2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College

 
2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College
2021
Year 10 Subject Selection
       Handbook

Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition
               RTO No: 41391
2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College
Contents
Message from College Principal .......................................................................... 4

Course Structure in Year 10 .................................................................................. 5

Prerequisites for Senior Study .............................................................................. 6

Year 10 Offering .......................................................................................................... 8

Elective options ...............................................................................................................................8

Compulsory Subjects

English................................................................................................................................ 9
English ..........................................................................................................................................................9
Essential English .........................................................................................................................................9
Literature ....................................................................................................................................................9

Mathematics ................................................................................................................. 11
Short Course in Numeracy ................................................................................................................. 12

Religious Education ................................................................................................... 13

Highly Recommended Subjects

Science ................................................................................................................................. 14
Biology/Psychology ................................................................................................................................ 14
Chemistry/Physics .................................................................................................................................. 15

Elective Subjects

Arts..................................................................................................................................... 17
Drama ....................................................................................................................................................... 17
Music ......................................................................................................................................................... 18
Visual and Media Arts ........................................................................................................................... 19

Business and Technology
Accounting/Economics ......................................................................................................................... 20
Certificate II in Business ....................................................................................................................... 22
Design ....................................................................................................................................................... 23
Digital Technology ................................................................................................................................. 24
Certificate II in Skills for Work and Vocational Pathways............................................................ 25

Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook – 2021                                                                                        Mount Alvernia College

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2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College
Health and Physical Education
Food and Nutrition ............................................................................................................................... 26
Certificate I in Hospitality .................................................................................................................... 27
Physical Education .................................................................................................................................. 28
Certificate II in Sport and Recreation ............................................................................................... 29

Humanities
Ancient History ...................................................................................................................................... 30
Geography ............................................................................................................................................... 31
Legal Studies............................................................................................................................................ 32
Modern History...................................................................................................................................... 33

Languages
Italian ........................................................................................................................................................ 34
Japanese.................................................................................................................................................... 34

Subject Selection Online ............................................................................................................... 35

Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook – 2021                                                                                        Mount Alvernia College

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2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College
Dear Students, Parents and Caregivers
Year 10 is a vital educational year for young people. It is the final year of compulsory attendance at
school and represents the beginning of the senior phase of learning. At the end of Year 10, students
will be required to make important decisions about their Senior Pathways, discerning between
Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR), Ranking and Vocational Education and Training (VET)
options. While students will continue to have the opportunity to study the ‘entitlements’ of the national
curriculum, Mount Alvernia is committed to ensuring that each student is able to aspire to their
personal excellence. The implication of this is that we would encourage students to select subjects that
they are intending on studying in Years 11 and 12, in order to establish a strong basis for success in
their Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE).

To this end, students in Year 10 will study a combination of compulsory core subjects and elective
subjects. Compulsory core subjects include:
    • English - Essential English (a foundational course) or English
    • Essentials Mathematics (a foundational course), General Mathematics or Advanced
        Mathematics
    • Religious Education

Students are strongly encouraged to also select a Science subject, as Science is often a pre-requisite
for further study at university and also required in some vocational pathways, including military
pathways. No student will be able to opt out of Science unless they have the permission of the Deputy
Principal: Teaching and Learning. Permission will only be granted in exceptional circumstances, and
generally in instances where a student has not been able to achieve success previously. While the
national curriculum requires the delivery of History and Health and Physical Education (HPE) to all
students in Year 10, students at Mount Alvernia College may opt out of these subjects and choose
other electives. If, in so doing, they are more able to choose subjects which align with later courses of
study. Although the College provides this flexibility to students, it strongly urges students and parents
to consider the benefits of these subjects, each of which provide opportunities for students to
consolidate important key content and skills.

To assist students and parents in making these important decisions, all students in Year 9 will attend
information sessions on subject selection and parents will receive information to guide their
discernment. Broadly, our advice is that subject selections should be influenced by consideration of
your daughter’s demonstrated achievement, as indicated in her results thus far
    • Year 11 and 12 prerequisites for courses (removing a subject at Year 10 may restrict your
        daughter’s later ability to study it in Years 11 and 12)
    • Your daughter’s areas of interest and post-school ambition
    • The desirability of keeping more than one pathway open and for a rounded, broad and balanced
        education.

To make the most of those opportunities available to you in Years 11 and 12 you will need to
    • Read this booklet carefully and complete your subject selection form
    • Look for opportunities throughout Year 10 to broaden your horizons and make the most of
       all that Mount Alvernia has to offer

Should you need any advice relating to subject selection, please make contact with the Teaching and
Learning Guardian for Years 9 and 10, Ms Sacha Carney or the Deputy Principal: Teaching and Learning,
Ms Kath Little.

We look forward to working further with you in your daughter’s education.
Peace and all good

Dr Kerrie Tuite
Principal

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2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College
Course Structure in Year 10

The aim in Year 10 is to provide you with the opportunity to gain the skills needed to make informed
and wise decisions when selecting a course of study for Years 11 and 12.

The following three subjects must be studied by all students for the entire year:

               ▪   An English subject
               ▪   A Mathematics subject
               ▪   Religious Education

Science is highly recommended, and only with the permission of the Deputy for Teaching and Learning,
would a student be able to not select it. Before any such request is made, parents and students should
be aware that Science is often a pre-requisite for further study at university and also required in some
vocational pathways, including military pathways.

