Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019

 
Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019
Rio Metro Regional Transit District
Short Range Plan
FY2020 - FY2026

           Addendum 7, May 2019
Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019
Table of Contents
Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 3
   I.1 Short Range Plan Structure ................................................................................................................. 3
   I.2 Relationship to the TAM Plan ............................................................................................................. 3
   I.3 Fiscal Impact of Positive Train Control ................................................................................................ 4
Section 1: FY2020 Budget and FY2021-FY2026 Projections ......................................................................... 5
   1.1 New Mexico Rail Runner Express Budget .......................................................................................... 5
   1.2 Transit Budget .................................................................................................................................... 7
Section 2: Accomplishments and Goals ........................................................................................................ 9
   2.1 Administration and Finance ............................................................................................................... 9
   2.2 Marketing Division ............................................................................................................................. 9
   2.3 Planning Division .............................................................................................................................. 10
   2.4 Rail Division ...................................................................................................................................... 10
   2.5 Transit Division ................................................................................................................................. 11
Section 3: New Mexico Rail Runner Express Capital Plan ........................................................................... 13
   3.1 Capital Maintenance Program ......................................................................................................... 15
   3.2 Grade Crossing Improvement Program ........................................................................................... 20
   3.3 Bridge Improvement Program ......................................................................................................... 24
   3.4 Capital Projects Program.................................................................................................................. 25
   3.5 Plans and Studies ............................................................................................................................. 33
Section 4: Transit Capital Plan .................................................................................................................... 34
   4.1 Revenue Vehicle Replacement Program .......................................................................................... 35
   4.2 Service Vehicle Replacement Program ............................................................................................ 37
   4.3 Capital Projects Program.................................................................................................................. 39
   4.4 Plans and Studies ............................................................................................................................. 41
Section 5: FY2021-FY2025 Infrastructure Capital Improvement Plan ........................................................ 44
Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019
Introduction

I.1 Short Range Plan Structure
This addendum to the Short Range Plan is divided into five sections:
     Section 1 positions the budget for the upcoming fiscal year and projections for the subsequent six
        years up front. In a way, the “answers” are provided first for the Board’s convenience, whereas
        more detailed descriptions for many of the planning- and capital-related projects are provided in
        later sections (particularly Sections 3 and 4).
     Section 2 summarizes Rio Metro’s accomplishments in the last fiscal year and its goals for the
        upcoming fiscal year. In doing so, this relatively brief progress report provides an across-the-
        agency snapshot of Rio Metro’s realized and anticipated achievements, including administrative,
        marketing and planning initiatives.
     Section 3, the New Mexico Rail Runner Express (NMRX) Capital Plan, satisfies the requirement in
        Rio Metro’s memorandum of agreement with NMDOT to jointly develop a five-year minimum
        capital maintenance plan/capital improvement plan for the NMRX system. Critically, by its direct
        link to Rio Metro’s Transit Asset Management (TAM) Plan, the NMRX Capital Plan also satisfies 49
        USC 5337(b)(2), which requires that projects receiving Section 5337 State of Good Repair funding
        be included in a recipient’s TAM Plan.
     Section 4, the Transit Capital Plan, assesses Rio Metro’s non-rail capital needs, including planning
        and operational initiatives that may ultimately result in future capital investments. This section
        also includes an evaluation of Rio Metro’s non-revenue (i.e., service) vehicle needs, regardless of
        the mode they serve.
     Section 5, Rio Metro’s Infrastructure and Capital Improvement Plan (ICIP) prioritizes unfunded
        and underfunded projects vetted in sections 3 and 4 for inclusion in the State of New Mexico’s
        coordinated ICIP. The State’s ICIP is the primary process whereby local government projects are
        considered for capital outlay and other state funding.

I.2 Relationship to the TAM Plan
With the adoption of its first TAM Plan in 2018, Rio Metro intentionally created a link between the TAM
Plan and the Short Range Plan.

Foremost, the investment priorities that were established in the TAM Plan must be revisited and refined
annually in the Short Range Plan. This occurs in two primary ways. First, lifecycle cost models that were
developed in tandem with the TAM Plan help identify capital maintenance and replacement needs
without regard to funding (i.e., an “unconstrained” scenario). The models’ outputs are subsequently
weighed against staff’s first-hand understanding of asset condition and known budgetary constraints to
determine Rio Metro’s investment priorities.

Second, with respect to replacements within an asset class, staff also work their way through the
evaluation criteria from Section 6.1 of the TAM Plan to guide their prioritization. For example, the criteria
that follow, listed in descending order of importance, would inform which cutaway buses to replace when
the budget is not adequate to replace all cutaway buses that have reached the end of their useful lives:
     Safety: Does the condition of the asset pose a safety risk to the travelling public, operators or
         others that cannot be easily mitigated through routine maintenance?

                                                     3
Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019
   Impacts to Service/Operations: Does the condition of the asset impact the ability to provide
        revenue service and meet existing levels of service?
       Maintenance: What is the level of maintenance and inspection required to keep the asset in
        working condition?
       Age: Is the asset beyond its useful life?
       Condition: What is the condition of the asset?

