2018-2021 Promoting Economic Development Dublin City

2018-2021 Promoting Economic Development Dublin City

2018-2021 Promoting Economic Development Dublin City

1 Dublin City Promoting Economic Development 2018-2021

2018-2021 Promoting Economic Development Dublin City

2

2018-2021 Promoting Economic Development Dublin City

3 Promoting Economic Development

2018-2021 Promoting Economic Development Dublin City

4 Dublin City: Promoting Economic Development 2018-2021 The Economic Development Office has produced this document to assist with the implementation of a range of strategic processes which have been developed to assist the office in its role as promoters of Economic Development for Dublin City. The adaptive nature of these processes mean the we will be able to identify emergent strategies and assist the Council in remaining resilient to external shocks through a range of policy measures and interventions which can make a difference to the lives of those who live work visit and invest in Dublin City.

This strategy is a living document and can be added to, amended or adapted, depending on changing economic conditions or with the introduction of new resources or responsibilities. It will be accompanied by an annual action plan which will detail the work to be undertaken by the office each year and assist in coordinating the resources of Dublin City Council.

2018-2021 Promoting Economic Development Dublin City

5 Contents: 1. Forward: Chief Executive Officer . . 6 2. Our Strategy: 2018-2021 . . 7 3. The Pillars of Economic Development . . 9 4. Future Projects: 2018-2021 . . 11 5. Our Role & Resources . . 14 6. Resource Allocation & Project apprasial . . 18 7. Communications Plan . . 22 Appendix A: National & Local Policy Context . . 26 Appendix B: High Level Objectives for 2018 . . 35 Appendix C: Dublin City SWOT Analysis . . 36 Appendix E: Economic Networks: (TBC . . 37 Appendix F: Potential areas of research: (TBC . . 38 Appendix G: Staffing Resources . . 39 Appendix H: EDO Action Plan 2018 (TBC . . 40

6 1. Forward: Chief Executive Officer Dublin remains one of the most vibrant Cities in the World, blending a unique mix of culture, history and enterprise which adds to a rich tapestry of life here and attracts millions to live, work, visit and invest in our City. As the engine which drives the national economy, supporting entrepreneurship, indigenous SME’s and International Investment at Local, Regional and National level, is critical to maintaining our success. The changing dynamic of what the “City of the Future” looks like and how we will interact with it are critical. Responding to the changing nature of work and employment, developing a smart public realm and sustainable transport infrastructure, and a City that meets the needs of its citizens, residents, visitors and students, all need to be addressed. In Dublin City Council, we are responsible for providing a wide range of Local Government services such as Planning, Parks, Housing, Waste, Libraries, and the Environment. However, the promotion of economic development is emerging as one of our key functions, as it has the potential for a significant positive impact on everything that we deliver. Through our work with the Economic Development and Enterprise Strategic Policy Committee and the Economic Development & Enterprise Office, we will continue to engage and collaborate with key stakeholders at local and national levels to champion the needs of the City and benchmark our progress against other comparable international Cities.

This strategy is designed to focus the resources of the Economic Development Office into areas where we can make the greatest positive impact for the City and assist in directing projects, research and policy. The strategy will be accompanied by an annual action plan to coordinate the activities and objectives at local and national level and will be used to measure and report on how economic activity and resources are contributing to addressing existing and future challenges and in improving the experience of citizens and visitors to this great capital City.

Owen P. Keegan Chief Executive Officer Dublin City Council

7 2. Our Strategy: 2018-2021 To support a City of opportunity that encourages an inclusive sustainable growing economy for all. The Economic Development Office (EDO) of Dublin City Council has responsibility for the promotion of economic development in Dublin City. Our vision above sets out our overarching objective, which is fundamentally to use our resources, knowledge and expertise, to make a difference for those who live, work, visit and invest in Dublin City. Our mission is; To support initiatives that will improve the quality of people's lives To enhance the ability of the City to attract and retain world class talent through Placemaking. To promote Dublin as an attractive place to live, work, visit and invest. To foster a culture of creativity and innovation in a globally connected City. To engage with economic stakeholders to maximise the alignment and impact of resources. We will achieve this by engaging, promoting, facilitating and collaborating with internal and external stakeholders, across a specific range of interventions designed to deliver on this vision. These interventions will be identified and assessed with reference to 4 pillars of Economic Development, which have been selected to offer clarity and focus to our role. These pillars were identified following consultation with a range of stakeholders and the completion of a SWOT analysis. Unlike other approaches to economic development, our interventions will largely be project based and seek to achieve specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time bound (SMART) outcomes. Economic Stakeholder Engagement

8 Projects undertaken by EDO will be assessed basses on their fit with the 4 pillars, their ability to “make a difference” and their potential benefits. Where possible, attempts will be made to assess the economic impact of projects in terms of job creation, value added & societal benefits. In addition to these projects we will carry out or commission research which informs our understanding and clarity of the 4 pillars, where we have identified gaps in existing research or where it is not sufficient information to inform decision making and policy creation. It is also our intention to focus elements of our recourses into advocating for and promoting a large scale project which will have significant impact on both the local and national economy. The type of project will include promoting the economic impact of Strategic Development Zones and Local Area Plans such as the Poolbeg SDZ and the Cherry Orchard LAP, major transport infrastructure such as the Metro North Project and the redevelopment of Dublin Port and the promotion of innovative sectoral clusters such as the Maker-Space project in DCU Alpha, the Educational cluster at DIT Grangegormon and the med-tech cluster surrounding the proposed James Street Medical Campus. In the case of these projects EDO will act, not as the lead, but by adding our experience, knowledge and expertise to further enhance the prospects of success of the projects by working closely with the all stakeholders to add a coherent narrative to the project.

