SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet

 
SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet
POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT
      SCIENCE FAIR 2019

Student Application & Resource Packet

          Saturday, March 30, 2019
       Fort Collins Museum of Discovery
       408 Mason Court, Fort Collins, CO 80524
SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
 The Fort Collins Museum of Discovery has 50 slots available for participants. In order to include as many students as
 possible parents need to sign a consent form indicating their desire for their student to participate. This consent
 form is at the end of the student application. Please allow time to get your applications signed by parents.

                               Science & Engineering Fair Details
 Date: Saturday, March 30th, 2019

 Location: Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, 408 Mason Court, Fort Collins, CO 80524

 Grade Levels: 4th and 5th graders only

 Categories: Projects will follow either the Scientific Method Process or the Engineering Design Process.
 Projects will be judged equally across all categories. Projects can focus on: Behavioral Science, Botany/Agriculture,
 Math/Computers, Consumer Science, Physical Science, Earth Science, and Zoology/Medicine.

 Deadline for Applications: Student applications, with signed parent consent form, must be received no later
 than 5:00pm Wednesday, March 13th, 2019. Applications can be emailed to Beth Unger at bunger@fcmod.org or
 filled out electronically at: https://goo.gl/forms/txsgynIzclZeGIxu2.

 Number of Participants: Each school may submit two participants and one substitute. Please understand that
 substitutes will only be called to participate if a participant from their school is unable to participate in the fair for
 any reason. Substitutes will be notified at their school by Friday, March 15th only if a participant from their school is
 unable to participate.

 Entry Drop-off Times: Students must drop off projects between 3:00pm and 7:00pm on Friday,
 March 29th at Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, at which time the student's interview appointment time for
 Saturday, March 30th will be handed out.

 Student Requirements: Students must agree to be present at Fort Collins Museum of Discovery for their
 assigned time slot for interviewing by judges. Please encourage students to make this interview their priority for
 the day. Interviews will take place between 9:30am and 11:30am Saturday, March 30th. All interview times are
 pre-arranged and coordinated so that a block of judges can both interview and judge a particular set of exhibits.
 Please let parents and students know that their scheduled interview time CANNOT be altered due to sport
 schedules or other conflicts.

           The Science Fair will be held at Fort Collins Museum of Discovery
                      408 Mason Court, Fort Collins, CO 80524

                  408 Mason Court        Fort Collins, CO 80524       970.221.6738       www.fcmod.org
SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet
Important Dates
March 8th, 2019    • Latest recommended date to hold school science fairs.
                   • Latest recommended date for teachers to send Parent Consent Form and Student
                     Applications home with student participants and substitute.
                   • Teachers must submit an “Intent Form” through Google Forms to indicate which
                     students they are submitting as participants (2) and substitute (1).

March 13th, 2019   • Parent Consent Form and Student Applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. Each
                     school may submit two participants and one substitute for the District Science Fair.
                     Email completed forms to Beth Unger at bunger@fcmod.org or fill out an electronic
                     form at: https://goo.gl/forms/txsgynIzclZeGIxu2.

March 15th, 2019   • If a participant is unable to participate for any reason, the Fort Collins Museum of
                     Discovery will contact schools and substitutes by March 15th to have the substitute
                     participate for their school.

March 29th, 2019   • Participating students drop off projects at Fort Collins Museum of Discovery between
                     3:00pm and 7:00pm and receive their interview appointment time for March 30th.

March 30th, 2019   • Science Fair!
                   • Students are required to attend their scheduled 20 minute interview appointments.
                     Appointments will fall between 9:30am and 11:30am.
                   • The awards ceremony will be at 2:30pm at Fort Collins Museum of Discovery.
                   • Students may take home their projects after the award ceremony or choose to leave
                     their project on public display at the museum on Sunday, March 31st.
March 31st, 2019   • All projects must be picked up by 2pm on Sunday, March 31st, 2019 or prior
                     arrangements must be made with the museum for a late pick-up.
SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet
EXHIBITOR GUIDELINES