In summary, the graphic below demonstrates how the lifecycle cost models, evaluation criteria and staff
input work together to inform the Short Range Plan.

                                  Figure I-1: Short Range Planning Approach

I.3 Fiscal Impact of Positive Train Control
This Short Range Plan is unmistakably shaped by Positive Train Control (PTC), a congressionally-mandated
system designed to protect against train-on-train collisions, overspeed derailments, work zone incursions,
and movements through red signals and misaligned switches. In FY2019, Rio Metro received conditional
approval of a temporary main like track exception from FRA that extends the date for full PTC
implementation to December 31, 2020. Around the same time, Rio Metro was also awarded $29.4 million
and $2.5 million grants from FRA under the Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements
(CRISI) PTC program. In conjunction with a $10.9 million State Infrastructure Bank (SIB) loan and other
federal and local funds, Rio Metro has amassed the $63.1 million to bring the project to fruition prior to
the deadline.

Despite securing significant, outside funding sources, Rio Metro must dedicate nearly all of its excess gross
receipts tax (GRT) revenues—except what is necessary to maintain existing levels of service, perform high-
priority maintenance, and complete previously programmed capital projects—to fund PTC. As will become
apparent in later sections, significant capital maintenance, replacement and improvement projects have
been scaled back or delayed to accommodate PTC. In short, the Rail Runner will undoubtedly benefit from
the enhanced level of safety that PTC provides, but it does mean that some assets will not be maintained
or improved at a level that Rio Metro would desire in the interim.

                                                     4
Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019
Section 1: FY2020 Budget and FY2021-FY2026 Projections

         Rio Metro’s budget is divided into two sections based on mode. The first accounts for all revenues and
         costs associated with the New Mexico Rail Runner Express commuter rail service. The second accounts
         for all of Rio Metro’s other transit services (e.g., bus) and administration.

         1.1 New Mexico Rail Runner Express Budget
         The FY2020 budget for the Rail Runner amounts to $124.0 million in revenues and $72.7 million in costs.
         Costs are further divided between operations and maintenance (O&M; $27.2 million) and capital ($45.4
         million). O&M costs reflect an unchanged level of service, and are anticipated to only marginally increase
         in later years. Capital costs are largely associated with PTC and the capital maintenance needs outlined in
         Section 3. Notably, PTC debt service payments on the State Infrastructure Bank loan will begin in FY2020
         and grow to $786,000 annually after PTC implementation is complete.

         The sizeable $51.3 million carryover from FY2020 into FY2021 is primarily due to the continuation of PTC,
         and includes portions of two FY18 CRISI PTC grants, Section 5337 funds, matching GRT, and State
         Infrastructure Bank (SIB) Loan proceeds. Following the completion of PTC in FY2021, subsequent
         carryovers reflect unspent federal formula funds and some GRT. For example, the FY2020 budget reflects
         two years of Section 5307 and 5337 funding that is theoretically available to Rio Metro in any given year;
         however, half of that amount will continue to carryover unless additional matching funds become
         available or an emergency warrants its use.
                                                  Table 1-1-1: Rail Runner Revenues
Rail Runner Revenues                                                              State Fiscal Year (Thousands of Dollars)
Capital & Operating                         FY2019 Approved     FY2020     FY2021     FY2022       FY2023     FY2024       FY2025     FY2026
   5307 Large Urban Capital                            17,067     17,092      8,945        9,102       9,285      9,470       9,660      9,853
   5307 Large Urban Capital Carryover
   5307 Large Urban Oper. Transfer to Bus              -1,200     -1,200     -1,200      -1,200      -1,200      -1,200     -1,200      -1,200
   5307 Small Urban                                       155        155        155         155         155         155        155         155
   5337 State of Good Repair                           17,285     19,794      9,275       9,414       9,555       9,746      9,941      10,140
   5337 State of Good Repair Carryover                  7,724      9,657
   5309 TAM Carryover                                     240
   CMAQ Operating Assistance                                       1,000      1,000       1,000       1,000
   STP-U Alameda Siding                                 1,367      1,367
   STP-U Centalized Traffic Control                                                       4,288       4,288
   STP-U Main 2 Extension                                                                               563       4,061
   Flex Fund Carryover                                    95
   State Capital Outlay                                            2,150
   State Bridge Repair/Replacement                                                                                 250         250
   Section 130/Crossing Improvements                      825        257        550         165
   BNSF/Amtrak Gross Ton Mile Fee                       2,200      2,200      2,266       2,300       2,335      2,370       2,406       2,454
   Rio Metro/NCRTD GRT                                 14,500     15,500     15,810      16,126      16,449     16,778      17,113      17,456
   Farebox                                              2,200      2,000      2,000       2,000       2,000      2,000       2,000       2,000
   GRT From Bus                                         1,200      1,200      1,200       1,200       1,200      1,200       1,200       1,200
   STP-U PTC and Wi-Fi                                    529        529
   PTC Discretionary Grant                              3,600      3,600
   PTC CRISI Grant                                     29,359     31,856
   State Infrastructure Bank (SIB) Loan                10,900     10,900
   Cash Reserves (GRT)                                  4,955      5,966
   Projected Carryover (Grant/GRT/SIB)                                       51,322      35,886      38,717     40,830      42,691      45,126
   TOTAL REVENUES                                     113,001    124,022     91,323      80,436      84,346     85,660      84,215      87,183