The EDO is responsible for delivering & reporting on a range of policy initiatives at local and national levels including, the Local Economic & Community Plan (LECP) The Dublin City Development Plan and The Dublin Regional Action Plan for Jobs The EDO reports into the Assistant City Manager for Culture, Recreation & Economic Services of Dublin City Council. The EDO also report to and is responsible for the management the Economic Development, Enterprise & International Strategic Policy Committee (SPC). This strategy is designed to focus the resources of the Economic Development Office into areas where we can make the greatest positive impact for the City and assist in directing projects, research and policy. The strategy will be accompanied by an annual action plan to coordinate the activities and objectives at local and national level and will be used to measure and report on how economic activity and resources are contributing to addressing existing and future challenges and in improving the experience of citizens and visitors to this great capital City.

9 3. The Pillars of Economic Development: Following a series of workshops, consultations and the completion of a SWOT analysis1 , the Economic Development Office have identified 4 key pillars which encapsulate our Vision and Mission for the City and assist in categorising the areas where we will focus our resources. 1. Human Development: Human development is the process of enlarging people’s choices. Their three essential choices are to lead a long and healthy life, to acquire knowledge and to have access to the resources needed for a decent standard of living. Additional choices, highly valued by many people, range from political, economic and social freedom to opportunities for being creative and productive and enjoying personal self—respect and guaranteed human rights. (OECD) 2. Placemaking & Clusters: Placemaking is a multi-faceted approach to the planning, design and management of public spaces. It capitalises on a local community's assets, inspiration, and potential, with the intention of creating public spaces that promote people's health, happiness, and well being. A business cluster is a concentration of interconnected enterprise, suppliers, and associated institutions in a particular field. Clusters are considered to increase the productivity with which companies can compete, nationally and globally.

3. Promotion & Investment: The promotion and investment component of economic development is critical for the success of any City and this is even truer for Dublin given the open nature of its economy. Dublin City Council can play a significant role in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI) into the City by supporting the activities of national agencies such as the IDA. Dublin City Council will actively promote the City as a key international destination for business and enterprise though promotional tools such as the Dublin.ie platform and the Dublin Economic Monitor. We will also to develop a concierge services for Dublin to provide potential investors with key information and contacts for the City. 1 Please see appendix B for details of the SWOT analysis.

10 4. Innovation & Transformation: To be called an innovative, an idea must be replicable at an economical cost and must satisfy a specific need. It involves deliberate application of information, imagination and initiative in deriving greater or different values from resources. The Economy of Dublin is constantly Transforming and evolving as we shift to new patterns of living and working such as Smart Cities and the Gig Economy. These societal shifts will result in disruptive solutions emerging to meet our changing needs and the City eco-system will need to be able to adapt to meet these transformations. Figure 2 below represents a categorisation of sample projects identified by EDO under the pillars of Economic Development.

Human Development Placemaking & Clusters Promotion & Investment Innovation & Transformation Talent & Skills City of Villages Strategy FDI Smart Dublin Job Creation Public Realm improvement Investment Start-up Dublin Education Public Parks & Spaces Influencing Accelerators & Incubators Wellbeing Community Development Concierge Service DCU Techshop Culture Wayfinding City Profile Universities & HEI’s Belonging Movement Research The gig Economy Recreation Infrastructure dublin.ie STEAM Creativity Networking Dublin Economic Monitor IOT & Big Data Diversity Bio-Diversity Dublin Globe EuroCities Enterprise Enterprise Sectors Accessing EU Funding The Circular Economy Local Enterprise Week Public Markets Enterprise Europe Network FutureScope 2018 Figure 1: Sample Projects under the 4 Pillars of Economic Development

11 4. Future Projects: 2018-2021 During the course of 2016 and 2017 the EDO has familiarised itself with the Economic Development eco-system in Dublin City and engaged with a wide range of stakeholders to deliver various policy initiatives, projects and research documents. With this in mind we have identified a number of potential projects under each of the Pillars which we are confident that we can deliver on, based on our knowledge, resource capacity and expertise. 1. Human Development: Talent Retention: (Research, Local Economic & Community Plan) How cities compete for Talent Retention is a key competitive factor for Cities who are all drawing from a limited global talent pool. The Global Talent Competitive Index (GTCI) 2017 ranked Dublin 26th out of 27 EU Cities for talent retention. The Economic Office will research how the City can improve its talent retention strategies and will disseminate the recommendations to stakeholders. Future of Work (Free Lancers Forum, FutureScope) The Gig Economy, freelancing, the independent sector is being described as the future way of working. Its definition is still emerging. The ‘FreeLancers Forum’ is an event that will take place in 2018 to explore this reality, and to create networking and support for those who are part of the Gig economy.

Well Being: (Dementia Supports) People friendly environments are now a key part of economic development policies. A workshop will be held to explore how to create a Dementia friendly environment in our villages, supported by business, to benefit the lives of those suffering from Dementia and their carers’. This will also become a Smart Cities SBIR challenge with a village identified to trial the concept.

