Coordinator Advisor

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 17 ATGIS Coordinator Tablelands Regional Council ATGIS Support Officer Advisor Regional Operations Manager Ergon Ergon Liaison Officer Advisor Area General Manager – FNQ Telstra Telstra Liaison Officer Advisor Principal Engineer DEWS Dam Liaison Officer (Crooks, Wyndham & Ibis) Advisor Manager Water, Wastewater & Waste Tablelands Regional Council Dam Liaison Officer (Wild River) Advisor Service Manager Sunwater Dam Liaison Officer (Tinaroo Falls) Advisor Site Manager Stanwell Corporation Dam Liaison Officer (Koombooloomba) Advisor DETE Regional Manager Department of Education, Training & Employment DETE Liaison Officer Advisor Each member of the LDMG is required to identify a deputy to undertake the role in their absence. Deputies to LDMG members are appointed by signed notice (Form DM13) with approval of the LDMG Chairperson. A Local Disaster Management Group Contact List is held separately (see Annexure B).

LDMG Executive There are many instances where the physical or virtual (teleconferencing, etc) meeting of all members of the Local Disaster Management Group will be neither possible nor necessary for the effective implementation of this Plan. (It is a legislative requirement that a meeting of the LDMG involves 50% + 1 of the membership). Accordingly, the Disaster Management Executive is established to expedite processes as appropriate. The Local Disaster Management Group authorises the Disaster Management Executive to make initial response operational decisions on its behalf. The Disaster Management Executive has an exclusively operational response function, and will not at any time replace the policy decision-making role of the Local Disaster Management Group. The Disaster Management Executive comprises the Chairperson and the Local Disaster Coordinator of the Local Disaster Management Group (or their respective deputies, as applicable).

Agency Roles & Responsibilities Tablelands Regional Council Tablelands Regional Council services are critical to the livelihoods of residents and fundamental to the success of Council. All Council services have designated responsibilities in disaster management which reflect their legislated and / or technical capability. The key role of Council is to maintain normal services (as far as possible) via Business Continuity Management and to maintain a disaster response capability. The role and responsibilities of services of Tablelands Regional Council are detailed below.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 18 TRC Service Role & Responsibilities COMMUNITY & REGIONAL PLANNING Community Services  Community Development Officers to proactively support prevention, preparation, response and recovery initiatives to enhance community resilience.  Maintenance of a property register which gives details of all assets owned and managed by Council including a description of the facilities available.  Arranging for the emergency securing of Council owned premises and repair and maintenance of all Council owned buildings.

 Make arrangements to open and secure Council buildings as required. Arrange for the emergency cleaning of premises as dictated by the response and recovery efforts.  Ensure all Libraries and Visitor Information Centres are kept informed of the disaster response and recovery phases so that they are able to act as an information hub to members of the public in affected communities.  Provide advice in relation to aerodromes.  Protection of heritage and important cultural artefacts where appropriate.  Facilitate access to culturally appropriate social and psychological support for adults and children affected by disaster.

 Mobilize trained Housing Support Officers to assist residents to deal with their immediate housing needs following disaster.  Support to residents in Aged Housing Facilities owned by Tablelands Regional Council.  Advise on issues relating to cultural heritage sites. Regulatory Services  Maintain reasonable standards of health in the region and advise on public health measures to be implemented including measures to control the spread of infectious diseases.  Monitor and advise on satisfactory standards of hygiene and the provision of water and sanitation at Evacuation Centres and other buildings used in the disaster.

 Provide advice and guidance on food safety matters and assess food premises and declare affected food as fit or unfit for human consumption.  Provide advice and guidance on vector and vermin control.  Advise on methods available for the control and disposal of pollution and toxic materials and other environmental protection methods including sampling and monitoring.  Building Inspectors to ensure dangerous structures are made safe using enforcement powers where necessary.  Arrange for the collection, holding and disposal of stray animals and to organize kennel arrangements for pets bought to Evacuation Centres in liaison with the RSPCA.  Weed spread prevention and communication. Regional Planning  Ensure future development takes account of hazards e.g. preventing building homes in flood plains.  Provide advice in relation to mapping prepared for flood risk

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 19 and wildfires as part of the planning scheme. ORGANISATIONAL SERVICES DEPARTMENT Organisational Development  Providing workplace health and safety advice in relation to employees and volunteers working on behalf of the Council for the duration of the disaster including accident investigation where appropriate and in conjunction with other agencies when necessary.  Ensure staff welfare and well being requirements are met as far as possible for the duration of the disaster event.  Ensure availability of the Employee Assistance Programme (EAP).

 Implement occupational health services and arrangements to provide confidential psychosocial debriefing and counselling support to staff as required.  Ensure staff records are accessible and that contact details, next of kin details and other information is kept up to date. Knowledge & Systems  Providing information and communications technology advice, GIS and spatial data support and support to the Local Disaster Coordination Centre (LDCC) to ensure an effective response.  Arranging for additional telephone facilities, computers and mobile phones, etc. at appropriate locations as required.  Ensuring that relevant data is secured and stored appropriately to preserve documentary evidence.  Liaising with other relevant agencies on communications issues.

Customer Services  Establishing and operating a disaster helpline facility to ensure accurate advice and information is given to the public.  Ensure relevant information is displayed on Council's website and the Facebook and Twitter sites remain up to date during the response and recovery effort.  Ensuring front counters are maintained at an appropriate level throughout the response and recovery phase.  Corporate Services  Ensuring Councillors understand their legislative requirements and legal obligations in disaster management.  Assist LDCC Officers with the interpretation of policy and procedure and with immediate problem solving and analysis.  Assisting with conflict resolution and the resolution of any complaints received during the response and recovery phase of a disaster.

Finance Services  Controlling, tracking and accounting for all monies expended in the disaster response and recovery phases.  Maintaining a petty cash inventory to ensure the availability of immediate cash sums for the purchase of equipment, supplies, etc.  Establishing separate accounts as necessary to deal with expenditure incurred on the disaster.  Providing support and guidance to Officers who are responsible for preparing applications under the rules of the Natural Disaster Relief & Recovery Arrangements (NDRRA) for cost recovery if applicable.

 Coordinating and organising the administration of any appeal funds that are established.  Arrange opening and staffing of Stores as required and make

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 20 available resources for use in a disaster.  Ensure adequate supply of fuel stocks and ensure appropriate distribution methods are available.  Advise on existing corporate suppliers and potential alternative suppliers for the procurement of resources during the response and recovery phases of disasters.  Assist as required with the coordination and acquisition of resources from neighbouring authorities and / or other areas in the event of mutual aid being invoked.

 Dealing with claims with the Council’s insurers to ensure that appropriate costs are recovered as far as possible. INFRATRUCTURE SERVICES Water & Waste  Maintain a safe supply of drinking water as far as reasonably practicable and advise on emergency measures to be taken.  Maintain sewerage operations at an appropriate level and advice on emergency measures to be taken.  Maintain the waste transfer stations at an appropriate level throughout the disaster response and recovery operations.  Provide specialist advice on the collection, recycling and disposal of waste including hazardous waste and materials.  Prepare and advise on Emergency Action Plans for Council owned referable dams.

 Coordinate damage reports of water, sewerage and waste critical infrastructure. Construction & Maintenance  Maintenance of the highway network including emergency closures and diversions.  Coordinate damage reports of roads infrastructure and provide advice on temporary and more permanent highways reinstatements and repairs.  Create diversions and detours as necessary.  Ensure sand and sandbags are available as required and source emergency stocks where appropriate.  Implementation of a priority system for the removal of fallen trees that block the highway and fallen trees on Council owned land.

 Assisting with clear up operations as required e.g. flood clearance, storm damage, chemicals / hazardous materials, etc.  Record flood heights and extents as far as possible during the response so surveyors can later collect relevant data.  Capture detailed photographic records for potential NDRRA claims. Infrastructure Support Services  Advise on plant and fleet availability and suitability. Arrange for the provision and / or hire of items as required.  Providing maintenance and servicing of plant and equipment (including on site breakdown) where appropriate.  Ensure critical infrastructure e.g. roads, storm water infrastructure, etc. is designed to an appropriate level to adequately mitigate risk as far as reasonably practicable.  Deploy surveyors following flooding events to record flood height and extent data.

 Project management of civil works required under NDRRA to ensure requirements are met.  Maintain stockpiles of materials to assist in the response and

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 21 recovery effort e.g. premix, sand, gravel, etc.) DEPARTMENT OF THE CEO Economic Development  Take a proactive role in the promotion of disaster prevention and preparedness initiatives in relation to economic development of the region.  Lead the Economic Recovery Sub Group as required. Media & Communications  Being the primary contact for all media inquiries in relation to any event which results in the activation of the disaster management system within the Tablelands area.  Preparing accurate media releases based on local operations.  Dealing with enquiries from all media sources.  Maintaining a working log of all media releases and significant contacts with media sources.

 Coordinating and managing all media interviews.  Liaising closely with members of the LDMG to gather information.  Maintaining a current contact register of media organisations.  Ensuring all media releases are approved by the chairperson or the Local Disaster Coordinator of the LDMG.  Monitoring media broadcasts and newspapers to ensure accurate reporting and follow-up to correct any misleading reporting.  Arranging a media briefing area at the disaster coordination centre. Partner Agencies Organisations involved in disaster management have designated responsibilities which reflect their legislated and / or technical capability and authority with respect to hazards, functions and / or activities of disaster management. The role and responsibilities of organisations involved with the Tablelands LDMG are detailed below.

Further details on the role and responsibilities of State Agencies and organisations in disasters can be found in the State Disaster Management Plan which aims to ensure a whole of government approach by ensuring the accountabilities of all State agencies have been addressed. Agency Role & Responsibilities Queensland Fire & Emergency Services – Office of Emergency Management Functional lead agency for warnings as an agency within the Department of Community Safety  Review, assess and report on the effectiveness of disaster management by the State at all levels, including the State Disaster Management Plan and district and local plans.  Establish and maintain arrangements between the State and Commonwealth on disaster management issues.  Ensure that disaster management and disaster operations within the State are consistent with the State’s policy framework, plans, and guidelines.

 Ensure that persons performing functions under the Act in relation to disaster operations are appropriately trained.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 22  Provide advice and support to the SDMG, DDMGs and LDMGs in relation to disaster management and disaster operations.  Coordinate reception operations.  Administer NDRRA relief measures. Perform the following responsibilities in support of disaster operations:  Develop, maintain, monitor and continuously improve the State’s disaster management arrangements and systems  Ensure the availability, maintenance and operation of the SDCC  Manage resupply operations  Coordinate, support and manage the deployment of State Emergency Service resources  Coordinate, support and manage the deployment of EMQ Helicopter Rescue resources Queensland Police Service (QPS) Primary agency responsibility for terrorism  Provide executive support to the State group.  Coordinate the disaster response operations for the State group if a QPS officer is appointed as a State Disaster Coordinator.