                                                                   5
Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019
Table 1-1-2: Rail Runner Costs
Rail Runner Costs                                                                 State Fiscal Year (Thousands of Dollars)
Operations & Maintenance                FY2019 Approved       FY2020       FY2021     FY2022       FY2023     FY2024       FY2025     FY2026
   Salaries & Benefits                              1,442        1,440        1,485        1,530       1,576      1,623       1,672      1,722
   Professional Services                               26          250          250            0          28         29          30         31
   Non-Professional Services                           26           65           27           28          28         29          30         31
   Communication                                      618          650          650          660         670        680         690        700
   Utilities                                          454          350          375          380         385        390         395        400
   Travel                                              15           15           15           16          16         17          17         18
   Indirect Overhead (MRCOG)                          311          350          321          330         340        350         361        372
   Printing/Supplies                                   26           26           27           28          28         29          30         31
   Insurance                                        3,000        3,200        3,200        3,300       3,300      3,300       3,300      3,300
   Fuel                                             2,600        2,600        2,678        2,758       2,841      2,926       3,014      3,105
   Vehicle Maintenance                                 16           20           20           20          21         21          22         22
   Herzog Transit Contract                         17,500       18,028       18,389      18,756       19,139     19,522      19,912     20,310
   Rental Expenses                                    215          215          221          228         235        242         249        257
   TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE COSTS            26,249       27,209       27,658      28,034       28,608     29,159      29,723     30,298

PTC Debt Service                          FY2019 Approved     FY2020       FY2021     FY2022      FY2023      FY2024      FY2025      FY2026
  SIB Loan Repayment (GRT, 18-yr, 1%)                  109          54          109        109         786         786         786         786
  TOTAL PTC DEBT SERVICE COSTS                         109          54          109        109         786         786         786         786

Capital                                   FY2019 Approved     FY2020       FY2021     FY2022      FY2023      FY2024      FY2025      FY2026
  Capital Maintenance Program                         2,533      4,374        6,124      7,844       7,774       7,174       6,574       7,544
  Grade Crossing Improvement Program                    825        257          550        165
  Bridge Repair and Replacement Program                 110        100          100        100          100        350         250
  Maintenance Facility                                                                                  100        300       1,300       1,300
  Service Vehicle Purchase                                         102                       25          44         19          25          69
  Positive Train Control & Wi-Fi                     34,500     38,616       20,500
  TAM Plan                                              300
  Security Projects                                     105          121        121         123         126        128         131        134
  Rehab/Renovate Rail Stations                          111
  Alameda Siding                                      1,600      1,600
  Centraized Traffic Control                                                              5,019       5,019
  Main 2 Extension                                                                                      659      4,753
  Wi-Fi/Signal Lease (incl. some O&M)                   267        267          275         300         300        300         300         300
  TOTAL CAPITAL COSTS                                40,351     45,437       27,670      13,576      14,121     13,025       8,580       9,347

  TOTAL COSTS                                        66,709     72,700       55,437      41,719      43,515     42,970      39,089      40,431

  PROJECTED CARRYOVER                                           51,322       35,886      38,717      40,830     42,691      45,126      46,752
    Grant Carryover                                             40,185       34,886      37,717      39,830     42,691      45,126      46,752
    GRT/SIB Carryover                                           11,137        1,000       1,000       1,000

                                                                 6
Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019
1.2 Transit Budget
         While the Rail Runner is obviously a mode of public transit, “transit” here refers to all other Rio Metro and
         partner services, including:
              Sandoval County commuter bus routes and Route 366 in Bernalillo County;
              Valencia County Dial-a-Ride, Pueblo of Isleta Dial-a-Ride and commuter bus routes;
              Rio Rancho Dial-a-Ride for seniors and individuals with disabilities;
              Job Access demand taxi service;
              Bike share program;
              ABQ RIDE fixed-route service;
              NMDOT Park & Ride Purple Route, which replaces an early morning Rail Runner train and
                  connects the Santa Fe County/NM 599 Rail Runner Station to Los Alamos; and
              Rio Metro staff in the Administration and Finance, Marketing, Planning and Transit divisions.