                                          Rules and Regulations
 1. Only 4th and 5th grade students in Poudre School District may enter and participate in the fair.
 2. All displays must be constructed by the exhibitor. The sponsor may give general and limited advice, but must not
 assist in construction.
 3. The exhibitor's name or name of the school must not be shown on display.
 4. Materials and construction should be durable. All moving parts must be firmly attached. Push buttons and levers
 must be securely mounted on the display.
 5. The Fort Collins Museum of Discovery will provide tables and electrical outlets. All other materials will be
 supplied by the exhibitor.
 6. Borrowed or purchased equipment, constructed by a person other than the exhibitor, must be labeled as such.
 Any borrowed equipment must be accompanied by a signed statement which grants permission, by the donor, for
 its use in the student's project.
 7. Ribbons or awards from individual school fairs are not to be displayed on projects.
 8. Each individual exhibitor is eligible to submit one individual project, of which (s)he is the sole creator.
 9. Each group project must follow the rules and regulations listed above as well as the following “Group
 Rules & Regulations”.

                               Group Project Rules & Regulations
 1. Groups may consist of 2-3 students.
 2. Once a project has competed in a science fair at any level, team membership cannot change and the project
 cannot be converted from an individual project to a team project or vice versa.
 3. In a future research year, any project may be converted from an individual to a team project, from a team to an
 individual project and/or have a change in team membership.
 4. Each team is encouraged to appoint a team leader to coordinate the work and act as spokesperson. However,
 each member of the team should be able to serve as spokesperson, be fully involved with the project, and be
 familiar with all aspects of the project. The final work should reflect the coordinated efforts of all team members
 and will be evaluated using similar rules and judging criteria as individual projects.

                                Set-up of Display & Participation
 1. Exhibitors will set up their displays at Fort Collins Museum of Discovery between 3:00-7:00pm on Friday,
 March 29th.
 2. Exhibitors must be at Fort Collins Museum of Discovery for their assigned interview time slot to answer questions
 from the judges. These interviews will take place between 9:30am and 11:30am Saturday, March 30th. The
 interview process is required. Exhibitors should understand that it is their job, as scientists, to communicate with
 the judges about their work.
 3. The awards ceremony will begin at 2:30pm on Saturday March 30th, at Fort Collins Museum of Discovery.
 4. Projects will be judged equally across all categories. Ribbons will be awarded in “Best of Show”, “Runner-Up”,
 and additional categories. All participants will receive a participant ribbon and certificate.

                  408 Mason Court        Fort Collins, CO 80524       970.221.6738       www.fcmod.org
SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet
5. Projects may be left on public display at the museum on Sunday, March 31st. All projects must be picked up by
2pm on Sunday, March 31st or prior arrangements must be made with the museum for a late pick-up. Any projects
that are not removed will be discarded.

                                          Display Regulations
1. Maximum table space for each entry shall be limited to an area 4 feet wide by 14 inches deep. Maximum height
may not exceed 4 feet. Oversized projects will be disqualified unless prior arrangements have been made with the
Fort Collins Museum of Discovery. In order to request a variance on the size requirements, students must prove that
the size requirements present a serious impact on the project's ability to be displayed.
2. All displays must be contained in the allotted space. Displays must be free standing. Since no part of a display
may be attached to the table or walls, exhibitors must furnish their own display supports.
3. Drapes are not allowed.
4. Each display should be self-explanatory without an accompanying demonstration or lecture.
5. When parts of a project can't be displayed (live animals, too large, etc.), please use photographs, drawings, or
models to illustrate the project.
6. The projects will be displayed in a public area. Normal wear and tear on the displays is to be expected during the
time the fair. Valuable instruments and objects should be securely fastened, covered, or removed after judging is
complete. Computers should not be left unattended. The Fort Collins Museum of Discovery is not responsible for
any loss or damage to Science Fair Projects.
7. The display should describe the parts of the scientific method or engineering design process. These parts include:
research/background, problem/question, hypothesis/proposed solution, materials, procedure/prototype design,
data/results, and conclusion. Materials may be displayed on the table in front of the project, but may not hang over
the front of the table.
8. The display should have an overall neat appearance with concise descriptions for the parts of the scientific
method or engineering design process.

