FOOD SAFETY PLAN For Northeastern Nevada Juvenile Center - THIS PLAN IS EFFECTIVE: AUGUST 7, 2012 - Elko County

 
FOOD SAFETY PLAN For Northeastern Nevada Juvenile Center - THIS PLAN IS EFFECTIVE: AUGUST 7, 2012 - Elko County
FOOD SAFETY PLAN
                     HACCP

   (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point)

                      For
Northeastern Nevada Juvenile Center

   THIS PLAN IS EFFECTIVE: AUGUST 7, 2012
Food Safety Plan
                                            Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION:
 Description of Food Safety Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1
 Description of Sponsor and Facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 1

SECTION 1:
 Standard Operating Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 2

SECTION 2:
 Categorizing Menu Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 44

SECTION 3:
 Identifying Control Measures (CCPs and SOPs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 46

SECTION 4:
 Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 53

SECTION 5:
 Corrective Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 56

SECTION 6:
 Recordkeeping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 62

SECTION 7:
 Review of Food Safety System and Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 74
Description of Food Safety Plan

This plan was developed July, 2012 by Patricia Plaster, Detention Director, for Northeastern
Nevada Juvenile Center. With much input from Detention Center Shift Supervisors. The Food
Safety Plan developed by Robbin Pedrett, Vice Principal, for Pyramid Lake Schools was used
as a guideline along with the USDA Food and Nutrition Services “Serving it Safe” guidelines.

All standards in this food safety plan are in accordance with the current Nevada Food Code.
Minimum cooking temperatures used are those required by Child Nutrition & Wellness, Nevada
State Department of Education which meet or exceed those required by the current Nevada
Food Code.

Description of Sponsor and School/Facility
1. Name of Sponsor:
       NNJC is a local government Juvenile Detention Center, under the jurisdiction of the
       Fourth Judicial District Court, Elko, Nevada.

2. Name of Site:
      Northeastern Nevada Juvenile Center

3. Name and Title of Lead Food Service Employee for this Site:
      Mrs. Juanita Coochyouma

4. Type of Site:
       Self Contained Kitchen

5. Meals served:
       Breakfast is served daily
       Lunch is served daily
       Dinner is served daily
       Mid morning and After School Snacks are provided to all

6. Number of Food Service Employees at this Site:
      10 - Detention Officer all have food service duties and responsibilities

                                             Page 1
SECTION 1:
                                   Standard Operating Procedures

The following Standard Operating Procedures have been adapted from the National Food Service
Management Institute (NFSMI) for use in Nevada schools.

Category                                                 Reference Number and Title                                      Page No

Multiple
1 - Washing Hands . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 3
2 - Using Suitable Utensils When Handling Ready-to-Eat Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 5
3 - Personal Hygiene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 7
4 - Storing and Using Poisonous or Toxic Chemicals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 9
5 - Using and Calibrating Food Thermometers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 11
6 - Preventing Cross-Contamination during Storage and Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 14
7 - Cleaning and, Sanitizing Food Contact Surfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 16

Receiving
8 - Receiving Deliveries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 20
9 - Handling a Food Recall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 22

Preparing
10- Washing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 24
11 - Controlling Time and Temperature during Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 26

Cooking
12 - Cooking Potentially Hazardous Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 28

Holding
13 - Holding Hot and Cold Potentially Hazardous Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 30
14 - Using Time Alone as a Public Health Control to limit Bacteria Growth in
     Potentially Hazardous Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 32
15 - Date Marking Ready-to-Eat, Potentially Hazardous Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 34

Serving
16 - Serving Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 36
17 – Preventing Cross-Contamination at the Service Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 38

Cooling
18 - Cooling Potentially Hazardous Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 40

Reheating
20 ~ Reheating Potentially Hazardous Food . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 42

                                                                 Page 2
HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedure

1 - Washing Hands

Purpose: To prevent food-borne illness caused by contaminated hands.

Scope: This procedure applies to food service workers who handle, prepare, and serve food.

Keywords: Hand-washing, Cross-Contamination

Instructions:
I. Train food service workers or other individuals that prepare or serve food on proper hand-washing.
Training may include viewing a hand-washing video, a demonstration of proper hand-washing
procedures, or other effective training tools.
2. Post hand-washing signs or posters in a language understood by all food service staff near all hand-
washing sinks, in food preparation areas, and restrooms.
3. Use designated hand-washing sinks for hand-washing only. Do not use food preparation, utility, and
dishwashing sinks for hand-washing.
4. Provide warm running water, soap, and single-use paper towels or warm air hand dryer. If paper towels
are used, provide a waste container at each hand-washing sink or near the door in restrooms.
5. Keep hand-washing sinks accessible anytime employees are present.
6. Wash hands:
     • Before starting work
     • During food preparation
     • When moving from one food preparation area to another
     • Before putting on or changing gloves
     • After using the toilet
     • After sneezing, coughing, Of using a handkerchief or tissue
     • After touching hair, face, or body
     • After smoking, eating, drinking, or chewing gum or tobacco
     • After handling raw meats, poultry, or fish
     • After any clean up activity such as sweeping, mopping, or wiping counters
     • After touching dirty dishes, equipment, or utensils
     • After handling trash
     • After handling money
     • After any time the hands may become contaminated

                                                Page 3
1 - Washing Hands, continued (SOP)

7. Follow proper hand-washing procedures as indicated below:
    • Wet hands and forearms with warm, running water (at least 110°F) and apply soap.
    • Scrub lathered hands and forearms, under fingernails, and between fingers for at least
        20 seconds. Rinse thoroughly under warm running water for 5-10 seconds.
    • Dry hands and forearms thoroughly with single-use paper towels.
    • Dry hands for at least 30 seconds if using a warm air hand dryer.
    • Turn off water using paper towels.
    • Use paper towel to open door when exiting the restroom.
8. Follow FDA recommendations when using hand sanitizers. These recommendations are as follows:
    • Use hand sanitizers only after hands have been properly washed and dried.
    • Use only hand sanitizers that comply with the current Nevada Food Code. Confirm with the
        manufacturers that the hand sanitizers used meet these requirements. Use hand sanitizers in the
        manner specified by the manufacturer.

