PROGRAM OF STUDIES Nute High School & Library 2019-2020 - Milton, New Hampshire 03851 Telephone: (603) 652-4591 - SAU 64

 
Nute High School & Library

PROGRAM OF STUDIES

          2019-2020

             22 Elm Street
    Milton, New Hampshire 03851
     Telephone: (603) 652-4591
                 1
NUTE HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

                                      Required or related classes:
English                 4 credits     Grade level English classes
Math                    3 credits     Must include at least 1 credit of Algebra (beginning with Class of 2020
                                      a 4th year of Math-related course is required)
Science                  3 credits    Must include Physical Science and Biology
Civics                  .5 credit
Geography               .5 credit
US/American History 1 credit
Social Studies elective 1 credit
Wellness                1 credit     .5 credit Personal Fitness / .5 credit Health (beginning Class of 2021)
Physical Education     .5 credit
Computer Education 1 credit
Economics              .5 credit
Fine Arts              .5 credit     Art, Band, Music, Drama, Graphic Arts
* Prior to Class of 2021 students may have taken Personal Fitness and Health separately.
Required Courses 16.5 credits
Elective Courses        7.5 credits

Total required for graduation = 24 credits

Class of 2020 and beyond: 20 Hours of Community Service
Starting with the graduating class of 2020, students must have 20 hours of community service completed
prior to graduation. The community service is not credit bearing. The Guidance Department has forms
available and will track this requirement. Students must return completed forms to Guidance.

                                    REQUIREMENTS FOR PROMOTION

Credit requirements for advancement to the next grade level are as follows:
Prior to the start of the 1st semester of the year you must have:
Sophomore 5 credits
Junior     11 credits
Senior     17 credits
Total Credits required for Graduation 24

                                         COURSE SCHEDULING

● Each student is expected to schedule seven classes per semester and to follow the school recommended
  sequence. Prerequisite courses may only be waived with approval of the Principal, the School Counselor
  and the teacher.
● Schedule changes should be made prior to the first day of class.
● Students may add or drop a class within five days of the start of the class. A request to add a class after
  five days requires the written approval of the parent, teacher, Principal and the School Counselor.
● No credit will be given for students who withdraw at the end of the semester from a yearlong class.

                                                      2
ACADEMIC LEVELS

Advanced Placement (AP)
Advanced Placement courses are designed for highly motivated students who are willing to meet the
challenge of a college level course. Upon completion of an AP course students may opt to take the AP exam
designed by the College Board, for a fee. Colleges often grant placement and course credit to students who
score above a certain number on the AP exam. These courses are only offered when resources are available
and there is enough student demand to support a section.

Honors Level (H)
Honors level is designed for highly motivated students who are willing to meet the challenge of a fast-paced
curriculum requiring a high level of commitment, responsibility and independent study. Honors credit is
obtained by performing work substantially above the expectations of the CP curriculum as outlined in this
program of studies.

College Preparatory (CP)
College preparatory level is designed for students who wish to take a demanding academic level and
complete the requirements for admission to a two or four year college. These courses require considerable
outside of class preparation by the student.

Technical/Vocational Preparatory Program (TP)
Technical/vocational preparatory courses provide a general education for students whose academic ability
and career interests are compatible with technical or vocational training. Students may elect to include a
specific vocational program at one of the three area vocational schools.

Grading System

A+     98-100         C+      83-84          F      0-69
A      95-97          C       80-82          P      PASS
A-     93-94          C-      77-79          F      FAIL
B+     91-92          D+      75-76          I      INCOMPLETE
B      88-90          D       72-74
B-     85-87          D-      70-71

A mark of incomplete is given at the end of each quarter when work has not been completed for legitimate
reasons. After two weeks, an incomplete automatically becomes the original earned grade unless additional
work has been submitted or a longer make-up period has been approved by teacher/administration.

Grade Point Averages
Nute GPAs are calculated on a 4.0 scale, all grades are converted from their numerical grade to a 0-4.0.
Nute has a weighted system for GPAs therefore if you take a course at the AP level 0.5 is added to your final
GPA (i.e. a 4.0 would become a 4.5), Honors level 0.4 is added, CP level adds 0.3 and all other courses stay
at current grade. A grade of Pass/Fail will not average into your cumulative GPA.

                                                      3
TESTING PROGRAMS

Grades 9-11   NWEA- Northwest Evaluation Assessment- Students may take tests called Measures
              of Academic Progress (MAP) on computers. Students are given MAP tests to
              determine instructional level and to measure academic growth from year to year in the
              areas of mathematics, reading, and language usage. MAP tests are unique in that they
              adapt to be appropriate for each student’s level of learning. As a result, each student
              has the same opportunity to succeed and maintain a positive attitude toward testing.
              Administered at least once per year.

Grade 10      PSAT 10 – This practice test for the SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) measures verbal,
              math and writing skills and is available to all interested sophomores. This is
              administered in the spring, during the school day.

Grade 11      Optional: PSAT/NMSQT – The grade 11 practice test for the SAT is used for juniors
              to qualify for National Merit Scholarship. Administered in the fall, during the school
              day.

              All juniors in the state of New Hampshire are required to take the SAT exam, as part
              of state testing. There is no fee for the exam. The test will be administered at Nute,
              during the school day in the Spring.

Grade 12      SAT or ACT (American College Test)
              It is recommended that college bound students take the SAT again in the Summer or
              Fall of their senior year. The SAT and/or ACT is necessary for many college
              admissions. Students must pre-register online by specific deadlines at
              CollegeBoard.org.
              (Students who meet specific criteria may be eligible for a fee waiver).

                                              4
RECOMMENDED COURSE SEQUENCING

College Prep Program
(Colleges, other than non-selective schools, require more courses than the minimum graduation
requirements.)

