PATIENT INFORMATION Rocket KCH Fetal Bladder Drain - Rocket Medical plc

 
PATIENT INFORMATION Rocket KCH Fetal Bladder Drain - Rocket Medical plc
GB

Rocket KCH™ Fetal Bladder Drain
PATIENT INFORMATION
Scope: This information covers R57405 Rocket KCH™ Fetal Bladder Drain and derivatives
Humanitarian Device: Authorised by Federal law for use in the treatment of Fetal Obstructive Uropathy.
The effectiveness of this device has not been demonstrated.
Definitions
        Amniocentesis: A procedure in which a sample of
         the amniotic fluid is taken and studied.
        Amniotic Sac: The space around your baby which
         is filled with fluid.
        Chorioamnionitis: An inflammation of the
         membrane surrounding your baby.
        Chorionic Villus Sampling (CVS): A procedure in
         which a sample of the tissue in the placenta is taken
         and studied.
        Fetal Karyotype: A study of your baby’s
         chromosomes.
        Gestational Age: The time that has passed since
         your baby’s conception.
        Lower Obstructive Uropathy: A blockage in the
         urinary tract below the bladder.
        Maternal Sepsis: An infection in the mother.
        Open Fetal Surgery: The partial removal of a fetus from the uterus so surgery can be performed to correct a defect.
        Urinary Ascites: The leaking of urine into your baby’s abdomen.
        Urinary Tract: The system which removes urine from the body.
        Catheter: A tube inserted into a body cavity to allow movement of fluid.
        Infuse: The addition of fluid into the body.
        Ultrasound: This is how a doctor can look at your baby on a television screen.
Why is there pressure in my baby’s urinary tract?
In normal pregnancy a baby’s urine will drain from the kidneys into the bladder and then through the urinary tract and into the amniotic
sac. It appears that this is not happening with your baby who has a condition know as lower obstructive uropathy. This means that
there may be a blockage in your baby’s urinary tract and the urine cannot flow freely into the amniotic sac.
This will cause pressure to build up in the urinary tract and if left untreated, could cause damage to your baby's lungs and kidneys.
In severe cases this damage could lead to stillbirth or could cause your baby to die shortly after birth because the lungs or kidneys
fail. It could also cause severe physical deformities.
The Kings College Hospital (London) Fetal Bladder Drain or “Rocket® KCH™ Catheter” is designed to help relieve the pressure in
the baby’s urinary tract. The Rocket® KCH™ Catheter allows the urine to flow from the baby’s bladder into the amniotic sac, by-
passing the baby’s urinary tract and thus relieving the pressure build-up.
Can my baby benefit from this procedure?
Your doctor will advise you if you and your baby are suitable for this procedure, typically your baby may benefit if:
        Your pregnancy is between 18 to 32 weeks and has a blocked urinary tract.
        Your baby shows no physical deformities under a detailed ultrasound.
        A study of your baby’s chromosomes, also called a fetal karyotype, shows no other serious defect.
When can this procedure be performed?
A doctor can perform this procedure if your baby is not less than 18 weeks but no older than 32 weeks gestational age. Since ea ch
case is different, your doctor will be able to give you more information about you and your baby.
PATIENT INFORMATION Rocket KCH Fetal Bladder Drain - Rocket Medical plc
Relieving pressure in your baby’s urinary tract:
An obstructed urinary tract is normally discovered during a routine ultrasound examination. Once identified, your doctor will perform
additional tests to see if your baby has other health related conditions. These additional tests can include:
        a more detailed ultrasound examination to see if your baby has any other physical problems.
        chromosomal testing.
Chromosomal testing is commonly performed in one of two ways:
The first is called chorionic villus sampling or CVS. The doctor inserts a fine catheter or needle into your uterus and removes a small
tissue sample. The second method is called amniocentesis and in this case, the doctor will insert a needle through your abdomen
and remove a sample of your amniotic fluid. This tissue or fluid is then studied to see if your baby has other health conditions.
Finally, the doctor may need to study your baby’s urine over a short period to determine how well your baby’s kidneys are functioning.
This is normally performed under local anaesthesia and occasionally sedation for you
and the baby if he/she is moving around a great deal. Occasionally, if there is not enough
in the space between your baby and the wall of your uterus your doctor may also perform
an amnio-infusion by infusing warm saline or similar fluid.

Inserting the Rocket® KCH™ Catheter.
The Rocket KCH™ Catheter is placed using ultrasonic monitoring to show it’s position
on a screen. Your doctor will insert a special needle through your abdomen and into the
uterus and fetal bladder (image right).
A little of your baby’s urine will then be withdrawn through the needle to confirm it is in
the correct place. Your doctor will then insert the catheter into the special needle and
position it so that a coil of catheter in your baby’s bladder and another coil outside in your
amniotic space. (lower image).
This allows urine to drain from your baby’s bladder into your amniotic sac and relive the
pressure in your baby’s urinary system.
The whole process usually takes 15-30 minutes. Your doctor may want you to stay in
hospital for observation, but usually only long enough to make sure you and your baby
are fit and well after the procedure.
Your doctor will regularly monitor you to ensure there are no early contractions and that
the baby’s heart rate is not abnormal or demonstrating any sign of distress. You will need
to have your next ultrasound examination within 48-72 hours after the procedure and
you will usually need follow-up ultrasound examinations every week until your baby is
born.
The doctor will be examining the position of the Rocket® KCH™ Catheter and checking
to make sure that it is functioning properly. Sometimes, through the baby’s movement or
by grasping it, the catheter may come out of your baby’s bladder or may become kinked
or blocked. If any of these things happen, the baby’s urine will no longer be able to drain
into the amniotic space. Your doctor may need to repeat the procedure and replace the
catheter.
If catheter continues to function well it is usually left in place and removed shortly after
birth. Your doctor will advise you on the most appropriate method of delivery for you and
your baby.

What other techniques can be used to treat my baby’s problems?
Your doctor can drain your baby’s bladder by regularly inserting a needle directly into the
fetal bladder. However, your doctor will need to do this as often as the pressure builds
up to prevent damage to your baby’s kidneys and lungs.
In some cases open fetal surgery can repair the blockage. Your doctor will advise you if
this is appropriate for you and your baby.

