Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District

 
ATTACHMENT 1b
                                                                        01/04/19 PDP Response Comments

                    Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District
                                                Derek J. Swenson
                                            Superintendent of Schools

George H. Mitchell Elementary School
Educational Program
GMES PreK-2 (740) / GMES PreK-3 (995
January 04, 2019 - MSBA PDP Comments Response

3.1.2 Educational Program Introduction
The Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District (BRRSD) is a suburban district located in both
Bristol & Plymouth County 30 south of Boston with a PreK-12 student population of approximately 5,400.
There are three elementary schools serving grades K-1, 2-4, & K-3, (Merrill/ LaLiberte & Mitchell); and
one intermediate school for grades 4-6 (Williams); two middle schools including grades 5-8 (Raynham
Middle School) and 7-8 (Bridgewater Middle School); and a comprehensive, college preparatory high
school serving grades 9-12 (Bridgewater-Raynham Regional High School). In addition, there is a Special
Education Preschool program for 3&4 year old students house at the Raynham Middle School and a Post-
High School Transitional Program for young adults ages 18-22, located on the Bridgewater State
University campus. The BRRSD is a high performing, top-tier district, focusing upon academic
achievement, social-emotional learning and personal growth. With an average class size of 25 students, a
full inclusion and co-taught model for special education along with in-district sub-separate special
education programming that support students with significant academic and behavioral needs, the BRRSD
strives to provide excellence in education for all students in an environment that values the individual. A
range of programs are offered to support general education as well, including English Language
Learning/Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) Title I, and tutorial support at all grade levels. The District
utilizes the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks to inform educational programming in grades PK-12.
This work is supported through the District’s Multi-Year Curriculum Renewal Plan, which includes
multiple phases for curriculum development, review and revision

TEACHING PHILOSOPHY AND METHODS, PRE-K -12
   1. The teaching philosophy and methodology for Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District is
      guided by the District’s mission, vision and core values. These are connected to strategic goals on
      educator growth, curriculum, instruction and school climate and culture. The District’s
      instructional philosophy is embedded in our mission which is to “provide excellence in education
      for all students in an environment that values the individual.” Our philosophy and methodologies
      are guided by the district’s core values, which include student achievement, personal growth,
      partnerships and collaboration, school culture and resources. These core values sustain our teaching
      philosophy and method, serving as underpinnings in five critical areas: The Bridgewater-Raynham
      Regional School Districts focuses on five major Core Values that are critical to providing strong
      effective schools for the students of the Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District in the
      coming years:Improve student achievement
   2. Develop personal growth in the areas of social-emotional and academic development
   3. Collaborate and partner with the communities of Bridgewater and Raynham

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4. Maintain a school climate that is inclusive and meets the needs of diverse learners.
   5. Continue to maintain appropriate facilities, materials, and instruction that support teaching and
      learning.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES
In current practice, the following guiding principles serve as foundations for our instructional philosophy
and methodology:
    Educator Growth: Supporting educator quality through sustained, high quality professional
     development, self-reflection and implementation of the educator evaluation framework. This
     includes collaboration, inquiry and coordination among faculty and staff, which is facilitated
     through professional learning communities, teacher training and high quality professional
     development. Key underpinnings for this guiding principle include increasing competencies in
     professional practice, skill building and research.
    Curriculum: Providing an aligned, coordinated and consistently delivered curriculum that
     increases student achievement and success. This has implications for the academic, social-
     emotional and personal domains of learning. Providing a range of curricular experiences that
     enriches and extends learning for all students—both inside and outside the classroom—is a key
     foundation for this guiding principle.
    Instruction: As means of improving the delivery of instructions by our educators, the
     Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District developed and adopted a consistent instructional
     framework that provides a common language and vision that is shared by all administrators and
     educators within the District in regard to research-based best instructional practices that maximize
     student achievement. The BRRSD Instructional Framework includes concepts such as Standards-
     based planning and teaching, Cognitive context for learning, Differentiated instruction, High order
     questioning strategies & Co-Teaching practices.
    School Climate and Culture: Promoting safe and supportive learning environments that address
     the social, emotional and health needs of all students. This establishes a shared set of expectations
     for behavior, safety and classroom environments that support student learning and wellbeing.
     Connected to this principle are developing behavioral norms and expectations for all students,
     which promote healthy individual and group relationships. Connected to this guiding principle, is
     professional development on Growth Mindset, Positive Behavioral Support for all classrooms and
     ALICE Training.

DISTRICT CURRICULUM GOALS
The curriculum goals, associated with improving student achievement through a PK-12 standards based
program of curriculum, instruction, and assessment, are embedded within the BRRSD District
Improvement Plan. This plan is effective throughout 2021 academic year, however we are currently
working with a DESE certified Planning for Success Model consultant to implement this strategic model
by September of 2019. These goals are linked to the Strategic Plan, which includes related objectives,
strategies/activities, outcomes, key personnel, and timelines. We use the mission, core values and strategic
goals as source factors for the curriculum goals

DISTRICT CURRICULUM GOALS—2016-2020
Goal 1: Refine and expand curricula & instructional practices that will enable students to meet or exceed
the standards in the content area
Goal 2: Increase academic excellence in English Language Arts K-12
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Goal 3:   Increase academic excellence in Mathematics K-12
Goal 4:   Increase academic excellence in Science K-12
Goal 5:   Increase academic excellence in History/Social Studies K-12
Goal 6:   Implement true co-teaching models of instruction
Goal 7:   Implement a Growth Mindset Model
Goal 8:   Focus on an increase rigor within all instructional practices that maximize student achievement