Apart from these compulsory or highly recommended subjects, three year-long electives are selected
for study throughout the year. Students are encouraged to consider how these choices will assist them
to prepare for their senior selections later in the year.

Each of the subjects is structured to

   •    focus on skills which provide students with a solid basis for learning in the twenty first century
   •    cover the content outlined by the national curriculum
   •    introduce students to the language, skills, ways of working and assessment in Years 11 and 12

For this reason, it is strongly recommended that students who are thinking of studying a particular
subject at Year 11, ensure they have exposure to it in Year 10. Students who are not able to successfully
complete a subject in Year 10, are advised that they are unlikely to experience success in the same
subject in Years 11 and 12.

Prerequisites for Year 11 and 12 courses are included on the following page, so that stakeholders have
advance knowledge of minimum requirements for successful completion in the Senior Years.

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2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College
Prerequisites for Senior Study

Students should not select subjects unless the minimum prerequisites have been met. Doing so places
students at risk of not achieving a Satisfactory result and losing QCE points. All students seeking to
study General subjects MUST have achieved a minimum C in English or Literature in Year 10.

       Faculty              Subject                                   Pre2requisites
 Art              Drama                     C in English and C+ in Drama
                  Film and Television       C+ in Visual and Media Art Year 10
                  Music                     C+ in Music in Year 10
                  Visual Art                C+ in Visual Art in Year 10
 Business and     Accounting                C+ in Business and C+ in General Mathematics
 Technology       Diploma in Business       C in English and Mathematics with a capacity to complete self-
                                            directed learning in a blended model
                  Design                    C+ in Design in Year 10
                  Economics                 C+ in General Mathematics
 Health and       Food and Nutrition        C+ in Food and Nutrition in Year 10
 Physical         Physical Education        C+ in Physical Education in Year 10
 Education
 Humanities       Ancient History
                  Geography                 C+ in English or Literature Year 10
                  Legal Studies             C+ in History or Study of Society Year 10
                  Modern History
                  Study of Religion
 Languages        English                   C in English Year 10
                  Italian                   C in Italian Year 10
                  Japanese                  C in Japanese Year 10
                  Literature                B- in English Year 10
 Mathematics      General Mathematics       C in Year 10 General Mathematics
                  Mathematical Methods      C+ in Year 10 Mathematical Methods
                  Specialist Mathematics    B+ in Year 10 Mathematical Methods
 Science          Biology                   C+ or above Science Year 10
                                            C+ in General Mathematics
                  Chemistry                 B in General Mathematics or C+ in Mathematical Methods
                                            C+ in Chemistry/Physics Year 10 or Science
                  Physics                   B in General Mathematics or C+ in Mathematical Methods
                                            C+ in Chemistry/Physics Year 10 or Science
                  Psychology                C+ in Science Year 10
                                            C+ in General Mathematics

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2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College
In Years 11 and 12, subjects are grouped into three main categories: GENERAL, APPLIED and
CERTIFICATE. The subjects above are General subjects. Applied subjects and Certificate courses
are available to all students, regardless of their previous study.

    •   General subjects are suited to students who are interested in direct entry into university
        from school, particularly in competitive courses with an ATAR higher than 63, and at
        universities such as the University of Queensland (UQ) or Queensland University of
        Technology (QUT). Results in General subjects contribute to the award of a QCE and an
        ATAR.

    •   Applied subjects are suited to students who are primarily interested in pathways beyond
        senior secondary schooling that lead to vocational education and training or work, or to
        students who have not demonstrated a capacity to achieve a C in General courses. Results in
        Applied subjects contribute to the award of a QCE and one Applied subject result may
        contribute to an ATAR.

    •   Certificate subjects are suited to those students who are primarily interested in vocational
        pathways. Results in Certificate subjects contribute to the award of a QCE and one Certificate
        III subject or higher may contribute to an ATAR. Certificate III, IV or Diploma courses are
        accepted by some universities for entry. Students who study a Certificate III, IV or Diploma
        successfully, will achieve a rank which can then be used as a basis for application to tertiary
        study. Ranking is not acknowledged as a basis for entry by UQ directly from school. Students
        who study a Certificate course in Year 10, can begin banking QCE points. This is strongly
        recommended particularly for students who typically achieve in the C range or lower.
        Completed Certificate II courses are worth four QCE points (students need a total of 20 for
        their QCE). Completed Certificate III courses are typically worth eight QCE points.

Students at the end of Year 10 may elect to study a combination of General, Applied and Certificate
courses in Year 11 and 12. Depending on the combination studied, different pathways may be followed.

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2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College
Year 10 Offerings

The table below, helps explain the parameters around subject selection for Year 10.