Deciding if fetal bladder drainage is best for you and your baby:
The decision to have the placement of the Rocket® KCH™ Catheter or any other
procedure to relieve the urinary pressure is an important decision and is up to you and
your partner. You do not have to have this procedure performed.
You have read about the potential risks of the procedure. You must understand these risks.
You should also know the potential risks of leaving this condition untreated.
PATIENT INFORMATION Rocket KCH Fetal Bladder Drain - Rocket Medical plc
The pressure build-up could damage your baby’s lungs and/or kidneys. This could lead to physical deformity or to your baby’s death.
If you are thinking about having this procedure performed, you should discuss it with your doctor as soon as possible. Your doctor
will be able to explain this procedure to you in more detail.
Before you make this decision, you must understand that using the Rocket® KCH™™ Catheter cannot correct the original defect. It
cannot correct the blockage in your baby’s urinary tract, this will need to be treated after your baby born.
The Rocket® KCH™ Catheter will only allow urine to drain from the baby’s bladder so that your baby’s lungs and kidneys can continue
to grow without pressure during pregnancy.
What are the risks associated with using the Rocket® KCH™™ Catheter?
As with all surgical procedures there are some risks. These are those involved with the placement of the Rocket® KCH™™ Catheter:
      Chorioamnionitis is an inflammation of the fetal membrane and can result after any procedure, including placing a fetal bladder
       stent, in which a doctor places an instrument into your uterus during pregnancy. This condition may cause you to lose the fluid
       around your baby or may cause infection in your baby and possibly cause your baby to be stillborn.
      Urinary ascites is the leakage of urine into your baby’s abdomen. This can occur as result of fetal stent placement although it
       usually resolves itself once the bladder has began to drain through the catheter.
      Placing the fetal bladder stent could cause you to go into pre-term labour. This can happen after any surgery which goes into
       the uterus during pregnancy.
      There might be some minor bleeding from your uterus or the placenta and minor injury to your uterus caused by the passing of
       the insertion needle, Any light bleeding will usually stop after a short time.
      Amniotic Band Syndrome is a rare abnormality where the babies extremities, such a fingers, toes or limbs, become trapped in
       part of the amniotic sac. Its cause is still unknown but some doctors believe that puncturing the amniotic sac as occurs when
       placing the KCH™™ Catheter may lead to this condition.
      Maternal sepsis is an infection in the mother which can happen as a result of placing any instrument into your uterus whilst you
       are pregnant. Your doctor will normally give you antibiotics before and after the procedure to help reduce this risk.
      Amniotic fluid may leak from the space between your baby and the wall of your uterus. This can happen any time after your
       doctor places an instrument into the uterus while you are pregnant. The needle could perforate your baby’s intestine and may
       cause other damage if the doctor doesn’t place it accurately. The whole procedure is carried out under ultrasound to minimize
       this risk.
      Abdominal wall defect and subsequent omental herniation have been reported in some studies. Placement of the catheter may
       result in a weakening of the baby’s abdominal wall and in severe cases a portion of bowel may herniate through requiring
       correction with surgery at a later date.
      Once the stent is implanted, there is the risk that it may become obstructed or dislodged, resulting in the need for repeated stent
       placements.
      Placing a fetal bladder drain could cause you to deliver your baby much earlier than planned. This could also happen if there is
       an inflammation of the fetal membrane.
      Clinical studies have not fully established the benefit of placing a fetal bladder stent compared to more conservative treatments.
       Your doctor will advise you of the benefits and risks in your particular situation.

If you have any other questions or concerns, please ask your doctor.

WARNING: Following insertion of the KCH™ Catheter REPORT IMMEDIATELY any pain, bleeding or fluid loss to your doctor.
These abnormal conditions should be closely monitored

    CAUTION: Federal law restricts this device to sale, distribution and use by or on the order of a physician with appropriate training
                                                              and experience.

                        This device is not manufactured
                        with natural rubber latex
                                                                                               ONLY

                   ROCKET MEDICAL PLC                                                                  Rocket Medical GmbH
                   Sedling Road, Washington,                                                           Am Rosengarten 48,
                   England, NE38 9BZ                                                                   15566 Schöneiche.
                   www.rocketmedical.com                                                               Germany

                                                           DO NOT RESTERILISE
                                          Unless opened or damaged, contents of package are sterile.

    0088
              ZDOCK045     080319      Rev 14      Copyright© 2003-2019       ROCKET MEDICAL PLC           All Rights Reserved. (GB)
PATIENT INFORMATION Rocket KCH Fetal Bladder Drain - Rocket Medical plc
Rocket KCH™ Fetal Bladder Drain
INSTRUCTIONS for USE
Scope: These instructions cover R57405 KCH™ Fetal Bladder Drain and derivatives
Humanitarian Device: Authorised by Federal law for use in the treatment of Fetal obstructive uropathy. The effectiveness of this device has not been
demonstrated.
Device Description: The device is a double pigtail stent with an outer tube diameter of 2.1mm and inner tube diameter of 1.5mm. The coils are
wound to 18mm diameters, 30mm between the coils. The proximal pigtail being a double coil orientated perpendicular to the stent to allow the pigtail
to lie flat against the Fetal abdomen. The distal pigtail is a one and a half coil orientated horizontally to the stent in order to hold the pigtail inside the
Fetal bladder. Both coils have 3 side ports, with distal coil tip being supported by a stainless steel tube for enhanced drainage and ultrasound
visualisation.
Indications for Use: The KCH™ Fetal Bladder Drainage Catheter is intended for use in fetal bladder decompression following diagnosis of fetal
post-vesicular obstructive uropathy in fetuses of 18-32 weeks gestation. The device is for use by or under the direct supervision of trained personnel
and accordance with national guidelines such as: Interventional procedure guidance 202: Fetal vesico–amniotic shunt for lower urinary tract outflow
obstruction. NICE Dec. 2006.
CONTRAINDICATIONS: The Rocket KCH™ Fetal Bladder Drainage Catheter should not be used in the presence of the following conditions: Severe
congenital abnormalities that jeopardise neonatal survival, abnormal karyotype, renal cortical cysts or evidence of renal failure.