                                                      Safety
1. The use of dangerous chemicals, open flames, and explosives will not be permitted with any display.
2. Live animals, poisonous plants, bacteria or fungi will not be permitted with any display. (This includes mold,
spoiled food, etc.) When parts of a project can’t be displayed, please use photographs, drawings, or models to
illustrate the project.
3. Ordinary doorbell push buttons will not be allowed to control electric circuits of 110 volts or higher. Electrical
apparatus must be properly insulated. This rule is essential to prevent electrical shock.
4. If batteries are used, they must be sufficiently charged to maintain operation throughout the time of the fair.
5. Studies involving the use of drugs or alcohol WILL NOT be permitted.
6. The Fort Collins Museum of Discovery Science Fair Committee reserves the right to refuse any exhibit which is
considered unsafe.

                                              Live Organisms
1. Animal-based experiments involving starvation, violent shock, chemical contact, stress or any other inhumane
treatment to any animals WILL NOT be permitted.
2. Live animals, poisonous plants, bacteria or fungi will not be permitted with any display. (This includes mold,
spoiled food, etc.) When parts of a project can’t be displayed, please use photographs, drawings, or models to
illustrate the project.
3. Actual parts of vertebrate animals may not be displayed.
4. Simple behavioral studies (such as mazes) are acceptable.
SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet
SCIENTIFIC METHOD vs.
ENGINEERING DESIGN
                                 “Which Category Do I Select?”
 While scientists use research and experiments to learn about how the natural world operates, engineers apply the
 principals of science and mathematics to develop solutions to real-world problems. Because scientists and engineers
 have different objectives, they follow different processes in their work. Scientists perform experiments using the
 scientific method; whereas, engineers follow the engineering design process. Both processes can be broken down
 into a series of steps, as seen in the diagram and table below:

                Scientific Method                                      Engineering Design Process

                                            Journal & Process
 You may choose to do a project either following the Scientific Method or following the Engineering Design Process.
 For either, follow the basic steps that are provided in this information packet and document your work in a science
 notebook. Notes may be kept in a physical notebook or electronically through apps such as “Google Science
 Journal”. Keep a timeline of your work. This is your daily journal of events as you study and learn about your project.
 Plan ahead. Don’t wait until the last minute. Provide your notebook as part of your project display and/or use it as
 a resource during your interviews. Proof of data collection is a requirement on the judging rubric.

                  408 Mason Court       Fort Collins, CO 80524      970.221.6738       www.fcmod.org
SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet
Suggested Themes & Ideas

Scientific Method                                           Engineering

Behavioral Science                                          Engineering
Reaction to stimuli                                         Water treatment
                                                            Solar energy/insulation
Botany and Agriculture                                      Structures (bridges, buildings)
Plants                                                      New inventions
                                                            Mechanics (auto, bicycles)
Consumer Sciences                                           Design
Product testing                                             Aeronautics (flight, airplane design, wind tunnels)
                                                            Pollution control
Earth Sciences
Rocks and minerals
Glaciers
Volcanoes
Mountains
Ecology

Math/Computers
Probability
Statistics
Mathematical relationships

Physical Science
Light, prisms, color
Motion, gravity
Heat Energy
Properties of materials (wood, metals, insulations, etc.)
Sound
Simple machines (pulleys, levers, gears)
Electricity
Magnetism
Chemistry

Zoology/Medicine
Medicine and the human body
Animals/Wildlife
SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet
SCIENTIFIC METHOD
PROCESS CRITERIA
                   These criteria should be documented on the exhibit display and in your notebook.

 Scientific Method:
 • Title
 • Testable question
 • Hypothesis (including independent/dependent variables)
 • Materials
 • Procedure
 • Results (in table, chart, and/or graph form with corresponding units)
 • Conclusion (supported or not supported)

 Example of a Science Fair Experiment:
 An experiment should follow a scientific process of which the results are not obvious. Variables should be used
 in the procedure. A rule to follow: If the hypothesis is easily obtained from resources or classroom science
 experiences, it usually is considered a demonstration. The following testable question is a typical example: “Does
 light increase the reproduction of Paramecium?”

 Title: Light and the Reproduction of Paramecium

 Testable Question: Does light increase the reproduction of Paramecium?

 Hypothesis: If light is increased, the reproduction of Paramecium will increase. Make sure to think about your
 variables: Independent variable- amount of light, Dependent variable- number of Paramecium

 Materials: Four culture dishes, microscope with camera, slides, Slo solution, light, and eyedropper.