                             Compulsory                                    Highly             Elective     Elective 3      Elective 4
                                                                       Recommended               2
English                       Mathematics                          Science/Elective 1
Options include:              Options include:                     Options include:
                                                                   -    Biology/Psychology
-       Essential English     -   Essential          Religion      -    Chemistry/Physics
-       English                   Mathematics
-       Literature            -   General                          *Students are able to
                                  Mathematics                      study all Sciences, as a
                              -   Mathematical                     separate elective
* Essential English is not        Methods
compatible with future
ATAR eligibility.                                                   Or another Elective if
                                                                   permission given to drop
                                                                   Science

Elective Options
Students will select three year-long courses of study. In some areas this will take the form of a
year-long course in a distinct area, however in others this will be a combined course offering. This is
to allow for diversity of skill development leading into the official senior context. Subjects with a
G next to their name, indicate that the work being done maps to the General syllabus’ in Years 11 and
12. Subjects with an A next to their name, indicate that the work being done maps to the Applied
syllabus’ in Years 11 and 12. Certificate II courses carry with them four QCE points. Students who
take them can begin banking QCE points for Years 11 and 12. This is a strong advantage for students,
particularly those achieving a GPA of less than nine. For additional information about course offerings,
please contact the Learning Area Advisor (LAA) for each faculty. Information about Certificate courses
should be sought from Mr Terry Donaghue, LAA for Vocational Education.

    Humanities                                   Languages                                    Business and Technology
    Ms Amanda Bopf                               Ms Sarah Porchak                             Ms Justine Malinowski
    -     Ancient History - G                    -    Italian - G                             -   Accounting/Economics - G
    -     Geography - G                          -    Japanese - G                            -   Certificate II in Business
    -     Legal Studies - G                                                                   -   Design - G
    -     Modern History - G                                                                  -   Digital Solutions - G
    -     Religion and Ethics - A                                                             -   Certificate II in Skills for
                                                                                                  Work and Vocational
                                                                                                  Pathways

    Health and Physical                          Art                                          Science
    Education                                    Ms Lorella Masci                             Ms Jen Gibbons
    Ms Michelle Popplewell
    -     Physical Education - G                 -    Drama - G                               -   Biology/Psychology - G
    -     Certificate I in Hospitality           -    Music - G                               -   Chemistry/Physics - G
    -     Food and Nutrition – G                 -    Visual and Media Arts - G
    -     Certificate II in Sport and
          Recreation

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2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College
Compulsory Subjects - English

Through a range of approaches, Year 10 students will gain knowledge, understanding and skills in
reading, listening, speaking, writing and creating. They are also expected to develop their ability as
independent, persistent and resilient life-long learners.

Students will be guided to choose either Essential English or English or Literature.

English

Throughout their studies in English, students engage with a variety of literary genres including extended
prose (novel), poetry, short story, film, and media. Students learn how to create and analyse
representations of concepts, identities, times and places, through various perspectives and task types.
Student’s experiment with language and aesthetic features to develop their own writing style in
analytical, imaginative, public and persuasive texts.

Essential English
Essential English develops and refines students’ understanding of language, literacy and literature to
enable them to interact confidently and effectively with others in everyday, community and social
contexts. Students recognise language and texts as relevant in their lives now and in the future and
learn to understand, accept or challenge the values and attitudes in these texts.

Students develop skills to read for meaning and purpose, and to use, critique and appreciate a range of
texts. They will engage with language and texts to foster skills to communicate confidently and
effectively for a variety of contexts including further education and work-related situations. As part of
their assessment in this subject, students will produce texts that reflect a variety of purposes and
audiences and engage creative and imaginative thinking to explore their own world and world of others.

English Essentials is not compatible with a university pathway directly from school, however it can be
used to qualify for ATAR upon the successful completion of Units 3 and 4. Students who study English
Essentials are able to study at a Diploma level immediately after school.

Students who gain a C- or less in English at the end of Year 9 will automatically be placed into Essential
English.

Literature
Literature focuses on the study of literary texts and seeks to allow students to pursue a passion in
canonical and classic texts. In this course, students will engage with literary genres such as extended
prose (novel), novella, poetry, short story, film and drama. Students learn how to create and analyse
various representations of concepts, identities, times and places within texts, and examine how cultural
assumption, attitudes, values and belief unpin texts and position readers. Students will examine and
experiment with stylistic devices and aesthetic features to develop their own writing style in analytical
and imaginative texts.

This course offers students opportunities to develop a repertoire of resources to interpret and create
texts for personal, cultural, social and aesthetic purposes. Students will engage with diverse texts to
help them develop a sense of themselves, their world and their place in it. Literature invites
independent, innovative and creative thinkers who have demonstrated strong English skills in Year 9.

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2021 Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook - Educating young women in the Franciscan tradition - Mount Alvernia College
Genre’s          Texts                              Task Types              Word
                                                                                           Limits
 English       Media            Shakespeare: Romeo + Juliet        Feature article         800-1000
               Persuasive       Novel: Looking for Alibrandi       assignment              words
               Imaginative      Poets: Wordsworth, Blake,          Persuasive Speech       5-6 minute
               Analytical       Keats                              Narrative exam          speech
                                Film: Lion                         Analytical exam
                                Media: Feature Articles
 Essential     Persuasive       Music videos                       Folio of work           500-800
 English       Informative      Resumes                            Short response exam     words
               Exposition       Short story: The Arrival           Short story             4-6 minutes
               Multimodal       Novel: Looking for Alibrandi       Multimodal response
               presentation
 Literature    Imaginative      Novel: The Book Thief              Imaginative written     1000-1200
               Analytical       Poets: Wordsworth, Blake,          assignment              words
                                Shelley, Byron, Keats, Coleridge   Imaginative spoken      6-7 minutes
                                Shakespeare: Hamlet                assignment              speech
                                Film: Ophelia                      Analytical exam (x2)
                                Novella: Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

All English courses have spoken and written assessment, four tasks in total each worth 25%

Major differences in the courses include:
   • word length
   • time limit for spoken tasks
   • skills developed

Subject Selection considerations for Years 11 and 12

Each course has a QCAA prescribed exam in Year 12; however, the Essential English External Exam
is in Term 2, rather than Term 4.