ADVERSE EFFECTS OF THE DEVICE ON HEALTH
Reported Advcerse and Side Effects: Currently there are no reported adverse effects on file for the KCH™ Fetal Bladder Drainage Catheter.
However, stent/shunt migration has been reported in >50% of cases of vesico–amniotic shunt placement in the literature. In one retrospective study,
Nineteen (46.3%) fetuses underwent shunt placement at a median gestational age of 19 (range: 16.3–31.1) weeks. Shunt dislodgement occurred in
10 (52.6%) patients. A total of 35 procedures were performed; among which 16 (45.7%) were repeat procedures. The only prenatal factor associated
with shunt dislodgement was the type of the shunt; the Rocket KCH™ catheter was associated with statistically lower migration rates: Ref: Kurtz et.al.
Factors associated with fetal shunt dislodgement in lower urinary tract obstruction. Prenat Diag 2016;36:720-725. Abdominal wall defect and subsequent omental
herniation was reported in 11% of cases in one study and in several other publications
Risks associated with Fetal-Amniotic Shunting include: chorioamnionitis, urinary ascites, pre-term labour, haemorrhage, amniotic band
syndrome, maternal sepsis, amniotic fluid leak, stent obstruction or migration requiring replacement, abdominal wall defect and subsequent omental
herniation. There is no evidence that these complications are device related but a feature of the overall technique which requires significant levels of
skill and careful evaluation of all the associated risks.
WARNING: Potential Adverse Events include the following complications: ascites, maternal sepsis, amniotic fluid leak and/or complete rupture of
the membranes, direct trauma to the fetus, such as fetal intestinal perforation, uterine injury or bleeding, placental bleeding, preterm labour. There is
a possible risk that these complications may require subsequent intervention leading to spontaneous abortion and in rare cases; loss of the uterus.

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE
Note: Clinical studies have not fully demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of fetal bladder stenting. However, some studies provide reasonable
assurance of the safety of the technique. In addition there is reported clinical experience with KCH™ catheter in over 20 years of use.
PRECAUTIONS
Patient / Diagnostic Evaluation: A complete medical history should be obtained to determine conditions that might influence the selection of the
procedure or to identify conditions that mediate contraindications to use of the device.
Physicians must evaluate each case on its individual merits and only use the device where there is significant risk of renal or pulmonary damage if
no intervention is made. The physician must have concluded that the risks to the fetus outweigh the potential risks of using the device. It is
recommended that the following investigations are conducted to determine if the fetus is suitable for treatment with the KCH™ Catheter.
         Ultrasound investigation to demonstrate lower obstructive uropathy, indications are normally; bilateral hydronephorosis, utreostasis,
          megacystitis or oligohydramniosis.
         Fetal karyotyping for chromosomal analysis to diagnose or exclude concomitant chromosomal abnormalities that may influence
          management decisions or treatment choices.
         Serial vesicocentesis to evaluate the fetal function through fetal urinary biochemical parameters. The parameters and their respective cut-
          off values are shown below:
         Serial vesicocentesis to evaluate the fetal renal function through fetal urinary biochemical parameters. The parameters and their respective
          cut-off values are Na +
INSTRUCTIONS FOR USE:
Note: The use of tocolytic agents during and after the procedure may be advisable. Close observation of the condition of the fetus for any sign of
preterm labour is mandatory.
Patient Preparation:
1    Perform ultrasound to ascertain position of the fetus. Manipulation of the fetus in utero may become necessary to allow the most advantageous
     access.
2    Sedate the mother if deemed advisable. Sedation of the fetus is not normally required, however if significant manipulation is required or there is
     excessive fetal movement then fetal and or maternal sedation may be required.
3    Establish using ultrasound that there is sufficient fluid in the amniotic space. Fetal obstruction uropathy commonly causes oligohydramniosis and
     amnio-infusion with 500ml-1000ml of warmed normal saline may be required depending on individual patient conditions.
4    At the time of amnio-infusion, it is advisable to administer intra-amniotic antibiotics due to the
     threat of choriomnionitis. A broad spectrum antibiotic such as nafcillin (500 – 100mg) or a
     cephalosporin (1-2gm) to which penicillin-resistant Staphylococci are sensitive is recommended.
     (Note: Administration of specific antibiotics and dosages is dependent on the individual patient’s
     conditions, and should be determined by the physician on a a case-by-case basis.)
5    Prepare the skin using suitable antibacterial skin prep. Local anaesthetic should be used at the
     puncture site.
6    Using a No.11 blade make a 5mm incision sufficient to allow insertion of the trocar and cannula
     assembly. (Fig 1.)
7    Under ultrasonic monitoring, introduce the trocar and cannula transabdominally into the uterus
     and fetal bladder.
8    Aspiration of urine through the irrigation channel will confirm correct insertion into the fetal bladder.
9    Remove the trocar and further aspirate sufficient urine to prevent back flow up the open cannula.
     Remove the seal from the cannula.
10 The KCH™ catheter, with its forming wire in place, (Fig.2) is then unrolled gently by hand. Unroll
     the fetal component between forefinger and thumb. Do NOT pull the tip of the catheter in an
     attempt to straighten it – as this will induce twisting of the material and cuase the catheter to kink.
     Carefully repeat the process for the maternal component.
11 CAREFULLY remove the forming wire and red pusher and substitute with the semi rigid guidewire.
12 Using the tapered end of guidewire holder as a support, insert the curved end of the wire
     through the whole length of the KCH™ catheter. Gently straighten the catheter to allow
     passage of the guidewire.
13 Gently insert the catheter/guidewire combination into the introducer set taking care not to kink the catheter. When fully inserted, remove the semi
     rigid guide wire.
14 Using the first stage pusher rod (Fig 3) deliver the distal end of the catheter into the Fetal bladder. Under ultrasound control, confirm that the
     fetal component has coiled fully and is in the correct position.
15 Withdrew the tip of the cannula from the Fetal abdomen and insert the second stage pusher rod to deliver the maternal component into the
     amniotic cavity forming a vesico-amniotic shunt.
             CAUTION: Care must be taken to avoid kinking the catheter during unrolling and insertion into the introducer set.
                    Ensure that both coils are free and that no portion of the stent has been left in the uterine wall.
16   Once correct positioning has been confirmed, remove the cannula and dress the puncture site appropriately.
17   Document the procedure and correct positioning of the KCH™ catheter.
18   Monitor the Fetal bladder and ensure that the vesico-amniotic shunt is active and drainage is taking place and that there is no evidence of Fetal
     distress or onset of premature labour.
Follow up: Serial ultrasounds should be performed within 24-72 hours to ensure correct function of the stent. Ultrasound examinations should be
performed weekly for the rest of the pregnancy to ensure continued function of the shunt.
Removal: The KCH™ catheter can be removed using conventional aseptic technique following satisfactory paediatric urological evaluation.
Disposal: This device should be handled and disposed of in accordance with local hospital policy and with regard to all applicable regulations,
including but without limitation to, those pertaining to human health & safety and care of the environment.
References: Rodeck. CH., Nicolaides. K.H. “Ultrasound “ Guided Invasive Procedures in Obstetrics” in Clinics in Obstetrics & Gynaecology - Vol.
10, No.3, December 1983