 Procedure: Steps used in the experiment; list only what’s necessary, and use diagrams to cut words.
 Measurement: the number of paramecia
 Comparison: growth at different light levels

 Results: Daily data table with data collection, photos, graph comparing the number of paramecia in the different
 cultures. (You cannot bring in live organisms such as these).

 Conclusion: This is a detailed discussion of the student’s findings as it relates to
 the hypothesis; the student should include inferences based on the results; the
 student should state whether the hypothesis is supported or not supported and
 explain the reasons for the statement. The student should use evidence from
 the experiment to support their findings, then reflect on what they learned.
 What might the next steps be? What was learned on reflection of the data?

                  408 Mason Court       Fort Collins, CO 80524      970.221.6738       www.fcmod.org
SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet
Scientific Method - Display Board Template

NOTE: The suggested template is for a traditional Science Fair Poster Display Board. Projects are not required to use
a poster board, but must still display all required criteria in an easy-to-understand display that meets all display
regulations. All display formats will be judged equally based on the required criteria.

                            Scientific Method - Graph Examples
                Fertilizer vs. Height                                      Animal Growth Rate

Complete graphs have a TITLE, SCALE on each axis, and a LABEL and UNIT for each scale.
Bar graphs are used for categories; i.e., type of fertilizer, type of trash, brand of product. Order does not matter.
Line graphs are used for continuous data; i.e., time, dates, amount of substance used. Order does matter.
SCIENCE FAIR 2019 POUDRE SCHOOL DISTRICT - Student Application & Resource Packet
ENGINEERING DESIGN
PROCESS CRITERIA
                      These criteria should be documented on the exhibit display and in your notebook.

 Engineering Design Process:
 • Title
 • Define the problem
 • Background research
 • Proposed solutions (preliminary designs – choose one to prototype)
 • Prototype description and development (materials and building process)
 • Results and Redesign (Prototypes #1 & #2 - tables/charts/graphs)
 • Conclusion (Did your design solve the problem?)

 Example of an Engineering Design Project:
 An engineering design project should solve a problem; the work should create a solution for a specific need. The
 following problem definition is a typical example: “What is the best material to block water, such as during a flood?”

 Title: Stop the Water!

 Define the Problem: What is the best material to block water during a flashflood?

 Background Research: What is typically used to block water during a flood? What is its effectiveness, other
 possible materials, absorption, etc.?

 Proposed Solutions: From the research, possible materials are discussed as well as how to test. First discussion of
 variables could happen here.

 Prototype Description and Development: Discussion of the material(s) chosen, creation steps and
 testing protocols.

 Results and Redesign: How did the material(s) hold up? What was discovered during testing? Did other variables
 become apparent?

 Conclusion: This is a detailed discussion of the student’s findings as it relates to
 the problem; the student should include inferences based on the results; the student
 should state whether the problem was solved, was it reliable and cost-effective. The
 student should use evidence from the prototype testing to support their findings,
 then reflect on what they learned. What might the next steps be? What was
 learned on reflection of the data?

                  408 Mason Court         Fort Collins, CO 80524     970.221.6738      www.fcmod.org
Engineering Design Process Display Board Template

                                               Materials and Building Process              Tables, charts, graphs

                                                 Tests of Prototypes #1 & #2              What worked and why?
         BACKGROUND                         (Data and photos, diagrams, charts,
           RESEARCH                           “eye catchers” should go here)

     PRELIMINARY DESIGNS
             AND
     PROPOSED SOLUTIONS

NOTE: The suggested template is for a traditional Science Fair Poster Display Board. Projects are not required to use
a poster board, but must still display all required criteria in an easy-to-understand display that meets all display
regulations. All display formats will be judged equally based on the required criteria.