OBJECTIVES OF PROGRAM ELEMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE SUBJECT
FACILITY: 21ST CENTURY LEARNING
These objectives are framed as a set of priority 21st Century Learning Goals for elementary students in
Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District. These goals were developed by the BRRSD
Administrative Council and PreK-4 Lead Teachers. These objectives have direct implications for setting
design priorities for Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District’s renovated and/or new George H.
Mitchell Elementary School.
1. Curiosity, Creativity and Risk-Taking: This involves developing a sense of passion, joy and
excitement in the classroom. Developing adaptability and initiative in student learning is major focus. This
goal focuses on addressing needs across several domains; including creativity, self-direction and inventive
thinking, while instilling a sense of empathy among students.
2. Communication and Collaboration: This is a key goal for the 21st century School, focusing on
building a community of learners in the classroom, involving both students and teachers. This goal builds
capacity for leadership, interpersonal skills, and high productivity. Moreover, it helps facilitate a learning
environment that supports digital-age literacy and differentiation in the classroom. In the affective domain,
this goal helps develop empathy, caring and respect among students.
3. Critical Thinking and Problem Solving: This includes a range of competencies for the 21st century
school, including reflective learning, project-based/experiential approaches, and developing depth of
understanding. Moreover, it focuses on developing a range of processes in the classroom, that probe the
complexities of learning, including a respect for learning, understanding success and failure, learning to
know and do, and learning how to find answers to complex problems.
4. Global Awareness: A key component of the 21st century School is developing global perspectives, as a means of
building capacity for diversity, empathy and acceptance in the classroom. A critical component of this goal is
developing social and personal responsibility in which students embrace multiple perspectives in an increasingly
diverse world. This goal is inextricably linked to enhanced school climate and culture.
5. Mastery of Core Academic Content: Serving as a cornerstone for the 21st century School, this goal
focuses on developing proficiency in core subjects. This includes ELA, foundational reading skills,
writing, and math. A key component is developing comprehension across content areas, while developing
knowledge and strategic learning (Learning how to learn), which becomes increasingly important as
students transition to the upper grades.
6. Self-Awareness and Discovery: This goal focuses on developing a sense of service and compassion
among students. A key component is helping students accept responsibility for their own learning, while
developing skills in prioritizing and planning. These are essential life and career skills for the 21st century.
Service learning goals are a priority in the school improvement plans and the district’s goals.
There are three elementary schools serving grades K-1, 2-4, & K-3, (Merrill/ LaLiberte & Mitchell); and
one intermediate school for grades 4-6 (Williams); two middle schools including grades 5-8 (Raynham
Middle School) and 7-8 (Bridgewater Middle School); and a comprehensive, college preparatory high
school serving grades 9-12 (Bridgewater-Raynham Regional High School). In addition, there is a Special
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Education Preschool program for 3&4 year old students house at the Raynham Middle School and a Post-
High School Transitional Program for young adults ages 18-22, located on the Bridgewater State
University campus.
Advantages of Current and Proposed Grade Configuration:
The current grade configuration at the George H. Mitchell Elementary School would keep the delivery of
service and staffing constant. It would also result in little to no transitioning issues or impact on other
BRRSD buildings. The proposed grade configuration (PreK-2) however, will allow for a more consistent
district-wide grade level alignment. This will create greater equity in regards to programming and delivery
of services within the regional.

2.3 Class Size Policies
    • District Policies, Targets, and Guidelines by Grade:
The Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School Committee has made maintaining reasonable class size as a
priority during each budget season.
The vision of the class size guidelines is to maximize the opportunities for high academic achievement for
all students within the available resources of the school district. The following are the target class size
guidelines:
      Kindergarten- target class size shall be 20-25 students. Inclusion sections with have Special
        Education Teacher & Paraprofessional Support.
      Grades 1-2: target class size shall be 20-25 student. Inclusion sections with have Special Education
        Teacher & Paraprofessional Support.
      Grades 3-6: target class size shall be an average of 22-25 students. Inclusion sections with have
        Special Education Teacher & Paraprofessional Support.
      Middle School: target class size shall be an average of 22-25. Inclusion sections with have Special
        Education Teacher & Paraprofessional Support.
      High School: target size will vary according to sections of the core programs with an average class
        size of 25. Inclusion sections with have Special Education Teacher & Paraprofessional Support.

    •   Current Average Class Size by Grade:
       Classrooms across the district consist of general education, inclusion models and sub-separate
               Elementary Schools                                         Classrooms
  Mitchell Elementary School                          10 K, 10 Grade 1, 9 Grade 2 & 8 Grade 3 Classrooms
  Merrill Elementary School                           7 K & 6 Grade 1 Classrooms
  LaLiberet School                                    7 Grade 2, 7 Grade 3 & 7 Grade 4 Classrooms

     • Proposed Changes:
The George H. Mitchell Elementary School currently services 968 students in a grades K-3. Prior to the
roof collapse in 2015, the GMES also housed an a.m. / p.m. PreK program that currently services 134
student at the Raynham Middle School. The plan moving forward is to reincorporate this the PreK
program back into the GMES academic setting. If the GMES remains a K-3 school, MSBA is projecting a
995 pupil population. This would result in 11 classrooms per grade level (K-3), 4 sub-separate special
education classrooms, and 8 PreK classrooms with an average class size of 22-23 students per classroom. .
If the GMES converts a K-2 school, MSBA is projecting a 740 pupil population. This would result in 11