      Freshman                   Sophomores                              Juniors                     Seniors
CP English 9               CP/H Global Studies           CP/H American Studies       H/AP Lit and Comp
CP Algebra I               CP/H Geometry                 CP Algebra II               OR CP Senior English
CP Physical Science        CP/H Biology                  and/or Trig/SAT Prep        CP Pre-Calc
CP Geography/Civics        CP French II/Spanish II       Social Studies Elective     OR H/AP Calculus
Wellness                   Economics                     CP French III/Spanish III   CP French IV/Spanish
                                                                                     IV
CP French I/Spanish I      Computers                     CP/H Chemistry              Electives (Psychology,
                                                                                     Science, etc.)
Computers                  Physical Education            Electives
Fine Arts                  Electives

Technical/Vocational Prep Program
       Freshman                 Sophomores                               Juniors                   Seniors
English 9                Global Studies                  American Studies            Senior English
Pre-Algebra OR Algebra Algebra I OR Geometry             Geometry OR Algebra         CTE II
I                                                        II*
Physical Science         Biology                         Chemistry* OR Science       Electives (Psychology,
                                                         Elective                    Science, etc.)
Geography/Civics           French II/Spanish II          Social Studies Elective     Internships/ELO
Wellness                   Economics                     CTE I
French I/Spanish I         Computers                     Electives
Computers                  Physical Education
Fine Arts                  Electives
*Some technical schools require successful completion of Algebra II and/or Chemistry

A listing of CTE Programs at the regional Career Technical Education Centers can be found at the end of this
program.

                                                     5
NEW HAMPSHIRE SCHOLARS

The New Hampshire Scholars Initiative is an effort by area business and school volunteers to encourage and
motivate all high school students to complete a defined, rigorous academic course of study that prepares
them for successful transition to college or university coursework or vocational and technical training
necessary to enter today’s competitive job market.
New Hampshire Scholars Program recommends a Core Course of Study to high schoolers that gives every
participating student the advantage of well-rounded, more challenging coursework in English, math, science,
social studies and foreign language. Students who undertake this rigorous Core Course of Study will
challenge themselves to do their best work during their high school career and will enjoy a wider range of
postsecondary options upon graduation.

When planning your curriculum, consider becoming a NH Scholar by taking courses that fulfill the
requirements. You can find more information at www.NHScholars.org.

Minimum NH Scholar                   STEM Pathway Additional           ART Pathway Additional
Requirements                         Requirements                      Requirements

English: 4 credits                   Lab Science: 1 more credit        Art: 2 credits (Visual Art, Fine
                                                                       Art, Performing Arts, Music,
                                                                       Graphic Design, etc.)

Math: 4 credits (including Alg 1,    STEM related course: 1 credit     Minimum GPA: 3.2
Alg II, and Geometry)                (Science, Math, Technology,
                                     Engineering, Computers, Adv.
                                     manufacturing, including CTE)
                                     *Cannot count a course twice

Lab Science: 3 credits (including    Minimum GPA: 3.2
Biology & Chemistry)

Social Science: 3.5 credits

Foreign language: 2 credits

                                                      6
FOUR YEAR PLAN
 Name: ________________________                   Plans after graduation (please check one):
                                                                  __ four year college or university
            Tentative occupational goals:                         __ two year college or Technical school
 1st choice _______________________                               __ military training

                                                                  __ on-the-job training or apprenticeship
     nd
 2        choice ______________________                           __ immediate employment

Please use this sheet to list the courses you will need to take during your four years of high school. Your selections
must reflect Nute's graduation requirements as well as the admissions requirements for any post-secondary
education or employment you might be interested in. Be sure to use such resources as the Program of Studies as
well as your School Counselor, teachers and parents to make your choices as accurate as possible. It is expected that
changes will be made to this plan throughout your high school career.

              FRESHMEN – GRADE 9                                    SOPHOMORE - GRADE 10

TOTAL MUST EQUAL                       7 CLASSES         TOTAL MUST EQUAL                       7 CLASSES

                JUNIOR – GRADE 11                                       SENIOR - GRADE 12

TOTAL MUST EQUAL              7 CLASSES                  TOTAL MUST EQUAL                 7 CLASSES
                                                         *If less credits/courses are needed, Seniors may apply
                                                         for Senior Privilege.

                                                          7
ENGLISH

ENGLISH 9 (TP/CP)                                                                                    1 CREDIT

A strong emphasis in writing skills, especially increasing sophistication in sentence structures and accuracy
in editing, will prepare students for higher level classes at both the high school and the college level.
Vocabulary enrichment and the MLA research paper will be taught. The emphasis in grammar will be on
parts of the sentence and sentence combining. Literature will include Romeo and Juliet, short stories, and
poetry. CP students will read and summarize 30 pages of a biography weekly, do extra assignments, and
meet a more stringent grading system than General level students, who will read and summarize bi-weekly.

ENGLISH 10 (TP/CP/H)                                                                         1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of 9th grade English

Essay writing, usage, diction, vocabulary, and SAT preparation will be the focus of this course. Skills will
be reinforced through oral reading and silent reading. Texts may include Macbeth, Mythology, Fahrenheit
451, and Lord of the Flies. All students will complete a research paper that follows the MLA format.
College Preparatory (CP) and Honors (H) students will be required to read additional literature, write more
in-depth essays, and meet a more stringent grading system. Students will read 40 pages weekly or biweekly
and summarize them. College Preparatory and Honors students will do more assignments with a more
demanding grading system than General level students. Honors students will be held to the highest standards
of quality work, participation, and attitude, and they may be required to meet outside of class weekly.
Summer reading is mandatory.

AMERICAN STUDIES (TP/CP/H)                                                                   2 CREDITS
Prerequisite: successful completion or concurrent enrollment of Global Studies

American Studies is a team-taught, interdisciplinary course focused on the literature, history, government,
and economics of the United States beginning with the present day and working backward to World War I.
Students will read primary documents, classic and contemporary American literature, and essays and
commentaries on American culture. Students will examine the United States’ system of government and
economics, understand how and why it works, and examines how it has changed over time. Domestic and
foreign policy, current events, and the rights and responsibilities of citizens will be explored in detail. New
Hampshire’s place in the national fabric will be examined. Students will be engaged in the writing process
throughout the course, including literary analysis, as well as focusing on vocabulary development.
*This course enables students to earn credits for both English 11 and US History.

CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE (CP/H)                                                               .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of English 9 and English 10 (or Global Studies)

This one-semester course is designed for students interested in exploring a diverse selection of literature
based on challenging contemporary issues, themes, and artists. Fiction, non-fiction, plays, film, and poetry
will be studied in-depth. Students will analyze, discuss, and find understanding of the challenging issues of
our time. Thematic units may include: Social Responsibility, Racism and Prejudice, Crime and Punishment,
Science and Fiction, Media Manipulation, etc. This course can be taken, along with another half year English
elective, to fulfill a student’s English coursework in his/her Senior year. When combine with another English
elective, this course is an alternative option to Senior English and Honors/AP Literature and Composition.

                                                        8
FICTION & FILM (CP/H)                                                                       .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of English 9 and English 10 (or Global Studies)

This class will examine the literary roots of some of cinema’s most successful films. We will consider: what
happens when a variety of short stories, novels, or plays are made into a film; if we approach film and
literary text differently; and how we view and read these texts. We will also consider the cultures out of
which the texts come: Does it make a difference if the work was written in 1789 and filmed in 2011, or if the
story was written by an Argentinian and filmed in London by an Italian director? Through questions such as
these, students will be asked to look at and think about films in a reflective manner. This course can be
taken, along with another half year English elective, to fulfill a student’s English coursework in his/her
Senior year. When combine with another English elective, this course is an alternative option to Senior
English and Honors/AP Literature and Composition.

SENIOR ENGLISH (TP/CP)                                                                      1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in 3 English credits

This year-long course will engage students in the study of literature and language through a variety of
techniques and mediums. Designed to meet the needs of each group of students, this senior level course will
draw from diverse literary texts, poetry, music, film, drama, fiction, current events, and more to provide
students with a review of skills and techniques essential to college and career readiness. Literature might
include The Crucible, Huck Finn, and 1984. Writing might include an essay for each book we read, a
college application essay, a Voice of Democracy essay, and a research paper.
LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (H/AP)                                                       1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of English 9, Global Studies and American Studies. Teacher
Recommendation required for Honors/AP level

An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose
written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of
purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a
writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way genre conventions and the
resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. The purpose of the AP English Language and
Composition course is to enable students to read complex texts with understanding and to write prose of
sufficient richness and complexity to communicate effectively with mature readers. Students who enroll in
this course will be expected to read a wide range of complex texts from the sixteenth century to
contemporary times. Students will learn to write interpretations of a piece of literature based on careful
observation of textual details, while considering the works: structure, style, and themes; social and historical
implications; literary elements such as figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. This will be a
challenging course, requiring rigorous academic pursuit and self-motivated learning. Any students taking this
at AP level who would like to take the AP exam will be responsible for the AP exam charge, currently at $91
per test but is subject to change. For a full description of the course expectations and purposes, please
review the AP Literature and Composition Course Description available at collegeboard.org.

                                                       9
ENGLISH ELECTIVES
                              (Not all English electives are offered every year.)

SAT WRITING (CP)                                                                            .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: English 9

This course will offer intensive preparation for the reading and the writing sections of the SAT I test.
Students will practice taking the SAT, review their answers, and study test-taking techniques. The focus of
this course will be on improving writing skills and usage knowledge to improve the scores on the writing
sections of the SAT.

WRITING WORKSHOP (CP)                                                                       .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: English 9

This is an intensive writing course. Students will use the writing process to draft, workshop, revise, edit, and
publish writing in the genre, either poetry or prose, of his or her choosing. The final exam grades are based
on the quality of writing from the writing portfolios kept by the students. The course grade is based on the
quantity of writing, both rough draft and revised and edited; writing exercises; the student’s diligence; and
the number of the student’s pieces published and the number shared for feedback.

                                            MATHEMATICS

Starting with the class of 2020 students will be expected to take a math class for each of their 4 years of
high school as stated in NH RSA 186:8: VII, requiring a high school pupil to attain competency in
mathematics for each year in which he or she is in high school through graduation either by satisfactorily
completing a minimum of 4 courses in mathematics or by satisfactorily completing a minimum of 3
mathematics courses and one non-mathematics content area course in which mathematics knowledge and
skills are embedded and applied, as may be approved by the School Board.

PRE-ALGEBRA (TP)                                                                                   1 CREDIT

This course is designed for students who need to further develop their mathematical skills in preparation for
Algebra I. The concepts of variables, relationships, equations, inequalities and open sentences are stressed.
The properties of mathematics are studied, as are exponents and real numbers. This course develops the
student's skills needed to translate English expressions into symbolic math and to solve word problems.
Students are also required to recognize and solve various types of formulas. Some of the special topics
introduced in this course are: statistics (including organizing data), graphs and charts, performing operations
on the number line, (Euclidean) geometry and coordinate geometry.
Major topics and concepts: Efficiency of Number Sense, Mental Mathematics, Relative Magnitude, Ratios,
Rates, Percents, Fractions, Similarity, Conceptual Understanding of Area and Volume, Conceptual
Understanding of Variables, Functions, Patterns, Rates of Change, Read, Interpret, and Analyze
Representations and Create Representations.

                                                       10
ALGEBRA I (TP/CP)                                                                                1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Pre-Algebra or teacher recommendation

The primary goal of Algebra I is to gain the ability to use variables and computational skills to solve
problems. Algebra I covers the elements of Algebra that can be employed in technical and more advanced
mathematics courses. Computer software utilized includes graphing and function programs, equation solving
assistance, and spreadsheets.
Major topics and concepts: The Language of Algebra (Real numbers, Absolute Value, Variables,
Polynomials, Expressions, Exponents, Patterns, Radicals), Patterns, Functions and Relations (Linear
Equations, Slope/ Rates of Change, Quadratics, System of Equations, Inequalities, Models, Exponential
Equations), Equivalence (Equality) (Equations, Rational Equations, Inequalities, Radicals, Exponents, Linear
Systems).