         The FY2020 transit budget comprises $23.8 million in revenues, $17.3 million in costs, and preserves the
         $5 million agency-wide cash reserve established in FY2015. Unlike the Rail Runner, which has significant
         capital commitments, the transit budget largely funds operations, maintenance and administration.
         Nevertheless, the transit budget contains some planning and capital investments, including vehicle
         replacements, University Blvd. BRT project development and transit-oriented development efforts, the
         construction of the Los Ranchos/Journal Center Rail Runner Station expansion, and the continued growth
         of the bike share program.
                                                       Table 1-2-1: Transit Revenues
Transit Revenues                                                                                State Fiscal Year (Thousands of Dollars)
Capital & Operating                                    FY2019 Approved        FY2020     FY2021     FY2022       FY2023    FY2024        FY2025     FY2026
   5307 Small Urban/5339 Small Urban                                760          1,509        775          790         806        822         839        855
   5307 Large Urban from Rail 50/50                               1,200          1,200      1,200        1,200       1,200      1,200       1,200      1,200
   5307 Large Urban from Rail 50/50 Carryover                     1,500          1,500
   5307 Large Urban Community Transportation                        191            382        191         191         191        191         191         191
   Subtotal, Urban Funds                                          3,651          4,591      2,166       2,181       2,197      2,213       2,230       2,246

  5310/5311/5339 Vehicle Purchase                                   72                        258         447         324        519         432        541
  5311 Rural Operations                                            850            830         842         851         859        868         877        885
  5304 Valencia County Transit Facility Eng. Report                                52
  Subtotal, Rural Funds                                            922            882       1,100       1,298       1,183      1,387       1,309       1,426

  CMAQ TDM/Marketing                                                178            273        281
  CMAQ Los Ranchos/Journal Center Stn. Expansion                    900            900
  CMAQ/PPTOD UNM/CNM/Sunport BRT Project Dev.                     1,547          1,547
  TAP/STP-U Bike Share Expansion/Replacement                        511            563                    750                    750
  STP-U Small Urban Valencia County Transit Facility                                                                           1,000
  Subtotal, Discretionary Funds                                   3,136          3,283        281         750           0      1,750           0          0

  TOTAL FEDERAL AND STATE REVENUES                                7,709          8,755      3,546       4,230       3,380      5,350       3,539       3,672

  Projected Carryover                                             1,625          2,582      5,497       6,475       6,671      7,100       7,178       7,729
  Farebox                                                            90             90         91          92          93         94          95          96
  Advertising                                                        88            100        100         100         100        100         100         100
  Rio Metro GRT                                                  12,300         12,700     12,546      12,797      13,053     13,314      13,580      13,852
  Rio Metro GRT to Rail                                          -1,200         -1,200     -1,200      -1,200      -1,200     -1,200      -1,200      -1,200
  UNM/CNM/Sunport BRT Partners                                      800            800
  TOTAL LOCAL REVENUES                                           13,703         15,072     17,034      18,263      18,717     19,408      19,753      20,577

  TOTAL REVENUES                                                 21,412         23,827     20,580      22,493      22,097     24,758      23,291      24,249

                                                                          7
Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019
Table 1-2-2: Transit Costs
Transit Costs                                                                                State Fiscal Year (Thousands of Dollars)
Operations & Maintenance                            FY2019 Approved        FY2020     FY2021     FY2022       FY2023    FY2024        FY2025     FY2026
   Sandoval County Commuter Bus                                1,470          1,470      1,492        1,537       1,583      1,630       1,679      1,730
   Rio Rancho Dial-a-Ride                                        700            750        761          784         808        832         857        882
   Subtotal, Sandoval County                                   2,170          2,220      2,253        2,321       2,391      2,462       2,536      2,612

  Valencia County Dial-a-Ride and Fixed Route                  1,500          1,600      1,624       1,673       1,723      1,775       1,828       1,883
  Subtotal, Valencia County                                    1,500          1,600      1,624       1,673       1,723      1,775       1,828       1,883

  ABQ RIDE                                                     4,500          4,355      4,355       4,755       4,755      4,755       4,755       4,755
  Job Access Program                                             382            382        382         382         382        382         382         382
  Subtotal, Bernalillo County                                  4,882          4,737      4,737       5,137       5,137      5,137       5,137       5,137

  Routes 366 and 505A                                           175            185         180         186         191        197         203        209
  NMDOT Purple Route                                            145            150         152         157         162        166         171        176
  Pueblo of Isleta Partnership                                  233            240
  Subtotal, Regional Commuter                                   553            575         332         343         353        363         374        385

  Administrative Overhead                                      2,400          2,400      2,472       2,546       2,623      2,701       2,782       2,866
  Indirect Overhead (MRCOG)                                    1,245          1,200      1,200       1,200       1,200      1,200       1,200       1,200
  TDM/Marketing                                                1,000            800        800         800         800        800         800         800
  Ski Santa Fe (NCRTD)                                            15             15         15          15          15         15          15          15
  UNM/CNM/Sunport BRT Project Dev./TOD                         1,856          1,856
  UNM/CNM/Sunport BRT Partners                                   800            800
  RMRTD Studies and Plans                                        150            150        150         150         150        150         150        150
  Valencia County Transit Facility Eng. Report                                   65
  MRMPO Assistance                                               200            200        200         200         200        200         200        200
  Bike Share Expansion/Replacement                               598            659                    878                    878
  Subtotal, Administration, Planning and Programs              8,265          8,146      4,837       5,789       4,988      5,944       5,147       5,231

  TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE COSTS                        17,369         17,277     13,783      15,263      14,592     15,681      15,022      15,248