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classrooms per grade level (K-2), 4 sub-separate special education classrooms, and 8 PreK classrooms
with an average class size of 22-23 students per classroom.
To maintain the current teacher to student ratio the proposed change of 11 classrooms per grade level will
adhere to the current class size guidelines. Each classroom will be staffed with a certified elementary
education teacher. The district is fully committed to the integrated and inclusion approach to special
education, any classroom size larger than the suggested guidelines will diminish the success of the
integrated classrooms. Each inclusionary section with include a certified elementary education and
academic service support through a certified special education teacher and an education support
professional (paraprofessional). The chart below demonstrates 11 classrooms per grade level resulting in a
class size of 22-23 students. It is essential to keep the 11 classrooms per grade level for an equitable ratio
of students and teachers in the classroom and it also allows for flexibility and growth within the BRRSD.
The goal will be to cluster each individual grade level together creating grade specific neighborhoods or
orbits. This will allow for more collective grade level academic and social opportunities. This grade level
organization will also reduce the transition time of grade level specific teachers and service providers such
as special education teachers, educational support professionals, speech and language pathologists and
occupational and physical therapists, thus increasing time on learning.
The following chart provides information on the number of required classrooms based on an enrollment of
(995) or (740) students:

        enrollment              Classrooms/ size             740 Enrollment             Classrooms / size
 Preschool (Special                      8               Preschool (Special                      8
 Education)                                              Education)
 Kindergarten                         11 / 22            Kindergarten                         11 / 22
 Grade 1                              11 / 22            Grade 1                              11 / 22
 Grade 2                              11 / 22            Grade 2                              11 / 22
 Grade 3                              11 / 22

2.4 School Scheduling Method
   • Current Scheduling Methodology:
The Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District has developed a scheduling method for the
elementary schools that addresses educational programming, student achievement and accountability
requirements. The district has established instructional time allocations for core subjects, specialist areas
and teacher planning. These time blocks are generally consistent at the K-4 level. The school day at the
elementary level runs from 9:05 a.m. through 3:25 p.m. There is some variation in the start and ending
times at elementary level.
Advantages: There would be no true differences in regards to daily scheduling when comparing a PreK-3
vs. PreK-2 model. The advantage of remaining PreK-3 would be that it would not impact other buildings
within the district and their schedules. The advantage of a PreK-2 model are more associated with a more
consistent district-wide grade level alignment that would result in greater opportunities for cross grade and
district common planning and more equitable delivery of programming and services. A PreK-2 model
would also assist in minimizing dismissal procedure and traffic flow concerns as it involves 255 fewer
students.
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Disadvantages: The disadvantage of remaining PreK-3 would be that dismissal procedure and traffic flow
issues may still exist as it involves 255 more students than a PreK-2 model. The disadvantages of a PreK-
2 model is that it will impact other buildings as Grade 3 students and staff would be transferred to the
Williams Intermediate School and Grade 6 students and staff would be transferred to the Bridgewater
Middle School. This may result in an impact their schedules, delivery of services and programming.
Core Subjects:
The administrative team at the George H. Mitchell Elementary School plans and sets all academic and
specialist schedules. Teachers do however, assist with student placement.
   •   ELA/Reading/Writing: Instructional time at generally ranges from 75-90 minutes per day/5 days
       a week. Typically, ELA/reading instruction involves an integration of reading, writing and social
       studies, which maximizes time for cross-disciplinary instruction. Depending on the skill being
       developed, ELA instruction is frequently integrated with social studies and science, which
       increases the amount of ELA time.
   •   Mathematics: Instruction is generally 60 minutes per day at the Mitchell Elementary Schools. This
       involves a combination of whole group instruction, guided and independent practice, small groups
       and reflection.
   •   Science: Instruction takes place 2-3 times per week for 45-50 minutes per session at each
       elementary school. The science block includes whole group instruction, small groups, guided
       practice and experiential labs and experiments. Integration of science texts in the ELA block
       increases the amount of instructional time through interdisciplinary learning. Science instruction is
       frequently flipped with social studies to provide more in-depth treatment of key concepts and
       skills.
   •   Social Studies: At the K-3 level, social studies instruction is thematic. The nature of the social
       studies standards in grades K-3 lends itself to a thematic/integrated treatment. In this model, ELA
       texts and writing are linked with social studies content. Social Studies instruction is frequently
       flipped with science to provide more in-depth treatment of key concepts and skills.
Specialist Subjects:
Specialists are shared on an itinerant basis across buildings and their schedule dictates how the school
schedule is developed.
   •   Art: Students meets 1X per week/50 minutes at each grade level; two art teachers work between
       the Mitchell and Merrill Elementary Schools.
   •   Music: Students meet 1X per week/50 minutes at each grade level; two music teachers work
       between the Mitchell and Williams Intermediate Schools.
   •   Physical Education: Students meets 2X per week/50 minutes at each grade level; three teachers
       work between the Mitchell and Merrill Elementary Schools.
   •   Library / Technology: Students meet 1X per week/50 minutes at each grade level; two proctors
       services the Mitchell only
Teacher Planning:
As per the collective bargaining agreement, teachers are provided 50 minutes of planning/preparation per
day. In addition, common planning time is has been worked into all teaching and paraprofessional
schedules however it is not contractual.

Whole School Meetings:

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Three whole school meetings take place on a monthly basis at the Mitchell Elementary School. This
includes Faculty, Professional Learning Community & Grade Level Meetings.

Lunch:
Lunch is scheduled for 25 minutes in the school cafeteria, followed by a 25 minute recess. There 4
individual lunch periods. Paraprofessionals, proctors and some service providers conduct lunch and recess
supervision. A PreK-2 model would result in one less lunch and recess coverage period thus resources
could be reallocated to classrooms as support for learning and instructions.