GEOMETRY (TP/CP)                                                                                 1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra I

Geometry is the study of formal math proofs and geometric figures, which develops deductive reasoning
capabilities and problem solving skills. Areas of discussion include area and volume formulas, polygons,
Pythagorean Theorem, trigonometric functions and extensive work with triangles and circles. A classroom
emphasis is placed on group problem solving and cooperative learning. Students use manipulatives such as
tangrams, pattern blocks, compass and straightedge and other mathematical tools in group problem-solving
sessions. Computer software utilized includes graphing programs, presentation graphics, Geometer's
Sketchpad, and graphic visualizations. Students are required to complete a research project and presentation
of a Mathematics or Science topic once per semester using resources including books, encyclopedias, other
classes and computer technology such as Internet searches. Geometry at the CP level will focus more on
proofs. Major Concepts: Congruency, similarity, transformations, volume, area, perimeter, polygons,
triangles, circles, constructions, proofs, Pythagorean Theorem, and trigonometric functions.

ALGEBRA II (TP/CP)                                                                             1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra I and Geometry

Algebra II further develops topics from Algebra I and Geometry with additional discussions in graphs and
functions, word problems, probability and statistics, radical operations, quadratic solutions and linear
systems. Much of the course work and problem solving involves the integration of Algebra and Geometry
into cohesive upper-level mathematics. Students will recognize, describe, and generalize patterns building
mathematical models to describe, interpret, and predict the behavior of real-world phenomenon at a more
sophisticated level than Algebra I. Computer software utilized includes graphing and function programs,
presentation graphics, equation solving assistance, Geometer's Sketchpad, graphic visualizations and
spreadsheets. Students will come to understand that algebraic methods and functions are important tools that
they can use to gain access to higher levels of mathematics, science, and engineering. Students are required
to complete a research project and presentation of a Mathematics or Science topic once per semester using
resources including books, encyclopedias, other classes and computer technology such as Internet searches.
Major topics and concepts: The Language of Algebra (Real & Complex Numbers, Absolute Value,
Variables, Polynomials, Expressions, Exponents, Patterns, Radicals), Patterns, Functions and Relations
(Linear Equations, Slope/ Rates of Change, Quadratics, System of Equations, Inequalities, Models,
Exponential Equations, Polynomials, Logarithmic Functions, Sequences and Series, Piecewise Functions,
Inverse Functions), Equivalence (Equality) (Equations, rational Equations, Inequalities, Radicals, exponents,
linear systems, logarithms, matrices.
                                                     11
PRACTICAL MATHEMATICS
Prerequisite: must be Grade 11 or higher

Practical Mathematics is a survey course focused on solidifying the algebra skills that students will need to
enter the workforce or be prepared for two-year colleges. As students review topics such as solving
equations, inequalities, and systems and simplifying and evaluating polynomial and rational expressions,
emphasis will be placed on applying these algebraic skills in real-world problem situations such as the
worlds of personal finance and investing, skilled trades, automotive technology, military science, aviation,
geodesics and mapping, food service, and agriculture.

                                      MATHEMATICS ELECTIVES
                                (Not all math electives are offered every year)

SAT MATH (CP)                                                                              .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II

This semester long course focuses on the SAT test and will help to prepare students for this test. Students
review topics that they may be weak in as identified by a diagnostic test. Other SAT tests are taken and
analyzed. Test-taking skills are emphasized.

TRIGONOMETRY (CP)                                                                          .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra I (CP), Geometry (CP), and Algebra II

Trigonometry is the study of right-angle triangles and their applications and related topics. The study of
trigonometry derived much of its interest from problems of astronomy and navigation and consists of
problems involving a combination of Algebra and Geometry. The course is designed especially for those
who will pursue the natural and physical sciences in college. Students are required to complete a research
project and presentation of a Mathematics or Science topic once per semester using resources including
books, encyclopedias, other classes and computer technology such as Internet searches.
Major topics and concepts: Similarity, Units and Accuracy, Right Triangle Trigonometry, Analytic
Geometry and Circular Trigonometry, Characteristics of Trig. Functions, Identities, Radian Measure, Non-
right Triangle Laws, Trigonometric Graphs, Vectors in the Plane.

APPLIED COLLEGE MATH (H)                                                                           1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra II

This course focuses on quantitative thinking with real-world applications. Some topics covered are logic,
number theory, number systems, algebra with applications, finance with simple and compound interest,
geometry and measurement, probability and statistics, set theory, and graph theory.

COLLEGE ALGEBRA (H)                                                                                1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra II (C or better)

This course prepares the student for higher-level mathematics. Some topics covered are factoring, rational
exponents, solving linear and quadratic equations, rational expressions, composite and inverse functions,
systems of linear and quadratic functions, geometry, matrix algebra, logarithmic functions, and exponential
functions and use of Trigonometry.
                                                      12
PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS (H)                                                                     1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra II (C or better)

Topics include basic measures of central tendency and variability; frequency distributions; probability; the
binomial distribution; the normal distribution; the normal distribution; sampling or distributions; estimation
of parameters; hypothesis testing; non-parametric tests; simple regression and correlation.

PRE-CALCULUS (H)                                                                                   1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry

The objective of this course is to prepare students to take Calculus at the high school level or in post-
secondary math courses. Advanced Algebra topics beyond the scope of the Algebra II course are covered,
including polynomial functions and equations, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, and
sequences and series. Other topics include right triangle trigonometry and cyclical trigonometric functions
using radian measure and graphing. Classroom emphasis is on problem solving. Students are required to
complete a research project and presentation of a Mathematics or Science topic once per semester using
resources including books, encyclopedias, other classes and computer technology.
Major topics and concepts: Linear Relations and Functions, Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities,
The Nature of Graphs, Polynomial and Rational Functions, The Trigonometric Functions, Graphs of
Trigonometric Functions, Polar Coordinates and Complex Numbers, Exponential and Logarithmic
Functions, Sequences and Series.