  Capital                                           FY2019 Approved        FY2020     FY2021     FY2022      FY2023      FY2024     FY2025       FY2026
  Valencia County Transit Facility                               750                                                        1,250
  Rio Metro Vehicle Purchase                                      90                       322         559         405        649         540        676
  Los Ranchos/Journal Center Station Expansion                 1,053          1,053
  TOTAL CAPITAL COSTS                                          1,893          1,053        322         559         405      1,899         540        676

  TOTAL COSTS                                                 19,262         18,330     14,105      15,822      14,997     17,580      15,562      15,924

  PROJECTED FUND BALANCE                                                     10,497     11,475      11,671      12,100     12,178      12,729      13,325
    Cash Reserve                                                              5,000      5,000       5,000       5,000      5,000       5,000       5,000
    Projected Carryover                                                       5,497      6,475       6,671       7,100      7,178       7,729       8,325

                                                                       8
Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019
Section 2: Accomplishments and Goals

The purpose of this section is to highlight each division’s major accomplishments in the past fiscal year
and goals for the upcoming fiscal year. Although many of the larger and more costly efforts described
below are covered in more detail in the subsequent NMRX and Transit capital plans, this section also calls
attention to smaller activities that, for example, incrementally implement the broader goals and
objectives of Rio Metro’s Long-Term Strategic Vision Plan.

2.1 Administration and Finance

    FY2019 Accomplishments
        Completed $60 million PTC funding package, including executing State Infrastructure Bank
           loan.
        Issued RFP, negotiated and executed contract with Xorail, and began PTC implementation.
        Submitted a Safety Risk Assessment and Risk Mitigation Plan to FRA and subsequently
           received approval of a temporary main line track exception extending the PTC deadline two
           years.
        Monitored usage and gathered community feedback on Phase I bike share expansion and
           identified Phase II station locations.

    FY2020 Goals
        Complete installation of PTC infrastructure, leaving final testing, training and revenue
           service demonstration for the first half of FY2021.
        Maintain adequate cash flow and reserves during PTC implementation.
        Install 50 bike share stations and 250 bicycles as part of Phase II expansion.

2.2 Marketing Division
    FY2019 Accomplishments
        Completed website re-design in September 2018.
        Implemented an interactive, responsive train scheduler (available on website/mobile devices)
           that allows passengers to plan their trip in an easier, more user-friendly way.
        Conducted a Customer Feedback Survey, including questions regarding the train, and, for the
           first time, Rio Metro buses.
        Expanded Seniors 62+ Ride Free Program to the entire 2019 calendar year. Year-over-year
           program ridership was up 35% in February and 12% in March.
        Santa’s Village, Rio Metro’s most significant annual incentive event, had 6,000 attendees
           (10% increase over FY2018).

    FY2020 Goals
        Publish a “Riding Rio Metro” brochure that encompasses all services and positions Rio
           Metro as a multi-modal transportation organization.
        Create vignettes of passengers from different target profiles sharing why they ride.
        Conduct a Customer Feedback Survey.
        Expand Rio Metro’s digital platform to include billboards.

                                                    9
Short Range Plan Rio Metro Regional Transit District - Addendum 7, May 2019
2.3 Planning Division
   FY2019 Accomplishments
       Completed five discretionary grant applications resulting in $31.9 million in federal funding
          for PTC implementation and associated improvements on the Rail Runner corridor.
       Submitted a grant application for the Valencia County Transit Facility. While this application
          was not successful, Rio Metro secured funding to complete environmental and engineering
          services to advance the project in support of an FY2020 grant application.
       Collaborated with the City of Albuquerque to develop an interim University Blvd. transit
          service alignment and operating plan, which is consistent with the recommendations of the
          UNM/CNM/Sunport study.
       Completed Rio Metro’s Transit Asset Management (TAM) Plan prior to FTA’s October 1, 2018
          deadline and began the integration of the TAM Plan with Rio Metro’s budget and capital
          planning activities, National Transit Database reporting, and internal administrative
          procedures.
       Completed construction of Phase I of the Town of Bernalillo pedestrian safety improvement
          project.
       Developed an initial “dashboard” that provides RMRTD staff access to information and
          analysis on performance data about Rio Metro ridership, operations and performance.
          Began preparing monthly Rail Runner and transit performance reports delivered to the
          RMRTD Board of Directors.

   FY2020 Goals
       Construct Los Ranchos/Journal Center Station parking and pedestrian improvements.
       Continue collaboration with the City of Albuquerque and project partners on finalizing interim
          service design and advancing the implementation of transit service on University Blvd.
       Complete the design and engineering of Phase II of the Town of Bernalillo pedestrian safety
          improvement project, including a potential pedestrian crossing of the railroad tracks and two
          roadway crossings.
       Continue to pursue discretionary grant funding for the Valencia County Transit Facility, Rail
          Runner corridor improvements and other priority capital needs.