2.5 Teaching Methodology and Structure
   •    Administrative and Academic Organization/Structure
            • Current Organization:
The Mitchell Elementary School is organized around grade-level teams, which serve as the basis for
Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) at the building level. PLC’s are designed to build capacity for
increased collaboration, inquiry and reflection. Teachers meet regularly to discuss common concerns,
share expertise and work collaboratively to improve teaching and learning. In addition, PLCs are engaged
in curriculum review, instructional planning, analyzing student work and reviewing assessment and
social/emotional data. There is designated space for K-3 classrooms at both Mitchell Elementary School-
Mitchell Elementary School and Bell.
Currently at the Mitchell, there are ten sections of Kindergarten, ten sections of Grade 1, nine sections of
Grade 2 and eight sections of Grade 3. There is some open space for meetings and professional
development, although these rooms are not adequately outfitted for PD. Common planning time is
provided for teachers who co-teach (Special Education Inclusion Sections) 50 minutes/1X to 2X per week.
During PLC and grade level meeting time, teachers typically meet in classrooms or in the cafetorium.
Each grade level team is supported by special education, ELL, Title I teachers and service providers. There
is limited break-out space for support teachers and tutors to meet with students, which is a major need. At
the administrative level, the Mitchell Elementary has a fulltime Principal, Assistant Principals, three
School Psychologists, one Social Worker, two Nurses and two Administrative Assistants. The Principal’s
and Assistant Principal’s Offices are located in separate wings of the building. The BRRSD believes this
design to be unsafe and inefficient. The Counseling Offices and Nursing Stations are also not centrally
located nor are they easily accessible by students or staff.
Proposed Changes:
In regards safety and efficiency, the BRRSD is proposing once central entrance and exit unlike the three
individual entry ways that currently exist. This entrance would consist of a pedestrian trap that would
limit visitor access into the physical building until being permitted to do so. Once a visitor entered the
building, he/she would progress into the Administrative Suite to conduct his/her business. The
Administrative Suite would house the Principal, Assistant Principal, and Counseling Offices as well as the
Administrative Assistants and Nursing Station.
Curriculum Delivery Methods and Practices (Current Practices):
In the BRRSD, curriculum delivery is framed as the implementation and monitoring of the educational
program. Curriculum delivery is a process that relates to achieving learning goals and providing the
necessary supports and accommodations for students. It focuses on building capacity for student
engagement, in terms of the learning experiences and interactions that take place within the designed
curriculum. Curriculum delivery is a dynamic component of the BRRSD Instructional Framework. This
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plan provides the context for a series of complex and interrelated processes encompassing curriculum
development, instruction, student support, professional development, educator collaboration, and access to
resources. Monitoring of the curriculum takes place through the BRRSD’s Assistant Superintendent,
Principals, Department Heads and Lead Teachers. Within this process, several components encompass
curriculum delivery. These include an aligned curriculum, instruction, professional development, review
of multiple data sources, and using a range of instructional resources (published, teacher developed,
supplementary).
Proposed Changes:
The BRRSD believes that curriculum delivery is linked to a range of instructional practices, including as
Standards-based planning and teaching, cognitive context for learning, high order questioning strategies,
co-teaching practices, whole group/direct instruction, guided practice, flexible grouping (strategies/needs-
based groups) small group and individual instruction, and differentiated instruction & learning through a
reading/writing workshop and guided math model. This is enhanced by integrated learning, which extends
across multiple content areas. A key component of curriculum delivery is having structures in place that
support inquiry, reflection and collaboration among teachers and students, and design features that build
capacity for effective teaching and learning. This will include common meeting spaces for professional
development and break-out spaces that support differentiation, all of which are designed to address 21st
Century learning goals and increase student achievement. The addition of small RTI rooms will support
the instruction of all learners within the Tier III model of delivery.

ELA/Literacy:
             • How Curriculum is Delivered:
At the Mitchell Elementary School, a range of instructional approaches are used to deliver the ELA
curriculum. The core academic resource is an anthology entitled Wonders by McGraw Hill. Delivery of
instruction includes direct/whole group instruction, flexible grouping, guided practice, and student
reflection. ELA instruction is provided 5X per week for 90 minutes. Typically, this block integrates
reading, writing and social studies. Explicit/direct instruction is provided on foundational reading skills,
including phonics/word recognition, phonological awareness, print concepts, and fluency. Classroom
instruction is based on the Massachusetts ELA/Literacy Frameworks. In addition to foundational reading
skills, the Frameworks focus on informational and literary text, writing across genres, language
development, and speaking and listening. To facilitate instruction, classrooms incorporate elements of the
reading-writing workshop model as a framework for differentiation. ELA resources include classroom
libraries, leveled readers, and content-area reading to support student learning across the curriculum.

Proposed Changes:
The ELA curriculum has implications for classroom and hallway designs that allows for collaboration,
break-out spaces, storage for classroom libraries, sufficient space for student tutorials. The extended
learning space and enhance the instructional delivery.

Mathematics
            • How Curriculum is Delivered:
At the Mitchell Elementary School, a range of instructional approaches are used to deliver the mathematics
curriculum. Curriculum is based on the 2017 Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks, and includes lessons
on counting, number and operations, operations and algebraic thinking, fractions, measurement and data,
and geometry. The core academic resource is a math series entitled Everyday Math 4 (EM4) by McGraw
Hill. EM4 is supplemented by a digital conceptual math program entitled ST Math. Currently, math
instruction is provided in blocks which meet 5X per week for 60 minutes for EM4 and 2X per week for 45

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minutes for ST Math. Delivery of instruction includes whole group/direct instruction, guided practice,
small groups/learning centers, independent work, and student reflection. Currently, math instruction is
provided in blocks which meet 5X per week for 60 minutes. Within the math block, there has been an
increased focus on higher level thinking strategies. The district has engaged in curriculum mapping and
alignment to support this work. Additional emphasis has been placed on math problem solving, conceptual
understanding and using visual models to guide student learning.
Proposed Changes:
In the proposed building, there is priority need for hallway break-out spaces that support small group
instruction, makerspaces for STEM/STEAM initiatives and project-based learning, and classroom designs
that facilitate collaboration, communication and differentiated instruction.