 Preserve peace and good order.  Prevent crime.  Maintain any site as a possible crime scene.  Provide a Disaster Victim Identification capability.  Conduct traffic control, including assistance with road closures and maintenance of road blocks.  Coordinate evacuation operations.  Coordinate search and rescue operations.  Manage the registration of evacuees and associated inquiries in conjunction with the Australian Red Cross.  Provide security for damaged or evacuated premises.  Respond to and investigate traffic, rail and air incidents.  Coronial investigations.

Queensland Fire & Emergency Services - Urban Operations Primary agency for structural fires, road accident and for chemical / hazardous materials (HazMat) related incidents.  Coordinate the disaster response operations for the State group if a QFRS officer is appointed as a State Disaster Coordinator.  Provide control, management and pre-incident planning of fires (structural).  Provide rescue capability for persons trapped in any vehicle, vessel, by height or in confined space.  Rescue of persons isolated or entrapped in swift water / floodwater events.

 Provide advice, chemical analysis and atmospheric monitoring at chemical / HazMat incidents.  Provide mass and technical decontamination capabilities under State Biological Disaster and State Radiological Disaster response.  Provide Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) capability for building collapse events.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 23  Support the Queensland Hazardous Materials Incident Recovery Plan.  Support the Queensland Coastal Contingency Action Plan - Chemical Spill Response Plan (a supporting plan of the National Marine Chemical Spill Contingency Plan, and National Marine Oil Spill Contingency Plan).  Provide Impact Assessment, and intelligence gathering capabilities.  Provide logistical and communications support to disasters within capabilities. Queensland Fire & Emergency Services - Rural Operations Primary agency for bushfire and primary production vegetation.  The Rural Operations of the QFRS is a separate arm that looks after the Rural Fire Service that specifically includes the Fire Warden system as well as the volunteer rural brigades.

 Provide control, management and pre-incident planning of fires (bushfires). Queensland Ambulance Service (QAS)  Provide, operate and maintain ambulance services.  Access, assess, treat and transport sick and/or injured persons.  Protect persons from injury or death, during rescue and other related activities.  Coordinate all volunteer first aid groups during major emergencies and disasters.  Provide and support temporary health infrastructure where required.  Collaborate with Queensland Clinical Coordination Centre in the provision of paramedics for rotary wing operations.  Participate in search and rescue, evacuation and victim reception operations.

 Participate in Health Facility evacuations.  Collaborate with Queensland Health in mass casualty management systems.  Provide Disaster, Urban Search and Rescue (USAR), Chemical Hazard (Hazmat), Biological and Radiological operations support with specialist logistics and specialist paramedics. Queensland Fire & Emergency Services - SSES)  Assisting the community to prepare for, respond to and recover from an event or disaster  Public Education  Rescue of trapped or stranded persons (see State Rescue Policy)  Search operations for missing persons  Emergency repair/protection of damaged/vulnerable buildings  Assistance with debris clearance  First Aid  Traffic Control  Short term welfare support to response agencies  Assistance with impact assessment  Assistance with communications  Assistance with lighting.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 24 Queensland Health Functional lead agency for health services and Primary agency for Pandemic Influenza, Biological and Radiological Incidents.  Coordinate the disaster response operations for the State group if a Queensland Health officer is appointed as a State Disaster Coordinator.  Protect and promote health in accordance with Health Services Act 1991 and Public Health Act 2005.  Provide Clinical and State-wide and Forensic services support for disaster response and recovery.

 Provide human-social support for response and recovery.  Provide appropriate pre-hospital on-site medical and health support.  Coordinate aero-medical tasking in partnership with QAS throughout the State.  Provide state representation at the Australian Health Protection Committee.  Ensure a whole-of-health emergency incident management capability to prevent, respond to, and recover from any event.  Provide appropriate public and community health risk and preventative measures information.  Provide health emergency incident information for media communications.

Industry Representatives  Advice regarding industry-specific effects of any potential disaster event  Advice on the response assistance that industry can provide, via specialist resources, manpower etc LDMG Sub-Groups To assist the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group meet its statutory requirements for operational planning, it has established 6 permanent Sub Groups. The Terms of Reference for each LDMG Sub Group are held at \\Trc.local\data\Atherton\Pccommon\084 Sarah Dean\Disaster Management Groups\Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG)\LDMG Sub Groups. Social Support Services Sub Group The key function of this Sub Group is to plan and coordinate the provision of social support during the response and recovery phases to meet the basic needs of people affected by disaster by ensuring comprehensive plans and procedures exist to meet welfare requirements. The Terms of Reference details the role and responsibilities for this Sub Group as well as meeting schedules, plan requirements, etc.

Economic Sub Group The key function of this Sub Group is to assess the impact of a disaster event on the economy and to coordinate the provision of financial management support, and industry assistance during planning, response and recovery activities.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 25 The Terms of Reference details the role and responsibilities for this Sub Group as well as meeting schedules, plan requirements, etc. Public Health & Environment Sub Group The key function of this Sub Group is to provide specialist public health advice in the prevention and management of disaster events, to provide specialist advice on waste management and to manage rehabilitation of the natural environment as required. The Terms of Reference details the role and responsibilities for this Sub Group as well as meeting schedules, plan requirements, etc.

Built Environment & Infrastructure Sub Group The key function of this Sub Group is to identify and protect critical infrastructure and to ensure a coordinated approach to conducting damage assessments and infrastructure repairs following disaster events. The Terms of Reference details the role and responsibilities for this Sub Group as well as meeting schedules, plan requirements, etc. TRC Resilience Sub Group The key function of this Sub Group is to enhance the resilience of Tablelands Regional Council services through Business Continuity Management to ensure the continued delivery of normal services as far as practicable during response and recovery operations. The Terms of Reference details the role and responsibilities for this Sub Group as well as meeting schedules, plan requirements, etc.

Community Resilience Sub Group The key function of this Sub Group is to engage with community members to raise awareness of disaster management issues and to improve communication between community networks and the Tablelands LDMG. This is achieved through the promotion of resilience activities and the development of Community Disaster Plans. The Terms of Reference details the role and responsibilities for this Sub Group as well as meeting schedules, plan requirements, etc. LDMG Task Groups The Tablelands LDMG also has the ability to convene additional supporting committees as required in the form of Task Groups. Task Groups are formed to deal with specific issues and cease to operate on fulfilment of the task. At the current time, the LDMG has the following task groups active: Emergency Risk Assessment Task Group The key function of this Task Group is to develop disaster risk assessments for the region using a sound methodology in accordance with legislative requirements.

The Terms of Reference details the role and responsibilities for this Sub Group as well as meeting schedules, plan requirements, etc.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 26 Local Disaster Coordination Centre Task Group The key function of this Task Group is to design the effective layout of the primary and secondary Local Disaster Coordination Centres, develop the operational plan and associated standard operating procedures and ensure training and exercise program is in place for personnel. Terms of Reference details the role and responsibilities for this Sub Group as well as meeting schedules, plan requirements, etc.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 27 Local Disaster Management Group Chair: Mayor of Tablelands Regional Council Deputy Chair / Recovery Chair: Local Disaster Coordinator Deputy Local Disaster Coordinator / Tablelands Regional Council CEO Deputy CEO & GM Organisational Services Department GM, Infrastructure & Maintenance GM Community & Regional Planning Queensland Police Service Queensland Fire & Emergency Services (OEM) Queensland Fire & Emergency Services (Urban) Queensland Fire & Emergency Services (Rural) Queensland Ambulance Service Queensland Health Advisors: Media Officer / Dam Owners / ATGIS Officer / Recovery Coordinator / Ergon Rep / Telstra / Technical Staff Social Support Services Sub Group Economic Sub Group Public Health & Environment Sub Group Built Environment / Infrastructure Sub Group TRC Resilience Sub Group Community Resilience Sub Group Tablelands Regional Council Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG) Structure (V2: Approved June 2012) Task Groups Established in response to deal with specific issues. Cease to function when task complete.

Organisational Chart A diagram showing the structure of the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group is below.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 28 Meetings Meetings of the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group are scheduled every 4-8 weeks depending on the time of year. Meeting dates are confirmed for a 12 month period in April of each year. During peak times of the year e.g. cyclone season, the LDMG meets on a monthly basis. Meetings are held in Mareeba or Atherton to ensure adequate representation across the region. A quorum of 50% +1 of the membership is required for meetings. If a member cannot attend the LDMG they are to appoint a suitably trained, skilled and experienced person from their agency to be their Deputy and complete the Form DM13 “Authorisation to appoint a deputy” for approval by the LDMG Chairperson. Members are encouraged to nominate a Deputy for the entire year. Once the Deputy is appointed they may attend the meetings and exercise the member’s functions and powers under the Disaster Management Act. A Deputy attending a LDMG is to be counted towards quorum. The Chairperson will preside at LDMG meetings. The Chairperson of the LDMG must be a councillor Tablelands Regional Council. If the Chairperson is unavailable then the Deputy Chairperson will preside if present. If both these members are absent and neither have appointed a Deputy or a member to act as Chairperson, then under section 41 of the Disaster Management Act, the members present can choose a member to preside as the Chairperson for the meeting. Members can join the LDMG meeting by utilising any form of technology that allows members to hear and take part in the discussion. If a member chooses to do this, their attendance is counted towards quorum.

Minutes will be taken of each meeting and distributed to all members. A resolution made by the LDMG is only valid when a majority of members vote in agreement. A resolution can also be valid if the majority of members give written agreement to the resolution and notice of the resolution is given under procedures approved by the group. The procedure for notice of a resolution will be by flying minute. Each member will be sent an email with the resolution clearly stated. If the majority of members reply in agreement than the resolution will be approved. Each resolution will be minuted.

Reporting Performance Reporting A written progress report on disaster management activities conducted is provided to all members of the Local Disaster Management Group prior to each meeting by the Local Disaster Coordinator and is a standing item on the meeting Agenda. A quarterly status report and specific reports requiring Council resolution are also submitted to Tablelands Regional Council on a regular basis. The Local Disaster Management Group will report at other times as directed regarding its activities to the full Council.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 29 The Local Disaster Management Group will, on an annual basis, forward a list of the Members of the Local Disaster Management Group to the Executive Officer of the State Group and the Mareeba Disaster District Coordinator. The District Disaster Coordinator requests regular status reports from Local Disaster Management Groups at the District Disaster Management Group meetings. In addition, an annual report, required under the Disaster Management Act 2003 is compiled from the information supplied and provided to Tablelands Regional Council, the District Disaster Coordinator and the Queensland Fire & Emergency Services Area Director West. Operational Reporting Extraordinary meetings of the Local Disaster Management Group will be convened on an as required basis during disaster operations.

The frequency of operational reporting in the form of SITREPS to the District Disaster Management Group and consequently to the State Disaster Management Group will be communicated by the District Disaster Coordinator. Linkages to TRC Corporate Plan Tablelands Regional Council has included disaster management issues within its Corporate Plan, to mitigate as far as practicable the communities' risk and exposure to the adverse impacts of natural or non-natural disaster hazards. The Corporate Plan identifies two priority issues directly linked to disaster management: .