12 2. Placemaking and Clusters Enterprise Space: (Research, Dublin Action Plan for Jobs) The diversity of the start-up community adds vibrancy and creativity to the city which is under threat due to increasing rents. An enterprise space review is being undertaken in Dublin City that will be presented at the 2017 European Co-working Conference. There is scope to increase affordable working space capacity in the city and to support specialist start up spaces and clusters. A City of Villages: (Local Economic & Community Plan) The Local Economic and Community Plan strategy has specifically identified the need to develop a City of Villages strategy to localise the focus, build local capacity and ownership to further enhance the village offering. This work will position villages to take advance of promotion and cluster development opportunities to improve the social & economic conditions of each village. Enterprise Town Awards: In 2017 Dublin City entered three city areas into the Enterprise Towns awards. The Liberties Ballymun and The Docklands, were selected, the process enhanced local collaboration and strengthened the pride in the unique aspects and future potential of each area. In 2018 three more areas will be selected and entered into the competition that brings local and national recognition. 3. Promotion and Investment: Dublin.ie: The award winning city branding website Dublin.ie has had 1.1M page views and has seen a 33% year on year increase in site users. Dublin.ie is designed to attract international investment, start ups, skilled talent and students to Dublin and to inspire those living and working here to make the most of their city experience. A digital marketing strategy will be implemented in 2018. Dublin City Promotion Campaign: (Video, digital and physical marketing) A promotional brochure that can be hosted online will be produced to showcase Dublin as a great place to live, work and invest. The publication will emphasise the unique qualities of Dublin City,

13 including friendliness, connectivity, international flavour and ease of doing business and will target those considering investing and moving to Dublin from overseas. Concierge Service: (soft landing pad for international investors & Business) The Dublin Commissioner of Startups has been successfully providing a Tech concierge service in the Dublin Docklands Area s promoted through Dublinglobe.ie. We are proposing to expand this service to include International Relations, Planning, and Smart Cities etc to provide an agile and responsive landing platform for international business seeking to learn about and invest in Dublin City. 4. Innovation and Transformation: Social Enterprise: (Responsible Innovation Summit, OffSet) Social Enterprise is significantly under represented as a sector in Ireland. It has the capability to deliver unique, tailored and efficient solution to societal challenges. Dublin City Council will support for-profit and not-for- profit social enterprise and assist them in developing their business capacity. Social Enterprise Awards, training, peer to peer learning and a Tool-Kit will be provided in 2018 Maker-Space: Dublin City University A Maker-Space for Dublin would advance innovation and transformation, bringing together a community engaged in light engineering, fast track prototyping and physical product development. STEAM skills development and Internet of Things (IoT) products would also be advanced. DCC in conjunction with DCU Alpha have sought funding support from Enterprise Ireland. FutureScope: (Dublin BIC – EDO/LEO/SmartDublin) FutureScope is an event that engages business leaders and entrepreneurs in sharing current trends and future insights that have the potential to transform out cities, business and enterprises. Dublin City Council will work with Dublin BIC, to provide themes and learning on the topics of SmartDublin, Local Enterprise and Economic Development.

14 5. Our Role & Resources: a. Our Role: The Economic development office is responsible for the promotion of Economic Development in the Dublin City Council administrative area. Our remit derives from the introduction of the Local Economic & Community Development Plan (LECP) as part of the Local Government Reform Act 20142 The Economic Development Office is the sister office and closely aligned to the operation and the activities of the Local Enterprise Office Dublin City, which also emerged from the Act following the dissolution of the County and City Enterprise Boards. Both offices are part a larger Dublin City Council department, Culture, Recreation and Economic Services and report into the Assistant Chief executive with responsibility for this department. The Work of the office can be broadly broken into 3 streams; Policy, Projects & Research.

Policy describes workflow that we are obligated to deliver or report on, such as the Local Economic & Community Plan, The Dublin Regional Action Plan for Jobs or the Dublin City Development Plan. In most cases we are one of many stakeholders with responsibility, and we need to work closely with others to deliver on the goals and objectives of these plans. Policy Projects Research Local Economic & Community Plan 2016-2021 Co-Working 2017 Conference Enterprise Space Economic Development, Enterprise and International Relations Strategic Policy Committee UPRISE 6 Dublin Fin-Tech & Entrepreneurship Talent retention Dublin Regional Action Plan for Jobs Enterprising Towns Awards 2017: The Docklands Growth Sectors Figure 2: Sample project streams for EDO workflow 2 http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/2014/act/1/enacted/en/print

15 Projects describe work that we undertake to promote specific areas of Economic Development and involve sponsorship agreements to support 3rd party events, participating in events through panels, presentations or stands, or hosting events that emerge from our policy work. It can also involve supporting the work of the LEO through the delivery of events for Local Enterprise Week. Research will be identified based on a needs assessment and can include short “sprint” style research assignments, literature reviews to frame existing knowledge or longer deep dives to more thoroughly explore specific topics. Examples of work flow for 2017 may be found in figure 2 above. In Addition, the EDO is responsible for the management, administration and operation of the Economic Development & Enterprise Strategic Policy Committee (SPC) for Dublin City Council. The purpose of Strategic Policy Committees is to formulate, develop, monitor and review policies which relate to the functions of Dublin City Council and to advise the Council accordingly. In addition to Economic Development, Enterprise & International Relation this SPC also has responsibility for Public Markets & Casual Trading.