Science
           • How Curriculum is Delivered:
At the Mitchell Elementary School, teachers use a variety of approaches and resources to deliver the
science curriculum. Currently, science is offered 2-3 times per week for approximately 45 minutes. The
science block includes experiential labs/experiments, which take place in the classroom. Currently, the
science curriculum is organized around three major strands—earth, life and physical science—which will
be expanded as we shift to the new standards. We are in the process of transitioning to the 2016
Massachusetts Science/Technology Engineering Frameworks (Next Generation Science Standards), which
emphasize higher level concepts, scientific practices and student inquiry. We continue to utilize to
standards-based kits as our primary curriculum resources. With the use of science kits, we will remain
focused upon inquiry and scientific practices, which has direct implications for the design and layout of
classrooms.
Proposed Changes:
In the proposed building, there is priority need for classrooms outfitted to support experiential/project-
based science, hallway break-out spaces that support small group instruction, makerspaces for science,
technology/engineering, art and mathematics (STEAM) initiatives. This will require classrooms outfitted
to support experiential/project-based science. A key need in the proposed school is the development of
makerspaces. These shared spaces will provide hands-on, creative ways to encourage students to design,
experiment, build and invent as they deeply engage in science, technology/engineering, art and
mathematics, . Makerspaces are designed for the invention and creation of new ideas. This will help
support the integration of STEAM. Having large collaborative spaces outside of the general education
class allows for more storage of materials and resources, joint classroom educational opportunities and the
visual representation and sharing of student work and ideas from throughout the school building. The
BRRSD would also like to develop an outdoor learning space adjacent to the markerspace. Accessibility
from the markerspace to an outdoor space will be a key component in the design of the building. Outdoor
learning opportunities are important to the school vision and application of hands on science. A future
goal of the BRRSD is to hire certified science teachers who will responsible for the teaching of K-12
STEAM initiatives. We envision these individual co-teaching with the general education teachers within
the markerspaces. The BRRSD have worked closely with professors from Bridgewater State University
who have provided our science and elementary school teachers with valuable STEAM related professional
development opportunities on their campus. The BRRSD will continue to explore further professional
development opportunities in these areas as means of assisting us in the transition from our traditional
science programming to more STEAM related approach. The acquisition of standards-based science kits
will help facilitate the transition to STEAM learning. In addition, classrooms need to be outfitted with
design features that support collaboration, scientific investigations, and experiential learning. This includes

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break-out spaces, common work areas, adequate power, sinks, lab-certified equipment, and sufficient
storage space.
Social Studies
            • How Curriculum is Delivered:
At the Mitchell Elementary School, social studies instruction is thematic. The nature of the social studies
standards in grades at this level lends itself to a thematic/integrated treatment. In this model, ELA texts
and writing are linked with social studies content. Social Studies instruction is frequently flipped with
science to provide more in-depth treatment of key concepts and skills. A high level of integration in social
studies is encouraged. Typically, social studies is integrated into ELA, by linking text, writing and social
studies content. The Massachusetts History/Social Studies Frameworks lend themselves to thematic
teaching, which is a major strength at the elementary level. Some classrooms switch back and forth
between science and social studies, but an integrated approach is key. Teachers use a range teacher
developed units, non-fiction and fiction literature, and supplemental resources to support the social studies
curriculum. Moreover, Bridgewater serves as an effective laboratory for community-based learning,
especially with the focus on local civics and history.
Proposed Changes:
The use of experiential/integrated approaches at the elementary level have implications for classroom,
media center and hallway design & organization, including the use of break-out spaces, common areas,
and sufficient space to display student work.

World Languages
The BRRSD does not currently offer world language until grade 6.Student Guidance and Support
Services
            • Current Services and Programs:
At the Mitchell Elementary School, guidance services are provided by counselors who provide support in
behavioral management, school adjustment, social skills development, social-emotional learning, bullying
prevention and crisis/trauma intervention. These services are coordinated with the principal, classroom
teachers, and specialists. Mitchell Elementary School has three School Psychologist and one Social
Worker that are housed in separate wings of the building. An array of guidance and support services are
provided at Mitchell Elementary School. All BRRSD elementary schools are in the 2nd year of
implementing Positive Behavioral Supports and Interventions (PBSI). Counselors at Mitchell Elementary
School serve as PBIS supports within the building. PBIS is designed to support classroom management,
social- emotional learning and bullying prevention. The objective of PBIS is to promote respectful,
responsibility, and safety learning environments. Mitchell Elementary School-Mitchell Elementary School
have active PBIS teams, focusing on implementation and data collection. The GMES also has a number of
service providers such as 2 speech and language pathologists, 1 occupational therapist and 1 physical
therapists. These individuals provide intervention and supports to students who qualify for such services
within their Individual Education Plans.

Proposed Changes:
In terms of a renovated and/or new facility, there is a need to consolidate counseling and support services
within one centralized area of the building. The BRRSD proposes this be in aforementioned
Administrative Suite. This will include designated spaces for counselors and support staff, break-out
spaces for meetings and consultations, and family spaces for parents/guardians visiting the school. The
new student support area will give staff and students a place to meet confidentially and provide an area

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where students can receive support in a warm and secure area. The new area will also support agencies
from the community that may need to meet with staff or students during the school day. As stated
previously, the goal will be to cluster each individual grade level together creating grade specific
neighborhoods or orbits. This grade level organization will assist in reducing the transition time of grade
level specific service providers such as speech and language pathologists and occupational and physical
therapists when servicing students within their grade level neighborhoods or orbits, thus increasing time on
learning.