Essential English does not meet University prerequisites for entrance (refer to University guidelines
for further information about entrance prerequisites).

All English courses contribute to the literacy requirement to obtain your QCE.

All English courses can be included for an ATAR calculation upon satisfactory completion of Units 3
and 4 in Year 1.2

Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook – 2021                                           Mount Alvernia College

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Compulsory Subjects - Mathematics

In Year 10 students will be directed to study either Introduction to Essential Mathematics, Introduction
to General Mathematics or Introduction to Mathematical Methods. While all courses cover the areas
of number and algebra, measurement and geometry and statistics and probability, the advanced course,
Introduction to Mathematical Methods, will challenge those with a flair for Mathematics - it has more
focus on abstract concepts such as algebra.

Successful completion of the Introduction to Mathematical Methods level is required before students
are promoted to Mathematical Methods or Specialist Mathematics in Years 11 and 12

All courses are intended to develop
     • Students’ understanding in the strands of number and algebra, measurement and geometry,
        statistics and probability
     • Students’ literacy and numeracy capabilities; and
     • an appreciation of the power of mathematical thinking and reasoning

Overview of Semesters 1 and 2 Learning

 Introduction to Essential Introduction to                    General Introduction                    to
 Mathematics               Mathematics                                Mathematical Methods
 Semester 1                         Semester 1                         Semester 1
    • Similarity and scale             • Similarity and scale             • Surds
    • Data                             • Data                             • Logarithms and
    • Volume and surface               • Area, volume and                   exponentials
      area                               surface area                     • Quadratics
    • Formula                          • Algebra                          • Probability and
 Semester 2                         Semester 2                              statistics
    • Financial mathematics            • Financial Mathematics         Semester 2
    • Ratio and rates                  • Equations                        • Trigonometry
    • Pythagoras’ theorem              • Pythagoras’ theorem              • Linear relationships
      and trigonometry                   and trigonometry                 • Non-linear
    • Linear relationships             • Linear relationships               Relationships

Overview of Approaches to Teaching and Learning
Students will explore the connections and applications of Mathematics. Through practical situations
they will be able to develop the ability to use their mathematical skills to analyse and predict the world
around them.

Students will develop an appreciation of the power of algebraic manipulation, mathematical modelling
and representation with the aid of technologies such as graphic calculators and data analysis software.
Through a range of life related, abstract, familiar and complex situations students can develop efficient
problem-solving skills. They will learn to explore possible solutions, apply reasoning skills and justify
decisions.

Assessment

Formative assessment involving progress tests and
topic tests will be used alongside the summative tests
and the problem solving and modelling task.

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Short Course in Numeracy - Semester 2 - Invitation only
In Year 10 students will be directed to study either Introduction to Mathematics General or
Introduction to Mathematical Methods. At the completion of semester one students may be invited to
complete a short course in numeracy as an alternative to General Mathematics in semester two.

This course is on offer as invitation only. Successful completion of the short course in numeracy can
be used to meet the numeracy requirement for the Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE). The
students will then have the opportunity to undertake alternative courses in Years 11 and 12. This is
most advantageous for students who are considering alternatives to school based senior studies.

Overview of Learning

Topics

Topic 1 - Personal identity and education
Topic 2 - The work environment

Course Objectives

    •    Personal and community
    •    Education and training
    •    Workplace and employment

Overview

As the short course in numeracy has implications to the QCE the course has the same underlining
pedagogical framework and processes found in senior Mathematics. Students will learn to
    • select and interpret mathematical information
    • select from and use a variety of mathematical and problem-solving strategies
    • use oral and written mathematical language and representations to communicate
        mathematically
    • plan, implement and adjust processes to achieve learning outcomes
    • apply learning strategies

Assessment

Both topics develop and assess the skills of numeracy and learning. One assessment is an oral
mathematics presentation including a learning journal. The other is a short response examination
including a learning journal based on Topic 2: The work environment.

Year 10 Subject Selection Handbook – 2021                                     Mount Alvernia College

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Compulsory Subjects - Religious Education
Essential Questions

             Why all the mystery? Why should I make socially just responses? How do religions of the world
             have an impact on our lives? Why do Catholics gather at a table for a meal? What role does
             prayer play in our lives? How does Catholic Social Teaching, Gospel and Franciscan values provide
             guidelines for action?

              Year 10 Religious Education involves four strands: Sacred Texts, Beliefs, Church and
              Christian Life. In Semester 2, Year 10 students will begin their course of study with Unit
              1 in Religion and Ethics to accommodate the timing of the Senior Syllabus and external
examinations that they may be sitting at the end of Year 12. The two modules to be studied contain
topics that are closely aligned with the Year 10 Curriculum.

In Year 10, students investigate various ways in which humanity understands the mystery of God. These
include the human experience of the created world; the valuable insights of the major world religions
(Christianity, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism and Buddhism) as reflected in their core beliefs and practices;
the different representations of God in Old Testament and New Testament texts by various authors
in different historical, social and cultural contexts; Christian spiritual writings that search for the
mystery of God in the midst of world events and the course of human history; and participation in
personal and communal prayer that can lead them to the simple awareness of the presence of God.