The SPC consists of 15 members, 10 of whom are nominated from the elected representatives of the Council and a further 5 are nominated from industry and community stakeholders. Meetings are also attended by relevant senior department managers of Dublin City Council. Meetings are held in the Council Chambers and occur 6-8 times annually, they are broadcast live3 with agendas and reports are circulated to members in advance and then published on the Dublin City Council website4 . b. Our Work: 2018 The following represent the key objectives for the EDO in 2018:  Work with Planning, International Relations, Smart Cities and other relevant stakeholders to progress key economic City Initiatives.

 Support and implement the work programme of the Economic Development and Enterprise Strategic Policy Committee.  Local Enterprise Office Staff will deliver on the objectives set out in the Local Enterprise Development Plan 2017-2020 3 https://dublincity.public-i.tv/core/portal/home 4 http://www.dublincity.ie/main-menu-your-council-strategic-policy-committees -corporate-policy-group/economic-development

16  Chart the creation of supported new employment in the City through conducting and reporting on the annual Employment Survey.  Economic Development Office staff will continue to deliver on the Economic Actions in the Dublin City Local Economic & Community Plan 2016-2021  Support the promotion of the City through the work of the Dublin.ie website.  Implement the objectives of the Dublin City Economic Development Strategy through the four strategic pillars of Human Development, Placemaking & Clustering, Promotion & Investment and Innovation & Transformation.

 Implement the findings of the review of the Office of the Commissioner for Start-up’s.  Support the publication of the Dublin Economic Monitor.  Further build our research capacity to inform decision making  Assist in the delivery of the Dublin Regional Action Plan for Jobs c. Our Resources: The budget of the EDO is roughly €500k annually (excluding salaries). This amount is split between an operations budget and a contributions budget. Operations cover the direct work of the office including expenses, stationary, printing and other administrations costs. It also includes the costs of commissioning studies, research and tendering as well as promotional materials and training costs. The contributions budget refers to financial assistance offered to 3rd parties support events, initiatives, conferences and services which have a direct positive impact on Dublin’s economic ecosystem. It is anticipated that with the implementation of this strategy, the EDO will be able to prioritise the delivery of small and large scale projects, events and initiative which support our vision for the promotion of economic development in Dublin and support a viable request to the Executive management team of Dublin City Council for an increase in financial resource allocation. Figure 3 below outlines an example of the type of work carried out by EDO in 2017 and how their objectives and outcomes align with the 4 pillars of economic development and the vision mission and role of the EDO.

17 Table 1: EDO - Resource Allocation & Hierarchy Figure 3: Example of projects carried out by EDO in 2017

18 6. Resource Allocation & Project apprasial: Given the natural constraints on the resources of the EDO, careful consideration should be given to the level of support allocated to each project. The allocation of EDO resources will be based on projected project outcomes and alignment and with the 4 pillars. 4 levels of involvement based on the following categories: Engagement level colour coded as “at a glance” with the 4 pillars. 1. Engage Contact with stakeholders and discuss options and supports available 2. Promote Social media, Videography, photography, newsletter, Press Release 3. Facilitate Assist with contacts into the ecosystem. 4. Collaborate Offer full EDO support to lead and/or partner on project. Human Development Placemaking & Clusters Promotion & Investment Innovation & Transformation Talent & Skills City of Villages FDI Smart Dublin Job Creation Parks Investment Start-up Dublin Education Public Realm Influence Accelerators Wellbeing Community Concierge Service Incubators Culture Wayfinding Profile Techshop Belonging Movement Research Universities & HEI’s Recreation Infrastructure dublin.ie The Gig Economy Creativity Networking Dublin Economic Monitor Global Cities Diversity BioDiversity Dublin Globe STEAM Figure 4: Example of resource allocation with projects

19 Based on the allocation and identification of resources workflow will be manages with a KANBAN A Kanban board which is a work and workflow visualization tool that enables you to optimize the flow of your work. Physical Kanban boards, like the one pictured below, typically use sticky notes on a whiteboard to communicate status, progress, and issues. This has been in use by the EDO since June 2016. Figure 5: EDO Kanban workflow management tool

20 Where significant levels of financial or human capital have been committed to a project, a formal project management structure will be implemented and each stage will be assessed and implemented prior to moving on. This will give all parties involved in the delivery a clear framework and process map for the delivery of the project and assist is obtaining value for money for the expenditure of public resources. Figure 6 below shows a draft of this process map with an explanation for the stages involved. .

1. Opportunity: Initial contact by stakeholder, either internal or external approach. 2. Appraisal: 2-page summary including resource commitment, budget, outcomes etc. 3. Approval: Presented to EDO senior management team for approval. 4. Consultation: Consultation with relevant economic stakeholders (if applicable). 5. Support: Written offer with terms, branding guidelines, milestones & obligations. 6. Phase 1: Partner/stakeholder accesses hard & soft EDO supports to deliver project. 7. Monitoring: EDO team monitor the project through all phases of delivery. 8. Report: Stakeholder/partner report on the project. 9. Phase 2: EDO conduct a review of project and release balance of support. Figure 6: Project implementation process map

21 Appraisal of each project will be carried out by completing a project appraisal form. This form will contain key information relating to the project stakeholders, contact information, timelines and venue information and the resources requested. The primary focus of the appraisal is to score the objectives, viability and fit of each project in terms of the 4 pillars of Economic Development and the amount of resources needs to successfully deliver it. This appraisal will need flexibility in terms of the difference between assessing sponsorship agreement for an event promoting a specific sector under the pillars and the identification of a piece of research to be conducted. Figure 6 below is a sample project appraisal form indicating what this assessment might looks like scoring an event sponsorship proposal based on its fit in terms of the 4 pillars and the resource allocation. A more analytical approach will need to be developed to fit with and assess the range of projects undertaken by the EDO.