The following courses qualify as “non-mathematics content area course in which mathematics knowledge
and skills are embedded and applied.”
Personal Finance
Accounting I / II
Introduction to Woodworking
Intermediate Woodworking
Advanced Woodworking

                                                  SCIENCE

PHYSICAL SCIENCE (TP/CP)                                                                           1 CREDIT

Physical Science is an introductory course covering topics relating to the interactions of matter and energy
and how those interactions have created our natural world. The course stresses the scientific method of
inquiry and is designed to give a general overview of motion, energy, chemistry and wave mechanics, and
the laws that govern them. Course work is supplemented with laboratory experiments and projects. College
preparatory credit in physical science involves more in depth and additional written chapter work, a final
written paper, as well as the regular class assignments and homework.

BIOLOGY (TP/CP/H)                                                                                  1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Physical Science

Biology is the study of life that seeks to provide an understanding of the natural world. This course covers a
wide variety of biological concepts including cells, animal populations and communities, evolution, the
human body, and genetics. CP and Honor students will be required to complete additional requirements to
ensure a more thorough understanding of the material.
                                                      13
SCIENCE ELECTIVES
                              (Not all science electives are offered every year)

CHEMISTRY (CP/H)                                                                               1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Physical Science and Biology, along with successful completion of
Algebra II and/ or current enrollment in Algebra II

Chemistry offers opportunities for students to consider intellectually challenging questions about the
behavior of matter. After acquiring basic laboratory techniques, students study and perform experiments to
help them understand, quantitatively and qualitatively, atomic structure and chemical change. This course
emphasizes laboratory applications and the development of independent thinking. Students opting for
honors credit will complete additional course requirements to ensure a more thorough understanding of the
material.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE (TP, CP, H)                                                                1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Physical Science and Biology
Environmental Science is the study of interactions between living organisms and their physical surroundings.
The course covers the diverse environmental conditions present on Earth and the populations and
communities of living organisms that inhabit them. The cycling of resource materials and the flow of energy
through ecosystems will be discussed, as well as the human condition and our impacts on the environment
and the biosphere. Students opting for CP credit will complete additional requirements to ensure a more
thorough understanding of the material.

EARTH SCIENCE (TP/CP/H)                                                                            1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Physical Science and Biology

Introduction to Earth Science uses the scientific method to explain natural aspects of Earth. Topics covered
in the course include the Plate Tectonic Theory to describe the formation of mountains, valleys, earthquakes,
volcanoes, and oceans. The course will conclude with a discussion about the atmosphere and weather.
College preparatory and honors credits in Introduction to Earth Science involve an additional research
project of the student’s choosing, written paper, and presentation to the class.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (CP/H)                                                                      1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Biology

Using biology as a foundation, this course builds upon concepts of biochemistry and provides and in-depth
exploration of all systems of the human body. The course is designed for the above average ability students
who may be interested in pursuing a career in a medically related field. Laboratory dissections are an integral
part of the course. Students opting for honors credit will complete more in depth requirements to ensure a
more thorough understanding of the material.

                                                      14
SOCIAL STUDIES
CIVICS (TP/CP)                                                                             .5 CREDIT

Civics will help students understand the importance of our governmental system, its workings, and the
history of our laws. The course will place an emphasis on the Constitution, Bill of Rights, amendments,
Mayflower Compact, and other significant documents that has shaped our current legal system. Students
will also study the principles of American democracy, such as popular sovereignty, individual rights, and the
system of checks and balances. Research projects, papers, outside reading, and position papers will be
required. College prep students will be required to accomplish additional work as determined by the teacher
to further challenge their abilities.
Major topics and concepts: Settlement, Early Government, Constitution, Bill of Rights, Presidency,
Senatorial powers, Judicial Branch, and Interest Groups.

GEOGRAPHY (TP/CP)                                                                          .5 CREDIT

During this course, students will study the relationship between the physical make-up of the land of the
different continents and how people have adapted to them. Students will study the different types of maps
and how they are used to support the information supplied. Also the cultural aspects of each of the major
continents will be touched upon. College prep students will be required to accomplish additional work as
determined by the teacher to further challenge their abilities.
Major topics and concepts: Geographical themes, United States physical and cultural geography, Latin
America, European geography, Middle Eastern influences, and the importance of Geography in today’s
world.

ECONOMICS                                                                                  .5 CREDIT

This course is designed to help students understand the economic choices that they will soon be confronting
and to help understand why the economy works the way it does. College prep students will be required to
accomplish additional work as determined by the teacher to further challenge their abilities and ensure a
more in depth understanding of the subject matter.
Major topics and concepts: The capitalist system, economic impact of consumers on a micro and macro
level, business competition, marketing, investment, and savings, American labor force, unemployment, and
growing and declining industries, how the government can influence the economy during periods of
recession, the development money as a medium of exchange, how banks operate, advancements in both
science and technology have impacted the exchange of goods on a global scale.

AMERICAN STUDIES (TP/CP/H)                                                                        2
CREDITS
Prerequisite: successful completion of Global Studies or concurrent enrollment in English 10

American Studies is a team-taught, interdisciplinary course focused on the literature, history, government,
and economics of the United States beginning with the present day and working backward to World War I.
Students will read primary documents, classic and contemporary American literature, and essays and
commentaries on American culture. Students will examine the United States’ system of government and
economics, understand how and why it works, and examine how it has changed over time. Domestic and
foreign policy, current events, and the rights and responsibilities of citizens will be explored in detail. New
Hampshire’s place in the national fabric will be examined. Students will be engaged in the writing process
throughout the course, including literary analysis, as well as focusing on vocabulary development.
*This course enables students to earn credits for both English 11 and US History.
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SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES
                                   (Not all electives are offered every year.)

FOUNDATIONS OF WESTERN CIVILIZATIONS                                                         1 CREDIT

Foundations of Western Civilizations seeks to discover the bedrock of today’s Western cultures and
societies. Through studies on Mesopotamia, ancient Egypt, Greece, the founding and collapse of the Roman
Empire, the Renaissance, and more, students will discover what comprises the beginnings of Western
culture. Students who would have taken Global Studies as a combined course, students who will likely be
going into the fields of history, geography, or politics, and students who are interested in learning about
ancient civilizations and the beginnings of our life as it is today are all welcome to take this course.