 CAUTION: Federal law restricts this device to sale, distribution and use by or on the order of a physician with appropriate training and experience.

                          This device is not manufactured
                          with natural rubber latex
                                                                                                      ONLY

                   ROCKET MEDICAL PLC                                                                          Rocket Medical GmbH
                   Sedling Road, Washington,                                                                   Am Rosengarten 48,
                   England, NE38 9BZ                                                                           15566 Schöneiche.
                   www.rocketmedical.com                                                                       Germany

                              Unless opened or damaged, contents of package are sterile. Store at room temperature.
                                              Avoid prolonged exposure to elevated temperatures.

 0088
           ZDOCK045        080319      Rev 14      Copyright© 2003-2019         ROCKET MEDICAL PLC                All Rights Reserved. (GB)
FR
 Sonde vésicale foetale Rocket KCH™
 INFORMATIONS SUR LE PATIENT
Objet : Ces informations portent sur la sonde vésicale fœtale R57405 Rocket KCH™™ et les produits dérivés.
Appareil humanitaire : Autorisé par les lois fédérales pour le traitement de l’uropathie fœtale obstructive.
L’efficacité de cet appareil n’a pas encore été démontrée.
Définitions
         Amniocentèse : Procédure par laquelle un
          échantillon du liquide amniotique est prélevé et
          analysé.
         Poche amniotique : Espace autour de votre bébé
          qui est rempli d’un liquide.
         Chorioamnionite : Inflammation de la
          membrane entourant le bébé.
         Choriocentèse :    Procédure par laquelle un
          échantillon du tissu placentaire est prélevé et
          analysé.
         Caryotype fœtal : Étude des
          chromosomes de votre bébé.
         Âge gestationnel : Temps écoulé depuis la
          conception du bébé.
         Uropathie obstructive basse : Obstruction des
          voies urinaires en dessous de la vessie.
         Septicémie maternelle : Infection chez la mère.
         Chirurgie fœtale ouverte : Retrait partiel du fœtus à partir de l’utérus afin de procéder à la correction d’un défaut par voie
          chirurgicale.
         Ascite urinaire : Écoulement de l’urine dans l’abdomen de votre bébé.
         Voies urinaires : Système qui évacuant l’urine du corps.
         Cathéter Tube inséré dans une cavité corporelle afin de permettre la circulation d’un liquide.
         Perfusion Ajout d’un liquide dans le corps.
         Échographie : Méthode par laquelle un médecin observe votre bébé sur un moniteur.
Pourquoi y-a-t-il une pression sur les voies urinaires de mon bébé ?
Au cours d’une grossesse normale, l’urine du bébé passe des reins à la vessie et puis par les voies urinaires pour se déverser dans
la poche amniotique. Il semble que les choses ne se déroulent pas ainsi pour votre bébé qui souffre de d’une pathologie appelée
uropathie obstructive basse. Cela signifie qu’il est possible que les voies urinaires de votre bébé soient bloquées et que l’urine ne peut
se déverser librement dans la poche amniotique.
Ceci causera une augmentation de la pression sur les voies urinaires susceptibles d'endommager les poumons et les reins de votre
bébé si aucun traitement n'est administré. Dans les cas graves, cette situation pourrait entrainer une mortinatalité ou le décès de votre
bébé peu de temps après la naissance en raison du non-fonctionnement des poumons ou des reins. Elle peut également causer des
malformations physiques graves.
La sonde vésicale foetale du Kings College Hospital (Londres) ou “Rocket® KCH™ Catheter” est conçue pour contribuer à réduire la
pression sur les voies urinaires du bébé. Le Rocket® KCH™ Catheter permet à l’urine de circuler de la vessie du bébé à la poche
amniotique, en évitant les voies urinaires du bébé et en diminuant de ce fait l’augmentation de la pression.
Mon bébé peut-il bénéficier de cette procédure ?
Votre médecin déterminera si votre bébé et vous pouvez bénéficier de cette procédure. Généralement, votre bébé peut en bénéficier si :
         Votre grossesse se situe entre 18 et 32 semaines et le fœtus souffre d’un problème de blocage
          des voies urinaires.
         Votre bébé ne présente aucune malformation lors d'une échographie détaillée.
         L’étude des chromosomes de votre bébé, également appelée caryotype, ne révèle aucun défaut grave.
Quand peut-on effectuer cette procédure ?
Un médecin peut effectuer cette procédure si votre bébé a 18 semaines au moins et 32 semaines au plus. Chaque cas étant différent,
votre médecin pourra vous fournir toutes les informations sur votre bébé et vous.
Diminution de la pression sur les voies urinaires de votre bébé :
L’obstruction des voies urinaires est généralement découverte lors d’une échographie de routine. Une fois qu’elle est identifiée, votre
médecin peut souhaiter effectuer des analyses supplémentaires afin de voir si votre bébé présente d’autres problèmes de santé. Ces
analyses supplémentaires peuvent inclure :
          une échographie plus détaillée afin de voir si votre bébé présente d’autres problèmes physiques.
          une analyse chromosomique.
L’analyse chromosomique est généralement effectuée de l'une des deux façons suivantes:
La première s'appelle choriocentèse. Le médecin insère un cathéter ou une aiguille fine dans votre utérus et prélève un petit échantillon
de tissus. La deuxième méthode s'appelle amniocentèse et dans ce cas, le médecin insère une aiguille à travers votre abdomen pour
prélever un échantillon de votre liquide amniotique. Ce tissu ou ce liquide est ensuite analysé afin de voir si votre bébé présente
d’autres problèmes de santé.
Finalement, le médecin peut souhaiter analyser l’urine de votre bébé pendant une courte période afin de déterminer le fonctionnement
des reins de votre bébé. Cette pratique est généralement effectuée sous anesthésie locale ou parfois
Votre bébé et vous êtes placés sous sédatif si le bébé s’agite beaucoup. Souvent, s’il n’y
a pas assez d’espace entre votre bébé et la paroi utérine, votre médecin peut également
procéder à une amnio-perfusion en injectant une solution saline chaude ou similaire.
Insertion du Rocket® KCH™ Catheter.
Le Rocket KCH™ Catheter est placé à l’aide d’un dispositif de surveillance échographique
permettant de montrer sa position sur l’écran. Votre médecin va insérer une aiguille
spéciale dans votre utérus et la vessie de votre bébé à travers votre abdomen (image à
droite).
Une petite quantité de l’urine de votre bébé sera ensuite prélevée à l’aide de l’aiguille afin
de confirmer qu’elle est bien en place. Votre médecin insère ensuite le cathéter dans
l’aiguille spéciale et le place de sorte qu’une spirale du cathéter se trouve dans la vessie
de votre bébé et une autre spirale dans votre espace amniotique. (image en-dessous).
Ceci permet à l’urine de passer de la vessie à la poche amniotique et diminue la pression
sur le système urinaire de votre bébé.
Toute la procédure prend généralement 15 à 30 minutes. Votre médecin peut souhaiter
vous garder à l’hôpital en observation, mais généralement uniquement jusqu’à ce qu’il
s’assure que votre bébé et vous êtes en bonne santé après la procédure.
Votre médecin vous suivra régulièrement afin de s’assurer qu’il n’y a aucune contraction
précoce et que le rythme cardiaque de votre bébé n’est pas anormal ou ne présente aucun
signe de détresse. Il est important que vous ayez votre prochaine échographie dans les
48 à 72 heures suivant la procédure et que les échographies de suivi aient lieu chaque
semaine jusqu’à la naissance de votre bébé.
Le médecin examinera la position du cathéter Rocket® KCH™ afin de s’assurer qu’il
fonctionne parfaitement. Parfois, à travers les mouvements du bébé ou au toucher, le
cathéter peut sortir de la vessie du bébé ou se retrouver entortillé ou obstrué. Si l'une de
ces situations survient, l’urine du bébé ne pourra plus se déverser dans l’espace
amniotique. Votre médecin peut devoir reprendre la procédure et remplacer le cathéter.
Si le cathéter continue de fonctionner parfaitement, il reste en place et est enlevé peu
après la naissance. Votre médecin vous conseillera sur les méthodes d’accouchement
les plus appropriées pour votre bébé et vous.