Figure 7: Sample Project Appraisal Form

22 7. Communications Plan a. Brand development: In order to effectively promote the Economic Development functions of Dublin City Council it is necessary for the EDO to have its own profile, which can be built on both nationally and internationally. The final logo design represents a clear and simple form which evokes the same tone as the main Dublin City Council brand while having its own unique style. It is intended that the EDO logo will sit side by side with the main DCC logo in all uses. The long blue line running under the “Economic Development” title represents the City’s relationship with water, as both the sea and the rivers of Dublin have formed an integral part in its social and economic development. The Dublin Spire is an iconic part of the city’s skyline and easily recognisable in the logo, but here it also represents the infrastructure and the built environment that makes the city unique. The circle at the bottom left represents the circular economy, which underpins the transformation that our city has seen but also supports its citizen’s connection with the City. “Dublin City Council” is clearly visible underpinning the Economic Development function of the office.

Supporting Economic Development b. Social media engagement: Social Media is one of the most effective forms of stakeholder engagement. Messages and information can be disseminated quickly and people and organisations can be engaged with on an ongoing basis. Much of the work of the EDO is event driven in nature and this lends itself well to social media platforms, particularly.

23 Primary feed: Twitter - @DCCEconDev c. Website Development: The main Dublin City Council web site is undergoing significant renovation and rebuilding. The EDO will engage with Corporate Services in order to ensure the new platform will meet the needs of the EDO. It is intended to develop a platform that can be used to promote the Economic Profile of Dublin City as a destination to Live Work Visit and Invest, offering information, contacts, access to networks and upcoming events. As EDO begins to spin up its research and publication function, this platform in conjunction with the social media will be used to promote and disseminate this work. The Economic development web page to take full advantage of the original content being created by EDO to promote & inform stakeholders.

Current site: www.dublincity.ie/economic Alternative: www.dublin.ie Figure 8: Twitter Profile for @DCCEconDev

24 d. Email Communications: An email account economicdevelopment@dublincity.ie is set up but currently dormant. This account will be reactivated and utilised as the general contact for the EDO. e. International Advertising & Promotion: The EDO will continue to identify opportunities to promote Dublin City and its economy at an international audience through advertisements and interviews in the international press, such as the Financial Times, the Economist and Foreign Policy Magazine and international event such as the Cannes Investment show, Eurocities and International Public policy Forums. Figure 9: Foreign Policy Magazine 2017, Dublin City promotional ad

25 Appendices & Supplemental Information: This section contains information’s that was not considered to be critical to the overall EDO strategy, but is necessary to expand on for the operations of the Economic Development Office. Elements of this section have not yet been fully completed and require further work to expand and marked with TBC (To Be Completed).

26 Appendix A: National & Local Policy Context 1. Local Government Reform Act 2014 The Economic development office is responsible for the promotion of Economic Development in the Dublin City Council administrative area. Our remit derives from the introduction of the Local Economic & Community Development Plan as part of the Local Government Reform act 20145 which states: 66B. (1) Each local authority shall make, in accordance with section 66C and any regulations made, or general policy guidelines issued, by the Minister for the purposes of that section, and the principles of sustainable development, a 6 year local economic and community plan (in this section referred to as the ‘Plan’), which shall be referred to as the ‘Local Economic and Community Plan’, prefixed by the name of the local authority concerned, and the Plan shall be for— (a) the promotion of economic development in its functional area, and (b) the promotion of local and community development in its functional area. The act continues to describe what is meant by Economic Development in this case; (2) For the purposes of subsection (1), promotion of economic development includes but is not limited to— (a) creating and sustaining jobs, (b) promoting the interests of the community, including— (i) enterprise and economic development across economic sectors, (ii) foreign direct investment, (iii) indigenous industry, (iv) micro-enterprises and small and medium sized enterprises, (v) tourism, and (vi) agriculture, forestry and the marine sectors, and other natural resource sectors, 5 http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/2014/act/1/enacted/en/print

27 2. Economic Development & Enterprise Strategic Policy Committee (SPC) The purpose of Strategic Policy Committees is to formulate, develop, monitor and review policies which relate to the functions of Dublin City Council and to advise the Council accordingly. The Economic Development SPC has 15 members with 10 representatives from the elected council and 5 from sectoral groups. It is normal for each SPC to meet 4 times annually however; this SPC tends to meet 6 times annually. The Economic Development SPC has responsibility for the following functions  Economic Development  Local Enterprise Office Dublin City  Casual Trading  Tourism  Markets  International Relations Representatives of the elected Members of Dublin City Council:  Councillor Deirdre Heney (F.F) Chairperson  Councillor Paul McAuliffe (F.F)  Councillor Gary Gannon (Lab)  Councillor Brendan Carr (Lab)  Councillor Noeleen Reilly (S.F)  Councillor Gaye Fagan (S.F.)  Councillor Paddy Bourke (Non Party)  Councillor Anne Feeney (F.G)  Councillor Greg Kelly (S.F)  Councillor Norma Sammon (F.G) Sectoral Members:  John Lombard, Assoc. of Consulting Engineers in Ireland (ACEI)  Denise Brophy, Dublinia Ltd.