Students explore how the Church has responded to the range of unprecedented threats to both human
and environmental ecology, from science, technology, materialism, consumerism and political
ideologies that have and are still facing Australia and the Modern World. They develop critical
understanding of the various sources that guide the Church’s action in the world today, including the
teaching of Jesus and the early Church, the principles of Catholic social teaching and the reasoned
judgements of conscience, carefully formed and examined. They examine the Eucharist as the primary
and indispensable source of nourishment for the spiritual life of believers, who carry on Jesus’ mission
in the world. They continue to develop their understanding of prayer in the Christian tradition through
an exploration of Centring Prayer and prayers for justice, peace and the environment, including the
Prayer of St Francis, the Magnificat and the Prayer of St Teresa.

‘I am a Muslim and a Hindu and a Christian and a Jew
and so are all of you.’
Mahatma Gandhi

Assessment

Learning and teaching in Religious Education in Year 10 is designed by a team of teachers, covering a
range of local and wider contexts and assessment is similar to that found in other social science
subjects. In Semester 2, Unit 1 of Religion and Ethics has also been approved as modules of work by
QCAA. All tasks are inquiry based and responding to these key questions related to their learning
experiences.

Term 1:         Why all the Mystery?
Term 2:         Why do Catholics gather at a table for a meal?
Term 3:         How do religions of the world have an impact on our lives?
Term 4:         Why should I make socially just responses?

Assessment tasks will be completed individually or, for some tasks, collaboratively with a partner. Tasks
include extended written response, analytical essay, project and examination.

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Highly Recommended Subjects – Science
No student can opt out of this subject without the permission of the Deputy Principal:
Teaching and Learning. Students may elect to study both of the Science strands
(Chemistry/Physics and Biology/Psychology).

Biology/Psychology -           This course is intended for students who are considering choosing
either Biology and/or Psychology in Year 11 and 12.

Biology
Biology is the study of the fascinating diversity of life as it has evolved and as it interacts and functions.
Investigation of biological systems and their interactions, from cellular processes to ecosystem
dynamics, has led to biological knowledge and understanding that enable us to explore and explain
everyday observations, find solutions to biological issues, and understand the processes of biological
continuity and change over time.

Living systems are all interconnected and interact at a variety of spatial and temporal scales, from the
molecular level to the ecosystem level. Investigation of living systems involves classification of key
components within the system, and analysis of how those components interact, particularly with regard
to the movement of matter and the transfer and transformation of energy within and between systems.

Analysis of the ways living systems change over time involves understanding of the factors that impact
the system, and investigation of system mechanisms to respond to internal and external changes and
ensure continuity of the system. The theory of evolution by natural selection is critical to explaining
these patterns and processes in biology and underpins the study of all living systems.

Psychology
Psychology provides opportunities for students to engage with concepts that explain behaviours and
underlying cognitions.

Students examine individual development in the form of the role of the brain, cognitive development,
human consciousness and sleep. Students also investigate the concept of intelligence, the process of
diagnosis and how to classify psychological disorder and determine an effective treatment, and lastly,
the contribution of emotion and motivation on the individual behaviour.

Psychology aims to develop students
    • interest in psychology and their appreciation for how this knowledge can be used to
       understand contemporary issues
    • appreciation of the complex interactions, involving multiple parallel processes that continually
       influence human behaviour
    • understanding that psychological knowledge has developed over time and is used in a variety
       of contexts, and is informed by social, cultural and ethical considerations
    • ability to conduct a variety of field research and laboratory investigations involving collection
       and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data and interpretation of evidence
    • ability to critically evaluate psychological concepts, interpretations, claims and conclusions with
       reference to evidence.

Assessment

Students will complete a range of assessment tasks including
    • Research investigation
    • Experimental investigation
    • data test
    • Exam

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Chemistry/Physics - This course is intended for students who are considering choosing either
Chemistry and/or Physics in Years 11 and 12.

Chemistry
Chemistry is the study of materials and substances and the transformations they undergo through
interactions and the transfer of energy. Chemists can use an understanding of chemical structures and
processes to adapt, control and manipulate systems to meet particular economic, environmental and
social needs.

Chemistry develops students' understanding of the key chemical concepts and models of structure,
bonding, and chemical change, including the role of chemical, electrical and thermal energy. Students
learn how models of structure and bonding enable chemists to predict properties and reactions and
to adapt these for particular purposes.

Students explore key concepts and models through active inquiry into phenomena and through
contexts that exemplify the role of chemistry and chemists in society.

Students design and conduct qualitative and quantitative investigations both individually and
collaboratively. They investigate questions and hypotheses, manipulate variables, analyse data, evaluate
claims, solve problems and develop and communicate evidence-based arguments and models.

Thinking in chemistry involves using differing scales including macro-, micro- and nano scales; using
specialised representations such as chemical symbols and equations; and being creative, as when
designing new materials or models of chemical systems.

The study of chemistry provides a foundation for undertaking investigations in a wide range of scientific
fields and often provides the unifying link across interdisciplinary studies.

Physics
Physics is a fundamental science that endeavours to explain all the natural phenomena that occur in
the universe. Its power lies in the use of a comparatively small number of assumptions, models, laws
and theories to explain a wide range of phenomena, from the incredibly small to the incredibly large.