Monitoring:
A designated employee will visually observe the hand-washing practices of the any staff working in food
service during all hours of operation. In addition, the designated employee will visually observe that
hand-washing sinks are properly supplied during all hours of operation.

Corrective Action:
Employees that are observed not washing their hands at the appropriate times or using the proper
procedure will be asked to wash their hands immediately. Employee will be retrained to ensure proper
hand-washing procedure.

Verification and Record Keeping:
A supervisory or other designated employee will complete the Food Safety Checklist to indicate that
monitoring is being conducted as specified. The Food Safety Checklist will be maintained with other
records for a minimum of 3 years and until given permission by a representative of Child Nutrition &
Wellness, Nevada State Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                 Page 4
HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedure

2 - Using Suitable Utensils When Handling Ready-to-Eat Foods

Purpose: To prevent food-borne illness caused by hand-to-food cross-contamination

Scope: This procedure applies to food service workers who prepare, handle, or serve food.

Key Words: Ready-to-Eat Food, Cross-Contamination

Instructions:
l. Use proper hand-washing procedures to wash hands and exposed arms prior to preparing or handling
food or at any time when the hands may have become contaminated.
2. Do not use bare hands to handle ready-to-eat foods at any time.
3. Use suitable utensils when working with ready-to-eat food. Suitable utensils may include:
     • Single-use gloves
     • Deli tissue
     • Foil wrap
     • Tongs, spoodles, spoons, and spatulas
4. Hands should be washed and gloves changed:
     • Before beginning food preparation
     • Before beginning a food handling task
     • After touching equipment (such as refrigerator doors) or utensils that have not been cleaned and
         sanitized
     • After contacting chemicals
     • After interruptions in food preparation occur, such as when answering the telephone or checking
         in a delivery
     • When a glove is torn, damaged, or soiled
     • Anytime contamination of a glove might have occurred

                                                Page 5
2 – Using Suitable Utensils When Handling Ready-to-Eat Foods, continued
(SOP)

Monitoring:
A supervisory or other designated employee will visually observe food service workers during all hours
of operation to ensure that gloves or suitable utensils are used and changed at the appropriate times.

Corrective Action:
Employees observed touching ready-to-eat food with bare hands will be retrained at the time of the
incident. Ready-to-eat food touched with bare hands will be discarded.

Verification and Record Keeping:
A supervisory or other designated employee will verify that food service workers are following this
policy by visually observing the workers during all hours of operation and by completing the Food Safety
Checklist. Food service workers will record any discarded food on the Damaged or Discarded Product
Log. A supervisory employee will verify that correct procedures are followed and logs are maintained
correctly by reviewing, initialing, and dating the Damaged and Discarded Product Log. Both the checklist
and the log will be maintained with other records for a minimum of 3 years or until given permission by
the Child Nutrition and Wellness, Nevada State Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                 Page 6
HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedure
3 - Personal Hygiene

Purpose: To prevent contamination of food caused by food service employees.

Scope: This procedure applies to food service workers who handle, prepare, or serve food.

Key Words: Personal Hygiene, Cross-Contamination, Contamination

Instructions:
I. Train food service workers on the employee health policy and on practicing good personal hygiene.
2. Follow the employee health policy.
3. Report to work in good health, clean, and dressed in clean attire.
4. Change apron when it becomes soiled.
5. Wash hands properly, frequently, and at the appropriate times.
6. Keep fingernails trimmed, filed, and maintained so that the edges are cleanable and not rough.
7. Do not wear artificial fingernails and fingernail polish.
8. Do not wear any jewelry on arms or hands except for a plain ring such as a wedding band.
9. Treat and bandage wounds and sores immediately. When hands are bandaged, single-use gloves must be
worn.
10. Cover a lesion containing secretion with a bandage. If the lesion is on a hand or wrist, cover with an
impermeable cover such as a finger cot or stall and a single-use glove.
11. Eat, drink, or chew gum only in designated areas where food or food contact surfaces may not become
contaminated.
12. Use tobacco products outside of detention premises as determined by department polices.
13. Taste food(s) using the following procedures.
     • Place a small amount of food into a separate container.
     • Step away from exposed food and food contact surfaces.
     • Use a teaspoon to taste the food. Remove the used teaspoon and container to the dish
          washing area. The soiled teaspoon shall not be reused for tasting before washing and sanitizing.
     • Wash hands immediately.
14. Wear hairnets or clean caps designed to effectively restrain all hair while in the kitchen.
15. Follow local public health requirements for personal hygiene.

                                                  Page 7
-3 - Personal Hygiene, continued (SOP)

Monitoring:
A supervisor or other designated employee will inspect workers when they report to work to be sure that
each employee is following this SOP. The supervisor or designated employee will monitor that all food
service workers are adhering to the personal hygiene policy during all hours of operation.

Corrective Action:
Any food service worker found not following this procedure will be retrained at the time of the incident
and affected food will be discarded.

Verification and Record Keeping:
A supervisor or other designated employee will verify that food service workers are following this policy
by visually observing the workers during all hours of operation and by completing the Food Safety
Checklist. Food service workers will record any discarded food on the Damaged or Discarded Product
Log. A supervisory employee will verify that correct procedures are followed and logs are maintained
correctly by reviewing, initialing, and dating the Damaged and Discarded Product Log. Both the checklist
and the log will be maintained with other records for a minimum of 3 years or until given permission by
the Child Nutrition and Wellness, Nevada Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                 Page 8
HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedure

4 - Storing and Using Poisonous or Toxic Chemicals

Purpose: To prevent food-borne illness caused by chemical contamination.

Scope: This procedure applies to food service workers who use chemicals in the kitchen.