 Evanne Kilmurray, Inner City Enterprise (ICE)  Martin Harte, The Temple Bar Company  Geraldine Lavin, Small Firms Association 3. Local Economic and Community Plan (LECP)

28 The Dublin City Local Economic and Community Plan (LECP) 2016 – 20216 was developed during 2015 by Dublin City Local Community Development Committee and the Economic Development and Enterprise Strategic Policy Committee. It was adopted by Dublin City Council in December 2015. The Dublin City LECP is made up of two documents:  A six-year strategy document setting out the 12 high-level goals for the lifetime of the plan. These goals were established following a period of public and stakeholder consultation during June 2015  An Action Plan which will be up-dated annually during the lifetime of the Plan. Actions in the Annual Plan are monitored by the relevant Strategic Policy Committees of Dublin City Council and reports on actions are submitted annually to the Local Community Development Committees (LCDC) and the Economic Development and Enterprise SPC for overall monitoring and review. Furthermore, during 2017, the two committees will work on developing the LECP in the following ways:  Up-date the socio-economic profile for the City (see below for some Dublin City social, economic and population statistics)  Identify any gaps, duplication or areas for potential collaboration between agencies in local economic development or community development activity across the City  Report back to local communities with feedback on the consultations that were carried out across the City during 2016  Liaise with the various organisations with an economic remit within Dublin City towards developing a programme of collaborative actions for the subsequent years of the LECP  Further engagement with public and publicly-funded bodies to agree strategic priorities for the City  Work with the relevant agencies to develop the Dublin Region Action Plan for Jobs 6 http://www.dublincity.ie/LECP

29 4. Dublin City Council: Dublin City Development Plan (DP) The Dublin City Development Plan (2016-2022) sets out policies and objectives to guide how and where development will take place in the city over the lifetime of the Plan. It provides an integrated, coherent spatial framework to ensure the city is developed in an inclusive way which improves the quality of life for its citizens, whilst also being a more attractive place to visit and work. This Plan was adopted by Dublin City Council at a Special Council meeting on 23rd September 2016. The Plan came into effect on 21st October 2016.

The development plan sets out a new approach to meet the needs and aspirations of citizens of Dublin and the country, not only for the 6-year life of the plan, but for the long term. This approach is based on the principles of sustainability and resilience on the social, economic and environmental fronts. This approach imbues the development plan throughout, cascading from the vision, core strategy, policies, objectives and standards through to implementation. The implementation of the measures in the city development plan will be pursued by active land management, whereby the City Council, through its departments and in collaboration with other agencies, will pro-actively work to achieve the aims of the core strategy. Chapter 6 - City Economy and Enterprise states: In responding to the challenges facing the economy of the city and its role as the national and regional economic engine, and the competition from other cities internationally, policies are set out including those to:  Improve the general attractiveness of the city for residents, workers, visitors and investors  Promote tourism as a key economic and employment driver  Identify and support emerging and growth sectors of the city economy  Enhance the Regeneration process by engaging in active land management, implementing the vacant land levy and other measures  Promote the role of Dublin as an Education city and a destination of choice for International Students 5. Regional Action Plan for Jobs: Dublin 2016-2018 (RAPJ) The Action Plan for Jobs: Dublin contains a suite of actions developed by local authorities, regional and national bodies, higher education institutions, the private sector and communities in Dublin, aimed at boosting job creation in the region.

30 The Plan considers Dublin both in the national context and in terms of how it is positioned in an international context. It is based on effective collaboration, the elevation of best practice, and a drive to differentiate Dublin's offering in a global context. 6. Dublin City Council Corporate Plan (CP) (TBC) The Dublin City Corporate Plan is for the period 2015-2019. It puts forward a Vision for both the city and the City Council as an organisation and affirms the values by which we should work together to deliver on our ambitions. The path set out in the Corporate Plan and the clear goals and objectives outlined are the result of an extensive and inclusive consultative process which commenced in summer 2014. The views of all key stakeholders were sought and considered while the Council also evaluated the environmental issues which can have such an important impact on our ability to deliver on what have now been outlined in this document as our key priorities for the next five years. Dublin City Council continues to provide the people of Dublin city and those who come to visit or who conduct business in the city, with over 600 services and our ambition is to continue to deliver high quality services in the most cost effective manner possible for the period of this plan. The objectives of the Corporate Plan are to:  Prepare a new Local Economic and Community Plan, which will help drive the socio- economic recovery of the city  Facilitate the expansion of the retail sector to ensure the city centre remains the primary retail centre of the region, and to support the development of tourism  Identify emerging growth areas and produce further Local Area Plans to bring forward the social and economic growth of the city  Produce an updated suite of economic and enterprise development policies in the new City Development Plan 2016-2022  Ensure the successful development of the key growth areas in the city through the implementation of the Development Plan, the Local Area Plans (LAPs), the Docklands Strategic Development Zone (SDZ) and the Grangegorman SDZ