                    Engineering Design Process Graph Examples
                Fertilizer vs. Height                                          Animal Growth Rate

Complete graphs have a TITLE, SCALE on each axis, and a LABEL and UNIT for each scale.
Bar graphs are used for categories; i.e., type of fertilizer, type of trash, brand of product. Order does not matter.
Line graphs are used for continuous data; i.e., time, dates, amount of substance used. Order does matter.
SUGGESTIONS FOR
GROUP PROJECTS

                              Group Project Rules & Regulations
 1. Groups may consist of 2-3 students.
 2. Once a project has competed in a science fair at any level, team membership cannot change and the project
 cannot be converted from an individual project to a team project or vice versa.
 3. In a future research year, any project may be converted from an individual to a team project, from a team to an
 individual project and/or have a change in team membership.
 4. Each team is encouraged to appoint a team leader to coordinate the work and act as spokesperson. However,
 each member of the team should be able to serve as spokesperson, be fully involved with the project, and be
 familiar with all aspects of the project. The final work should reflect the coordinated efforts of all team members
 and will be evaluated using similar rules and judging criteria as individual projects.

                                    Tips for Working in a Group
 • Break the Scientific Method or Engineering Design Process down into steps or stages. As a group, make a plan for
 how to work on each step.
         • Will each student be the lead on a different section?
         • Will each student be responsible for creating a different part of the prototype ?
 • Suggest roles for participants in each group to encourage building expertise and to illustrate ways to divide
 responsibility for the work.

                                                       Roles
 Student teams often function most effectively when members have designated roles. These can be teacher-
 determined or established by the groups themselves, e.g., by giving teams a list such as the one below and asking
 them to decide on and delegate appropriate roles within their group. These roles can be fixed or rotating. Here are
 some possible group roles, but the list is not exhaustive. Think creatively and come up with your own!

 Facilitator:    Moderates team discussion, keeps the group on task, and distributes work.
 Recorder:       Takes notes summarizing team discussions and decisions, and keeps all necessary records.
 Reporter:       Serves as group spokesperson to the judges, summarizing the group’s activities and/or conclusions.
 Timekeeper:     Keeps the group aware of time constraints and deadlines and makes sure meetings start on time.
 Prioritizer:    Makes sure group focuses on most important issues and does not get caught up in details.
 Checker:        Checks to make sure all group members understand the concepts and the group’s conclusions.
 Runner:         Gets needed materials and is the liaison between groups and between their group and the teacher.

 These roles are adapted from information found at:
 “What are best practices for designing group projects?” Carnegie Mellon University, Eberly Center. Webpage. 12
 October 2018.
 https://www.cmu.edu/teaching/designteach/design/instructionalstrategies/groupprojects/design.html

                  408 Mason Court       Fort Collins, CO 80524      970.221.6738       www.fcmod.org
JUDGING CRITERIA

                                   Sample Interview Questions
 Interest in Problem
 • Why did you choose this for your topic?
 • Have you ever done anything with this topic before?
 • Do you think you'll ever want to work on this topic again?

 Understands Scientific Method Procedure
 • Where did you get your information to begin your project?
 • Tell me what you were trying to figure out by doing this project.
 • Why did you make the hypothesis that you did?
 • How did you perform your experiment?
 • Tell me about how you used "controls?"
 • What were the results of your experiment?
 • What conclusion did you make based on the results of your experiment?

 Understands Engineering Design Process
 • Why was it important to you to find a solution to solve the original problem?
 • What sources did you use to do background research on your problem?
 • Why did you choose the design that you did to prototype, instead of your other proposed design solutions?
 • What materials and process did you use to build your design?
 • What were the results of your first prototype?
 • For your second prototype, what changes did you make and why?
 • What were the results of your second prototype?
 • Did your prototypes successfully solve your original problem?

 Understands Concepts of Project
 • What did you learn by doing this project?
 • What was the most interesting or surprising thing you found out?
 • If you were to do this project again, is there anything you'd change?
 • What would you do next to learn more about this topic?

                  408 Mason Court       Fort Collins, CO 80524      970.221.6738   www.fcmod.org
Sample Group Interview Questions
Interest in Problem
• Why did you choose this for your topic?
• Did your topic change as you discussed it with the group?

Understands Scientific Method Procedure
• What role did you play in researching your topic?
• Tell me what you were trying to figure out by doing this project.
• How did you form your hypothesis as a group? Did anyone disagree about the hypothesis? If so, how did you
resolve any disagreements?
• Tell me about how you used "controls" in your experiment.
• What were the results of your experiment? Was anyone surprised by the results?
• What conclusion did you make based on the results of your experiment?