Quelles autres techniques peuvent être utilisées pour traiter les problèmes du
bébé ?
Votre médecin peut régulièrement vider la vessie de votre bébé en insérant directement
une aiguille dans la vessie du bébé. Cependant, votre médecin devra le faire aussi
fréquemment que la pression augmentera afin d’éviter d’endommager les reins et les
poumons de votre bébé.
Dans certains cas, une chirurgie fœtale ouverte peut réparer l’obstruction. Votre médecin
vous conseillera sur la procédure appropriée pour votre bébé et vous.

La vidange de la vessie du bébé est-elle la meilleure chose pour votre bébé et
vous ?
La décision de poser le cathéter Rocket® KCH™ ou tout autre procédure visant à
diminuer la pression urinaire est une décision importante qui doit être prise par votre
partenaire et vous. Vous n’êtes pas obligée de vous soumettre à cette procédure.
Vous avez lu les risques potentiels de la procédure. Vous devez comprendre ces risques.
Vous devez également avoir pris connaissance des risques potentiels liés au non traitement
de ce problème.
L’augmentation de la pression pourrait endommager les poumons et/ou les reins de votre bébé. Ceci pourrait causer une
malformation physique ou le décès de votre bébé.
Si vous pensez à effectuer cette procédure, vous devez en parler avec votre médecin le plus tôt possible. Votre médecin sera à
même de vous fournir des explications détaillées sur cette procédure.
Avant de prendre une décision, vous devez comprendre que l’utilisation du cathéter Rocket® KCH™™ ne peut pas corriger le problème
initial. Elle ne peut corriger l’obstruction des voies urinaires de votre bébé, car celle-ci devra être traitée après la naissance de votre
bébé.
Le cathéter Rocket® KCH™ permettra à l’urine de sortir de la vessie du bébé afin que les poumons et les reins de votre bébé
puissent continuer leur croissance sans pression pendant la grossesse.
Quels sont les risques associés à l’utilisation du cathéter Rocket® KCH™™ ?
Comme pour les procédures chirurgicales, il existe quelques risques. Il s’agit des risques liés à la pose du cathéter Rocket®
KCH™™ :
    La chorioamionite est une inflammation de la membrane fœtale et peut survenir après toute procédure, y compris la pose d’une
     endoprothèse vésicale fœtale, au cours de laquelle le médecin place un instrument dans votre utérus pendant la grossesse.
     Cette situation peut causer une perte du liquide amniotique ou une infection de votre bébé et éventuellement une mortinatalité.
    L'ascite urinaire est l’écoulement de l’urine dans l’abdomen de votre bébé. Elle peut survenir du fait de la pose d’une
     endoprothèse fœtale bien qu’elle disparaisse généralement d’elle-même dès que la vessie commence à évacuer l’urine à
     travers le cathéter.
    La pose d’une endoprothèse fœtale peut entrainer chez vous un accouchement prématuré. Ceci peut survenir après toute
     opération chirurgicale ayant lieu dans l’utérus pendant la grossesse.
    Il pourrait y avoir des cas de saignements mineurs de l’utérus ou du placenta et une légère blessure sur votre utérus causée
     par le passage de l’aiguille d’insertion. Tout saignement léger s’arrêtera généralement rapidement.
    Le syndrome des brides amniotiques est une anomalie rare au cours de laquelle les extrémités du bébé, telles que les doigts,
     les orteils se retrouvent strangulés en partie dans la poche amniotique. Son origine demeure inconnue, mais certains médecins
     pensent que la perforation de la poche amniotique lors de la pose du cathéter KCH™™ peut en être la cause.
    La septicémie maternelle est une infection de la mère qui peut survenir suite à la pose d’un instrument dans votre utérus
     pendant votre grossesse. Votre médecin vous administrera généralement des antibiotiques avant et après l’opération afin de
     réduire le risque.
    Le liquide amniotique peut s’écouler dans l’espace situé entre votre bébé et la paroi utérine. Ceci peut survenir à tout moment
     après que le médecin ait placé un instrument dans l’utérus pendant votre grossesse. L’aiguille peut perforer les intestins de
     votre bébé et causer d’autres dommages si le médecin ne la place pas correctement. Toute la procédure est effectuée sous
     échographie afin de minimiser ce risque.
    Les anomalies de fermeture de la paroi antérieure et l’hernie épiploïque qui s’ensuit ont été signalées dans certaines études.
     La pose du cathéter donner lieu à l’affaiblissement de la paroi abdominale de votre bébé et dans certains sévères, une partie
     des intestins peut se transformer en hernie et nécessiter une correction ultérieure pat voie chirurgicale.
    Dès que l’endoprothèse est implantée, il existe un risque d’obstruction ou de dislocation, entraînant la nécessité de replacer
     d’autres endoprothèses.
    La pose d’une sonde vésicale fœtale pourrait entrainer l’accouchement prématuré de votre bébé. Ceci peut également survenir
     en cas d’inflammation de la membrane fœtale.
    Les études cliniques n’ont pas totalement établi les avantages de la pose d’une endoprothèse vésicale fœtale comparée à
     d’autres traitements classiques. Votre médecin vous conseillera sur les avantages et les risques dans votre situation