2.6 Teacher Planning & Room Assignment Policies
Existing Teacher Planning Spaces & Planning Time:
Teachers are required by contract to have 50 minutes/per day of planning and preparation time. Inclusion
grade-level teams utilize one to two of these 50 minute preparation period as common planning time
opportunities each week. This shared time includes classroom teachers, special educators and
paraprofessionals. PLC Meetings serve as a form of professional development in which a group of
educators meets regularly, shares expertise, and works collaboratively to improve teaching skills and the
academic performance of students. Topics for discussion can include curriculum articulation, lesson
planning, reviewing assessments and student work & data. PLC Meetings take place once a month in lieu
of a contractual faculty meeting.
Proposed Changes:
The new design will include spaces for common planning time, specifically the small storage/office area
between adjoining classrooms. A professional development/multi-purpose room will support grade and
school wide PLC time and professional development. The new area will support the ongoing professional
development and encourage cross content discussions and curriculum planning supporting all
students.Current Professional Development Practices:
In addition to PLCs and grade-level meetings, professional development takes place during the district-
wide professional development week in August prior to the start of the new school. Typically, the BRRSD
alternate between building-level and district-wide modules and common planning opportunities. PD also
takes place at the district level in which teachers represent their grade level and school at Department Head
/ Lead Teacher Meetings. This can include PD on curriculum resource implementation, vertical &
horizontal curriculum alignment, development of assessments, analyzation of data and sharing of best
practices instruction. This work is then shared out at the building level with principals, teachers and
support staff. PD is a key goal in the District and School Improvement Plans, which needs to be sustained
into the future renovated and/or new facility that supports 21st Century goals for educator quality.
Proposed Changes:
A major concern is the lack of common meeting space for professional development, especially with
technology capabilities. This is a challenge in addressing 21st Century goals with our educators. Finding
effective and efficient space for district-wide or building-level PD is has become an increasing concern as
the BRRSD’s faculty & staff numbers grow. A key priority in the renovated and/or new facility is
providing sufficient space, equipment & technology for effective delivery of professional development.
This includes sufficient space for collaboration and inquiry, break-out spaces for small & collective
groups, wall space to display PD products, comfortable seating, climate control, and appropriate
technology infrastructure (internet, interactive boards, projectors & printing capabilities)

2.7 Pre-Kindergarten
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Current offerings, practices, and location
Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District offers both a full day Integrated Pre-Kindergarten classes
to children between the ages of 3 and 5 years old who require special education programming. Each
integrated classroom can accommodate 8 typically developing model students and 7 students with
disabilities. The BRRSD’s Integrated Pre-Kindergarten classrooms were located at the Mitchell
Elementary School prior to the roof collapse in 2015. Since that time, the program has been housed at the
Raynham Middle School. The goal is to reintroduce the program back into the Mitchell Elementary
School as an element of the project. Pre-K currently consist of six partial day classrooms.
Moving forward 8 Pre-K class will be necessary in order for this integrated special education program to
be in compliance under the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education’s regulations. Recently
our Director of Student Services, advocated for additional PreK faculty and staff to sufficiently services
this growing student population. He explained that in March of 2016 the PreK Program began to see an
increase in both its number of students in need of the early intervention service and the severity of the
student’s disabilities. Since the law mandates that the maximum enrollment of students on an IEP within
one Preschool classroom is seven (7) with an additional eight (8) peer students, the program would have
become non-compliant with the law due to the number of “move in” students to our communities of
preschool age. At that time a waiver was filed with DESE. This waiver allowed, the addition of one child
at each level. The approval letter from DESE was clear that the waiver was a temporary solution and that
the District should begin to plan ahead for the possibility of continued growth. The data the BRRSD has
gathered over the last two years represents a drastic increase in PreK students who will soon be entering
the integrated special education program. The data clearly showed that without the creation of 2 additional
PreK classrooms by the 2019-2020, the District will be out of compliance.
How Curriculum is Delivered
All Integrated Pre-Kindergarten classrooms provide rich language based curriculum with a multi-sensory,
developmental, project based approach to learning. The base curriculum materials are from the for Big Day
for Pre-K, which provides instruction materials to develop children’s cognitive, gross motor, fine motor,
social, emotional and language skills. There is also a strong commitment to helping children develop self-
respect, positive peer relationships, self-control and friendships based on mutual respect. Each child’s
unique learning style is respected and nourished. The Pre-Kindergarten teachers provide a warm and
welcome, while at the same time, structured learning environment and follow the Massachusetts
Curriculum Frameworks.
Proposed Changes
The goal in a renovated and/or new facility would be to add Pre-Kindergarten capacity for eight Pre-
Kindergarten classroom in both the PrsK-3 and PreK-2 options. This would allow this integrated program
to service the needs of 112 special education teacher and 128 typical peers. All Pre-Kindergarten
classrooms will have attached toilet rooms as well as two individual attached pullout spaces for discrete
trial intervention and to address the needs of deregulated students. All Pre-Kindergarten classrooms must
have appropriate pre-kindergarten sized furniture and tables. In addition, this new facility must have an
outdoor play area with play equipment that is appropriately sized and is accessible to students with
disabilities. This play area will also need to be enclosed by a protective fence to provide student safety.
The larger school option allows for more collaboration and program planning between Pre-K teachers
and related service staff, such as Occupational Therapists (OT), Physical Therapists (PT), behavior
specialists (BCBAs), etc. These related service providers would have space within the new school
and not have to be itinerant employees, traveling between buildings. The new preschool space will
support transition of special education students into the public school setting with a goal of
continuous support and services.