Understands Engineering Design Process
• Why was it important to you to find a solution to solve the original problem?
• How did you decide as a group which sources to use for background research on your problem?
• How many design solutions did your group propose in total? As a group, how did you choose the design that you
did to prototype?
• What materials and process did you use to build your design? Did you ever disagree about the building materials
and process? If so, how did you resolve any disagreements?
• What were the results of your first prototype?
• For your second prototype, what changes did you make and why?
• What were the results of your second prototype?
• Did your prototypes successfully solve your original problem?

Understands Concepts of Project
Judges may ask the same question to each participant or different questions to different participants:
• What part of the experiment or design process did you help with?
• What was the most challenging or rewarding part of working on this project with a group?
• What was the most interesting or surprising thing you found out?
• If you were to do this project again, is there anything you'd change?
• What would you do next to learn more about this topic?
District Science Fair Judging Form: Scientific Method
Project title:                                                                                                                                                Project #

Score Points          1 - Unsatisfactory                2 - Partially Proficient                         3 - Proficient                             4 - Advanced                    SCORE
Question or       •    not stated                 •   unclear, vague, or not testable          •   question or purpose is clearly        •   question or purpose is clearly
                                                  •   indicates the student has a general          stated                                    stated
problem
                                                      idea of why the experiment was           •   testable question/problem             •   testable question/problem
                                                      conducted                                •   may not be directly related to the    •   relates directly to the experiment
                                                                                                   experiment that was conducted             that was conducted
Hypothesis        •    not stated or not          •   stated in general terms but not          •   clearly stated                        •   clearly stated
                       related to the                 prompted by initial observations.        •   hypothesis appears to be based on     •   clearly based on initial observation
                       question or problem        •   appears to be an uneducated guess            initial observations
Procedure         •    not stated                 •   steps are incomplete, not in a logical   •   steps are complete and in a logical   •   steps are complete, in a logical
                                                      order, and/or lack significant detail        order                                     order
                                                                                               •   may lack some detail                  •   very detailed
Experimental      •    variable not identified.   •   variable is identified                   •   variable is identified                •   variable is identified
                  •    not a controlled           •   not a controlled experiment; error is    •   the experiment contains a control     •   the experiment contains controls
design
                       experiment                     introduced by experimental design            but it may not account for all the        for virtually all factors affecting
                                                                                                   factors affecting results                 results
Results           •    not stated, or, stated     •   stated and supported by some data        •   described and supported by data       •   described and displayed in a
                       but not supported              and/or journaling                            that is displayed in an organized         logical and organized way (e.g.
                       with data or               •   data not displayed in an organized           way (e.g. charts, graphs)                 charts, graphs)
                       journaling on what             way and/or not thoroughly analyzed       •   data may not be thoroughly            •   data were thoroughly analyzed
                       happened                                                                    analyzed
Conclusions       •    not stated or unclear      •   stated but not related to hypothesis     •   clearly stated and relates to         •   clearly stated and relates to
                                                  •   not necessarily supported by                 hypothesis                                hypothesis
                                                      experimental data                        •   somewhat supported by the             •   strongly supported by the
                                                                                                   experimental data                         experimental data
Originality and   •    no evidence of             •   experiment adapted from another          •   original experiment or highly         •   uniquely original or novel topic
                       original design (e.g.          source (e.g. book, kit, etc.)                adapted experiment from another           and/or approach to a question or
creativity
                       store bought kit)          •   student demonstrates some ability to         source                                    problem
                                                      do own work                              •   student clearly demonstrates          •   clear evidence of original thinking
                                                                                                   ability to do own work                    and design
Proof of Data     •    data collection            •   not detailed but shows an attempt to     •   somewhat detailed; documents          •   detailed in nature; documents
                       missing or lacks detail        document what happened                       procedure, data collection,               procedure, data collection,
Collection
                  •    does not provide           •   shows some evidence that student             observations, etc.                        observations, etc.
                       evidence that student          did own work                             •   provides evidence that student did    •   provides clear evidence of student
                       did own work                                                                own work                                  having done own work
Visual & Oral     •    display is not             •   display needs work on organization       •   display is neat and organized         •   display is neat, organized and
                       organized and/or neat          and/or neatness                          •   data displayed in graphical form          creative
Communication
                  •    data not displayed         •   data not displayed in graphical form     •   written text is solid but may need    •   data displayed in appropriate
of Results        •    written text needs         •   written text needs additional editing        some additional editing or                graphical form
(Display &             significant editing or         or rewriting                                 rewriting                             •   written text is meaningful,
Interview)             rewriting                  •   can somewhat describe, explain and       •   can describe, explain and answer          purposeful and focused
                  •    cannot describe,               answer questions about project but           questions about project with          •   can describe, explain and answer
                       explain and answer             may not have enthusiasm and                  enthusiasm and confidence but             questions about project with
                       questions about                confidence and/or may not use                may not use correct scientific            enthusiasm and confidence while
                       project                        correct scientific terminology               terminology                               using correct scientific terminology