     particulière.

Si vous avez d’autres questions, vous pouvez consulter votre médecin.
AVERTISSEMENT : Après l’insertion du cathéter KCH™ SIGNALEZ IMMEDIATEMENT toute douleur, tout saignement ou
fuite de liquide à votre médecin. Ces anomalies doivent être suivies de près.

ATTENTION : Les lois fédérales restreignent la vente, la distribution et l’utilisation aux médecins ou sur ordre d’un médecin
dument formé et expérimenté.

                         Ce dispositif n'est pas fabriqué avec
                         du latex en caoutchouc naturel
                                                                                             ONLY

                    ROCKET MEDICAL PLC                                                                          Rocket Medical GmbH
                    Sedling Road, Washington,                                                                   Am Rosengarten 48,
                    England, NE38 9BZ                                                                           15566 Schöneiche.
                    www.rocketmedical.com                                                                       Germany

                                                             NE PAS RESTÉRILISER
                                     Sauf en cas d’ouverture ou de dommage, le contenu du paquet est stérile.

    0088
              080319   Rev 14    ZDOCK045          Copyright© 2003-2019     ROCKET MEDICAL PLC             Tous droits réservés.     (FR)
FR

Sonde vésicale foetale Rocket
KCH™CONSIGNES D'UTILISATION
Objet : Ces instructions portent sur la sonde vésicale fœtale R57405 Rocket KCH™™ et les produits dérivés.
Appareil humanitaire : Autorisé par les lois fédérales en cas d’uropathie obstructive fœtale. L’efficacité de cet appareil n’a pas
encore été démontrée.
Description de l'appareil : L’appareil est une endoprothèse double tire-bouchon doté d’un tube externe de 2,1 mm de diamètre et
d'un tube interne de 1,5 mm de diamètre. Les spirales sont enroulées à 18 mm avec un espacement de 30 mm. L’extrémité tire-
bouchon est une double spirale perpendiculaire à l’endoprothèse afin de permettre au tire-bouchon de reposer à plat contre
l’abdomen du fœtus. L’extrémité tire-bouchon distale est une spirale et demi horizontale à l’endoprothèse afin de maintenir le tire-
bouchon dans la vessie du bébé. Les deux spirales comportent 3 ports latéraux, dotés d’une extrémité distale soutenue par un tube
en acier inoxydable pour améliorer l’évacuation de l’urine et la visualisation de l’échographie.
Consignes d'utilisation : La sonde vésicale fœtale KCH™ est destinée à l’utilisation en cas de décompression de la vessie du bébé
suite au diagnostic d’une uropathie obstructive fœtale post-vésicale chez des fœtus de 18 à 32 semaines. L’appareil doit être utilisé
par ou sous la supervision d’un personnel dûment formé et conformément aux directives nationales telles que : Directive des
procédures d’intervention 202 : Shunt vésico-amniotique du fœtus pour l’obstruction des voies urinaires inférieures. NICE Déc.
2006.
CONTRE-INDICATIONS : La sonde vésicale fœtale KCH™ ne doit pas être utilisée dans les conditions suivantes : Anomalies
congénitales graves susceptibles de mettre en danger la survie du nouveau-né, caryotype anormal, kystes corticaux rénaux ou
preuve d’insuffisance rénale.
EFFETS INDÉSIRABLES DE L’APPAREIL SUR LA SANTÉ
Effets indésirables et effets secondaires signalés : Aucun effet indésirable n’a été signalé à ce jour sur la sonde vésicale fœtale
KCH™. Cependant, la migration des endoprothèses / shunts a été signalée dans 50 % des cas de pose d’endoprothèse vésico-
amniotique dans les publications scientifiques. Dans une étude rétrospective, dix-neuf fœtus (46,3 %) ont subi des poses de shunts
à l’âge gestationnel moyen de 19 semaines (16,1 - 31,1). Lle déplacement des shunts est survenu chez
10 patients (52,6 %). Un total de 35 opérations ont été effectuées, dont 16 (45,7 %) étaient des répétitions. Le seul facteur prénatal
associé au déplacement des shunts était le type de shunts. Les taux de migrations associés au cathéter Rocket KCH™ étaient
statistiquement plus faibles. Réf.: Kurtz et.al. Factors associated with fetal shunt dislodgement in lower urinary tract obstruction. Prenat Diag
2016;36:720-725 Les cas d'anomalie de fermeture de la paroi antérieure et d'hernnie épiploïque ont été signalés dans 11 % des cas
dans une étude et plusieurs autres publications.
Les risques associés au shunt foetal-amniotique comprennent entre autres lesomplications suivantes : la chorioamionite,
l'ascite urinaire, un accouchement prématuré, des hémorragies, le syndrome des brides amniotiques, la septicémie maternelle, la
fuite du liquide amniotique, l'obstruction ou le déplacement de l'endoprothèse néciessitant un remplacement, les anomalies de
fermeture de la paroi antérieure et l'hernie épiploïque subséquente. Il n'existe aucune preuve que ces complications soient liées à
l'appareil. Elles seraient plutôt le fait de la technique globale qui requiert des niveaux importants de compétence et d'évaluation
minutieuse de tous les risques associés.