Keywords: Chemicals, Cross-Contamination, Contamination, Material Safety Data Sheet

Instructions:
I. Train food service workers on the proper use and storage of chemicals and on the proper use of chemical test
kits and first aid as specified in this procedure.
2. Designate a location for storing the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS).
3. Label and date all poisonous or toxic chemicals with the common name of the substance.
4. Store all chemicals in a designated secured area away from and below food and food contact surfaces using
spacing or partitioning.
5. Store only chemicals that are necessary to the operation and maintenance of the kitchen.
6. Mix, test, and· use sanitizing solutions as recommended by the manufacturer, State, or local health
department.
7. Use the appropriate chemical test kit to measure the concentration of sanitizer to ensure sanitizer is mixed
correctly.
8. Follow manufacturer's directions for specific mixing, storing, and first aid instructions on chemicals.
9. Do not use chemical containers for storing food or water.
10. Use only hand sanitizers that comply with the current Nevada Food Code, Confirm with the manufacturer
that the hand sanitizers .used meet the requirements of the current Nevada Food Code.
II. Label and store first aid supplies in a container that is located away from food or food contact surfaces.
12. Label and store medication for juveniles or employees in a separate refrigerator located away from the
food service area. Juvenile medications are stored in the Medical-room per department policy and any staff
medication needing refrigeration will be stored in the staff Break-room. Per department policy no medication
will be stored in a food service area.
13. All refrigerated medicines will be in a covered, leak proof container where they are not accessible to
juveniles and cannot contaminate food.

                                                    Page 9
4 - Storing and Using Poisonous or Toxic Chemicals, continued (SOP)

Monitoring:
Food service workers and supervisory employees will visually observe that chemicals are being stored,
labeled, and used properly during all hours of operation.

Corrective Action:
Discard any food contaminated by chemicals. Label and/or properly store any unlabeled or misplaced
chemicals.

Verification and Record Keeping:
A supervisory or other designated employee will verify that food service workers are following this
policy by visually observing the workers during all hours of operation and by completing the Food Safety
Checklist. Food service workers will record any discarded food on the Damaged or Discarded Product
Log. A supervisory employee will verify that correct procedures are followed and logs are maintained
correctly by reviewing, initialing, and dating the Damaged and Discarded Product Log. Both the checklist
and the log will be maintained with other records for a minimum of 3 years or until given permission by a
representative of Child Nutrition & Wellness, Nevada State Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                Page 10
HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedure

5 - Using and Calibrating Food Thermometers

PURPOSE: To prevent food-borne illness by ensuring that the appropriate type of thermometer
is used to measure internal product temperatures and that thermometers used are correctly calibrated for
accuracy.

SCOPE: This procedure applies to food service workers who prepare, cook, and cool food.

KEY WORDS: Thermometers, Calibration

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Train food service workers on the proper procedures in using and calibrating food thermometers.
2. Follow the food thermometer manufacturer's instructions for use. Use a food thermometer that
measures temperatures from 0 °F (-18 °C) to 220 °F (104 °C) and is appropriate for the temperature being
taken. For example:
• . Temperatures of individual thin products, such as hamburgers, chicken breasts, filets, nuggets, hot
dogs, and sausage patties, must be taken using a thermistor or thermocouple with a thin probe. If a
bimetallic, dial-faced stem thermometer or digital stem thermometer is used, patties should be stacked and
the stem should be inserted through
the center of several portions.
• Bimetallic, dial-faced stem thermometers are most appropriate for measuring temperatures of thick
foods. A dimple mark located on the stem of the thermometer indicates the maximum food thickness that
can be accurately measured. In the absence of a dimple mark, assure the thermometer is inserted in food
at least 1 ½ inches above the tip.
• Use only oven-safe, bimetallic thermometers when measuring temperatures of food while cooking in an
oven.
3. Have food thermometers easily-accessible to food service workers during all hours of operation. .
4. Clean and sanitize food thermometers before each use.
• Wash probe of thermometer by hand with warm, soapy water. Do NOT immerse dial in water.
• Rinse probe with clean, warm water.
• Sanitize probe with sanitizing solution approved for food contact surfaces or with alcohol swab.
• Air, dry to minimize the risk of re-contamination.
• Store in clean case or sleeve.

                                                 Page 11
5 - Using and Calibrating Food Thermometers continued, (SOP)

INSTRUCTIONS, continued:
5. Store food thermometers in an area that is clean and where they are not subject to contamination or
frequent jostling.
6. Food service workers will use either the ice-point method or boiling-point method to verify the
accuracy of food thermometers. This is known as calibrating the thermometer.
• To calibrate using ice-point method;
          a. Insert the thermometer probe into a cup of crushed ice.
          b. Add enough cold water to remove any air pockets that might remain.
          c. Allow the temperature reading to stabilize before reading temperature.
          Temperature measurement should be 32 °F (± 2 °F) [or 0 °C (± 1°C)]. If not, calibrate to this
          temperature as directed below.
• To calibrate using boi1ing-point method:
          a. Immerse at least the first two inches of the probe into boiling water.
          b. Allow -the temperature reading to stabilize before reading temperature. Reading should be 212
          °F (± 2 °F) [or 100°C (± 1°C)]. If not, calibrate to this temperature as directed below.
• To calibrate thermometers to the correct temperatures using a:
          a. Bimetallic, stemmed, dial-faced thermometer, adjust the temperature by turning the dial while
          securing the calibration nut (located just under or below the dial) with pliers or a wrench..
          b. Digital thermometer with a reset button, adjust the thermometer according to manufacturer's
          instructions.
• If an inaccurate thermometer cannot be adjusted on-site, discontinue using it and follow the
manufacturer's instructions for having the thermometer calibrated.

MONITORING:
I. Food service workers will check the accuracy of the food thermometers:
        • At regular intervals (at least once every two weeks)
        • If dropped
        • If used to measure extreme temperatures, such as in an oven
        • Whenever accuracy is in question
2. Supervisory employees and food service workers will visually observe that thermometers are being
used and calibrated correctly during all hours of operation.

CORRECTIVE ACTION:
I. Retrain any food service worker found not following the procedures of this SOP.
2. Retrain workers who are using or calibrating food thermometers improperly.