"A Vibrant and Healthy Community" - Support a safe living environment for the community through a proactive response to public safety matters. "A Sustainable Environment" - Reduce the community's risk and exposure to the adverse impacts of natural hazards through disaster management planning and response. The disaster management planning process essentially ‘operationalises’ the intent of the Corporate Plan. TRC Disaster Management Strategic Direction - Priorities The following disaster management priorities for Tablelands Regional Council will ensure compliance with the disaster management legislation and will provide a sound legal grounding for disaster management in the Tablelands Region:  Identification, development and fostering of function-specific planning groups to support the Local Disaster Management Group.

 Development of a comprehensive hazard and risk assessment for the Tablelands Regional Council area.  Development of a disaster mitigation strategy for the Tablelands Regional Council area.  Development of a comprehensive disaster management arrangements document for the Tablelands Regional Council area.  Development of appropriate response operational plans for the Tablelands Regional Council area.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 30  Development and resourcing of primary and secondary disaster coordination centres for the Tablelands Regional Council area.  Development of a holistic disaster recovery plan for the Tablelands Regional Council area.  Development of a disaster management training and exercise regime for the Tablelands Regional Council area.  Development of an effective disaster preparedness community awareness strategy. (As endorsed by Council resolution at Item 20 of the meeting of Tablelands Regional Council on 08 October 2008).

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 31 Section 3: Disaster Risk Assessment Risk Assessment The Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group is in the process of conducting a comprehensive Disaster Risk Assessment for the Tablelands Region. Phase 1 which involved the Natural Hazard Risk Assessment is now complete. The methodology utilised to identify, analyse and evaluate disaster risks is the National Emergency Risk Assessment Guidance (NERAG) which provides a contextualised disaster risk assessment methodology consistent with the Australian / New Zealand Standard AS / NZ ISO 31000:2009 Risk Management - Principles and Guidelines.

The key elements of the disaster risk management process include: 1) Establish the Context; 2) Identify Risks; 3) Analyse Risks; 4) Evaluate Risks (Risk Assessment); and 5) Treat Risks. 6) Monitor & Review Risks The Natural Hazard Risk Assessment for the Tablelands region was adopted by the LDMG on 14 August 2013. The document is available at: \\trc.local\data\Atherton\Pccommon\084 Sarah Dean\Disaster Management Groups\Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG)\LDMG Task Groups\Emergency Risk Assessment Task Group\TRC Natural Disaster Risk Report 25 July 2013.docx Further work is scheduled during 2014 to identify and assess non-natural disaster hazards.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 32 Community Context Geography The Tablelands region is located in Far North Queensland approximately 1800km north of Brisbane and 100km west of Cairns. The region covers the 11,334 km2 geographic catchment of the former Atherton, Eacham and Herberton Shire Council areas. These former Shire Councils, along with the Mareeba Shire Council amalgamated in 2008 to form the Tablelands Regional Council. Following a public referendum, residents of the former Mareeba Shire Council voted to de-amalgamate effective from 1 January 2014, The map below illustrates the continuing Tablelands Regional Council boundary from January 1 2014.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 33 The Tablelands Regional Council area is adjoined by Cairns, Cassowary Coast and Charters Towers Regional Councils, and the Mareeba and Etheridge Shires. See map which outlines the local government area and adjoining local government boundaries. Relationships with neighbouring Councils are effective. A regional Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) for cooperation during disaster events has been signed with Cairns Regional Council, Cassowary Coast Regional Council, Townsville City Council, Hinchinbrook Shire Council and Burdekin Shire Council.

Climate & Weather The size of the Region is such that the topography varies considerably. The eastern border of the Region overlooks Cairns from the Atherton Tablelands eastern escarpment. The terrain is predominantly tropical in nature with fertile soils, lush growth and relatively high rainfall. This part of the Region is the most densely populated and heavily farmed with potatoes, sugar, corn, avocadoes and bananas as the main crops. Further to the west of the Region the terrain is characterised by open bush plains interspersed with relatively low ridge systems. Soils are poor compared to those in the east of the Region; rainfall is considerably lower resulting in drainage systems that are usually dry.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 34 Population The Tablelands Regional Council has a population of around 23,374 which is dispersed across an area of 11,334 sq km. Atherton is the major service centre for residents in outlying towns and farming districts and contains a range of businesses and essential service providers. According to the ABS Quick Stats, approximately 6,861 people reside in Atherton. Smaller towns dispersed throughout the mountainous east of the region are:  Tolga / Rangeview (2,426)  Malanda (2,052)  Yungaburra (1,116)  Herberton (934)  Ravenshoe (897). Additionally, there are many other small localities with populations of 150-700 people. The eastern portion of the region is a dormitory area for the greater Cairns area, with increasing numbers of people choosing to live on the Tablelands and commute to Cairns on a daily basis. In addition, there can be significant increases in population numbers seasonally by tourists and itinerant workers.

Age Structure The Tablelands region has a relatively old population age structure with a median age of 43 years compared with 36 for Queensland and 37 for Australia (ABS 2011 Census). 17.9% of the Tablelands population were aged 65 years and older compared with 13.1% of the Queensland population. Age group Tablelands (R) Queensland Australia 0-14yrs 20.1% 20.2% 19.3% 15-64yrs 62.0% 66.7% 66.7% 65 yrs+ 17.9% 13.1% 14.0% Source: Usual residents, ABS, 2011 Census of Population and Housing By 2026 it is forecast that 26.3% of the Tablelands population will be aged 65 years and older compared with 18.1% of the Queensland population (Qld Govt population projections, 2011, medium series). Please note this data is from the Tablelands Regional Council area prior to de- amalgamation.

Cultural Diversity Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people comprise 10.3% of the Tablelands population compared with 3.6% of the Queensland and 2.5% of the Australian population (ABS, 2011 Census). The Tablelands has a higher proportion of usual residents born in Australia at 78.9% compared with Queensland (73.7%) and Australia (69.8%). The main language other than English spoken

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 35 at home in the Tablelands is Italian (2.9%) followed by German (0.8%). Please note this data is from the Tablelands Regional Council area prior to de-amalgamation. Dwellings There were 20,275 private dwellings in the Tablelands region at the 2011 census, 13.7% unoccupied. Of the 16,235 occupied private dwellings, 89.4% were separate, detached houses, 1.9% semi- detached, 5.3% flats, units or apartments and 3.2% other dwellings such as caravans, tents, sheds etc.

The Tablelands has a high proportion of home ownership with 41.1% of occupied private dwellings owned outright compared with 29.0% in Queensland and 32.1% in Australia. 26.7% of Tablelands households own their house with a mortgage compared with 34.5% in Queensland and 34.9% in Australia. Median monthly mortgage repayment was $1424 in the Tablelands compared with $1850 in Queensland and $1800 in Australia. 28.0% of Tablelands households rent their dwellings compared with 33.2% in Queensland and 29.6% in Australia. Median rent $188 per week in the Tablelands compared with $300 in Queensland and $285 in Australia.

Please note this data is from the Tablelands Regional Council area prior to de-amalgamation. Households Of the 16,235 households counted at the 2011 census, 70.4% were family households, 26.7% were lone person households and 2.8% group households. Family households consist of couple families, with and without children, single parent households and other households. The Tablelands has a much higher proportion of couple families without children at 45.9% compared with Queensland, 39.5%, and Australia, 37.8%. This is consistent with the older population of the Tablelands.

Please note this data is from the Tablelands Regional Council area prior to de-amalgamation. Socioeconomic disadvantage The Tablelands has a high unemployment rate (9.5%) compared with Queensland (5.5%) (Australian Government, DEEWR, Small Area Labour Markets, March quarter 2012). The Tablelands has lower median weekly incomes that Queensland and Australia which is partly explained by its older population and high proportion of lone person households. See table 2 below. Table 2: Median weekly income, persons aged 15 years and older, 2011 census, usual residents Tablelands (R) Queensland Australia Individual $451 $587 $577 Family $1,049 $1,453 $1,481 Household $854 $1,235 $1,234 Source: ABS 2011 Census of Population and Housing

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 36 34.7% of households in the Tablelands region have gross incomes less than $600 per week compared with only 22.8% of households in Queensland and 23.7% in Australia. However, with lower rents in the Tablelands the proportion of households where rent payments are 30% or more of household income is lower at 9.2% than in Queensland (11.9%) and Australia (10.4%). There are pockets of disadvantage, for example Herberton where 45% of households have incomes less than $600 per week.

Please note this data is from the Tablelands Regional Council area prior to de-amalgamation. Vulnerable sectors of the Tablelands population At the 2011 census:  26.7% of the Tablelands population (4,341 households) were living on their own  7,817 people were aged 65 years and over  757 people were aged 85 years and over  29.5% of men aged 85 years and over were living alone  52.8% of women aged 85 years and over were living alone  3,367 persons had a core activity need for assistance (4.9% of the population)  4,046 people aged 15 years and over provided unpaid assistance to a person with a disability (11.6%)  2,739 children were aged under 4 years  238 people aged 45 years and over could not speak English well or at all, 120 of these were aged 85 years and over Please note this data is from the Tablelands Regional Council area prior to de-amalgamation. Internet connection  In the Tablelands (R) LGA at the time of the 2011 Census 68.0% of households were connected to the internet compared with 78.3% of Queensland households For further details see TRC Community Profile at: http://profile.id.com.au/assets/profile/tablelands/PDF/Tablelands%20Regiona l%20Council%20ar ea.pdf Social Support Infrastructure Social support infrastructure in the area is extremely limited with essential government and non- government services usually provided in Atherton. Some provide outreach services to smaller rural towns and districts. However, most people still have to travel to these services and the budgets of most of the human service agencies preclude them expanding their outreach services. The geographically dispersed population and the fact that many residents are socially isolated, means that many in the population have a relatively low socio-economic position compared to the rest of the Queensland population.

Community Preparedness & Capacity Notwithstanding the limitations of a small percentage of the populace, the community is essentially regarded as having the capacity to respond to and recover from most situations. The

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 37 pragmatic rural values in the community engender a significant degree of self-reliance, which brings stability, foundation and sustainability. There is a solid base of emergency service response capacity spread across the region, with Queensland Police Service, Queensland Fire & Rescue Service, both urban and rural volunteer, Queensland Ambulance Service, and State Emergency Service volunteers are represented in most communities. The majority of smaller communities in the Tablelands Regional Council region have proactively developed Community All-Hazard Disaster Plans documenting how the community will prevent, prepare for, respond to and recover from disaster events.