2.4 Rail Division

   FY2019 Accomplishments
       Completed maintenance (including the replacement of 12,500 railroad ties) and repairs on
          the Rail Runner corridor, including the replacement of bridge panels on the Rio Grande bridge.
       Constructed Downtown Bernalillo Station Crossing, which included a new pedestrian crossing
          with gate arms, audible and visual warning devices, and an advance train warning system. Rio
          Metro and Operation Lifesaver conducted a joint public education effort on pedestrian safety
          at the crossing and along the rail corridor.
       Completed the scope of work, schedule, initial data collection and coordination for PTC
          implementation that will, in turn, be carried out by the PTC contractor, Xorail.
       Completed a Safety Risk Assessment and Risk Mitigation Plan for the NMRX system and
          implemented the capital improvements and operational modifications required by the plan
          in advance of the FRA deadline, thereby allowing the Rail Runner to continue operating at
          current levels.

                                                  10
   In coordination with Bernalillo County, relocated and reconstructed the Desert Rd. crossing
           to include: the elimination of a skewed crossing configuration; new traffic signals and
           pavement markings on all approaches that serve vehicles and pedestrians; improved drainage
           infrastructure to prevent future track washouts; a four-quadrant gate system to prevent
           motorists from driving around gates when lowered; and fencing and landscaping that
           discourages trespassing and encourages safe crossing behavior.
          Conduct eighth biennial NMRX Full Scale Exercise in Albuquerque, NM in June 2019. This
           exercise is critical to the Rail Runner, and is designed to test a scenario that includes an active
           shooter, chemical dispersal devices, decontamination, mass triage, and multi-agency
           communication.

   FY2020 Goals
       Construct the new Alameda siding between Alameda Blvd. and Alameda Rd. in Albuquerque
          to reduce delays and improve operating efficiencies.
       Continue a facilities review and implement Americans with Disabilities Act improvements at
          Rail Runner stations including braille station signs, handrail modifications, and local agency
          notification/coordination.
       Begin the first two locomotive engine overhauls (commonly referred to as “top deck”
          overhauls). The remaining seven locomotive overhauls will be phased over the next four
          years.
       As part of NMDOT’s 2017 TIGER grant project, complete rail corridor improvements on the
          NMDOT-owned tracks between Lamy and Madrid, which is used almost exclusively by Amtrak
          (the Southwest Chief). These improvements include upgrading the signal and
          communications systems, track and culvert replacement, and fencing.
       Collaborate with the City of Albuquerque and other stakeholders to determine if and how the
          Rail Runner may serve Balloon Fiesta Park.

2.5 Transit Division
   FY2019 Accomplishments
       Purchased Remix planning and scheduling software to more efficiently evaluate existing
          routes, develop new routes/schedules, and create bid rosters; and to minimize the staff hours
          required to complete these tasks manually.
       Implemented Route 210 deviated fixed route service on NM 6 in Los Lunas (June 2019).
       Installed fareboxes on all Rio Rancho Dial-a-Ride buses and changed fare structure to be
          consistent with Valencia County Dial-a-Ride.
       Implemented the See Something Say Something program by displaying posters on all buses
          and at offices to improve customer and employee safety.
       Upgraded Trapeze schedule software in partnership with ABQ RIDE.
       Redesigned and replaced all Rio Metro bus stop signs in Sandoval and Valencia counties.
       Issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) jointly with North Central Regional Transit District for
          driver/dispatcher/maintenance uniforms.
       Issued an RFP for a new dial-a-ride scheduling software with options including automatic
          passenger counters, automatic vehicle location, automated voice annunciators, real-time
          vehicle tracking and other customer-side enhancements, and data collection required for
          federal and state reporting.

                                                    11
   Issued a Request for Qualifications for the Job Access Program to solicit responses from both
       taxi and Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) such as Uber and Lyft.

FY2020 Goals
    Implement anti-human trafficking campaign to include training bus operators to look for signs
       of human trafficking, and placing posters on buses and in offices.
    Develop a training curriculum to improve operational consistency between both Rio Rancho
       and Valencia County divisions, ensure compliance with federal and state safety regulations
       and enhance customer service.
    Evaluate the performance of and implement route, schedule and stop changes to Route 206
       in the City of Belen.
    Identify, evaluate and implement potential changes to Rio Rancho Dial-a-Ride, including
       expanding the service area and/or providing service to the general public.
    Identify, evaluate and implement changes to the Job Access program that would improve
       operational efficiency and ridership, including the developing a new brochure and
       informational material.

                                              12
Section 3: New Mexico Rail Runner Express Capital Plan

The FY2020-FY2026 New Mexico Rail Runner Express (NMRX) Capital Plan finds it basis in the 2013
memorandum of agreement (MOA) between Rio Metro and NMDOT:

        The parties shall jointly develop a five (5) year NMRX and NMRX Corridor capital maintenance
        plan/capital improvement plan that will be subject to the joint approval of the RMRTD Chief
        Executive Officer and the NMDOT Cabinet Secretary. The capital maintenance/capital
        improvement plan will be reviewed annually and updated at least every two (2) years. The plan
        shall focus on maintaining NMRX in a safe condition and a state of good repair and shall identify
        the projected annual costs of planned programs, projects, major purchases, and activities;
        projected annual funding amounts by funding source for each program, project, major purchase
        or activity; and a demonstration that the plan will maintain NMRX in a safe condition and a state
        of good repair. The plan shall comply with the FTA-required NMRX capital asset management plan
        and shall demonstrate how the programmed expenditures assist in meeting NMRX performance
        targets. The plan will be presented to the STC by RMRTD as part of the NMRX annual report.