                                                 Page 12
5 - Using and Calibrating Food Thermometers continued, (SOP)

VERIFICATION AND RECORD KEEPING:
Food service workers will record the calibration temperature and any corrective action taken, if
applicable, on the Thermometer Calibration Log each time a thermometer is calibrated, A supervisory or
other designated employee will verify that food service workers are using and calibrating thermometers
properly by visually observing the employees during the calibration process and while thermometers are
being used. Calibration Logs will be reviewed by a supervisory employee and will be maintained with
other records for a minimum of 3 years, or until given permission by a representative of Child Nutrition &
Wellness, Nevada State Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                 Page 13
HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedure

6 - Preventing Cross-Contamination during Storage and Preparation

PURPOSE: To reduce food-borne illness by preventing unintentional contamination of food.

SCOPE: This procedure applies to food service workers or other employees who are responsible for
receiving, storing, preparing, and serving food.

KEY WORDS: Cross-Contamination, Preparation, Contamination, Storage, Receiving

INSTRUCTIONS:
I. Train food service workers on the proper procedures to prevent cross-contamination during storage and
preparation.
2. Wash hands properly using instructions in the Washing Hands SOP.
3. Avoid touching ready-to-eat food with bare hands, Follow instructions in the Using Suitable Utensils
When Handling Ready-To-Eat Foods SOP.
4. Separate raw animal foods from ready-to-eat foods during receiving, storage, and preparation. For
example, eggs, fish, meat, and poultry should be separated from lettuce, cut melons and luncheon meats.
5. Separate different types of raw animal foods, such as eggs, fish, meat, and poultry from each other,
except when combined in recipes.
6. Store raw animal foods in refrigerators or walk-in coolers by placing the raw animal foods on shelves
in order of cooking temperatures with the raw animal food requiring the highest cooking temperature on
the lowest shelf.. For example, raw chicken should be stored below ground beef.
7. Separate unwashed fruits and vegetables from washed fruits and vegetables and other ready-to-eat
foods.
8. Use only dry, cleaned, and sanitized equipment and utensils. Follow instructions, in the "Cleaning and
Sanitizing Food Contact Surfaces" SOP.
9. Clean and sanitize utensils, knives, pans, cutting boards and other food contact surfaces between
handling of raw and cooked products.
10. Touch only those surfaces of equipment and utensils that will not come in direct contact with food.
11. Place food in covered containers, or packages, except during cooling, and store in the refrigerator or
cooler.
12. Designate an upper shelf of a refrigerator or walk-in cooler as the "cooling" shelf. Uncover containers
of food during the initial quick cool-down phase to facilitate cooling.
13. Clean the exterior surfaces of food containers, such as cans and jars, of visible soil before opening.

                                                 Page 14
6 - Preventing Cross-Contamination during Storage and Preparation,
continued (SOP)

MONITORING:
A designated food service worker will continually monitor food storage and preparation to ensure that
food is not cross-contaminated.

CORRECTIVE ACTION:
I. Retrain any food service workers found not following the procedures in this SOP.
2. Separate foods found improperly stored.
3. Discard ready-to-eat foods that are contaminated by raw eggs, raw fish, raw meat, or raw poultry..

VERIFICATION AND RECORD KEEPING:
A supervisory or other designated employee will ensure that all workers are following these procedures
by visually observing food service staff and by completing the Food Safety Checklist.
Food service workers will document any discarded food on the Damaged and Discarded Product Log. A
supervisory employee will verify that appropriate corrective actions are being taken by reviewing,
initialing, and dating the Damaged and Discarded Product Log. The checklist and log will be maintained
with other records for a minimum of 3 years or until given permission by a representative of Child
Nutrition & Wellness, Nevada State Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                Page 15
HACCP:-Based Standard Operating Procedure

7 - Cleaning and Sanitizing Food Contact Surfaces

PURPOSE: To prevent food-borne illness by ensuring that all food contact surfaces are properly cleaned
and sanitized.

SCOPE: This procedure applies to food service workers involved in cleaning and sanitizing food contact
surfaces.

KEY WORDS: Food Contact Surface, Cleaning, Sanitizing

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Train food service workers who prepare or serve food or who clean areas where foods are prepared and
served on the proper procedures used to dean and sanitize food contact surfaces.
2. Follow manufacturer's instructions regarding the use and maintenance of equipment and use of
chemicals for cleaning and sanitizing food contact surfaces. Refer to Storing and Using Poisonous or
Toxic Chemicals SOP.
3. Wash, rinse, and sanitize food contact surfaces of sinks, tables, cutting boards, equipment, utensils,
thermometers, carts, and equipment:
        • Before each use
        • Between uses when preparing different types of raw animal foods, such as eggs, fish, meat, and
        poultry
        • Between uses when preparing ready-to-eat foods and raw animal foods, such as eggs, fish, meat, and
        poultry
        • Any time contamination occurs or is suspected
4. Wash, rinse, and sanitize food contact surfaces of sinks, tables, cutting boards, equipment, utensils,
thermometers, carts, and equipment using the following procedure:
        • Wash surface with detergent solution.
        • Rinse surface with clean water.
          Sanitize surface using a sanitizing solution mixed at a concentration specified on the
        manufacturer's label.
        • Place wet items in a manner to allow air drying.