Industry The Tablelands is experiencing continual economic growth. The mainstay of the economy, agriculture, in its many forms is in a relatively healthy condition, despite the fluctuations in market price for a number of commodities. Principal agricultural pursuits involve beef and dairy farming, chicken breeding / fattening, sugar cane, bananas and fruit and vegetable growing. Mining has experienced resurgence in recent times across Queensland. Mt. Garnet Snow Peak Mine is the only operational mine in the Tablelands Regional Council area. Tourism is booming in the region, with the catch word being ‘diversity’ – there is a range of tourism opportunities, such as environmental, historical, agricultural and traditional touring. In addition, the caravans and motor homes of the ‘Grey Nomads’ are becoming increasingly prevalent in the area, and this section of the tourism industry brings an annual boost the economy of the region. Tablelands Regional Council is one of the major employers in the region, and has significant resources and competent personnel to contribute considerably to the physical response demands of any disastrous event.

Critical Infrastructure Transportation - Road System In the Tablelands area, public transport infrastructure is extremely limited. This means that most people have to rely on private transport to travel to work and to access essential and specialist services, including medical services. Most communities are connected by a network of sealed roads, but there is no train network and only a very limited public bus network. Lack of adequate transport infrastructure may prove to be a problem in the response to a major event. The major road transport routes are:  The Kennedy Highway heading north from Walkamin into the Mareeba Shire Council area which connects the area to Cairns via the Kuranda Range Road.  The Gillies Highway heading east from Atherton to Gordonvale via Yungaburra and the Gillies Range. This road is susceptible to regular landslides and flooding problems at the bottom of the range, within the Cairns Regional Council area of responsibility.  The Palmerston Highway heading South-East from Malanda to Innisfail via Millaa Millaa. This road is susceptible to occasional landslide problems.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 38  The Kennedy Highway heading west from Atherton to Mt Garnet. This road is subject to regular flooding problems at Innot Hot Springs essentially cutting the inland supply route which is critical if the Bruce Highway is closed.  The Gulf Developmental Road from Mt Garnet to the Etheridge Shire and beyond. Transportation - Railway A privately owned tourist passenger service operates between Ravenshoe & Tumoulin. Transportation – Airfields There are no Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) certified aerodromes in the Tablelands Regional Council area of responsibility.

The closest CASA certified aerodrome is in Mareeba which is owned and managed by the Mareeba Shire Council. It is located approximately 7.5km south of Mareeba, off the Kennedy Highway. The aerodrome has a single sealed runway system, 1505m long and 30m wide. A weight limit of 5,700kg currently applies, severely restricting the potential use of the facility for disaster relief purposes. Local aerodromes in the more rural areas of the region can provide the principal means of resupply during prolonged periods of isolation caused by severe weather events. Aerodromes owned and operated by Tablelands Regional Council are located at:  Atherton  Herberton  Mt Garnet Additional information about private air in the region is held in the Remote Property Survey Forms in the Local Disaster Coordination Centre.

Essential Services Telecommunications Telephone communications (landline and mobile) in the eastern, more populous parts of the region are relatively good. Recent improvements in mobile telephony systems have enabled extended mobile telephone coverage to many population centres, but some rural and remote areas in the southern and western areas of the region are still devoid of coverage. Many rural properties rely on solar-powered telephone systems, utilising a battery back-up, which is vulnerable to failure in extended periods of inclement weather. Similar problems have been experienced with the failure of batteries and generators at exchanges. The whole area is covered by broadcast radio, via ABC Far North on either AM or FM frequencies. Commercial radio providers have variable coverage of the area. Broadcast radio is vulnerable to failure in some smaller communities where adequate back up power at the transmission sites is an issue.

UHF and VHF radio coverage for QPWS, TRC and UHF CB repeaters in the region has been mapped by ATGIS and is available for reference by disaster management stakeholders. An initial contact channel (UHF-CB 10) has been agreed for the region (see Resilient Communications Sub Plan).

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 39 The area is reasonably well served by free to air broadcast television, and subscription satellite television is becoming more popular in all areas. High speed internet connection is available in the larger centres, but dial-up or satellite-based access is still required in the more remote areas of the Tablelands. Power Supply Power supply is managed by Ergon Energy and is sourced through the Powerlink transmission network connecting to power stations across Queensland, including stations near Rockhampton and Gladstone. The electrical supply is vulnerable to the external influences such as weather conditions or third party events causing supply interruptions.

Transmission: The electricity is transported through the Power link high-voltage transmission network. Electricity is transmitted from the power stations at high voltage (up to 330,000 volts) to Powerlink bulk supply substations so it can travel long distances efficiently. At Powerlink’s high-voltage bulk supply substations voltage is reduced to a lower voltage (66000 to 132,000 volts) to allow distribution. Distribution: The area is served from the one 132/66kV Bulk Supply Connection Point, T55 Turkinje substation located near Mareeba. The Tableland system consists of a 66kV sub transmission network and a number of 66/22KV zone substations which distribute power across the Tablelands Regional Council area from the Turkinje T55 bulk supply point. Water Supply Water supplies to communities across the Tablelands are diverse. Some centres are serviced by major dams, while others rely on creeks, bores and irrigation channels. Most, but not all, of the water supplies are treated.

Water supplies for the Tablelands come from: Herberton, Ravenshoe, Mt. Garnet, Tabo and satellite communities:  Wild, Herbert & Millstream Rivers  Vine Creek & North Cedar Creek  Wurruma Swamp  Eastine Creek Dam & Bores Malanda, Yungaburra, Atherton, Tolga, Millaa Millaa, Kairi, Tinaroo, Walkamin & Tinaroo Park  North Johnstone River & Upper Barron River  Scrubby Creek  Lake Tinaroo & Bores  Beatrice River There are a number of irrigation channels that traverse the eastern part of the Tablelands, emanating from Tinaroo Falls Dam. Water is distributed by gravity through an irrigation channel to the various sections of the Mareeba-Dimbulah Water Supply Scheme. In the Tablelands Regional Council area, this serves the Tolga and Walkamin farmlands. From a vulnerability perspective, the tropical location of the area will normally ensure that ample water supplies exist, and extreme conditions for a protracted period would be required to imperil those supplies. In some areas, however, reservoirs are relatively small for the population served.

Power is required to support water distribution and treatment. Extended power failures will lead to a loss of reticulated water supply.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 40 Sewerage Reticulated waste water treatment systems are in place in the more populated areas of the Tablelands Region, while septic treatment arrangements are more common in the rural areas. Most systems have the potential to cause health and/or environmental problems within 24 hours of the lack of electrical power. Stormwater Reticulated stormwater systems are in place in the more populated areas of the Tablelands Region. Stormwater infrastructure in rural areas is limited to bridges, culverts, open channels and floodway's.

Control of stormwater is essential to: (a) Providing access for emergency vehicles, residents, farms and businesses; and (b) Controlling damage to property and the environment. Buildings The majority of buildings on the Tablelands are low-set, timber or masonry / concrete construction with iron roofing. Some double storey buildings exist in the business centres – most of these are used for retail activities e.g. hotels or offices above retail outlets. Building stock is mostly over 30 years old and was constructed prior to the introduction of improved cyclone-rated building codes. Light industry facilities where they exist usually have steel frames and iron roofing and cladding.

Newer buildings have fared reasonably well during tropical cyclones and major storms in recent times, including Tropical Cyclone Larry and Yasi. Older structures, however, have been more susceptible to damage. Medical Facilities Public Hospitals: Queensland Health provides public hospitals in Atherton and Herberton. Primary Health Centres: Queensland Health provides primary health centres in Malanda, Millaa Millaa, Ravenshoe and Mt Garnet. An overview of facilities available at each Hospital and Primary Health Centre can be found at: http://www.health.qld.gov.au/wwwprofiles/cairns.asp Private Medical Practitioners: Situated in Atherton, Malanda, Herberton, Ravenshoe & Yungaburra as well as some smaller communities across the region. Mortuary Capacity (formal)  Atherton Hospital 6  Herberton Hospital 1  Guilfoyles Funerals Atherton 12 TOTAL = 19

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 41 Proposed Future Development Future development in the Tablelands Regional Council area will generally be contained within the Urban Footprint and Rural Living areas of the Far North Queensland Regional Plan 2009 - 2031 and in accordance with Council's four current planning schemes. Council's new planning scheme which will guide future development throughout the region is anticipated to come into effect in 2014. Hazards The Tablelands Disaster Risk Assessment identifies a number of natural and non-natural hazard events which may impact the community of the Tablelands Regional Council area. The events likely to affect the region have been identified as: Storms & Cyclones The Tablelands area is subject to severe hail storms and mini-tornadoes have been experienced, resulting in extensive environmental damage and the destruction of homes. Result of a small but severe tornado Silver Valley, October 2000 Due to its latitude the Tablelands region is vulnerable to tropical cyclones, mainly in the period from November to April annually. The Tablelands is vulnerable to cyclones from two directions, either from the Pacific Ocean to the east or from the Gulf of Carpentaria from the north-west. There has been until recently a broad misconception that tropical cyclones do not affect the Tablelands area, because of the ‘protection’ afforded by the mountain ranges between the Tablelands and the coastal strip. This misconception was resolved in March 2006, with category 4/5 Tropical Cyclone Larry impacting the southern Tablelands, causing substantial damage and financial loss and again in 2011 with category 5 Tropical Cyclone Yasi which was the largest and most intense cyclone to cross the Queensland coast since records began and was not downgraded to a tropical low until it reached Mt. Isa.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 42 Crop damage from winds and flooding associated with tropical cyclones in particular has caused significant economic losses in the past. Climate change predictions suggest that future cyclones may be more intense. Wildfire The wildfire risks across the Tablelands Regional Council area ranges from moderate to high from August to December depending on the variables of the weather at the time. The communities and areas in and around Herberton, Wondecla, Ravenshoe, Millstream, Mt, Garnet, Innot Hot Springs and Silver Valley have an average rainfall for the first 6 months of each calendar year after which time the mainly savannah and eucalypt vegetation cures to become quite vulnerable to wildfire for the remainder of the year Infrastructure and settlement in the remote southern part of the Tablelands Regional Council area is sparse, therefore any wildfire generally poses limited threat. However, wildfires in the remote area can become significant due to lack of resources and scarcity of water for fire fighting purpose.

The communities and areas in and around Atherton, Tolga / Rangeview, Tinaroo and Yungaburra incorporate heavily timbered forest country and more mountainous countryside which when in a wildfire could create added risks for landowners and fire fighting personnel. The communities and areas in and around Malanda, Tarzali and Milllaa Millaa lie in the wetter rainforest/higher altitude belt. The vegetation type is more rainforest therefore does not pose a wildfire threat under existing weather patterns. The exception is if the Tablelands experience harsh frosts in the winter periods then prolonged dry period - this then will increase the possibility of grass fires in these areas of the Tablelands.

With the increase in development across the region it is quite important that where rural residential lots impinge into the bushlands that the appropriate risk analysis be conducted and the required mitigation strategies be applied to reduce the threat of an approaching wildfire. All individual landholders across the Tablelands Regional Council area are encouraged to mitigate the risk of wildfire e.g. firebreaks. Flooding The escarpment and the divide extend the length of Eastern Australia. The Divide is the watershed which separates rivers that flow east to the coast, from those which flow west. On the Tablelands, the Barron, Johnstone, Mulgrave, Russell, Tully and Herbert (Wild River) flow east towards the Coral Sea.