 AVERTISSEMENT : Les effets néfastes potentiels incluent entre autres les complications suivantes : ascites, septicémie maternelle, fuite du
 liquide amniotique et/ou rupture des membranes, traumatisme direct sur le fœtus, tels que perforation intestinale du foetus, lésion utérine ou
 saignement utérin, saignement du placenta, accouchement prématuré. Il est possible que ces complications nécessitent une intervention ultérieure
 pouvant aboutir à un avortement spontané et dans de rares cas, à une ablation de l’utérus.

EXPÉRIENCES CLINIQUES
Remarque : Les études cliniques n’ont complètement démontré la sécurité et l’efficacité de l’implantation d’endoprothèses dans la
vessie du fœtus. Cependant, certaines études procurent une assurance raisonnable sur la sécurité de cette technique. En outre, des
expériences cliniques sur le cathéter KCH™ ont été effectuées en plus de 20 ans d’utilisation.
PRÉCAUTIONS
Évaluation du patient / évaluation diagnostique : Les antécédents médicaux complets doivent être obtenus afin de déterminer les
conditions qui pourraient influencer le choix de la procédure ou d’identifier les contre-indications immédiates vis-à-vis de l’utilisation
de l’appareil.
Les médecins doivent procéder à l’évaluation individuelle de chaque cas et utiliser uniquement l’appareil en cas de risque sérieux de
lésion rénale ou pulmonaire si aucune intervention n’est effectuée. Le médecin doit parvenir à la conclusion que les risques sur le
fœtus sont plus importants que les risques potentiels relatifs à l’utilisation de l’appareil. Il est recommandé que les examens suivants
soient effectués afin de déterminer si le traitement à l’aide du cathéter KCH™ est adapté pour le fœtus.
         En cas d’examen échographique visant à démontrer l’uropathie obstructive basse, les signes sont généralement
          l'hydronéphrose bilatérale, l'utréostasie, la mégacystite ou l'oligoamniosie.
         La détermination du caryotype foetal pour une analyse chromosomique afin de diagnostiquer ou d’exclure les anomalies
          chromosomiques concomitantes qui peuvent influencer les décisions de prise en charge et le choix du traitement.
         Des vésicocentèses répétées afin d’évaluer le fonctionnement du fœtus à travers les paramètres urinaires biochimiques du
          fœtus. Les paramètres et leurs valeurs limites sont présentés ci-dessous :
         Vésicocentèses répétées afin d’évaluer le fonctionnement du fœtus à travers les paramètres urinaires biochimiques du
          fœtus. Les paramètres et leurs valeurs limites respectives sont : Na +
b. Conseils aux patients :
Il est recommandé que les patients soient suivis de près par des médecins qui les informeront sur les options, les risques et
avantages de l’utilisation du cathéter KCH™.
Il est recommandé que les éléments suivants soient abordés en détail et que les préoccupations des patients soient complètement
étudiées.
         La ponction de l’utérus et des membranes utérines présente un risque d’écoulement du liquide amniotique et une rupture
          complète potentielle des membranes.
         L’implantation du cathéter KCH™ est une procédure intrusive et présente un risque d’infection et le développement d’une
          chorioamnionite. Ceci peut donner lieu à un avortement spontané ou à la nécessité d’une interruption de grossesse par
          voie chirurgicale. Dans des rares cas, l’intervention peut donner lieu à l’ablation de l’utérus.
         Comme c’est le cas avec nombre de procédures internes pendant la grossesse, il existe un risque d’accouchement
          prématuré.
La pose du cathéter KCH™ peut réduire le risque de lésion rénale ; toutefois, elle n’exclut pas complètement le risque que le bébé
puisse souffrir d’une déficience rénale ou pulmonaire co-existante à l’accouchement et il pourrait être nécessaire par la suite de
procéder à une transplantation de rein à l’avenir. Les sondes vésicales fœtales peuvent être déplacées ou obstruées et ceci peut
nécessiter une répétition de la procédure pendant la grossesse afin de permettre le remplacement ou l’évacuation.