31 7. EMRA: Regional Spatial and Economic Strategy (RSES) (TBC) Prior to the establishment of the Eastern and Midland Regional Assembly on 1st January 2015, the three previous Regional Authorities within Eastern and Midland Region produced individual Regional Planning Guidelines (RPG’s). These planning guidelines set out a strategic planning framework for their respective three areas and will remain in force until at least 2016. The implementation of the RPGs are an integral part of the Government’s programme to enable Ireland’s planning system to play an important role in the national economic recovery by delivering a plan-led planning system where spatial plans are aligned to benefit the economy, environment and provide for an improved quality of life. This process has sought to prioritise future infrastructural investment at a regional and local level, whilst promoting the growth of designated settlements. It is proposed that the (RPG’s) will be replaced by a Regional Spatial & Economic Strategy for the region. “The objective of regional spatial and economic strategies shall be to support the implementation of the National Spatial Strategy and the economic policies and objectives of the Government by providing a long-term strategic planning and economic framework for the development of the region for which the strategies are prepared which shall be consistent with the National Spatial Strategy and the economic policies or objectives of the Government.” (sec23 Planning and Development Act 2000) The Eastern and Midland Regional Assembly, has twelve constituent local authorities split into three Strategic Planning Areas Prior to the establishment of the Eastern and Midland Regional Assembly on 1st January 2015, the three previous Regional Authorities within Eastern and Midland Region produced individual Regional Planning Guidelines (RPG’s). These planning guidelines set out a strategic planning framework for their respective three areas and will remain in force until at least 2016.

The implementation of the RPGs is an integral part of the Government’s programme to enable Ireland’s planning system to play an important role in the national economic recovery by delivering a plan-led planning system where spatial plans are aligned to benefit the economy, environment and provide for an improved quality of life. This process has sought to prioritise future infrastructural investment at a regional and local level, whilst promoting the growth of designated settlements. It is proposed that the (RPG’s) will be replaced by a Regional Spatial & Economic Strategy for the region.

32 “The objective of regional spatial and economic strategies shall be to support the implementation of the National Spatial Strategy and the economic policies and objectives of the Government by providing a long-term strategic planning and economic framework for the development of the region for which the strategies are prepared which shall be consistent with the National Spatial Strategy and the economic policies or objectives of the Government.” (sec23 Planning and Development Act 2000) The Eastern and Midland Regional Assembly, has twelve constituent local authorities split into three Strategic Planning Areas 8. Dublin Regional Enterprise Strategy: (TBC) The Dublin Regional Enterprise Strategy provides a coherent and coordinated approach to promoting enterprise, employment and entrepreneurial activities in the Dublin Region for the period 2017-2019. To inform the development of the enterprise strategy, a review of existing and emerging enterprise and employment policies is essential.

The review recognises the wide range of policies that presently exist and the associated flexibility therein, to ensure that the strategy remains responsive to changing economic conditions and technological advances. In considering this policy direction, the augmentation through research, analysis and consultation of the current enterprise landscape in the Dublin Region provides a focused approach on key areas. These areas include, inter alia, understanding the ‘key enterprise sectors’ (namely, Administration, Professional Services, Tourism and Leisure, Education and Training, Manufacturing and Industry, Transport and Logistics, Construction, ICT and Technology and Retail and Wholesale), the associated employment levels, together with the clustering of enterprise activity and enterprise supports.

Stakeholder consultation allows for key insights to be garnered and incorporated into the strategy’s development and future overall direction. The recent improvements in the national economy have been heavily driven by the economy of the Dublin Region. Growth in the number of enterprises and a reduction in the unemployment rate illustrate an increasingly entrepreneurial economy and reflect the establishing of many new start-up enterprises. Within this context, the identification of ‘growth opportunity areas’ can have significant potential for enterprise consolidation and expansion in the future. These are centred on the following: Design and Creative Industries, Food Industry, The Green Economy (Cleantech and Environment), International Financial Services, Pharma/Biopharma, Software and Digital, Tourism, and Education and Training.

33 Recognising the existing enterprise landscape and the policy and economic conditions that shape it, it is paramount that a future ‘enterprise vision’ for the Dublin Region be articulated. The vision of this strategy is… “… for the creation of a sustainable, globally competitive and innovative destination for enterprise development and living”. The delivery of this vision is ensured through ‘key enterprise objectives’ which reflect and to guide the current enterprise landscape towards the delivery of the enterprise strategy. With each objective relating to a vital ‘enterprise driver’, covering areas of meeting the needs of entrepreneurs and enterprises, assisting the potential ‘growth opportunity areas’, future skills, education and training needs and requirements, promoting a culture of entrepreneurship and innovation, the positioning of the City Region, and ensuring a high quality of life, focussed ‘enterprise recommendations’ will ensure their fulfilment. In turn, these recommendations can ensure the roll- out of both regional and local ‘enterprise actions’, with the successful implementation of these being crucial to secure the overall successful delivery of this three-year enterprise strategy for the Region, through an integrated and focussed approach.