MODERN GLOBAL ISSUES                                                                         .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: Geography

Students will discover some of the biggest issues facing various societies in our world through reading,
research, discussion, and more. This course focuses on multiple themes, including but not limited to: the
impact of globalization, the role of the global citizen, the role of the United Nations, and international
politics. Students are asked to learn about and analyze a range of ever evolving issues presented to our world
today as international affairs develop. Recommended for students who plan to be an active participant in
their community and/or students who interested in or plan to enter fields in politics or history.

MODERN AMERICAN ISSUES                                                                       .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: Civics

Modern American Issues introduces students to the most significant matters facing the American public
today. Students will learn about current events in U.S. politics, as well as major issues facing voters at the
polls. Because of the nature of the course, the curriculum is ever evolving. Students will also begin to
discover their own opinions and political leanings through research, readings, discussion, and more. This
course serves as an introduction to the importance of becoming an active, responsible citizen.
Recommended for students who plan to be an active participant in their community and/or students who
interested in or plan to enter fields in politics or history.

HISTORY OF MEDIA                                                                             .5 CREDIT

History of Media will focus on the evolution of communications media and its mutual influence on society.
Students will be asked to analyze the importance of media and the transfer of information to the general
public. Medias to be studied include, but are not limited to, newspaper, radio, television, music, and social
media.

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COMPARATIVE RELIGIONS                                                                       .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: Geography

This course seeks to explore today’s living world religions. Christianity, Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, and
Islam will serve as the five major world religions that students will study. Each religion will be looked at
through multiple lenses, including but not limited to historically, politically, and modern practices. Students
will be challenged to look at the world in new ways. By studying and comparing these religions students
will gain a better understanding of the people and the world around them. Students will be challenged to look
at the world in a new way and examine the role of religions in our world today.

CRIME & PUNISHMENT                                                                          .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: must be Grade 10 or higher

This course will look at the phenomenon in our society of punishment in regards to crime, the idea of
punishment for punishment’s sake, and punishment for rehabilitation of the offender. Topics in this course
will include historical patterns of violence, the formation and purpose of police and jails, and the evolution of
punishment for criminals. Several questions we will look at include how we determine the appropriate
amount of punishment, the effectiveness of punishment on criminals in our society, and whether race, sex or
age affect punishment. It also covers the general progression of punishment and levels of crime in our
country.

STREET LAW                                                                                  .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: must be Grade 10 or higher

Throughout this class, the goal will be to gain a better understanding of the American Legal system through a
variety of different exploratory techniques. Students will develop and understanding of the law, its
application in society, and correlation to their lives. Students will engage in debates, analyze hypotheticals,
groups research work, mock processes of law, and other creative and engaging methods to gain a better
understanding of our law-based society. Questions that will be asked include: what is the purpose of laws,
how effective are our laws, how laws affect public issues today, and how may we improve the system we
have.

HISTORICAL FICTION OR FACT (TP/CP/H)                                                        .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Global Studies

This course will examine the use of film to enhance student’s understanding of significant historical events.
The course will be centered on student research and discussion as students evaluate and analyze the historical
accuracy and purpose of various historical films. (This will be a writing intensive class.)
The course would be set up in the following manner: An introduction a specific historical event, watch and
analyze a historical film focused on the specific event (i.e. The Patriot focuses on the American Revolution),
discuss major ideas in the film to evaluate, research those major ideas and evaluation on the historical
accuracy of the major ideas in the film.

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CONTEMPORARY ISSUES (TP/CP)                                                                   .5 CREDIT

This class covers the major issues facing the world at this time as well as people and events that have had a
major impact on the world we live in. Students will use a variety of media, such as newspapers, magazines,
and television. It will be expected that all issues be explored with an open mind. CP credit can be earned
through additional readings and papers and a more in depth understanding of the material.
Major topics and concepts: The issues involving the creation of Israel and the subsequent conflicts that
resulted, cause of Islamic terrorism and the impact on the way we view the world, the political system in the
United States including the basic platforms for the democratic and republican parties, determining fact from
opinion, be able to analyze political cartoons, and be able to check sources for bias, news organizations (TV,
radio, and newspapers, as well as individual reporters) and be able to identify what, if any, bias is being
portrayed, current issues before the Supreme Court, local, national, and world events.

PSYCHOLOGY (CP, H)                                                                     1 CREDIT
Psychology will be studied using an eclectic approach. Various theories, including behaviorism, humanism,
and psychoanalysis will be explored. Gestalt, Pavlov, Skinner, Rogers, Watson, Kohlberg and Freud, among
others, will be covered. The foundation of norms and values, as well as theories of human development will
be explored. Class participation, projects, and outside reading will be required. Honors credit may be earned
with additional achievement.
Major topics and concepts: The major theories/approaches to psychology, including but not limited to the
theories of Freud, Watson, Maslow, Skinner, Erickson, and Pavlov, human intelligence through biological
and environmental means. Nature vs. nurture, how our personalities can be shaped by many different
factors, the biological and chemical systems that may influence behavior, how society’s treatment of
psychological issues has changed over time, how environmental and heredity theories that help to explain
human behavior.

                                         MODERN LANGUAGES

Though a modern language is not a graduation requirement, the study of a modern language is a college
admission requirement for many colleges. Most colleges require at least two years of study of the same
language to be admitted to their school. Competitive colleges may require three or four years of consecutive
language study.

The Modern Languages Program offers students the opportunity to study a second language: French,
Spanish, or Greek.

Students will develop oral and written communication as well as listening and reading comprehension in the
target language. Students are exposed to grammatical structures & vocabulary related to the unit themes
while all units are enriched with cultural awareness. The Modern Languages beginner classes (Levels 1 & 2)
are offered at the Technical/Vocational Preparatory Program prep level (TP). Students that are identified as
having skills to be successful at the College Preparatory (CP) level will need to pass the summative
assessments with a grade of a B or higher to be placed in a the CP level language course.
The Department of Modern Languages recommends that students who are considering taking their first year
of a language be enrolled in at least CP level English classes or have a recommendation from their middle
school Modern Languages Teacher.