                                                      Page 16
(

7 – Cleaning and Sanitizing Food Contact Surfaces, continued (SOP)

INSTRUCTIONS, continued:
5. If a 3-compartment sink is used for utensils, cutting boards and removable parts of equipment, setup
and use the sink in the following manner:
         • In the first compartment, wash with a clean detergent solution at or above 110°F or at the
         temperature specified by the detergent manufacturer.
         • In the second compar1ment, rinse with clean water.
         • In the third compar1ment, sanitize with a chemical sanitizing solution mixed at a concentration
         specified on the manufacturer's label or by immersing in hot water at or above 171°F for 30
         seconds. Test the sanitizer concentration using an appropriate test kit.
         • Air dry items prior to storing.
6. If a mechanical dishwashing machine is used for utensils, cutting boards and removable parts of
equipment:
         • Verify the information on the data plate with the dishwashing machine manufacturer.
         • Refer to the information on the data plate for determining wash, rinse, and sanitization (final)
         rinse temperatures; sanitizing solution concentrations; and water pressures, if applicable.
         • Follow manufacturer's instructions for use.
         • If using hot water to sanitize, and following the 1999 Nevada Food Code:
                  ° for a stationary, single-temperature machine, the temperature of fresh hot water
                  sanitizing rinse as it enters the manifold is not more than 194°F and not less than 165°F.
                  For all other dishwashing machines with variable wash and rinse temperatures, the
                  temperature of fresh hot water sanitizing rinse as it enters the manifold is not more than
                  194°F and not less than 180°F.
         • If using chemical to sanitize and following the 1999 Nevada Food Code:
                  ° Chlorine solution must have the following minimum temperatures and concentration:
        Minimum                                      Minimum Temperature
       Concentration

           Mg/L                        pH 10 or Less                            pH 8 or Less

             25                            120 °F                                  120 °F

             50                            100 °F                                   75 °F

             100                            55 °F                                   55 °F

                 ° Iodine solution should have a minimum temperature of 75°F, a pH of5.0 or less and
                   a concentration between 12.5 mg/L and 25 mg/L.
                 ° Quaternary ammonia should have a minimum temperature of 75°F, a concentration
                  as indicated by the manufacturer and used only in water with 500 mg/L hardness or less.
        • Air dry utensils and other food contact items prior to storing.

                                                 Page 17
7 - Cleaning and Sanitizing Food Contact Surfaces, continued (SOP)

INSTRUCTIONS, continued:
     • At end of day, remove strainer screens and clean. Inspect upper and lower sprayer wash arms
     and nozzles to assure they are not clogged with food or plastic debris. Remove the wash arms to
     remove any food build up. Use, chemical de-lime agent periodically as needed if lime build up
     occurs. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for cleaning and maintaining dishwashing machine.

MONITORING:
Food service workers will:
I. During all hours of operation, visually and physically inspect food contact surfaces of equipment and
utensils to ensure that the surfaces are clean.
2. In a 3-compartment sink, on a daily basis:
     • Visually monitor that the water in each compartment is clean.
     • Take the water temperature in the first compartment of the sink by using a cal1brated
         thermometer.
     • If using chemicals to sanitize, test the sanitizer concentration by using the appropriate test kit for
         the chemical.
         • If using hot water to sanitize, use a calibrated thermometer to measure the water temperature.
         Refer to Using and Calibrating Food Thermometers SOPs.
3. In a dishwashing machine, on a daily basis:
         • Visually monitor that the water and the interior parts of the machine are clean and free of debris.
         • Continually monitor the temperature and pressure gauges, if applicable, to ensure that the
         machine is operating according to the data plate.
         • For hot water sanitizing dishwashing machine, ensure that food contact surfaces, are reaching
         the appropriate temperature by monitoring temperature gauges, by using heat sensitive tape,
         and/or by using maximum registering thermometers (e.g. T-sticks).
         • For chemical sanitizing dishwashing machine, check the sanitizer concentration on a recently
         washed food-contact surface using an appropriate test kit.

CORRECTIVE ACTION:
1. Retrain any food service worker found not following the procedures in this SOP.
2. Wash, rinse, and sanitize dirty food contact surfaces. Sanitize food contact surfaces if it is discovered
that the surfaces were not properly sanitized. Discard food that comes in contact with food contact
surfaces that have not been sanitized properly.

                                                  Page 18
7 – Cleaning and Sanitizing Food Contact Surfaces, continued (SOP)

CORRECTIVE ACTION continued:
3. For a 3-compartment sink:
         • Drain and refill compartments periodically and as needed to keep the water clean.
         • Adjust the water temperature by adding hot water until the desired temperature is reached.
         • Add more sanitizer or water, as appropriate, until the proper concentration is achieved.
4. For a dishwashing machine:
         • Drain and refill the machine periodically and as needed to keep the water clean.
         • Contact the appropriate individual(s) to have the machine repaired if the machine is not reaching
         the proper wash temperature indicated on the data plate.
         • For a hot water sanitizing dishwashing machine, retest temperatures by running the machine
         again. if the appropriate water temperature is still not achieved on the second run, contact the
         appropriate individual(s) to have the machine repaired. Wash, rinse, and sanitize in the 3-
         compartment sink until the machine is repaired or use disposable single service/single-use items
         if a 3-compartment sink is not available.
         • For a chemical sanitizing dishwashing machine, check the level of sanitizer remaining in bulk
         container. Fill, if needed. "Prime" the machine according to the manufacturer's instructions to
         ensure that the sanitizer is being pumped through the machine. Retest if the proper sanitizer
         concentration level is not achieved, stop using the machine and contact the appropriate
         individual(s) to have it repaired. Use a 3-compaliment sink to wash, rinse, and sanitize until the
         machine is repaired.

VERIFICATION AND RECORD KEEPING:
Food service workers will record monitoring activities and any corrective action taken on the appropriate
temperature log. A supervisory or other designated employee will verify that food service workers have
taken the required temperatures and tested the sanitizer concentration by visually monitoring food service
workers during the shift and reviewing, initialing, and dating the temperature logs). A supervisory or
other designated employee will complete the Food Safety Checklist. The logs and checklists will be
maintained with other records for at least 3years or until given permission by a representative of Child
Nutrition & Wellness, Nevada State Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                 Page 19
HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedure
8 - Receiving Deliveries

Purpose: To ensure that all food is fresh and safe when it enters the food service operation and is stored
safely and quickly.

Scope: This procedure applies to food service workers who handle, prepare, or serve food.