Physics has helped to unlock the mysteries of the universe and provides the foundation of
understanding upon which modern technologies and all other sciences are based.

Physics uses qualitative and quantitative models and theories based on physical laws to visualise, explain
and predict physical phenomena. Models, laws and theories are developed from, and their predictions
are tested by making, observations and quantitative measurements.

In this subject, students gather, analyse and interpret primary and secondary data to investigate a range
of phenomena and technologies using some of the most important models, laws and theories of physics,
including the kinetic particle model, the atomic model, electromagnetic theory, and the laws of classical
mechanics.

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Physics aims to develop students
   • appreciation of the wonder of physics and the significant contribution physics has made to
        contemporary society
   • understanding that diverse natural phenomena may be explained, analysed and predicted
        using concepts, models and theories that provide a reliable basis for action
   • understanding of the ways in which matter and energy interact in physical systems across a
        range of scales
   • understanding of the ways in which models and theories are refined and new models and
        theories are developed in physics; and how physics knowledge is used in a wide range of
        contexts and informs personal, local and global issues
   • investigative skills, including the design and conduct of investigations to explore phenomena
        and solve problems, the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data, and the
        interpretation of evidence
   • ability to use accurate and precise measurement, valid and reliable evidence, and scepticism
        and intellectual rigour to evaluate claims
   • ability to communicate physics understanding, findings, arguments and conclusions using
        appropriate representations, modes and genres. investigative

Assessment

Students will complete a range of assessment tasks including
    • Research investigation
    • Experimental investigation
    • Data test
    • Exam

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Choose three elective subjects if studying Science and four if not studying Science

                                 Elective Subjects - Art
Drama
Drama examines the human experience by investigating, communicating and embodying stories,
experiences, emotions and ideas that reflect the human experience. In Drama, students engage in
aesthetic learning experiences that develop the twenty first century skills of critical thinking, creative
thinking, communication, collaboration and teamwork, personal and social skills, and information and
communication technologies (ICT) skills. They learn how to reflect on their artistic, intellectual,
emotional and kinaesthetic understanding as creative and critical thinkers and curious artists.
Additionally, students will develop personal confidence, skills of inquiry and social skills as they work
collaboratively with others.

Key Concepts and Skills

In Semester one, students will be involved in Queensland Theatre Company’s Scene Project where
they will work in partnership with a professional theatre company to develop their knowledge of how
ideas and intentions are communicated in and through drama. Students will develop and sustain
different roles and characters for given circumstances and intentions. They perform devised and
scripted drama in different forms, styles and performance spaces. They collaborate with others to plan,
direct, produce, rehearse and refine performances. They select and use the elements of drama,
narrative and structure in directing and acting to engage audiences. They refine performance and
expressive skills in voice and movement to convey dramatic action.

In Semester two, students will explore a variety of issues surrounding the themes of displacement and
loss. In particular, the unit will focus on the ways in which theatre can educate and challenge audiences.
Students will engage in a focus study of Matt Cameron’s ‘Ruby Moon’ where they will explore,
workshop and analyse the world of the play, the characters and possible dramatic meanings for
audiences. They will look at skills of performance, devising monologues and a play trailer for the text.
The unit will culminate in an evening performance for family and friends which forms part of the
assessment.

Students will have the opportunity to participate in workshops with industry artists throughout the
year and will attend one live theatre performance per semester.

Assessment

Students will complete a variety of assessment types chosen from these possible modes.

Responding Task - extended written responses to analyse and interpret dramatic elements and
meaning of live or recorded theatre performances

    •   Responding Task – Examination
    •   Making Task - Group Performance
    •   Making Task - Dramatic Project

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Music
Not because we expect you to major in music, not because we
expect you to play or sing all your life, not so you can relax, not so
you can have fun but so you will be human, so you will recognise
beauty, so you will be sensitive, so you will be close to an infinite
beyond this world, so you will have something to cling to, so you will
have more to love, more compassion, more gentleness, more good
- in short, more life. Of what value will it be to make a prosperous
living unless you know how to live? That is why we study music!
     - Author unknown

Music exists distinctively in every culture and is a basic expression of human experience. Students’
active participation in Music fosters understanding of other times, places, cultures and contexts.
Through continuous and sequential music learning, students listen to, compose and perform with
increasing depth and complexity. Through performing, composing and listening with intent to music,
students have access to knowledge, skills and understanding which can be gained in no other way.

Music has the capacity to engage, inspire and enrich all students, exciting the imagination and
encouraging students to reach their creative and expressive potential. Skills and techniques developed
through participation in music learning allow students to manipulate, express and share sound as
listeners, composers and performers. Music learning has a significant impact on the cognitive, affective,
motor, social and personal competencies of students.

Key Concepts and Skills

In each of these semester units’ students will explore a variety of repertoire across the spectrum of
musical history. In Semester 1 students will study the unit ‘Broadway or Bust’. Have you ever been and
seen a show and wondered how they put the show together? This unit is for you! Come on a learning
journey that explores the ways in which composers, lyricists and musicians throughout musical theatre
history have drawn inspiration from the life and stories of others to create shows for audiences. In
Semester 2 students will study the unit ‘Trendsetters’. In this unit students will explore prolific female
musicians, and how they have shaped the development of popular music from the beginnings to
contemporary works today. Students will develop a stronger understanding of harmony to enable them
to perform a wide variety of popular pieces. As a class they will produce an album of their own original
music, gaining an understanding of recording techniques and production. This unit prepares students
for senior music studies.