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FRENCH I (CP)                                                                                    1 CREDIT

This course is an introduction to French language and culture. Emphasis is placed on speaking, writing,
reading, listening and beginning grammar. Major themes of this course: Getting to know you – Introductions,
greetings, polite expressions, and talking about likes & dislikes. Family & Friends – Describe one's family
and friends, talk about physical descriptions and personalities. School - Talk about one's daily schedule,
describe teachers & courses while giving opinions. Sports and Hobbies - Discuss a wide variety of activities,
when and how often one participates and the weather. Café and food - Learn to read a French menu and
order at a café.

FRENCH II (CP)                                                                                   1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of French I with a grade of C or better

French 2 is a continuation of French 1. Emphasis is placed on continuing speaking, writing, reading,
listening and beginning grammar. The students will continue to practice in the present tense with a main
focus on the past tense. Major themes of this course: People, Family, and Friends - Talk about family and
friends by learning a variety of new adjectives to describe people and objects. Movies and TV - Express
movie & TV preferences and learn how to buy a movie ticket. Daily routine - Describe a typical day,
weekend & vacation. Clothing and Shopping – Learn how to ask questions to a salesperson and discuss
clothing.

FRENCH III (H)                                                                                   1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of French II with a grade of C or better

The emphasis of French 3 is placed on speaking, writing, reading, listening and intermediate
grammar. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of authentic French audio & video clips, short stories,
newspaper & magazine articles. Major themes of this course will focus on intermediate grammar along with
student-chosen vocabulary themes for each unit. The expectation is to stay in the target language as often as
possible with significant, volunteered participation in French.

FRENCH IV (H)                                                                              1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of French III with a grade of C or better

The emphasis of French 4 is placed on speaking, writing, reading, listening and intermediate/advanced
grammar. Students will be exposed to a wide variety of authentic French audio & video clips, short stories,
newspaper & magazine articles. Major themes of this course will focus on intermediate/advanced grammar
along with student-chosen vocabulary themes for each unit. The expectation is to stay in the target language
with significant, volunteered participation in French.

EXPLORATORY GREEK & CULTURE                                                               .5 CREDIT

This course is an introduction to Greek culture and language. Learn customs, etiquette, cuisine, cultural
events & celebrations of modern day Greece. Students will try a variety of traditional Greek dishes and will
prepare a Greek dish in class. Students explore famous landmarks of Greece, geography, Ancient Greece and
mythology. An introduction to the Greek language includes practicing basic vocabulary, expressions, and
survival phrases along with identifying the Greek alphabet letters and English words that originate from the
Greek language.

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EXPLORATORY GREEK & CULTURE II                                                             .5 CREDIT

This course continues to expose students to Greek culture and language. Learn more about Greek customs,
etiquette, cuisine, cultural events & celebrations. Students explore popular travel destinations, Athens & its
landmarks, constellations, & astronomy. Students continue to try a variety of Greek foods and prepare
traditional dishes. Students will begin to interpret and produce simple Greek expressions and sentences.

SPANISH I (CP)                                                                                 1 CREDIT

Students will be introduced to common vocabulary and basic grammatical concepts through TPR and
through conventional methods. Beginning speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills will also be
developed. Topics will include: greetings, introductions, descriptions, telling the time/date/weather, asking
for and giving directions, expressing opinions, preferences, feelings, etc. Aspects of Spanish and Latino
culture will also be explored. Students in the Spanish I class are expected to create a portfolio of work
samples and pieces of evidence to confirm their individual progress in learning the Spanish language.

SPANISH II (CP)                                                                                    1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Spanish I with a grade of C or better

Spanish II revisits and extends the topics of Spanish I and further expands vocabulary, while introducing
more complex grammatical structures. The four language skill areas of reading, writing, listening, and
speaking will be further developed. Students in the Spanish II class will complete individual research
projects to further their knowledge and understanding of the cultures of Spain and Latin America.

SPANISH III (H)                                                                                    1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Spanish II with a grade of C or better

At the Spanish III level, students are expected to use Spanish only in the classroom, (to the greatest extent
possible). Weekly oral presentations and activities to develop spontaneous speaking skills are routine.
Students in Spanish III explore more thoroughly grammatical concepts and are introduced to situational
vocabulary, (expressions to use in various situations). Major works of Spanish literature and art are
introduced. Research in cultural topics will be required.

SPANISH IV (H)                                                                                  1 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of Spanish III with a grade of C or better

In the Spanish IV classroom, students will “fine tune” their abilities in the four language skill areas.
Students use Spanish exclusively in the classroom and are expected to present weekly oral current event
reports from a Spanish speaking country. Pragmatic language skills, (using conversation fillers, introducing
or changing a topic, etc.) are introduced and listening skills are further developed by listening to native
speakers of the language at conversational speed. Major works of Spanish art and literature are explored in
more depth. A cultural research project that connects to the community is required.

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BUSINESS EDUCATION
                                   (Not all electives are offered every year)

INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS                                                                      .5 CREDIT

This course will investigate the world of business, how it all works, and what types of careers can be pursued
within it, Practical case studies about popular businesses will be reviewed. This course is a must for anyone
interested in pursuing a career in business or a business degree after high school. There is no prerequisite but
basic computer experience is helpful.

INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING                                                                   .5 CREDIT

This course would introduce learning Java, which is an object-oriented programming language. Java is free
to access and can run on all platforms. Also, if time allowed, Visual Basic for Excel would be introduced as
well. Visual Basic is a programming language that helps to automate repeating operations and redundant
tasks.

SPORTS AND ENTERTAINMENT MARKETING                                                            .5 CREDIT

The business of entertainment, including movies, concerts, theme parks, and sporting events have a
tremendous impact on our economy and provide many career opportunities. These activities are global in
their reach and impact. Sports marketing is a growing division of the marketing field that focuses on the
business of sports and the use of sports as a marketing tool. This class will provide students with an overview
of the sports and entertainment field form a business and marketing perspective.