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2.8 Kindergarten
Current offerings, practices, and location
                 • How Curriculum is Delivered
The Bridgewater-Raynham Regional School District offers a free full-day Kindergarten Program.
Currently, Mitchell Elementary School has ten sections of Kindergarten, which are supported by a full-
time. Three of the ten are identified as inclusion sections to service the needs special needs students. The
structure of the classroom consists of a general education teacher, a special education teacher and/or
paraprofessional. The Kindergarten curriculum is based on the learning standards in the Massachusetts
Curriculum Frameworks. These standards provide a foundation for integration and thematic approaches. A
continuum of learning experiences is provided to address the diverse needs of all students. There is a focus
on high expectations and rigor in addressing the learning standards. Students enter kindergarten with
multiple levels of readiness, interests and needs, which are addressed through the curriculum. A wide
range of instructional approaches are used to deliver the curriculum, including direct/explicit instruction on
foundational concepts and skills, flexible grouping (skills/needs-based), learning centers and child-initiated
activities. Core resources include the Wonders, EM4 & ST Math. . We are in the process of developing
units aligned to the 2016 Science/Technology Engineering Frameworks. In addition, the local community
is used as a resource to support the social studies curriculum.
School readiness is a major consideration in terms of addressing the wide range of social-emotional,
academic and behavioral needs at the kindergarten level, since students enter the program with exposure to
the world that varies widely. The PBIS framework is utilized to support school climate.
Curriculum delivery is monitored through the District’s curriculum renewal plan and indicators established
by Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (ESE). A range of quantitative and qualitative
assessments are used to monitor program quality and student progress. Extensive work has been completed
to develop a high quality kindergarten program. This includes curriculum development, training on
assessments, creating an aligned report card, and providing high quality professional development on math
differentiation and PBIS.

Proposed Changes
The goal in a renovated and/or new facility is to continue to offer full day kindergarten programs to
maximize instruction, coordinate student services, facilitate professional development, and support
program quality. Kindergarten classrooms will require break-out spaces, common areas, sufficient storage,
student cubbies, and classroom designs that facilitate differentiation and project-based learning.

2.9 Lunch Programs
How Program is Delivered for the 995 Pupils at the Mitchell Elementary School: (995) Mitchell
Elementary School
Mitchell Elementary School has a kitchen, cooking preparation areas, meal warming equipment/apparatus
or cold storage. Meal preparation occurs on site. The daily lunch period runs from 11:15 a.m. -1:15 p.m.
and services four separate grade level lunches during that time span.
Proposed Changes for a 995-Pupil School:

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For a building with (995) student enrollment the proposal would still include be a full service kitchen with
storage and food preparation and service onsite. In addition to a full service kitchen, the proposal would
include a cafeteria service area allowing the service of one or multiple lunch periods as appropriate. This
space may be a shared space such as a ‘cafetorium’ with appropriate and flexible uses during non-lunch
periods. The proposal also includes a larger cafetorium space to service two grade levels at a time thus
limiting the lunch period from two hours to one. This will allow resources utilized for lunch and recess
coverage (i.e. paraprofessionals, proctors, etc.) to be reallocated to classroom support.
Inclusive of the proposal of a full service kitchen would include the following kitchen requirements.
A building with enrollment of 995 would necessitate, even with adequate storage, the splitting of cases of
product, repacking and reshipping that product to other buildings in district (shared stock due to lower
enrollment).
    Refrigeration/Cold storage
      Walk-in refrigerator – min 500 cubic feet. With appropriate storage racks.
      Walk-in freezer – min 500 cubic feet. With appropriate storage racks.

          Cooking
          Stove – 4-6 burners
          Oven – 60,000 BTU (per oven) 160 enrollment 1 oven
          Mixer – 20 qt
          Stainless steel mobile mixer table with under shelf
          Food Processor
          Appropriate peripherals including commercial can opener, pots, pans, cutting boards, knives,
           mixing bowls, storage containers

    Sanitation
      High temperature door type dish machines with booster heater with capacity for cutting boards,
        sheet pans and hotel pans
      3-bay sink with disposer
      Vegetable prep sink

    Service Equipment
      Steam Table – 5 well
      Work Table – 3, adjustable height. Stainless
      Countertop Merchandising Service/Display warmer
      One section solid door pass through heated coating cabinet
      General small wares – standard full service kitchen equipment

How Program is Delivered for the 740 Pupils of the Mitchell Elementary School: (740) Mitchell
Elementary School
Mitchell Elementary School has a kitchen, cooking preparation areas, meal warming equipment/apparatus
or cold storage. Meal preparation occurs on site. The daily lunch period runs from 11:15 a.m. -1:15 p.m.
and services four separate grade level (K-3) lunches during that time span.
Proposed Changes for a 740-Pupil School:
For a building with (740) student enrollment the proposal would still include be a full service kitchen with
storage and food preparation and service onsite. In addition to a full service kitchen, the proposal would
include a cafeteria service area allowing the service of one or multiple lunch periods as appropriate. This
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space may be a shared space such as a ‘cafetorium’ with appropriate and flexible uses during non-lunch
periods. The proposal also includes a larger cafetorium space to service two grade levels at a time thus
limiting the lunch period from two hours to one. This will allow resources utilized for lunch and recess
coverage. Cafeteria supervision is primarily provided by educational support professionals
(paraprofessionals). By reducing the lunch periods by one full hour, those educational support
professionals can be reallocated to classrooms to provide academic intervention and supports to students
who require these services through their individual education plans. Reducing the lunch periods also
provides some flexibility should the BRRSD ever explore extending recess or research based movement
times throughout the course of the academic day.
Inclusive of the proposal of a full service kitchen would include the following kitchen requirements.
A building with enrollment of 740 would necessitate, even with adequate storage, the splitting of cases of
product, repacking and reshipping that product to other buildings in district (shared stock due to lower
enrollment).
    Refrigeration/Cold storage
         Walk-in refrigerator – min 500 cubic feet. With appropriate storage racks.
         Walk-in freezer – min 500 cubic feet. With appropriate storage racks.