The following Flooding is of significant concern in specific areas of the Tableland Region, with a number of areas subject to water incursion into residences during severe events:  Wondecla  Millstream Estate  Malanda  Herberton  Ravenshoe  Innot Hot Springs  Mount Garnet

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 43 Flooding of the transportation network is a major concern during the response to a significant event. Many roads become impassable due to swollen rivers and creeks. (See Transportation – Roads above). Dams There are several dams in the Tablelands area which, if they were subject to a catastrophic failure, would result in major flooding, which would potentially cause significant loss of life; damage to property and the environment; and economic privation. Those dams are:  Tinaroo Falls Dam – north-east of Atherton  Crooks and Wyndham Dams – north of Mt Garnet  Wild River Dam – east of Herberton  Koombooloomba Dam - south-west of Ravenshoe Emergency Action Plans for each referable dam are available from the Local Disaster Coordinator and are available in the Tablelands Local Disaster Coordination Centre. Epidemic / Pandemic The risk of an outbreak of disease throughout the population of the Tablelands could cause the health system to be taxed to its limits and may involve the isolation and quarantine of large numbers of people for a protracted period. In recent years, the World Health Organization (WHO) has warned of viruses that could potentially mutate and easily transfer from human to human creating an influenza pandemic with significant world-wide consequences. An influenza pandemic is a disease outbreak that occurs worldwide when:  a new strain of influenza virus emerges to which no-one is immune;  the virus causes disease in humans; and  the virus is easily spread between humans. In the absence of immunity, a new influenza strain can rapidly spread across the globe, causing epidemics or pandemics, infecting large numbers of people with fatal results. Other diseases of concern include dengue fever which is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito. Dengue is not endemic (i.e. naturally occurring in north Queensland). The dengue mosquito is common in north Queensland and outbreaks can occur when the virus is transmitted to the local mosquito population in north Queensland by infected international travellers or residents returning home from overseas.

Dengue is endemic in over 100 countries worldwide and is found primarily in urban settings in the tropics. Between 50 and 100 million cases of dengue are reported around the world each year and over 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. Several hundred thousand dengue cases each year result in dengue haemorrhagic fever which usually affects children under 15 years of age. The average fatality rate with dengue haemorrhagic fever is 5%. Dengue on the Tablelands is a rare but possible occurrence. Pest & Animal Diseases Animal pests and diseases are a major threat to Australia's livestock and poultry industries and an outbreak could impact on our access to export markets and undermine livelihoods.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 44 Australia is currently free of the world's worst animal diseases such as foot-and-mouth disease and avian influenza H5N1, but has been recently impacted by other diseases, such as Equine Influenza and the Hendra Virus. An outbreak of a disease in poultry, such as Newcastle Disease, would be catastrophic for the economy of the Tablelands, given the number of poultry breeders in the area. Far North Queensland was affected by papaya fruit fly from 1995 to 1998. This affected a large range of fruit and vegetable crops. Over 700 growers were affected within a 15,000 square kilometre quarantine area. The incursion cost Queensland industry around $110 million in lost trade, control, treatment and eradication.

Screw-worm flies could cost close to $500 million a year nationally in lost production and control measures if they entered Australia. They would have a devastating effect on northern livestock production. The social, economic and environmental consequences of a Foot and Mouth Disease worst-case scenario outbreak involves key beef and lamb export markets being closed for an extended period. The Productivity Commission estimates that the cost of a Foot and Mouth Disease incursion under this scenario would be between $8 billion and $13 billion of gross domestic product and its consequences would be felt nationally for nearly 10 years after the event. It would be crippling for the industry in the Tablelands region. Although regarded as a low risk, it is possible that an outbreak of an emergency animal disease could be intentional. Earthquakes Earthquakes have not in the immediate past been a major threat in the Tablelands area. Recent historical data exists in relation to tremors which have caused minor damage, but none has caused any great concern. Notwithstanding, the existence of even a slightly volatile seismic environment acts as a prompt for maintaining situational awareness of the threat, and its possible consequences.

The following table represents the five strongest recorded earthquakes to occur within the Tablelands Regional Council’s area. Date Magnitude (Richter Scale) Location 06 Nov 1992 3.5 3 km S of Ravenshoe 19 Jun 1950 3.2 1km ESE of Evelyn 20 Mar 2000 3.1 3.7km SE of Yungaburra 24 Jun 1961 2.9 25km SE of Ravenshoe 01 Dec 2013 2.8 North of Tinaroo Dam Major Infrastructure Failure One of the most serious issues facing disaster managers in the 21st century is society’s dependence upon technology. The same technology which makes life easier for all, and which everyone takes for granted when it is functioning as planned, has the potential to fail, for a variety of reasons, with potentially devastating consequences.

There is the potential for a “ripple effect”, where the failure of one essential service may lead to progressive failures of other essential services – e.g. loss of power would lead to loss of communications, loss of reticulated water supply, loss of sewage treatment capability, etc.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 45 All forms of electronic communication would be affected, affecting such divers areas as banking and commerce (no automatic teller machines or EFTPOS availability) the transport sector (airline bookings, radar, air traffic control), television, the internet and telephone systems in all government offices (all spheres of government). It is important to note that it is probable that the problem will not only affect this area, but would probably have state-wide and possibly national consequences, resulting in a lack of external support capacity.

Hazardous Materials Incidents Mining on and around the Tablelands has brought with it an increase in the amount of hazardous materials being transported through and stored in the region. The materials include some highly toxic chemicals, which if not handled with appropriate care, could be the catalyst for a disaster. Transportation and storage regulations, individual company policies and procedures and emergency services contingency response plans are in place to safeguard the population and the environment from accidental exposure to these chemicals, but their presence and transportation on major highways and through residential areas is nevertheless a risk to the community. The Lion Factory at Malanda is classed as a Dangerous Goods Facility as it holds various quantities of chemicals such as fuel, caustic, acid, nitrogen, butane, propane, ammonia, etc. Safety procedures are in place and risk management is a key consideration of site operations includes annual third party audits / inspections, various bi-annual testing, emergency procedures and training for staff. It should be noted that the site is just under the threshold for classification as a Major Hazard Facility (MHF). A site specific plan is available in the LDCC. Regional Events impacting on TRC area It is important to be aware of events happening in other areas which may impact on the Tablelands Regional Council area. Examples may include mass evacuation from the coast as a result of a Tsunami or Cyclone.

Cost to the Community of Disaster Events Tangible Costs Since amalgamation in 2008, Tablelands Regional Council's recorded disaster management costs (Natural Disaster Relief Arrangements) totalled in excess of $91 Million for damage to local government assets and for counter-disaster operational expenses. Intangible Costs While extreme events are relatively rare, when they do occur they can have a major impact on the health outcomes of the community. Obviously, such events can claim many lives and disrupt the provision of basic services, but they can also have other more subtle effects on the mental health of the population.

For example, following Cyclone Larry in 2006 residents in the affected region reported experiencing a number of emotional highs and lows. Sleep disturbance, lack of concentration and forgetfulness have also been reported as side effects of the disaster. Some of these symptoms may be associated with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and many residents also reported feeling anxious as the next cyclone season approached.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 46 Risk Treatment Plan The Risk Treatment Plan which forms part of the Disaster Risk Assessment was signed off by the Tablelands LDMG on 14 August 2013. It outlines the process to be undertaken by LDMG agencies in the implementation of the Risk Treatment Plan and the ongoing management of residual risk and risk sharing. The Risk Treatment Plan includes:  the process for the allocation of responsibility for the implementation of risk treatment strategies, monitoring and reporting;  the request for responsible agencies to incorporate the identified treatment strategies into their agency corporate planning process for recognition and implementation;  strategies for the management of residual risk; and  the process for notification where risk sharing is identified as a treatment option. The Risk Treatment Plan is monitored by the LDMG. Agencies responsible for implementation of the strategies are required to report regularly on progress at LDMG meetings.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 47 Section 4: Capacity Building Community Awareness In accordance with s.30 (a) of the Disaster Management Act 2003, the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group must ensure that the community is aware of ways of mitigating the adverse effects of an event and preparing for, responding to and recovering from a disaster. Notwithstanding the limitations of a small percentage of the populace, the community is essentially regarded as having the capacity to respond to and recover from most situations. The pragmatic rural values in the community engender a significant degree of self-reliance, which brings stability, foundation and sustainability. In addition, there is a solid base of emergency service response capacity spread across the region, with Queensland Police Service, Queensland Fire & Rescue Service, both urban and rural volunteer, Queensland Ambulance Service, and State Emergency Service volunteers are represented in most communities. The key strategy employed by the Tablelands LDMG to build resilience and promote community capacity is the Community All-Hazard Disaster Plan Initiative which seeks to encourage residents in small communities to work together to build resilience and the capacity to be self sufficient for several days.

In addition, a program of regular disaster management education, awareness raising, training and capacity building activities and promotion takes place at various times of the year in the form of presentations to key groups (e.g. business / industry, community sector, etc.), displays, publications, newspaper articles, advertisements and media statements to inform the community of the disaster management arrangements the LDMG has in place.. Each Council regional centre has on display a copy of this Local Disaster Management Plan, any relevant public awareness material available and copies of this plan are provided to Libraries and Tourist Information Centres. Various meetings are held throughout the year with key partners and various initiatives are targeted at different sectors of the community e.g. business, care homes, industry, etc.

All community awareness activities are documented, approved by the LDMG and reported to the DDMG to identify opportunities for consistent messaging, joint programs and commonalities of approach. The success of community awareness programs is monitored and reviewed by the LDMG Community Resilience Sub Group. Training The Local Disaster Coordinator will ensure that a suitable disaster management training program is designed and implemented, in collaboration with the training provided through Emergency Management Queensland as part of the State wide framework. The training program will include training through workshops, discussion forums and formal instruction, to maintain disaster management knowledge and understanding levels of all participants at the highest possible level. The Local Disaster Coordinator will liaise with Queensland Fire & Emergency Services (OEM) in relation to accessing State/Commonwealth provided training programs and will arrange for members of the Local Disaster Management Group to be made aware of training courses or other

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 48 appropriate activities being offered by the Department of Emergency Services or any other agency. Personnel that have responsibilities under disaster management plans are expected to demonstrate their knowledge, skills and experience and undertake a program of continuous development. Evaluation of all training events is undertaken to ensure training is effective and meets the end-user needs. An auditable record of attendance is maintained by the Local Disaster Coordinator.