As alluded to above, the NMRX Capital Plan is inextricably linked with Rio Metro’s Transit Asset
Management (TAM) Plan. In part, this satisfies 49 USC 5337(b)(2), which requires that projects receiving
Section 5337 State of Good Repair funding be included in a recipient’s TAM Plan. Moreover, because the
NMRX Capital Plan is updated annually as part of Rio Metro’s Short Range Plan—whereas the TAM Plan is
updated every four years—this approach is more responsive to changing asset conditions, previously
unidentified needs, and known budgetary constraints.

The NMRX Capital Plan is divided into five programs:
    1. The Capital Maintenance Program accounts for the projects necessary to maintain the rolling
       stock, signals, fixed guideway, structures and communications equipment in a state of good
       repair. These projects are typically funded with Section 5337 funding.
    2. The Grade Crossing Improvement Program lists highway-rail and pedestrian-rail crossings
       scheduled for repair or reconstruction. Unless otherwise noted, these projects are funded by
       NMDOT through the Section 130 Railway-Highway Crossings program and/or tenant railroad
       trackage fees and contributions.
    3. The Bridge Improvement Program is derived from the NMRX Annual Bridge Inspection Report
       and input from Rio Metro staff and NMDOT’s Rail and Bridge Design bureaus.
    4. The Capital Projects Program includes funded and unfunded capital projects that have the
       potential to enhance safety, add track capacity, increase train speed and reduce travel time,
       improve facilities and equipment, implement Americans with Disabilities Act modifications, etc.
    5. Plans and Studies includes various efforts that, if pursued, would likely results in significant
       capital and operational investments on the NMRX system.

Each program includes a table with project titles, funding source, costs allocated by fiscal year of
expenditure, and total costs. The tables are accompanied by brief descriptions of each project, and where
applicable, status updates. Also, as noted in the introduction to Rio Metro’s Short Range Plan and more
thoroughly in the TAM Plan, all funded projects reflect Rio Metro’s investment priorities based, in part,
on the outputs of lifecycle cost models and Rio Metro and NMDOT staff input.

                                                   13
Finally, the NMRX Capital Plan includes improvements on segments of the NMRX system that are not
traversed by the Rail Runner, but are used by Amtrak and/or BNSF. 1 Rio Metro can neither apply federal
formula funds or gross receipts tax revenues (GRT) toward projects along such segments, nor does it have
direct capital responsibility for them (as defined by the TAM rule). These projects are highlighted with an
asterisk noting Rio Metro’s lack of direct capital responsibility.

Nevertheless, NMDOT receives federal formula grants (e.g., Section 130), discretionary grants (e.g.,
TIGER), and trackage fees paid by Amtrak and BNSF that can be applied toward projects off the Rail Runner
corridor. Consequently, these projects are included in the NMRX Capital Plan because they 1) impact the
broader NMRX system; and 2) their funding sometimes passes through Rio Metro’s financial system when
NMDOT utilizes Rio Metro’s contract with Herzog Transit Services, Inc. (HTSI). In these instances, NMDOT’s
(or another agency’s) participation is also noted.

1“Rail Runner” refers to the commuter rail service owned by NMDOT and operated by Rio Metro. “NMRX system” refers to the
railroad infrastructure likewise owned by NMDOT and variously used by Amtrak, BNSF and the Rail Runner.

                                                          14
3.1 Capital Maintenance Program
The capital maintenance program consumes a significant portion of Rio Metro’s Section 5337 State of
Good Repair apportionment, and is typically the largest of the funded programs in the NMRX Capital Plan.
Most of the projects are “programmatic”—that is, they receive about the same amount of funding
annually to maintain an asset (e.g., railroad ties) at an acceptable condition as determined by staff and
the TAM Plan’s lifecycle cost models. Other projects, like locomotive overhauls, are discrete, one-time
costs that arise at a specific time in an asset’s lifecycle.

Capital maintenance projects are divided into four categories: rolling stock (e.g., train cars), fixed
guideway (tracks, signals, bridges, stations, etc.), facilities (e.g., stations) and equipment.

3.1.1 Rolling Stock
Clean Oil, Test and Stencil (COT&S): Every four years, each Bombardier BiLevel cab and coach car
undergoes a detailed inspection and replacement of all major air valves and brake actuators as required
by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). This process is referred to as “clean, oil, test and stencil”
(COT&S). There are 13 coach cars and 9 cab cars in the Rail Runner fleet, which means that 5 to 6 cars are
subject to this requirement each year. The annual cost, which includes the COT&S kits, is $170,000.