What I liked:                                                                                                                                                            Total _    / 36
Ideas for additional investigation:
What I learned:
District Science Fair Judging Form: Engineering Design Process
Project title:                                                                                                                                                 Project #

Score Points          1 - Unsatisfactory                2 - Partially Proficient                        3 - Proficient                              4 - Advanced                      SCORE
Identify          •     not stated                •   problem is unclear or vague             •   problem is clearly stated             •   problem is clear and well-thought
                                                  •   not directly related to the solution    •   may not be directly related to the        out
Problem
                                                      that was tested                             solution that was tested              •   relates directly to the solution that
                                                                                                                                            was tested
Background        •     not provided or not       •   very little research is relevant or     •   some research is relevant and         •   relevant research is clearly
                        related to the                documented                                  documented                                documented
Research
                        problem                   •   research collected from only one or     •   research collected from limited       •   research collected from a variety of
                                                      an unknown resource                         number of resources                       sources
Proposed          •     not stated                •   one or more designs are proposed,       •   two or more designs are clearly       •   multiple designs are clearly
                                                      but not clear                               proposed                                  proposed
Design
                                                  •   proposed designs barely relate to       •   proposed designs somewhat             •   proposed designs all directly relate
Solutions                                             the problem                                 relate to the problem                     to the problem
Prototype         •     not stated                •   materials and steps are incomplete,     •   materials and steps are complete      •   materials and steps are complete, in
                                                      not in a logical order, and/or lack         and in a logical order                    a logical order
Design and
                                                      significant detail                      •   may lack some detail                  •   very detailed
Development
Results and       •     not stated, or, stated    •   stated and supported by some data       •   described and supported by some       •   described and supported by that is
                        but not supported             and/or journaling                           data that is somewhat organized           displayed in a logical and organized
Redesign
                        with data or              •   prototype was not redesigned or re-         (e.g. charts, graphs)                     way (e.g. charts, graphs)
                        journaling on what            tested                                  •   prototype was re-designed but         •   prototype was re-designed and
                        happened                                                                  not completely re-tested                  completely re-tested
Conclusions       •     not stated or unclear     •   stated solution but not related to      •   stated solution that relates to       •   clearly stated solution that relates to
                                                      problem                                     problem                                   problem
                                                  •   not supported by prototype results      •   somewhat supported by the             •   strongly supported by the prototype
                                                                                                  prototype results                         results
Originality and   •     no evidence of            •   design adapted from another source      •   original design or highly adapted     •   uniquely original or novel topic
                        original design (e.g.         (e.g. book, kit, etc.)                      design from another source                and/or approach to a problem
creativity
                        store bought kit)         •   student demonstrates some ability       •   student clearly demonstrates          •   clear evidence of original thinking
                                                      to do own work                              ability to do own work                    and design
Proof of Data     •     data collection           •   not detailed but shows an attempt       •   somewhat detailed; documents          •   detailed in nature; documents
                        missing or lacks detail       to document what happened                   design, data collection, revisions,       design, data collection, revisions,
Collection
                  •     does not provide          •   shows some evidence that student            etc.                                      etc.
                        evidence that student         did own work                            •   provides evidence that student        •   provides clear evidence of student
                        did own work                                                              did own work                              having done own work
Visual & Oral     •     display is not            •   display needs work on organization      •   display is neat and organized         •   display is neat, organized and
                        organized and/or              and/or neatness                         •   data displayed in graphical form          creative
Communication
                        neat                      •   data not displayed in graphical form    •   written text is solid but may need    •   data displayed in appropriate
of Results        •     data not displayed        •   written text needs additional editing       some additional editing or                graphical form
(Display &        •     written text needs            or rewriting                                rewriting                             •   written text is meaningful,
Interview)              significant editing or    •   can somewhat describe, explain and      •   can describe, explain and answer          purposeful and focused
                        rewriting                     answer questions about project but          questions about project with          •   can describe, explain and answer
                  •     cannot describe,              may not have enthusiasm and                 enthusiasm and confidence but             questions about project with
                        explain and answer            confidence and/or may not use               may not use correct scientific            enthusiasm and confidence while
                        questions about               correct scientific terminology              terminology                               using correct scientific terminology
                        project