9. Dublin Regional Action Plan for Jobs: (TBC) The Dublin Action Plan for Jobs has been developed following wide local stakeholder engagement. It is a rolling agenda which will allow additional actions and ideas to be added as they emerge over the period of the Plan and beyond. An Implementation Committee will be established with a Chairperson appointed by the Minister for Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, to oversee monitoring of implementation. A six-monthly Progress Report will be published by this Committee twice yearly. The Progress Reports will also identify areas for further action in a rolling framework. The Minister will also appoint Enterprise Champions for Dublin to drive the enterprise and jobs focus of the Plan. The following metrics have been incorporated in actions set out above where relevant. They are summarised here for ease of reference. By 2020, we will:  Have 66,000 more people in employment and reach an unemployment rate of 6 percent2;  increase the number of start-ups in the region by a minimum of 25 percent;  increase the survival rate of start-ups in the first five years by a minimum of 25 percent;

34  deliver a minimum of 430 FDI investments for Dublin over the period 2015-2019;  improve the capacity of Irish owned agency supported enterprises to grow to scale by a minimum of 30 per cent across many turnover thresholds3;  increase RD&I performance within enterprises, with an increase: of 20 percent in RD&I expenditure in foreign owned entities (by 2019); of 20 percent in numbers of Irish owned enterprises engaging in RD&I activities; and more collaborative activity involving enterprises and state funded research institutes, delivering at least one third more collaborations and seeding intensified clustering activities;  double enterprise investment in training and upskilling for employees;  deliver a 7 percent increase year on year in visitor numbers to reach 6.2 million4; and  achieve a doubling of spend by visitors to reach a total of €2.5 billion5. 10. BREXIT: Context, Response & Opportunities (TBC) Key stakeholders in relation to brexit  EU Commission  DPER  DJEI  Dept. Housing Planning, Community & Local Government  Dept of Foreign Affairs  Dept of An Taoiseach  DPER  EI/LEO  ESRI  IDA

35 Appendix B: High Level Objectives for 2018 The following represent the key objectives for the Economic Development & Enterprise Offices for 2018:  Support and implement the work programme of the Economic Development and Enterprise Strategic Policy Committee.  Local Enterprise Office Staff will deliver on the objectives set out in the Local Enterprise Development Plan 2017-2020  Chart the creation of supported new employment in the City through conducting and reporting on the annual Employment Survey.

 Economic Development Office staff will continue to deliver on the Economic Actions in the Dublin City Local Economic & Community Plan 2016-2021  Support the promotion of the City through the work of the Dublin.ie website.  Implement the objectives of the Dublin City Economic Development Strategy through the four strategic pillars of Human Development, Placemaking & Clustering, Promotion & Investment and Innovation & Transformation.  Implement the findings of the review of the Office of the Commissioner for Start-up’s.  Support the publication of the Dublin Economic Monitor.

 Further build our research capacity to inform decision making  Assist in the delivery of the Dublin Regional Action Plan for Jobs  Work with Planning, International Relations, Smart Cities and other relevant stakeholders to progress key economic City Initiatives.

36 Appendix C: Dublin City SWOT Analysis A SWOT analysis was conducted to get a high level picture of the key Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats to the Dublin City Economy. Work on this began in 2016 during a series of Local Economic & Community Plan (LECP) stakeholder workshops which were conducted by the EOD Team to assist in developing the 2017 LECP Action Plan. Further individual meetings were conducted individually with a range of individuals, organisations and business groups at which this work was further developed. Table 5 below shows the resulting analysis used to inform the 4 Pillars of Economic Development which form the core of this document.

Strengths Weaknesses Educated Workforce Lack of economic diversity EU Membership Constrained Housing supply English Speaking Level of Infrastructure Investment Low Corporation Tax Profile Reliance on UK markets Enterprise Support Eco-System Fiscal Space Restrictions Opportunities Threats BREXIT BREXIT Foreign Direct Investment Ability to attract and retain talent Growth Sectors & Clustering On-Island hard border Talent Development External Fiscal/Economic Shocks New Export Markets National Debt Figure 10: Dublin City SWOT analysis

37 Appendix E: Economic Networks: (TBC) To effectively execute our role the EDO will ne to build on existing relationships with key economic stakeholders while simultaneously developing new relationships. This section is intended to identify the different stakeholders that we should engage with from both the Public and Private sectors. 1. Economics Development, Enterprise & International Relations Strategic Policy Committee 2. Economic Working Group 3. Senior Management Team 4. Dublin Region Economic Development Management Team 5. External Public: DPER, DHECLG, EI, IDA, EMRA 6. External Private: Dublin Chamber, British & Irish Chamber, IBEC, ESRI,

38 Appendix F: Potential areas of research: (TBC) Once resources are in place, EDO will be able to begin to build out an informed research programme and carry out analysis and commentary functions. Examples of the areas intended to be researched on are:  Enterprise Space  Skills Gaps  Growth Sectors  Deprivation  Commercial Space Vacancy Register  Migrant Entrepreneurship

39 Appendix G: Staffing Resources The table below indicate the structure of the EDO. Those highlighted in Blue are permanent staff, grey indicates temporary staff either in place (Senior Economic Development Officer) or expected to start in the next 6 months (2 X Researchers & 2 X LGMA Graduates) and those in green are additional resources anticipated to be needed to resource the team effectively but not yet approved. Figure 11: EDO structure and resources

40 Appendix H: EDO Action Plan 2018 (TBC) This section will contain a complete listing of all the actions to be completed under:  The Dublin Regional Action Plan for Jobs  The Local Economic & Community Plan  Dublin City Development Plan  National Enterprise Strategy  Dublin Climate Action Plan We will also build an Events Calendar for 2018

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