Assessment

Students will complete a variety of assessment types chosen from these possible modes.

Responding Tasks
   • Written response through the Musicology strand students will analyse and interpret musical
       elements

Performance
    • Ensemble and/or solo work
    • Composition - Improvising, creating arrangements of work, composing original songs

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Visual and Media Arts
Students are encouraged to reach their creative and expressive potential to make media and visual
artworks. As artists and audiences, students learn how these art forms entertain and challenge as well
as enrich themselves, communities, cultures and histories. twenty first century skills like critical and
creative thinking are embedded into learning and assessment for students to design solutions to multi-
media and visual problems. Such problem-solving skills are transferrable to a range of fields within and
beyond the arts.

Throughout this one-year course, students build self-confidence to effectively communicate ideas using
image, sound and text. They use emerging technologies to design, produce and display multi-modal art
and media. Using information and communication technologies, students may apply skills to other areas
of study to creatively share content to engage audiences. Ensuring responsible use and distribution of
content, students also learn about social and cultural values with ethical and social considerations.
Working independently and collaboratively, students interpret, analyse and evaluate meaning from
information to represent innovative ideas.

Sharing viewpoints about local, national and global issues, students explore curiosity, articulate
concepts and tell stories for different purposes and audiences. Their personal aesthetic for art and
media making evolves as students learn to investigate concepts through inquiry processes and iterative
design thinking. They learn too about role of artists, craftspeople, designers and media makers who
contribute to society and the significance of creative industries. For example, Media Arts leads to roles
in digital storytelling online, television, film, cinema, news, video, video games and radio. Whereas,
Visual Arts leads to roles in public programs, galleries, museums and community centred projects.

Knowledge and Skills

In Semester 1 students investigate concepts related to the environment. In Media Arts, students design
and produce artworks in narrative and non-narrative stories about environments for different purposes
and audiences. For example, student select genre and media conventions to apply for digital storytelling
online, television, film, cinema, news, video, video games and radio. In Visual Arts students explore
natural and urban environments through 2D and 3D media. Students work through inquiry processes
to understand concepts of utopian and dystopian environments in artworks of other artists to influence
their own art making.

In Semester 2 students study Media Arts to investigate representations in different cultures, times
and places. Studying Media Arts, students explore gender stereotypes represented in film. From
viewing other media maker’s films, students shape their viewpoints about how they want to
communicate or challenge gender stereotypes. In Visual Arts students explore representations,
construction and appropriation by studying historical art styles and modern art movements. Students
resolve a body of work using 2D and 3D media, materials and techniques.

Assessment

Students will complete a variety of assessment types chosen from these possible modes.

Responding to artworks through extended written responses
   • Multimodal responses
   • Making tasks in Media Arts including a treatment, storyboard and film
   • Making task in Visual Arts

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Elective Subjects – Business and Technology

Accounting/Economics

Accounting

Accounting is a language that is used to communicate business information which is usually expressed
in monetary terms to interested parties.

The study of accounting enables students to understand the processes involved in generating,
recording, classifying, analysing, interpreting and reporting accounting information as a basis for
planning, control and effective decision making.

In this unit students will explore the fundamental accounting principles and assumptions, follow the
accounting process from source document through to productions of statements and analyse the
financial performance of a business.

This course promotes the development of numeracy, effective communication and logical reasoning.
Students study a range of theoretical and practical aspects of Accounting. Computer technologies such
as Excel, Word, PowerPoint are an integral part of this study.

It would be advantageous for students intending to study Accounting in the senior school to take
Business and Enterprise in Year 10.

Key Concepts and Skills

Topics studied may include
   • The nature and fundamental concepts of Accounting
   • The accounting process from analysing transactions through to the preparation of final reports
   • Cash management
   • Performance analysis
   • Computerised accounting methods

Economics
The Year 10 curriculum gives students the opportunity to further develop their understanding of
economics concepts by considering Australia’s economic performance and standard of living. In the
economics unit students will explore the ways governments manage economic performance to
improve living standards is explored, along with the reasons why economic performance and living
standards differ within and between economies.

Students explore the nature of externalities and why the government intervenes to ensure that prices
reflect the depletion of resources or costs to society. Students examine the consequences of decisions
and the responses of business to changing economic conditions, including the way they manage their
workforce.

Students will demonstrate their learning, knowledge and skills through developing responses to the
following key questions:

    •   How is the performance of an economy measured?
    •   Why do variations in economic performance in different economies exist?
    •   What strategies do governments use to manage economic performance?
    •   How do governments, businesses and individuals respond to changing economic conditions?

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Students explore the different types of business enterprises available and the implications on owners
from an accounting perspective. Students will also understand how to advise prospective investors on
the evaluation of their business and recommend how to improve profit and equity ratios.

Students will demonstrate their learning, knowledge and skills through developing responses to the
following key questions:

    •   How are transactions entered into a business’s records?
    •   How do businesses present financial data to investors?
    •   What strategies can be implemented to improve financial performance?