Key Words: Cross-Contamination, Temperatures, Receiving, Holding, Frozen Goods,
Delivery

Instructions:
I. Train food service workers who accept deliveries on proper receiving procedures.
2. Schedule deliveries to arrive at designated times during operational hours when possible.
3. Post the delivery schedule, including the names of vendors, days and times of deliveries, and drivers'
names.
4. Establish a rejection policy to ensure accurate, timely, consistent, and effective refusal and return of
rejected goods.
5. Organize freezer and refrigeration space, loading docks, and store rooms before deliveries to assure
foods are placed in storage in a timely manner.
6. Have tools available at the time of delivery. These include: product specification lists and purchase
orders, temperature logs, calibrated thermometers, pens, flashlights, and clean loading carts.
7. Keep receiving area clean and well lighted.
8. Do not touch ready-to-eat foods with bare hands.
9. Determine whether foods will be marked with the date arrival or the "use by" date and mark
accordingly upon receipt.
10. Compare delivery invoice against products ordered and products delivered.
11. Inspect the delivery truck when it arrives to ensure that it is clean, putrid odors, and organized to
prevent cross-contamination. Be sure refrigerated foods are delivered on a refrigerated truck.
12. Check the interior temperature of refrigerated trucks.
13. Confirm vendor name, day and time of delivery, as well as driver's identification before accepting
delivery. If driver's name is different from what is indicated on the delivery schedule, contact the vendor
immediately.
14. Check frozen foods to ensure that they are all frozen solid and show no signs of thawing and
refreezing, such as the presence of large ice crystals or liquids on the bottom of cartons. Use infrared or
other thermometers to check surface temperatures if desired.

                                                  Page 20
8 - Receiving Deliveries, continued (SOP)

15. Check the temperature of refrigerated foods.
         a. For fresh meat, fish, and poultry products, insert a clean and sanitized thermometer into the
         center of the product to ensure a temperature of 41°F or below. The temperature of milk must be
         45°F or below but ‘strive for 35'. In Nevada, check the approximate temperature of milk by
         placing a thermometer between two Cartons or use an infrared thermometer.
         b. For packaged products, insert a food thermometer between two packages being careful not to
         puncture the wrapper or use an infrared thermometer. If the temperature exceeds 41°F, it may be
         necessary to take the internal temperature before accepting the product.
         c, For eggs, the interior temperature of the truck should be 41°F or below. The temperature of
         shell eggs must be 45°F or below. Liquid eggs must be 41"F or below.
16. Check dates of milk, eggs, and other perishable goods to ensure safety and quality.
17. Check the integrity of food packaging.
18. Check the cleanliness of crates and other shipping containers before accepting products. Reject foods
that are shipped in dirty crates.
19. Transfer foods to their appropriate storage locations as quickly as possible.

Monitoring:
The food service manager or other supervisory employee will verify that food service workers are
receiving products using the proper procedure by visually monitoring receiving practices during the shift
and reviewing the invoices or Receiving Log.

Corrective Action:
Reject the following:
a. Frozen foods with signs of previous thawing,
b. Cans that have signs of deterioration- swollen sides or ends, flawed seals or seams, dents, or rust
c. Punctured packages
d. Expired foods
e. Foods that are out of safe temperature zone or deemed unacceptable by the established rejection policy

Verification and Record Keeping:
Record the temperature and the corrective action on the delivery invoice or on the Receiving Log.
Invoices/logs will be maintained with other records for a minimum of 3 years and until given permission
by a representative of Child Nutrition & Wellness, Nevada State Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                Page 21
HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedure

9 - Handling a Food Recall

PURPOSE: To prevent food-borne illness in the event of a product recall.

SCOPE: This procedure applies to food service workers who prepare or serve food.

KEY WORDS: Food Recalls

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Train food service workers on the proper procedures used in handling a food recall.
2. Review the food recall notice and specific instructions that have been identified in the notice.
3. Communicate the food recall notice to all facility employees.
4. Hold the recalled product using the following steps:
         • Physically segregate the product, including any open containers, leftover product, and food
         items in current production that contain the recalled product.
         • If an item is suspected to contain the recalled product, but label information is not available,
follow NNJC’s procedure for disposal.
5. Mark recalled product "Do Not Use" and ''Do Not Discard." Inform the entire staff not to use the
product.
6. Inform the Detention Director of the recalled product.
7. Identify and record whether any of the product was received by the facility, locate the food recall
code(s) and production date(s) listed in the recall notice.
8. Obtain accurate inventory counts of the recalled products from the facility kitchen, including the
amount in inventory and amount used,
9, Account for all recalled product by verifying inventory counts against records of food received at the
facility kitchen,

MONITORING:
The food service workers and food service manager, or other designated employee, will visually observe
that the facility has segregated and secured all recalled products.

                                                  Page 22
9 – Handling a Food Recall, continued,(SOP)

CORRECTIVE ACTION:
1. Retrain any food service worker found not following the procedures in this SOP.
2, Determine if the recalled product is to be returned and to whom, or destroyed and by whom.
3. Notify all facility workers of procedures, dates, and other specific directions to be followed for the
collection or destruction of the recalled product.
4. Consolidate the recall product as quickly as possible, but no later than 30 days after the recall
notification,
5. Conform to the recall notice using the following steps:
         • Report quantity and facility where product is located to manufacturer or distributor for
         collection,
         • Complete and maintain all required documentation related to the recall including:
         • Recall notice
         • Records of how food product was returned or destroyed
         • Reimbursable costs
         • Public notice and media communications
         • Correspondence to and from the public health department and State agency

VERIFICATION AND RECORD KEEPING
Food service workers will record the name of the contaminated food, date, time, and the reason why the
food was discarded on the Damaged or Discarded Product Log, A supervisory or other designated
employee will verify that appropriate corrective actions are being taken by reviewing, initialing, and
dating the Damaged or Discarded Product Log. Maintain the Damaged or Discarded Product Logs for a
minimum of 3 years or until given permission by a representative of Child Nutrition & Wellness, Nevada
State Department of Education to discard.