What I liked:                                                                                                                                                             Total _     / 36
Ideas for additional investigation:
What I learned:
STUDENT APPLICATION
         *NEW! Electronic Application may be filled out online at: https://goo.gl/forms/txsgynIzclZeGIxu2
   NOTE: If you are participating as a group, a separate student application must be filled out by each student and signed by their
     guardian. The project title must match exactly with the other student applications from your group.(Please print neatly)

Student Information
Student's Name:                                                                Home Phone:
Parents’ Name(s):
Student’s Grade:                   School:
Science Teacher:                                                        School Phone:
Project Title:
Preferred t-shirt size (check one)        Youth MD           Youth LG         Adult SM         Adult MD           Adult LG

Project Category
         Engineering Design Process
         Scientific Method
Project Type
         Individual Project
         Group Project
Project Size (please indicate exact size)
Width:           inches (maximum 48") Depth:                  inches (maximum 14") Height:                 inches (maximum 48")
Electricity Requirements
Do you need 110 AC Current for your project?                  Yes              No (Note: you must furnish your own extension cord.)

Photo Release and Waiver
Photo Release:
I give my permission, for myself and/or my child to be photographed/videotaped during participation in the Fort Collins
Museum of Discovery programs, camps or activities and for that photograph or video image to be used for the purpose
of promoting Fort Collins Museum of Discovery (FCMoD) programs and events including, but not limited to, publication
in brochures, newsletters, website, staff training, and grant projects. I understand that such photographs or videos
remain the property of the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery.

         Yes, I give my permission                   No, I do not give my permission

                    408 Mason Court          Fort Collins, CO 80524       970.221.6738        www.fcmod.org
Parent Consent Required
(Teachers: please check the appropriate designation)
Your child has earned the honor to:
         present his/her project            or         be a substitute
at the PSD District Science Fair. The District Science Fair is held at Fort Collins Museum of Discovery, 408 Mason Court, on
March 30th, 2019. Both presenters and alternates need to fill out this form and ensure that it is returned to the Fort
Collins Museum of Discovery by March 13th by 5:00pm (email to bunger@fcmod.org).
In order to be eligible to participate, your child needs to commit to two things:
• Friday, March 29th between 3:00-7:00pm - Deliver the science fair project to Fort Collins Museum of Discovery
• Saturday March 30th between 9:30-11:30am - Engage in an interview with judges for 20 minutes at an assigned time.
The exact time of the interview will be given when the project is dropped off on March 29th.
Please understand that interview times CANNOT be changed due to sports schedules or other commitments.
All members of a group must be present for the interview or the project will be disqualified.

By signing below, you agree to the following:
On behalf of the above-named participant, I assume all risks of participating in this activity or event. I hereby waive,
release, and discharge the Fort Collins Museum of Discovery (FCMoD) from any and all liability, including but not limited
to personal injury, property damage, property theft, or actions of any kind which may hereafter occur to the
above-named participant by participatingin this program.
In the event of serious illness or injury, I hereby give permission to the FCMoD staff to secure emergency medical care for
the above-named participant, and agree to pay for any incurred expenses. I give permission to the FCMoD staff to secure
transportation (via ambulance) for the participant to the doctor or hospital and I release the FCMoD from responsibility
in connection with such emergency medical attention.

YES, I would like my child to participate in the District Science Fair and understand the guidelines above.

Parent/Guardian signature                                                                           Date

                 Applications must be received by 5:00 p.m., March 13th, 2019
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