CONSIGNES D'UTILISATION :
Remarque : L’utilisation d’agents tocolytiques pendant et après la procédure peut être conseillée. L’observation de près de la
condition du fœtus à la recherche de quelque signe d'accouchement prématuré est obligatoire.
Préparation du patient :
1   Effectuez une échographie afin de déterminer la position du fœtus. La manipulation du fœtus dans l’utérus peut être
    nécessaire afin de permettre un accès plus avantageux.
2   Mettre la mère sous sédatif si cela est opportun. La sédation du fœtus n’est pas généralement nécessaire ; toutefois, si une
    manipulation importante doit être effectuée ou si le fœtus bouge un peu trop, la mère peut être mise sous sédatif.
3   Confirmer qu’il y a suffisamment de liquide dans l’espace amniotique à l’aide de l’échographie. L’uropathie obstructive fœtale
    est généralement à l’origine d’une oligoamniosie et une amnio-perfusion avec une solution saline chaude de 500ml - 1000ml
    peut être nécessaire selon la condition du patient.
4   Au moment de l'amnio-perfusion, il est conseillé d'administrer des antibiotiques intra-
    amniotiques en raison du risque de chorioamniotite. Une grande variété d’antibiotiques
    tels que la nafcilline (500 - 100 mg) ou la céphalosporine (1-2 gm) auxquels les
    staphylocoques résistant à la pénicilline sont sensibles est recommandée. (Remarque :
    L’administration d’antibiotiques et de doses spécifiques dépend de la condition du
    patient et devrait être déterminée par le médecin au cas par cas.
5   Préparer la peau à l’aide d’un lotion antibactérienne appropriée. L’anesthésie locale
    doit être effectuée sur la zone où est pratiquée la ponction.
6   À l’aide d’une lame n°11, pratiquer une incision de 5mm afin de permettre l’insertion
    du trocart et de la canule. (Fig 1.)
7   Sous contrôle échographique, introduire le trocart et la canule par voie
    transabdominale dans l’utérus et dans la vessie du fœtus.
8   L’aspiration de l’urine à travers le canal d’irrigation confirmera l’insertion correcte
    dans la vessie de fœtus.
9   Enlever le trocart et aspirer davantage d’urine, en quantité suffisante pour éviter un
    reflux à travers la canule ouverte. Enlever le bouchon de la canule.
10 Le cathéter KCH™, avec son fil en forme de boucle, (Fig.2) est ensuite enroulé à la
    main. Dérouler le composant fœtal entre le pouce et l’index. Ne PAS tirer l’extrémité
    du cathéter pour essayer de le raidir – car cela induirait une torsion du matériau et
    plierait le cathéter. Répéter soigneusement le processus pour le composant maternel.
11 Enlever SOIGNEUSEMENT le fil en forme de boucle et le poussoir rouge et les
    remplacer par un fil-guide semi-rigide.
12 À l’aide de l’extrémité effilée du fil-guide utilisé comme support, insérer
    l’extrémité recourbée du fil à travers toute la longueur du cathéter KCH™.
    Redresser doucement le cathéter afin de permettre le passage du fil-guide.
13 Insérer doucement la combinaison cathéter/fil-guide dans l’outil d’introduction en prenant soin de ne pas tordre le cathéter.
    Dès que le cathéter est complètement inséré, retirer le fil-guide semi-rigide.
14 À l’aide du poussoir de premier niveau (Fig 3), relâcher l’extrémité distale du cathéter dans la vessie du fœtus. Sous contrôle
    échographique, confirmer que la partie de l’appareil insérée dans le fœtus s’enroule complètement et est dans la bonne
    position.
15 Enlever le bout de la canule de l’abdomen du fœtus et insérer le poussoir du deuxième niveau afin de libérer la partie de
    l’appareil qui se trouve dans le corps de la mère dans la cavité amniotique pour former un shunt vésico-amniotique.
           ATTENTION : Éviter que le cathéter se torde pendant l’insertion dans l’outil d’introduction.
 Vérifier que les deux spirales sont libres et qu’aucune partie de l’endoprothèse ne reste dans la paroi utérine

16 Dès que la position correcte est confirmée, enlever la canule et faire un bandage approprié de la zone de ponction.
17 Faire un rapport sur la procédure et le positionnement adapté du cathéter KCH™.
18 Surveiller la vessie du fœtus et vérifier que le shunt vésico-amniotique est actif, que l’évacuation de l’urine s’effectue et qu’il n’y
   a aucun signe de détresse fœtale ou de début d'accouchement prématuré
Suivi : Plusieurs échographies doivent être effectuées dans une période de 24 à 72 heures afin de de s’assurer du fonctionnement
approprié de l’endoprothèse. Les examens échographiques doivent être effectués chaque semaine pendant le reste de la
grossesse afin de s’assurer du fonctionnement continu de l’endoprothèse.
Retrait : Le cathéter KCH™ peut être retiré à l’aide d’une technique aseptique conventionnelle après une évaluation pédiatro-
urologique satisfaisante.
Mise au rebut : Cet appareil doit être manipulé et mis au rebut conformément aux procédures de l'hôpital local et aux normes
applicables, y compris et sans se limiter à celles concernant la santé et la sécurité humaine et le respect de l'environnement.
Références : Rodeck. CH., Nicolaides. K.H. “Ultrasound “ Guided Invasive Procedures in Obstetrics” in Clinics in Obstetrics &
Gynaecology - Vol. 10, No.3, December 1983.

ATTENTION : Les lois fédérales restreignent la vente, la distribution et l’utilisation aux médecins ou sur ordre d’un médecin dument
formé et expérimenté.

                       Ce dispositif n'est pas fabriqué avec
                       du latex en caoutchouc naturel
                                                                                           ONLY

                  ROCKET MEDICAL PLC                                                                         Rocket Medical GmbH
                  Sedling Road, Washington,                                                                  Am Rosengarten 48,
                  England, NE38 9BZ                                                                          15566 Schöneiche.
                  www.rocketmedical.com                                                                      Germany

                                                              NE PAS RESTÉRILISER
                                      Sauf en cas d’ouverture ou de dommage, le contenu du paquet est stérile.

  0088
            080319   Rev 14    ZDOCK045         Copyright© 2003-2019      ROCKET MEDICAL PLC             Tous droits réservés.   (FR)
You can also read
Next slide ... Cancel