Adapted from: National Food Service Management Institute, (2002), Responding to a Food
Recall, University, MS: Author.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                    Page 23
HACCP- Based Standard Operating Procedure

10 - Washing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

Purpose: To prevent or reduce risk of food-borne illness or injury caused by contaminated fruits and
vegetables.

Scope: This procedure applies to food service workers who prepare or serve food.

Keywords: Fruits, Vegetables, Cross-Contamination, Washing

Instructions:
1. Train food service workers who prepare or serve food on how to properly wash and store fresh fruits
and vegetables.
2. Wash hands using the proper procedure.
3. Wash, rinse, sanitize, and air-dry all food-contact surfaces, equipment, and utensils that will be in
contact with produce, such as cutting boards, knives, and sinks.
4. Wash all raw fruits and vegetables thoroughly before combining with other ingredients, including:
        • Unpeeled fresh fruit and vegetables that are served whole or cut into pieces.
        • Fruits and vegetables that are peeled and cut to use in cooking or served ready-to-eat.
5. Wash fresh produce vigorously under cold running water or by using chemicals that comply with the
current Nevada Food Code. Follow manufacturer's instructions for proper use of those chemicals.
Packaged fruits and vegetables labeled as being previously washed and ready-to-eat are not required to be
washed.
6. Scrub the surface of firm fruits or vegetables such as apples or potatoes using a clean and sanitized
brush designated for this purpose.
7. Remove any damaged or bruised areas.
8. Label, date, and refrigerate fresh-cut fruits and vegetables.
9. Serve cut melons within 7 days if held at 41°F or below (see SOP for Date Marking Ready-to-
Eat, Potentially Hazardous Food).
10. Do not serve raw seed sprouts to persons highly susceptible to food-borne illness such as preschool-
age children.

                                                Page 24
10 - Washing: Fresh Fruits and Vegetables; continued: (SOP)

Monitoring:
A supervisory or other designated employee will visually monitor that fruits and vegetables are being
properly washed, labeled, and dated during all hours of operation. In addition, food service workers will
check the quality of fruits and vegetables in cold storage on a regular basis.

Corrective Action:
Unwashed fruits and vegetables will be removed from service and washed immediately before being
served. Unlabeled fresh cut items will be labeled and dated. Discard cut melons held after 7 days.

Verification and Record Keeping:
A supervisory employee or other designated employee will complete the Food Safety Checklist to
indicate that monitoring is being conducted as specified in this procedure. Maintain the Food
Safety Checklist for a minimum of 3 years or until given permission by a representative of Child
Nutrition & Wellness, Nevada State Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                 Page 25
HACCP – Based Standard Operating Procedure

11 - Controlling Time and Temperature during Preparation

PURPOSE: To prevent food-borne illness by limiting the amount of time that potentially hazardous
foods are held in the temperature danger zone during preparation.

SCOPE: This procedure applies to food service workers who prepare food.

KEY WORDS: Cross-Contamination, Time and Temperature Control, Food Preparation,
Temperature Danger Zone

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Train food service employees on the proper procedures used when controlling time and temperature
during preparation.
2, Use a clean, sanitized, and calibrated probe thermometer to take temperatures during preparation. Refer
to the Using and Calibrating Food Thermometers SOP.
3. Wash hands prior to preparing foods. Refer to the Washing Hands SOP.
4, Use clean and sanitized equipment and utensils while preparing food.
5. Separate raw foods from ready-to-eat foods by keeping them in separate containers until ready to use
and by using separate dispensing utensils, Refer to the Preventing Cross Contamination During Storage
and Preparation SOP.
6. Pre-chill ingredients for cold foods, such as sandwiches, salads, and cut melons, to 41°F or below
before combining with other ingredients.
7. Prepare foods as close to serving times as the menu will allow.
8. Prepare food in batch amounts to limit the time for preparation of any batches of food so that
ingredients are not at room temperature for more than 30 minutes before cooking, serving, or being
returned to the refrigerator.
9. Limit the total, combined time that food is allowed to be in the temperature danger zone to 4 hours.
10. If potentially hazardous foods are not cooked or served immediately after preparation, quickly chill.
Refer to the Cooling Potentially Hazardous Foods SOP.

MONITORING:
A supervisory or other designated employee will ensure that foods are maintained at safe temperatures
and are not allowed to be in the temperature danger zone for more than 4 hours.
Clean, sanitized thermometers will be used to check temperatures.

                                                 Page 26
11 - Controlling Time and Temperature during Preparation, continued
(SOP)

CORRECTIVE ACTIONS:
I. Retrain any food service worker found not following the procedures in this SOP.
2. Begin the cooling process immediately after preparation is complete for any foods that will be cooked
and cooled (i.e. will not be served hot.)
3. Rapidly cool ready-to-eat foods or foods that will have additional cooking at a later time.
4. Immediately return ingredients to the refrigerator if the anticipated preparation completion time is
expected to exceed 30 minutes.
5. Discard food held in the temperature danger zone for more than 4 hours.

VERIFICATION AND RECORD KEEPING:
The supervisory or other designated employee will verify that food service workers are taking the
required temperatures and following the proper preparation procedure by visually monitoring food service
workers during the shift and reviewing, initialing, and dating the temperature log(s) or production log.
The supervisory other designated employee will complete the Food Safety Checklist to indicate that
monitoring is being conducted as specified in this procedure. Maintain the Food Safety Checklist and
temperature log(s) for a minimum of 3 years or until given permission by a representative of Child
Nutrition & Wellness, Nevada State Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                Page 27
HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedure

12 – Cooking Potentially Hazardous Foods

Purpose: To prevent food-borne illness by ensuring that all foods are cooked to the appropriate internal
temperature

Scope: This procedure applies to food service workers who prepare or serve food.

Key Words: Cross-Contamination, Temperatures, Cooking.