    Cooking
         Stove – 4-6 burners
         Oven – 60,000 BTU (per oven) 450 enrollment 2 ovens
         Mixer – 20 qt
         Stainless steel mobile mixer table with under shelf
         Food Processor
         Appropriate peripherals including commercial can opener, pots, pans, cutting boards,
           knives, mixing bowls, storage containers
    Sanitation
         High temperature door type dish machines with booster heater with capacity for cutting
             boards, sheet pans and hotel pans
         3-bay sink with disposer
         Vegetable prep sink
    Service Equipment
         Steam Table – 5 well
         Work Table – 3, adjustable height. Stainless
         Countertop Merchandising Service/Display warmer
         One section solid door pass through heated coating cabinet
         General small wares – standard full service kitchen equipment

2.10 Technology Instruction Policies and Program Requirements
Description of Existing Educational Technology:
Currently at the Mitchell Elementary School, each core classroom is equipped with:
   •   Smart Board interactive whiteboard, and projector
   •   Teacher PC connected to classroom sound system
   •   Four to Six Student PC’s and headphones for sound
   •   Access to shared carts of iPads and Chromebook Carts
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•   There was a six computer lab technology suite that was unfortunately damaged due to issues
       associated with the roof collapse
   •   Special Education Classrooms are supplied with their own teacher computers as well as iPads for
       students who required assistive technology.
 Two Technology Proctors are assigned to the Mitchell Elementary School.          These individuals support
classroom activities and the ST Math program.
Proposed Educational Technology Objectives:
All equipment and systems will continue to be managed by the BRRSD Technology Department.
The major objectives for the technology design will be to replicate and expand upon the successes of the
recent upgrades that were made at the Mitchell Elementary School prior to the roof collapse. We will seek
to expand our mobile technology offerings for students by providing one to one access should operational
funding be available for this initiative. Robust wireless network access, interactive whiteboards,
classroom amplification systems and ample access to Internet bandwidth are all necessary and two
traditional computer clusters with one being locate within the Media Center. These one these traditional
labs would be utilized for our ST Math program and the one in the Media Center would be for research
purposes. These lab would be essential especially if a one to one model initiative cannot be implemented
in grades K-4. They are also important to have from a professional development and community outreach
perspective. Presenters often use our schools to provide in service to our staff and members of the
community. Desktop labs are often required for individual that do not have wireless devices.

2.11 Media Center/Library
Current Programming:
The Mitchell Elementary School has an identified library, however it very limited space. The Mitchell
Elementary School has its own Library/Media Proctor who work across all elementary schools.
Library/Media Proctor also receives assistance from parent volunteers and other support staff in
completing library tasks. The curriculum is delivered through group read-alouds, instruction on
information/technology literacy skills, and assisting students with accessing resources for projects or class
assignments.
Current Staffing:
Currently serving the Mitchell Elementary School is 1 FTE .

Current Hours:
The Mitchell Elementary Library/Media Center is open during schools of 9:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. The
BRRSD would however, like to explore before and after school student and community access options.
Proposed Changes:
A priority need in the renovated and/or new facility is providing a library/media center that addresses 21st
Century learning goals. This includes shifting the paradigm to a learning commons model, as a way of
building collaboration and communication. The proposed library should have flexible space with movable
chairs and tables, sufficient storage, break-out spaces for projects, whiteboards, and a range of digital and
print resources.
Narrative Description of Educational Activities:

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A typical day for students using a library/media center building around a learning commons model
will allow for students using computers and reference materials to do research or class assignments,
reading and checking out magazines and books to take home and using computers or technology
devices that can be checked out to work on creative writing or other educational learning programs.
These activities may occur during regularly scheduled classroom academic ‘library/media’ blocks or
within other types of breakout or free periods. Additionally, before and after school the library center
can be a meeting place for students to work cooperatively on school assignments or a quiet place to
do homework or read. The library/media center will also be part of the school community offering
parents/guardians an opportunity to engage in the school day by volunteering in the center to support
classroom teachers and the media specialist with projects and research.
2.12 Visual Art Programs
How Curriculum is Delivered:
All elementary schools provide 50 minutes of art instruction once a week. Mitchell Elementary School has
2 FTE art teachers. There are designated art classrooms the Mitchell Elementary Schools. The art
curriculum is organized around key art domains based on the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks.
These include drawing, painting, sculpture, printmaking and collage. Connections are made with the
community, such as Bridgewater State University and the Senior Center as resources for the art
curriculum. Student work is regularly displayed throughout the building so adequate wall space is a
necessity. Mitchell Elementary School students participate in a district-wide art festival each April. Art
teachers regularly collaborate to coordinate the delivery of the visual arts curriculum. This includes
curriculum mapping, alignment and sharing lessons.
Proposed Changes:
A priority need in the renovated/and or new facility is for designated art classrooms in close proximity to
general education classrooms to support integrated learning and collaboration. This will help promote the
transition to STEAM learning at the elementary level, with art serving as medium for design, creation,
reflection and presentation. Art classrooms in the renovated/and or new facility will require sufficient
studio space, display walls, storage areas, and preparation areas with sinks.
2.13 Music/Performing Arts Programs
How Curriculum is Delivered:
All Mitchell Elementary School students participate in music instruction for 50 minutes once a week.
There are 2FT music teachers at the Mitchell Elementary School. It has dedicated space for music
instruction however, there is very limited space for school performance within the building. Music
instruction is based on the Massachusetts Arts Curriculum Frameworks, with lessons focusing on key
music concepts and skills. Music programs are provided for parents and the school community on a
regular basis. BRRSD music teachers meet on a periodic basis to coordinate curriculum, reflect on
instruction, share ideas, and plan community programs.
Proposed Changes:
The new design will include performance areas with the flexibility to be used as classrooms and school
wide concerts. There will be ample space for creative movement, dance instruction, and instrument
storage. The classrooms will be able to support gross motor skills as part of the music instruction.

2.14 Physical Education Programs
How Curriculum is Delivered:

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