Community members who form the Community Disaster Teams are also offered relevant training from the State-wide Disaster Management Training Framework. Exercises Under s.59 of the Disaster Management Act 2003, Local Government must review the effectiveness of the Local Disaster Management Plan at least once a year. Exercises are a key component of disaster management strategies as they allow procedural and functional weaknesses to be identified and mitigated prior to a real event. Exercising can take many forms from simple discussion type exercises to full scale, live operations. Disaster management exercises are used to test the arrangements in plans, allow staff an opportunity to assess the arrangements in both a theoretical and practical environment and allow organisations an opportunity to practice their role in a 'safe' environment which builds confidence in plans and the resilience of arrangements.

Tablelands Regional Council's annual exercise to test the activation of this plan and the operation of the Local Disaster Coordination Centre is Exercise Beacon. In addition, exercises to test other key functions e.g. Evacuation Centre Management, Business Continuity Management, Impact Assessment are held as required but at least every other year. Council also participates in exercises organised by other agencies e.g. DDMG, DFES, Lion Factory, etc. as required. All exercises are fully evaluated through observation, debrief and feedback. A hot debrief with all participants is held immediately after the conclusion of all exercises and data is captured using feedback evaluation forms. Within 14 days of the exercise, an After Action Review will be held to capture learning in relation to the exercise design and conduct and the achievement of exercise objectives.

Following any significant exercise, a post-exercise report will be produced identifying good practice and lessons to be learnt. Post-exercise reports are presented to the LDMG and to Council who endorse the recommendations and timeframes for implementation. The LDMG is responsible for monitoring the implementation of recommendations to ensure lessons identified are learnt. Post-Disaster Procedures Debriefing is a compulsory part of dealing with disasters. All staff involved in disaster operations are expected to participate in hot debriefs. Debriefs should be conducted at the end of exercises and operational shifts to ensure information is captured whilst still fresh in people’s minds. This will ensure that all lessons learnt during operations are captured and that any necessary amendments can be made to improve future responses.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 49 An internal review considering Council's actions as a whole will be completed within four weeks of STAND DOWN of the disaster event and a report will be circulated to the appropriate Officers. A multi-agency After Action Review may also be necessary to ensure that lessons learnt are captured by all agencies involved. This allows all agencies to consider ways in which their response can be improved investigate ways of resolving issues and if appropriate, formulate guidance on best practice. Reports will be circulated to all partner agencies involved. Incident Report The Local Disaster Coordinator is responsible for producing the final incident report for approval by the LDMG and Tablelands Regional Council. This report will be the authoritative source document relating to the event and will include a summary of events, a timeline of the response, areas identified as good practice and any lessons to be learnt. This report will contain an action plan to ensure lessons identified are implemented and this will be monitored by Council. The Mayor of Council and Chief Executive Officer will wish to ensure that there is appropriate follow up to any lessons that emerge from the debriefing process. Appropriate follow up will depend on the circumstances but might include revision of plans, procedures, training or exercising. Disaster Studies It is not uncommon for specific studies to be conducted after an event to understand community attitudes and concerns in order to provide information to assist future decision making. Council may be asked to conduct a study or assist another agency to conduct a study.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 50 Section 5: Concept of Operations Concept of Operations - Response Strategy Activation This Local Disaster Management Plan will be activated at the local level by the Local Disaster Coordinator in response to a disaster event which requires a coordinated response and recovery effort. This decision should be taken in liaison with the Chairperson of the LDMG wherever possible. It is the duty of the Local Disaster Coordinator to inform LDMG members and the District Disaster Coordinator regarding the Plan’s activation. The Local Disaster Coordinator is responsible for activating the LDMG. This would generally occur following consultation with the Chair of the LDMG and the DDC. The process for activation of the LDMG is documented in the ‘Activation of the LDMG Sub Plan’. The four levels of activation are ALERT, LEAN FORWARD, STAND UP and STAND DOWN. A description of each level is shown below.

Triggers Actions Communications Alert  A heightened level of vigilance due to the Awareness of a hazard that has the potential to affect the local government area  Hazard & risks identified  Information sharing with warning agency  All LDMG members are expected to maintain situational awareness and keep abreast of weather conditions (where applicable).   Situation should be monitored by someone capable of assessing the potential of the threat.  Chairperson and LDC on mobile remotely

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 51 Triggers Actions Communications Lean Forward Operational state prior to ‘stand up’ characterised by a heightened level of situational awareness and a state of operational readiness.  There is a likelihood that threat may affect local government area  Threat is quantified but may not yet be imminent  Need for public awareness  LDMG is now to manage the event  LDMG members are required to be available to attend meetings of the LDMG.  Disaster Coordination Centre to be setup to facilitate operations – on standby but not prepared. LDCC staff on standby.

 Start new operation in Guardian.  Appropriate preparatory actions to be taken by all agencies.  Evacuation centres are on stand by; prepared but not activated. Resources are transported to designated Evacuation Centres and Personnel are identified and deployed to set up the Evacuation Centre.  Determine budget codes for CDO, REPA and Emergent Works.  Notify Community Disaster Teams to move to ALERT  Develop / confirm rosters for 72hrs and consider accommodation requirements.  Establish communication links and ensure key contact details are distributed. Conduct radio checks where appropriate.

 Evacuation Centres to be identified, equipment to be located and checked, centres to be set up (not activated) and trained staff to be available.   LDMG Chairperson and LDC to maintain regular contact to assess the need for future action.   Ensure District Disaster Coordinator is aware of the situation and establish reporting requirements.  Stand Up  Threat is imminent  Community will be or has been impacted  Need for coordination in LDCC  Resources and personnel mobilised.  Requests for support received by LDMG agencies or to the LDCC  The response requires coordination  Disaster Coordination Centre fully operational - activation SITREP sent to DDC and media release issued by LDMG Chairperson. LDMG members to ensure personnel from their own respective agencies are aware LDMG / LDCC is fully operational and provide Liaison Officers where appropriate.

 LDC will invoke the Local Disaster Management Plan and Operational Plans as required.  Evacuation Centres are activated and fully operational. Key communication links established.  Notify Community Disaster Teams to move to LEAN FORWARD. Ensure they are moved to STAND UP only when all clear has been given.  Develop plans for conducting rapid damage and needs assessments immediately following the event.  Issue warnings where appropriate.  Consider need for disaster declarations.   LDCC contact through established land lines and generic email addresses  Chair, LDC and LDMG members present at LDCC, on established land lines and/or mobiles, monitoring emails Stand Down  No requirement for coordinated response  Threat is no longer present  Community has returned to normal function  Return to normal business operations  Recovery taking place  Final checks for outstanding requests  Transition to recovery.

 Return to normal operations.  Normally implemented on a progressive basis as the situation winds down.  Debriefing phase – were stated objectives met, what worked, what didn’t work, safety issues, what immediate actions are required?  Plan review. Consolidate financial records  Hand over to Recovery Coordinator for reporting  Return to local government core business  Final situation report sent to DDMG  LDMG members not involved in recovery operations resume standard business and after hours contact arrangements

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 52 Disaster Declaration A declaration of a disaster situation may be made by the District Disaster Coordinator (DDC) for the District or part of the District, or by the Minister and the Premier for the State or parts of the State. Specifically, s.64 of the Disaster Management Act states: A DDC for a disaster district may, with the approval of the Minister, declare a disaster situation for all or part of the district if satisfied;  A disaster has happened, is happening or is likely to happen in the disaster district;  It is necessary, or reasonably likely to be necessary, for the DDC or a declared disaster officer to exercise declared disaster powers to prevent or minimise loss of human life, illness or injury to humans, property loss or damage or damage to the environment. Before declaring a disaster situation, the DDC must take reasonable steps to consult with the District Disaster Management Group and each local government who is in, or partly in, the declared area for a disaster situation. However, failure to consult does not affect the validity of the declaration. A disaster situation declared by a DDC:  Comes into force immediately it is approved by the Minister and signed by the DDC.  Remains in force for 14 days unless the Minister ends the disaster situation sooner or the period is extended by a regulation for a further 14 days.

The declaration of a disaster situation provides additional powers to officers nominated by the DDC and will normally only be declared when it is necessary to exercise those powers. Declared Disaster Powers under Part 4 of the Disaster Management Act 2003 can be used to prevent or minimise:  Loss of life  Illness or injury to humans  Property loss or damage  Damage to the environment If the LDMG or the Local Disaster Coordinator believes it is necessary to use these powers, then the Chairperson of the LDMG should contact the relevant District Disaster Coordinator and put forward their case for the need to declare a disaster situation. This can be orally or in writing and may detail what class of person they would like to be made Declared Disaster Officers, the exact powers that are required, the reason for the request and the area where powers may be needed. When a declaration is made and the Local Disaster Coordinator and / or LDMG Chairperson are notified of this, they will immediately notify all agencies within the Local Disaster Coordination Centre and pass the information onto other agencies not represented which may need to access the powers. The LDC and the EMQ representative will inform all agencies of what the powers mean and who is authorised as Declared Disaster Officers.

It should be noted that is not necessary to declare a disaster situation to activate the disaster management arrangements or to obtain financial assistance through established disaster relief schemes e.g. NDRRA, SDRA, etc. All declarations will be given the widest circulation through LDMG member organisations and to the community via the media.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 53 Local Disaster Coordination Centre The Local Disaster Coordinator is responsible for activating the Local Disaster Coordination Centre (LDCC). The primary Local Disaster Coordination Centre for the Tablelands Regional Council area is situated in the Atherton boardroom of the Council building located at 45 Mabel Street, Atherton. All response will be coordinated through the LDCC under the priorities set by the LDMG and relayed through the Local Disaster Coordinator. All agencies will be represented in the LDCC by a person able to commit the resources of their agency.

The process for activation and operation of the LDCC is documented in the Activation and Operation of the LDCC Sub Plan. Warning Notification and Dissemination Good public communication is vital to the successful handling of any disaster event. A well- informed public is better able to respond to a disaster, which in turn will minimise the impact of the event on the community. A program of community education prior to an event, ensures the public are made aware of the risks of disasters, how local responders are prepared to deal with events and what they should do to prepare before disasters occur.

When an event is imminent, it is essential the public are warned of the danger and provided with information about the event and advice on recommended actions. The key objective is to deliver accurate, clear, timely information and advice to the public so they feel confident, safe and well informed and are aware of any recommended actions. There are a number of different warnings that emanate from various sources that are relevant to the threats which impact on the Tablelands Regional Council area. Predominantly warning products will be issued by the Bureau of Meteorology in relation to Severe Weather Warnings, Tropical Cyclone Advices but can also arise from other sources such as Queensland Fire & Emergency Services in relation to hazardous materials incidents and bushfires or Geo-Science Australia for earthquakes. Warnings will be broadcast on local radio, websites and social media sites. Assistance will be sought from Community Disaster Teams (where it is safe to do so) to distribute warnings at key locations throughout their communities. The LDC can request, through their DFES (OEM) member on the LDMG, an Emergency Alert campaign to be delivered via landline and text messages to potentially affected constituents. There is also the ability to send email, SMS and voice messages using the Early Warning Network, a service Tablelands Regional Council subscribes to and offers on an opt-in basis to residents of the region. It is vital that warning messages are appropriate to the risk and the kind of audience being addressed.