Instructions:
1. Train food service workers who prepare or serve food on how to use a food thermometer and cook
foods using this procedure.
2. If a recipe contains a combination of meat products, cook the product to the highest required
temperature.
3. In Nevada, cook products to the following temperatures:
          a. 140 °F for 15 seconds
              • Commercially pre-cooked ready-to-eat meat (ham, roast beef, turkey, etc.)
          b. 145°F for 15 seconds
              • Seafood and beef roasts
          c. 160 °F for 15 seconds
              • Ground beef
              • Raw pork, ham and sausage
              • Egg dishes
          d. 165 °F for 15 seconds
              • Ground poultry
              • Leftovers
          e. 170 °F for 15 seconds
              • Poultry breasts
          f 180 °F for 15 seconds
              • Poultry legs, thighs and wings
              • Whole poultry
          g. Follow manufacturer's instructions
             • Processed meat items (chicken nuggets, turkey fritters, cooked beef patties, etc.)
4. Use a clean, sanitized, and calibrated probe thermometer (preferably a thermocouple).
5. Avoid inserting the thermometer into pockets off at or near bones when taking internal cooking
temperatures.

                                                Page 28
12 - Cooking Potentially Hazardous Foods, continued (SOP)

Instructions, continued:
6. Take at least two internal temperatures from each batch of food by inserting the thermometer into the
thickest part of the product (usually the center).
7. Take at least two internal temperatures of each large food item, such as a turkey, to ensure that all parts
of the product reach the required cooking temperature.

Monitoring:
Temperatures will be taken at the end point of cooking· and recorded on logs. These logs will be
monitored by a supervisory worker to ensure that the temperatures meet the minimum standards.

Corrective Action:
Continue cooking food until the internal temperature reaches the required temperature.

Verification and Record Keeping:
Food service workers will record product name, time, the temperature /time, and any corrective action
taken on the Cooking-Reheating Temperature Log (or other appropriate temperature log). The food
service manager or other supervisory worker will verify that food service workers have taken the required
cooking temperatures by visually monitoring food service employees and preparation procedures during
the shift and reviewing, initialing, and dating the temperature log. Maintain temperature logs with other
records for a minimum of 3 years or until given permission by a representative of Child Nutrition &
Wellness, Nevada State Department of Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                  Page 29
HACCP-Based Standard Operating Procedure

13- Holding Hot and Cold Potentially Hazardous Foods

Purpose: To prevent food-borne illness by ensuring that all potentially hazardous foods are held at the
proper temperature.

Scope: This procedure applies to food service employees who prepare or serve food.

Key Words: Cross-Contamination, Temperatures, Holding, Hot Holding, Cold Holding, Storage.

Instructions:
1. Train food service workers who prepare or serve food about proper hot and cold holding procedures.
Include in the training a discussion of the temperature danger zone.
2. Follow State or local health department requirements regarding required hot and cold holding
temperatures. State and local health department requirements are based on the 1999 Nevada
         Food Code:
                  • Hold hot foods at 140 °F or above; and
                  • Hold cold foods at 41°F or below.
3. Preheat steam table and/or hot box if applicable.
4. Use a clean, sanitized, and calibrated probe thermometer to measure the temperature of the food.
5. Take temperatures of foods by inserting the thermometer near the surface of the product, at the thickest
part, and at other various locations.
6. Take temperatures of holding units by placing a calibrated thermometer in the coolest part of a hot
holding unit or warmest part of a cold holding unit.
7. For hot foods held for service:
         • Verify that the air/water temperature of any unit is at 140 OF or above before use.
         • Reheat foods in accordance with the Reheating Potentially Hazardous Foods SOP.
         • All hot potentially hazardous foods should be 140 °F or above before placing the food out for
         display or service.
         • Take the internal temperature of food before placing it on a steam table or in a hot bolding unit
         and at least every 2 hours thereafter.
8. For cold foods held for service:
         • Take the internal temperature of the food before placing it into any walk-in cooler or reach-in
         cold holding unit.
         • Chill food in accordance with the Cooling Potentially Hazardous Foods SOP if the food is not
         41°F or below.
         • Verify that the air temperature of any cold holding unit is at 41°F or below before use and at
         least every 4 hours thereafter during all hours of operation.

                                                      Page 30
13- Holding Hot and Cold Potentially Hazardous Foods, continued (SOP)

Monitoring:
Temperature logs will be monitored to ensure that foods are held at proper temperatures. Potentially
hazardous hot foods shall be held above 140°F and potentially hazardous cold foods below 41°F.

Corrective Action:
I. For hot foods:
         • Reheat the food to 165 °F for 15 seconds if the temperature is found to be below 140 °F and the
         last temperature measurement was 140 °F or higher and taken within the last 2 hours.
         Repair or reset holding equipment before returning the food to the unit, if applicable.
         • Discard the food if it cannot be determined how long the food temperature was below 140 °F
2. For cold foods:
         • Rapidly chill the food using an appropriate cooling method if the temperature is found to be
         above 41°F and the last temperature measurement was 41 °F or below and taken within the last 2
         hours:
                      o Place food in shallow containers (no more than 4 inches deep) and uncovered on
                          the top shelf in the back of the walk-in or reach-in cooler.
                      o Use a quick-chill unit like a blast chiller.
                      o Stir the food in a container placed in an ice water bath.
                      o Add ice as an ingredient.
                      o Separate food into smaller or thinner portions.
         • Repair or reset holding equipment before returning the food to the unit, if applicable.
         • Discard the food if it cannot be determined how long the food temperature was above 41°F.

Verification and Record Keeping:
Food service workers will record temperatures of food items and document corrective actions taken on
the Time and Temperature for Holding (or other appropriate) log. A designated food service worker will
record air temperatures of coolers and cold holding units on the refrigeration logs. The food service
manager or other supervisory worker will verify that food service workers have taken the required
holding temperatures by visually monitoring food service workers during the shift and reviewing the
temperature logs. The temperature logs will be maintained with other records for a minimum of 3 years or
until given permission by a representative of Child Nutrition & Wellness, Nevada State Department of
Education to discard.

Date Implemented: _____________________ By: _______________________________

Date Reviewed: ________________________ By: _______________________________

Date Revised: ________________________By: ______________________________

                                                Page 31
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