ACCOUNTING I (TP/CP)                                                                          .5 CREDIT

This course is designed to prepare students with skills to enhance their opportunities for success in the
workplace and in society. Students will develop a foundation in the economical, financial, technological and
ethical aspects of business to become competent consumers, employees and entrepreneurs. Students will
study the accounting cycle for a service business and a merchandising business. The student will be
expected to analyze transactions, journalize, post, perform banking and payroll procedures, prepare
schedules and financial statements. Students will also complete a Video Transfer Simulation covering all
aspects of the basic accounting cycle.
Major topics and concepts: GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles), Posting to a General
Ledger, Journalizing and Posting Transactions for a Proprietorship, Work Sheet for a Service Business,
Financial Statements for a Proprietorship.
*This course qualifies as a fourth year of Math related experience.

ACCOUNTING II (TP/CP)                                                                      .5 CREDIT
Prerequisite: successful completion of completed Accounting I with a grade of C or better, recommended for
students in grades 10 – 12.

 This course is an advanced course that provides further instruction in the accounting process. Students will
recognize and compare the different forms of business organizations, identify the various accounting
functions involved with each form business organization and perform accounting procedures that include
topics such as: depreciation, bad debts and uncollectible accounts. Students will be expected to practice
                                                      21
productivity skills as they apply to accounting and complete the accounting cycle work within an assigned
time frame. An advanced simulation packet will be provided for students to demonstrate their knowledge of
accounting concepts.
Major topics and concepts: Preparing Payroll Records, Payroll Accounting, Taxes, and Reports,
Accounting for Uncollectible Accounts Receivable, Accounting for Plant Assets and Depreciation.
*This course qualifies as a fourth year of Math related experience.

BUSINESS LAW (CP)                                                                          .5 CREDIT

This course is designed to help students achieve an understanding of the legal principles, which will be
useful throughout life. Students will study problems, which will reflect true situation where business law has
a major impact on the lives of young persons, adults and businesses. Students study a wide variety of topics
including: Ethics, Crimes, Laws for Minors, Laws for Families, Laws for Consumers, contracts, kinds of
law, enforcing the law and torts. Students will acquire information in regard to preventing legal difficulties.
Students will be expected to keep law portfolios, prepare research projects and participate in class
discussions.
Major topics and concepts: Laws and their Ethical Foundation, Constitutional Rights, Criminal Law and
Procedure, Civil Law and Procedure, Contracts, Torts, Consumer Protection.

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (TP/CP)                                                                 .5 CREDIT

Students will be introduced to today’s critical business management concepts and principles in a realistic,
investigative, and enriching manner. Business operations are approached from the entrepreneurial and
management perspective. Students will create their own business, completing all nine steps of a business
plan. Also covered will be a brief introduction of business law, contracts, ethics, technology, and
international business.
Major topics and concepts: Business and its Environment, Forms of Business Ownership and the Law,
Information and Communication Systems, Production and Marketing Management, Financial Management,
Legal Aspects of Business, Human Resources Management, Management Responsibilities.

             INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
                          (Not all electives are offered every year)

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (TP)                                                                    .5 CREDIT

This course is offered to students who wish to learn real-world computer applications in a wide variety of
professions. Students will design various office documents using Word, Excel, PowerPoint and use Adobe
PhotoShop (if available). This course is offered to students who wish to learn real-world computer
applications in a wide variety of professions. Students will design various office documents using Word,
Excel, PowerPoint and use Adobe PhotoShop (if available). They will become familiar with tool bars, set-up
options, templates, tables, formulas graphics, modifying templates and creating common workplace
documents.
Major topics and concepts: Microsoft Word applications, Microsoft PowerPoint applications, Microsoft
Excel applications, Adobe Photoshop, Ethical Responsibilities

                                                      22
COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II                                                                   .5 CREDIT

This course is offered to students who wish to learn advanced computer applications necessary to pursue a
career in a variety of business professions. Students will design a number of advanced office documents
using Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Adobe PhotoShop (if available). Many integrated computer application
projects will be completed in a simulated business environment.
Major topics and concepts: Microsoft Word applications, Microsoft PowerPoint applications, Microsoft
Excel applications, Adobe Photoshop, Ethical Responsibilities.

COMPUTER GRAPHICS                                                                        .5 CREDIT

This course will focus on the theory and practice of visual elements of electronic media. Students will take
and process digital still images as well as short videos. They will use the scanner to import pager images.
They will work with various image formats, e.g., BMP, TIFF, JPEG and become familiar with the properties
of each. Students will work with the GIMP program, as well as MS MovieMaker, to create simple
animations, study pixel properties, layering and color options. Students will produce several projects
including flyers, brochures, and greeting cards. An electronic project using PowerPoint or a web page will
also be created.
Major topics and concepts: Introduction to Computer Graphics, Using GIMP (GNHU Image Manipulation
Program), Using a digital camera and/or the FLIP video camera, Incorporating digital photos and/or videos
into a variety of documents, Creating a story board in MS MovieMaker, Ethical responsibilities regarding
photographs, movies, and posting to the Internet.

WEB PAGE DESIGN                                                                          .5 CREDIT

This course will focus on the construction and evaluation of Web pages. Students will explore existing
educational web pages and evaluate them. Using free online web creation sites, students will create a variety
of web pages. They will also create their own pages using Notepad and HTML tags. Students will insert
images, format text and graphics, add music and create hyperlinks. Students will also learn about the history
of the Internet, e-mail applications, operators, and identity theft.
Major topics and concepts: Introduction to the Internet, E-Mail, Refining a search using Operators,
Identity Theft and Computer Ethics, Using HTML, Free online web creation sites.

                                     TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION
                                  (Not all electives are offered every year)

INTRODUCTION TO WOODWORKING                                                             .5 CREDIT
This semester long course is designed to introduce students to general woodworking practices. Students will
expand their knowledge and experience through various projects, lessons, and vocabulary. Students will be
expected to learn about and safely use hand tools, power tools, and woodworking machinery. The projects
are designed to give students as much experience as possible by using many different machines and tools.

INTERMEDIATE WOODWORKING                                                                  .5 CREDIT
This semester long course is designed to build upon student skills and woodworking practices gained in
Woodworking 1. Woodworking 1 is a prerequisite. Students will expand their knowledge and experience
through various projects, lessons, and vocabulary. Students will be expected to safely use hand tools, power
tools, and woodworking machinery.

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