The process for the notification and dissemination of warning products is not a function dependant on the activation of the LDMG, rather should be an automatic responsibility of LDMG Executives and members regardless of the status of activation of the LDMG. The process for dissemination of warnings and public information is documented in the Public Information & Warnings Sub Plan.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 54 Media Management The news media (broadcasting, print and text services) are the primary means of communication with the public in disaster circumstances and arrangements are in place with local radio stations to broadcast regular updates on the situation to keep the public informed and help them cope with disruption or changes to normal public facilities and services. Websites and social media are also increasingly being used to provide a further source of more detailed information for those at work or who have no immediate access to television or radio during the day. In the event of a disaster, there is likely to be a high demand for information from the media. With the development of 24 hour rolling news, the advent of multiple channels, the increase in number of news websites and advances in technology meaning that live interviews, pictures and reports can be uploaded to the world wide web from a mobile phones as events are unfolding means there will be a constant demand from the media for accurate, timely and up to date information. Effective media management is critical to ensure the public are kept informed of the relevant issues. Where information is not provided, rumours will flourish which will lead to misunderstanding, confusion and panic and could seriously damage Council’s and the LDMG's reputation.

To ensure that conflicting information is not given out to the media, all information will be coordinated through the Tablelands Regional Council Media & Communication Officer (or nominated Deputy) who is responsible for managing media communication on behalf of the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group. This will involve dealing with media enquiries, the issuing of media statements, organisation of interviews and visits and media briefing times. The Mayor of the Tablelands Regional Council, in her capacity as Chairperson of the Local Disaster management Group, will authorise all information disseminated to the public from the LDMG. This should be done in consultation with the Local Disaster Coordinator of the LDMG. For urgent matters where the Mayor is not available, the Local Disaster Coordinator of the LDMG will authorise all information for public distribution.

Other LDMG members or their organisations may also be involved in managing media enquiries during disaster events. In these circumstances, it is vital that organisations only discuss topics relevant to their area of expertise and only what they know to be factual, confirmed information. The process for dissemination of warnings and public information is documented in the Public Information & Warnings Sub Plan. Financial Management The pre-determined financial management process for the recording of expenses incurred during a disaster is included in the ‘Financial Management Sub Plan’. Impact Assessment Following the impact of a disaster event, its is anticipated that measures will need to be implemented to undertake an Impact & Needs Assessments initially on a rapid basis, followed by further detailed assessments to determine the extent of the area affected, damage to homes, infrastructure and essential services and the level of hardship being experienced in the community. Detailed arrangements for collecting, collating, recording and distributing impact assessment data can be found in the Impact & Needs Assessment Operational Sub Plan.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 55 Resupply The size and geographic diversity of the Tablelands Regional Council area and the nature of the hazards likely to affect those communities guarantees that at some time, some communities will be temporarily isolated by the effects of one or more of those hazards. When this occurs, the hardships imposed upon the communities concerned could require responses from the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG). It is the policy of the State Disaster Management Group (SDMG) that a set of procedures exists to ensure that food supplies and basic commodities can be provided to rural and remote communities which are vulnerable to isolation for extended periods of time. The SDMG document ‘Resupplying Isolated Communities Policy and Procedures’ (the State Resupply Policy) outline the various roles and responsibilities of different levels of the disaster management system.

Further detail on local arrangements can be found in the Resupply Operational Plan. Accessing Support and Allocation of Resources The following table depicts the disaster management system in operation at local level: E V E N T RESPONSE AGENCIES Need help? No Handle using Agency procedures Yes Request Assistance from LDMG Need help? Yes No Request Assistance from DDMG Provide Support from LDMG resources When any event occurs, emergency response agencies will assess whether assistance is required to manage the situation. If the outcome of this assessment is no, then the event will be managed by response agencies utilising their own resources in accordance with their own organisational procedures. However, if the outcome of the assessment is that the response agencies require assistance or their capacity has been exceeded, then a request will be made by the response agency to the LDMG for support.

The agencies represented on the LDMG have significant resources available to their organisations. The LDMG will utilise whatever resources are available to it at the time of an

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 56 event. This may include resource lists from Council and other agencies, neighbouring authorities, approved hire companies and the yellow pages. Tablelands Regional Council has access to various resource lists which can be used at the time of an event and are available in the LDCC. This includes:  Tablelands Regional Council Plant List  Panel of Providers / External Contractors List  Tablelands Regional Council Fleet List Cross boundary arrangements exist in the form of a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with a number of regional and shire Council's. This MoU can be activated by the Local Disaster Coordinator and / or Chairperson of the LDMG but must be approved by the Chief Executive Officer. The DDC should be advised if this MoU is invoked.

If the LDMG is unable to locate a resource, support will be requested from the District Disaster Management Group (DDMG). In these circumstances, a Request for Assistance (RFA) will be submitted to the District Disaster Coordinator (DDC) for action. All RFA's are to be approved by the Local Disaster Coordinator. Strategies for the prioritisation for the allocation of support and resources will be determined by operational requirements of the Local Disaster Coordination Centre. Resources will be prioritised by the LDCC in accordance with the three key priorities established by the LDMG; life, property and the environment. Each of these can be further prioritised by the LDMG as required. The LDMG establishes the priorities and the LDCC implements them under the coordination of the Local Disaster Coordinator.

Operational Reporting Extraordinary meetings of the Local Disaster Management Group will be convened on an as required basis during disaster operations. The frequency of operational reporting in the form of SITREPS to the District Disaster Management Group and consequently to the State Disaster Management Group will be communicated by the District Disaster Coordinator. Hazard Specific Arrangements The QDMA include plans and procedures for specific hazards such as influenza pandemic, animal and plant disease, terrorism and bushfire. Primary agencies are allocated responsibility to prepare for and respond to the specific hazard based on their legislated and / or technical capability and authority.

These plans are to address the hazard across all PPRR phases and how organisations are to provide support to the primary agency in the management of the hazard specific event. Specific planning is required as their coordination and operational procedures can differ from those of the QDMA.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 57 The following table outlines the primary agencies responsible for each specific hazard and the respective State and National Plans: Specific Hazard Primary Agency State & National Plans Animal and plant disease Department of Agriculture, Fisheries & Food (DAFF) Queensland Veterinary Emergency Plan Australian Veterinary Emergency Plan Australian Emergency Plant Pest Response Plan Biological (human related) Queensland Health Queensland Multi-agency Response to Chemical, Biological, Radiological Incidents Bushfire Queensland Fire & Emergency Services Wildfire Mitigation & Readiness Plans (Regional) Chemical Queensland Fire & Emergency Services Queensland Multi-agency Response to Chemical, Biological, Radiological Incidents Influenza pandemic Queensland Health Queensland Pandemic Influenza Plan National Action Plan for Human Influenza Pandemic Ship-sourced pollution Department of Transport & Main Roads Queensland Coastal Contingency Action Plan National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea by Oil and other Noxious and Hazardous Substances Radiological Queensland Health Queensland Multi-agency Response to Chemical, Biological, Radiological Incidents Terrorism Queensland Police Service Queensland Counter- Terrorism Plan National Counter-Terrorism Plan Below is a diagrammatic representation of the process for the conduct of operations where the QDMA are activated to provide support to a hazard specific primary agency operating under hazard specific arrangements.

In most instances the operational liaison and planning undertaken between each structure will be achieved through the placement of liaison officers into respective committees/groups and coordination centres/ incident management centres at each level. The hazard specific arrangements are demonstrated as a generic structure. Hazard specific detail on the nature of the support provided by the disaster management arrangements, the placement of liaison officers and notification processes are detailed in hazard specific plans.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 58

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 59 Concept of Operations - Recovery Strategy Local Disaster Management Groups (LDMG's) should ensure that recovery arrangements are prepared for, planned for and implemented to support their applicable local government area. Queensland has adopted the nationally established principles for recovery which recognise that successful recovery relies on: 1. Understanding the context 2. Recognising complexity 3. Using community-led approaches 4. Ensuring coordination of all activities 5. Employing effective communication 6. Acknowledging and building capacity The recovery strategy has been developed to:  include all functions of recovery (human-social, infrastructure, economic and environmental);  define broad parameters for the effective coordination of recovery operations within the local government area; and  identify constraints to the coordination of recovery operations within the local government area.

Activation of Recovery Arrangements The four levels of activation for recovery are ALERT, LEAN FORWARD, STAND UP and STAND DOWN. It is important to note that recovery commences before response ends. A description of each level of recovery in relation to response levels of activation is shown below. Response Alert Triggers Actions Communications Response Lean Forward Recovery Alert  Response phase at ‘lean forward’ level of activation  Appointment of LRC as appropriate  Potential actions and risks identified  Information sharing commences  LRC in contact with LDCC/LDC  Initial advice to all recovery stakeholders  LRC and LRG members on mobile remotely Response Stand Up Recovery Lean Forward  Response phase at ‘stand up’ level of activation  Immediate relief arrangements are required during response phase  Monitoring of response arrangements  Analysis of hazard impact or potential impact  Relief and recovery planning commences  Deployments for immediate relief commenced by recovery functional agencies  LRC and LRG members on mobile and monitoring email remotely  Ad hoc reporting

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 60 Response Stand Down Recovery Stand Up  Immediate relief arrangements continue  Response phase moves to ‘stand down’ level of activation. Medium term recovery commences.  LRG activated at LDCC or alternate location  Recovery plan activated  Deployments for immediate relief response  Action plans for four functions of recovery activated as required  Community information strategy employed  Participate in response debrief  Transition arrangements from ‘response and recovery’ to ‘recovery’ activated including handover from LDC to LRC  Action plans for four functions of recovery continue  Community information strategies continue  LRC and LRG members present at LDCC or alternate location, on established land lines and/or mobiles, monitoring emails  LRC and LRG members involved in medium term recovery continue as required  Regular reporting to LDMG/LDC Recovery Stand Down  LRG arrangements are finalised. Community returns to normal activities with ongoing support as required.  Consolidate financial records  Reporting requirements finalised  Participate in recovery debrief  Participate in post event debrief  Post event review and evaluation  Long term recovery arrangements transferred to functional lead agencies  Return to core business  LRC and LRG members resume standard business and after hours contact arrangements  Functional lead agencies report to LRC/LRG as required Functions of Recovery For the purpose of effective coordination, aspects of recovery are conceptually grouped into four functions: Human-Social Recovery: includes personal support and information, physical health and emotional, psychological, spiritual, cultural and social well being, public safety and education, temporary accommodation, financial assistance to meet individual needs and uninsured household loss and damage. The functional lead state agency for human-social recovery is the Department of Communities, Child Safety & Disability Services. Locally, arrangements will be coordinated through the LDMG Social Support Services Sub Group and the LDMG Community Resilience Sub Group.