Assessment

Assessment may involve the completion of
    • Examinations
    • Assignments

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BSB20115: Certificate II in Business
Registered Training Organisation: Mount Alvernia College (RTO: 41391)

Cost: No additional cost, included in school fees

The Certificate II in Business is offered as a Year 10 subject. This qualification reflects the role of
individuals in a variety of junior administrative positions who perform a range of mainly routine tasks
using limited practical skills and fundamental operational knowledge in a defined context. Individuals in
these roles generally work under direct supervision.

Students completing this Certificate will be awarded four points towards their QCE. Students who
complete the course may be eligible for an ATAR and pathways to further study.

How is student work assessed in the Certificate II in Business?

A range of teaching/learning strategies will be used to deliver the competencies. These include:
    • Practical tasks/experience
    • Hands-on activities involving customer service
    • Group projects

Evidence contributing towards competency will be collected throughout the program. This process
allows a student’s competency to be assessed in a holistic approach that integrates a range of
competencies.

QCE Points Available

Four QCE points available. Students who go on to complete the Certificate III in Business will not
receive duplicated credit. Only the better of the QCE points will be applied.

Units of Competency offered

                                                  Core Units
 BSBWHS201            Contribute to health and safety of self and others
                                                   Electives
 BSBIND201            Work effectively in a business environment
 BSBCMM201            Communicate in the workplace
 BSBITU211            Produce digital text documents
 BSBITU212            Create and use spreadsheets
 BSBITU213            Use digital technologies to communicate
 BSBCUS201            Deliver a service to customers
 BSBSUS201            Participate in environmentally sustainable work practices
 BSBWOR202            Organise and complete daily work activities
 BSBWOR203            Work effectively with others
 BSBWOR204            Use business technology
 BSBITU312            Create electronic presentations

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Design
Designers have the opportunity to positively impact the future through their ability to creatively solve
complex problems and enhance the lives of others. They use design processes to identify needs and
opportunities, generate ideas, produce well-designed solutions and evaluate their success. Design
thinking skills can be applied in a diverse range of occupations from the built environment and product
design through to innovations to assist in biomedical engineering.

Key Concepts and Skills

Using a design process, students will learn how to:

    •   Analyse issues in a local, national or global community to identify their own design brief
    •   Use divergent and convergent thinking to generate ideas for possible solutions.
    •   Work independently and collaboratively to select and use various technologies to produce
        samples, prototypes and final products suitable for the intended purpose.
    •   Explore and use Design Thinking and the Design Process to respond to a variety of design
        situations
    •   Investigate topic specific Design Disciplines, Influential Designers, Design styles and materials
    •   Establish criteria for success through the analysis of data, collaborative feedback and evaluation

Assessment

Students will document and present their work in design folio format which may include a combination
of hand-drawn illustrations, digital 3D renderings and photographs as well as written notes and
evaluations. Students will also have the opportunity to create prototypes using traditional workshop
skills and digital technologies such as 3D printing.

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Digital Technology
In a world that is increasingly digitised and automated, it is critical to the wellbeing and sustainability of
the economy, the environment and society, that the benefits of information systems are exploited
ethically. This requires deep knowledge and understanding of digital systems. Digital systems support
new ways of collaborating and communicating and require new skills such as computational and systems
thinking. These technologies are an essential problem-solving toolset in our knowledge-based society.

Digital Technology provides students with practical opportunities to use design thinking and to be
innovative developers of digital solutions and knowledge. The subject helps students to become
innovative creators of digital solutions, effective users of digital systems and critical consumers of
information conveyed by digital systems.

Digital Technology provides students with authentic learning challenges that foster curiosity,
confidence, persistence, innovation, creativity, respect and cooperation. These are all necessary to
make sense of complex ideas and relationships in all areas of learning. Digital Technology helps students
to be regional and global citizens capable of actively and ethically communicating and collaborating.

Unit 1 - Caesar, Spies and Keeping Secrets
Students will investigate the nature of data, data security and data encryption. In this unit students will
use a general-purpose programming language to develop concepts in data security, including ciphers,
encryption and cybersecurity.

Unit 2 - It’s a Small World
In this unit, students will investigate and build small scale computer networks, delve into the world of
telecommunications and explore the ways these networks have led to the social media giants that
dominate the digital technologies landscape today. Students will conclude this unit looking at the
outcomes of this interconnectedness by developing a prototype for an autonomous (driverless) vehicle.
Building upon the security unit, they will look into all aspects of a driverless vehicles operations,
resulting in a product launch for their vehicle concept.

Unit 3 - Robot Rescue
Students will work individually and together to Explore the nature of rescue robots, develop an
algorithm and a hardware system design, generate a prototype solution using any or all of the materials
and tools available (including a robotics system - e.g. LEGO EV3/NXT robots, Spheros, M-Bots) and
use a procedural programming language (e.g. JavaScript, Python) to program their solution. Within this
unit, students will discuss ethical use of technology, computer hardware communication systems
(including networks) and will collect and use data to inform some of their decisions.

Unit 4 - Advanced Web Programming
Web sites are a programmed environment that brings together a range of languages, each designed for
a set purpose. Students will develop and write web sites using HTML, CSS, JS and PHP. They will use
a live web server to store and display their websites, as well as write code to allow their web pages to
function as live web sites on the internet.

Assessment

    •   research folio
    •   projects
    •   examinations

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