Economic Recovery: includes renewal and growth of the micro economy (within the affected area), the macro economy (overall economic activity of the State), individual and household entities (e.g. employment, income, insurance claims), private and government business enterprises, industry, assets, production and flow of goods and services. The functional lead State agency for economic recovery is the Department of State Development, Infrastructure & Planning Services (SDIPS) Locally, arrangements will be coordinated through the LDMG Economic Sub Group.

Infrastructure Recovery: includes repair and reconstruction of residential, public, commercial, industrial and rural buildings and structures, government structures, utility structures, systems and services (transport, water, sewage, energy, communications and other essential services and dam safety. The functional lead State agency for infrastructure recovery is the Department of

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 61 Local Government Community Recovery & Resilience (DLGCRR). Locally, arrangements will be coordinated through the LDMG Built Environment & Infrastructure Sub Group. Environmental Recovery: includes restoration and regeneration of biodiversity (species and plants), eco-systems, natural resources, environmental infrastructure, amenity / aesthetics (e.g. scenic lookouts), culturally significant sites and heritage structures. It also includes management of environmental health, waste, contamination, pollution and hazardous materials. The functional lead State agency for environmental recovery is the Department of National Parks, Sport & Racing (DNSPR). Locally, arrangements will be coordinated through the LDMG Public Health & Environment Sub Group.

Additionally, Council has established a TRC Resilience Sub Group to coordinate the recovery of TRC Services in a structured manner. Further detail is contained within the LDMG Recovery Sub Plan. Recovery Sub Plan The Local Disaster Management Group Recovery Sub Plan provides a framework for the coordination of recovery operations within the Tablelands Regional Council area and is supported by the procedures outlined in the Queensland Recovery Guidelines.

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 62 Annexure A: Distribution List The level of circulation of the Local Disaster Management Plan will be determined by the Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group. An auditable list of the holders of plans will be recorded and maintained. Plans have been issued as follows: POSITION ORGANISATION DISASTER MANAGEMENT ROLE STATUS Mayor Tablelands Regional Council LDMG Chairperson Executive Member Councillor Tablelands Regional Council LDMG Deputy Chairperson / Recovery Chairperson Member Senior Advisor Disaster Management Tablelands Regional Council Local Disaster Coordinator Executive Member Chief Executive Officer Tablelands Regional Council Deputy Local Disaster Coordinator Deputy Deputy CEO & GM Organisational Services Department Tablelands Regional Council Tablelands Regional Council Liaison Officer Member GM, Infrastructure & Maintenance Tablelands Regional Council Tablelands Regional Council Liaison Officer Member GM Community & Regional Planning Tablelands Regional Council Tablelands Regional Council Liaison Officer Member Sergeant Queensland Police Service QPS Liaison Officer Member Area Director West Queensland Fire & Emergency Services QFES Liaison Officer (EMQ) Member Inspector (Urban Operations) Queensland Fire & Emergency Services QFES Liaison Officer (QFRS) Member Inspector (Rural Operations) Queensland Fire & Emergency Services QFES Liaison Officer (RFSQ) Member Officer in Charge (Atherton) Queensland Ambulance Service QAS Liaison Officer Member Manager Occupational Health & Safety Queensland Health QH Liaison Officer (Medical Services) Member Manager Regulatory Services Tablelands Regional Council Environmental Health Liaison Officer Advisor Manager Community Services Tablelands Regional Council Human-Social & Community Resilience Liaison Officer Advisor Industry Recovery Officer Queensland Dairy Farmers Organisation Economic Liaison Officer Advisor Environmental Health Officer Queensland Health QH Liaison Officer (Public Health) Advisor Media & Communications Officer Tablelands Regional Council Media & Communications Officer Advisor Community Development Officer Tablelands Regional Council Recovery Coordinator Advisor ATGIS Coordinator Tablelands Regional Council ATGIS Support Officer Advisor Regional Operations Manager Ergon Ergon Liaison Officer Advisor Area General Manager - FNQ Telstra Telstra Liaison Officer Advisor Principal Engineer DEWS Dam Liaison Officer (Crooks, Wyndham & Ibis) Advisor Manager Water, Wastewater & Waste Tablelands Regional Council Dam Liaison Officer (Wild River) Advisor Service Manager Sunwater Dam Liaison Officer (Tinaroo Falls) Advisor

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 63 Site Manager Stanwell Corporation Dam Liaison Officer (Koombooloomba) Advisor DETE Regional Manager Department of Education, Training & Employment DETE Liaison Officer Advisor District Disaster Coordinator (Mareeba) Queensland Police Service District Disaster Coordinator (Mareeba) Councillors Tablelands Regional Council Service Centres, Libraries & VIC’s Tablelands Regional Council

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 64 Annexure B: Tablelands LDMG Contact List The Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group Master Contact List for all organisations/persons involved in the Council’s disaster management arrangements is updated at each LDMG meeting and will is held by the Local Disaster Coordinator. A copy of this excel document is available at: \\Trc.local\data\Atherton\Pccommon\084 Sarah Dean\Disaster Management Groups\Local Disaster Management Group (LDMG)\Contact List

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 65 Annexure C: Definitions, Abbreviations & Acronyms DEFINITIONS TERMINOLOGY DEFINITION Community A group of people with a commonality of association and generally defined by location, shared experience, or function (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998) Consequence The outcome of an event or situation expressed qualitatively or quantitatively, being a loss, injury, disadvantage, or gain (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998) Critical Infrastructure A service, facility or a group of services or facilities, the loss of which will have severe adverse effects on the physical, social, economic or environmental well being or safety of the community. (Handbook, EMA: Critical Infrastructure Emergency Risk Management and Assurance) Disaster A serious disruption in a community, caused by the impact of an event, that requires a significant coordinated response by the State and other entities to help the community recover from the disruption (Disaster Management Act 2003, S13(1)) Disaster Management Arrangements about managing the potential adverse effects of an event, including, for example, arrangements for mitigating, preventing, preparing for, responding to and recovering from a disaster (Disaster Management Act 2003, S14) Disaster Management Executive The Chairperson and Executive Officer, Tablelands Local Disaster Management Group (or their respective deputies, as applicable) Disaster Operations Activities undertaken before, during or after an event happens to help reduce loss of human life, illness or injury to humans, property loss or damage, or damage to the environment, including, for example, activities to mitigate the adverse effects of the event (Disaster Management Act 2003, S15)

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 66 Disaster Response Capability The ability to provide equipment and a suitable number of persons, using the resources available to the local government, to effectively deal with, or help another entity to deal with, an emergency situation or a disaster in the local government’s area (Disaster Management Act 2003, S80(2)) Event An event means any of the following:  a cyclone, earthquake, flood, storm, storm tide, tornado, tsunami, volcanic eruption or other natural happening;  bushfire;  an explosion or fire, a chemical, fuel or oil spill, or a gas leak;  an infestation, plague, or epidemic;  a failure of, or disruption to, an essential service or infrastructure;  an attack against the State; or  another event similar to the above events. An event may be natural or caused by human acts or omissions (Disaster Management Act 2003, S16(1)&(2)) Hazard A source of potential harm, or a situation with a potential to cause loss (Emergency Management Australia, 2004) Lifelines The public facilities and systems that provide basic life support services such as water, energy, sanitation, communications and transportation. (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998) Mitigation Measures taken in advance of a disaster aimed at decreasing or eliminating its impact on society and environment (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998) Preparedness Measures to ensure that, should an emergency occur, communities, resources, and services are capable of coping with the effects (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998) Prevention Measures to eliminate or reduce the incidence or severity of emergencies (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998)

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 67 Reconstruction Actions taken to re-establish a community after a period of rehabilitation subsequent to a disaster. Actions would include construction of permanent housing, restoration of all services, and complete resumption of the pre- disaster state (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998) Recovery The coordinated process of supporting emergency-affected communities in reconstruction of the physical infrastructure and restoration of emotional, social, economic, and physical well-being (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998) Rehabilitation The operations and decisions taken after a disaster with a view to restoring a stricken community to its former living conditions, whilst encouraging and facilitating the necessary adjustments to the changes caused by the disaster (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998) Relief The provision of immediate shelter, life support and human needs of persons affected by, or responding to, an emergency. It includes the establishment, management and provision of services to emergency relief centres (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998) Residual Risk The level of risk remaining after implementation of a risk treatment (AS/NZS 4360:2004) Response Measures taken in anticipation of, during, and immediately after an emergency to ensure its effects are minimised (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998) Risk The chance of something happening that may have an impact on the safety and wellbeing of your community. It includes risk as an opportunity as well as a threat and is measured in terms of consequences and likelihood (Adapted from AS/NZS 4360:2004) Risk Identification The process of identifying what can happen, why, and how (Australian Emergency Management Glossary, 1998)

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 68 Risk Management The culture, processes, and structures that are directed towards realizing potential opportunities whilst managing adverse effects (AS/NZS 4360:2004) Risk Reduction Actions taken to lessen the likelihood, negative consequences, or both, associated with a risk (AS/NZS 4360:2004) Risk Treatment Process of selection and implementation of measures to modify risk (AS/NZS 4360:2004) Serious Disruption Serious disruption means: (a) loss of human life, or illness or injury to humans; or (b) widespread or severe property loss or damage; or (c) widespread or severe damage to the environment (Disaster Management Act 2003, S13(2)) ACRONYMS ADF Australian Defence Force ATGIS Atherton Tablelands Geographical Information Services AEMI Australian Emergency Management Institute BoM Bureau of Meteorology DAFF Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry DCCSDS Department of Communities, Child Safety and Disability Services DCS Department of Community Safety DDC District Disaster Coordinator DDCC District Disaster Coordination Centre DDMG District Disaster Management Group DEWS Department of Energy & Water Supply DNRM Department of Natural Resource Management DSDIP Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning DTMR Department of Transport & Main Roads EMA Emergency Management Australia GIS Geographic Information System Guidelines Disaster Management Planning Guidelines LDC Local Disaster Coordinator LDCC Local Disaster Coordination Centre LDMG Local Disaster Management Group LDMP Local Disaster Management Plan NDRRA Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements NHRA Natural Hazard Risk Assessment NPRSR Department of National Parks, Recreation, Sport and Racing

LOCAL DISASTER MANAGEMENT PLAN V3.0 January 2014 69 PPRR Prevention, Preparedness, Response, Recovery QAS Queensland Ambulance Service QFES Queensland Fire and Emergency Services QFRS Queensland Fire and Rescue Service QPS Queensland Police Service Q-Rail Queensland Rail RACE Response Advice for Chemical Emergencies RFSQ Rural Fire Service Queensland SDCC State Disaster Coordination Centre SDCG State Disaster Coordination Group SDMC State Disaster Mitigation Committee SDMG State Disaster Management Group SES State Emergency Service SEWS Standard Emergency Warning System SOPs Standard Operating Procedures TPHU Tropical Population Health Unit (Queensland Health) TRC Tablelands Regional Council XO Executive Officer

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