Exterior Refinish: The cab and coach cars entered service in 2006 and 2008. Since that time, weathering
(sunlight, rain, wind and sand) has negatively affected the exterior paint and Rail Runner logo, and
altogether diminished the look and appeal of the rolling stock. Several companies specialize in refinishing
car exteriors, which includes paint touch up, waxing and buffing, and treating the entire exterior with a
weather- and UV-resistant coating. Approximately $220,000 would be needed to refinish all 22 cars
($10,000 each): 10 in FY2020, 10 in FY2021 and 2 in FY2022 vehicles.

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) Overhaul/Conversion: Each of the 22 cab and coach
cars has 2 HVAC units that must be overhauled periodically and also converted at their first overhaul to
accept a new refrigerant based on US EPA rules. The cost per unit is $20,000, and the program provides
funding for all 44 overhauls within the seven-year program.

Cab/Coach Car Midlife Overhaul: Although far less involved than a locomotive overhaul, each cab and
coach car require some maintenance when they reach midlife. $1,000,000 is reserved in FY2026 to replace
seats and door motors, rebuild the trucks, and refinish the exterior, if necessary, on six cab cars and six
coach cars that entered service in 2006. Depending on each car’s condition and the recency of other
treatments, these overhauls may be staggered into later years.

Head End Power (HEP) Overhaul: Each locomotive has a main engine that applies power to the wheels
and a head end power (HEP) engine that powers the lighting, HVAC and other electrical systems in cab
and coach cars. HEPs must be overhauled as they approach their maximum recommended hours of use.
One HEP will be overhauled per year at an annual cost of $160,000.

                                                    15
Table 3-1: Capital Maintenance Program

Capital Maintenance Program
                 Project                     Unit         Unit Cost    FY2020       FY2021       FY2022       FY2023       FY2024       FY2025       FY2026       7-Year Total
Rolling Stock
Cab/Coach Clean, Oil, Test & Stencil     Annual Cost       $170,000     $170,000     $170,000     $170,000     $170,000     $170,000     $170,000     $170,000     $1,190,000
Cab/Coach Exterior Refinish                  22             $10,000     $100,000     $100,000      $20,000                                                           $220,000
Cab/Coach HVAC Overhaul/Conversion           44             $20,000     $130,000     $130,000     $130,000     $130,000     $130,000     $130,000     $100,000       $880,000
Cab Midlife Overhaul                          6            $100,000                                                                                   $600,000       $600,000
Coach Midlife Overhaul                        4            $100,000                                                                                   $400,000       $400,000
Loco. Head End Power (HEP) Overhaul         1/Year         $160,000     $160,000     $160,000     $160,000     $160,000     $160,000     $160,000     $160,000     $1,120,000
Loco. Top Deck Overhaul 101                   1            $600,000     $600,000                                                                                     $600,000
Loco. Top Deck Overhaul 102                   1            $600,000     $600,000                                                                                     $600,000
Loco. Top Deck Overhaul 103                   1            $600,000                  $600,000                                                                        $600,000
Loco. Top Deck Overhaul 104                   1            $600,000                  $600,000                                                                        $600,000
Loco. Top Deck Overhaul 105                   1            $600,000                               $600,000                                                           $600,000
Loco. Top Deck Overhaul 106                   1            $600,000                               $600,000                                                           $600,000
Loco. Top Deck Overhaul 107                   1            $600,000                                            $600,000                                              $600,000
Loco. Top Deck Overhaul 108                   1            $600,000                                            $600,000                                              $600,000
Loco. Top Deck Overhaul 109                   1            $600,000                                                         $600,000                                 $600,000
Loco. Traction Motor Repair             8 Repairs/Year     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $1,400,000
Loco. Turbo Replacement                     1/Year          $24,000      $24,000      $24,000      $24,000      $24,000      $24,000      $24,000      $24,000       $168,000
Coupler Repair/Replacement                  4/Year          $20,000      $20,000      $20,000      $20,000      $20,000      $20,000      $20,000      $20,000       $140,000
Wheel Replacement                          15/Year          $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000       $350,000
Fixed Guideway
Ballast                                10,000 Tons/Year    $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $200,000     $1,400,000
Bridge Components                        Annual Cost        $30,000      $30,000      $30,000      $30,000      $30,000      $30,000      $30,000      $30,000       $210,000
Emergency Drainage Cleanout              Annual Cost        $80,000      $80,000      $80,000      $80,000      $80,000      $80,000      $80,000      $80,000       $560,000
Fencing                                 10 Miles/Year       $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000       $350,000
Frog Replacement                            5/Year          $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000       $350,000
Other Track Material                     Annual Cost        $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000      $50,000       $350,000
PTC Capital Maintenance                  Annual Cost      $3,500,000                $1,750,000   $3,500,000   $3,500,000   $3,500,000   $3,500,000   $3,500,000   $19,250,000
Signal Component Replacement             Annual Cost       $189,000     $189,000     $189,000     $189,000     $189,000     $189,000     $189,000     $189,000     $1,323,000
Ties                                     11,500/Year      $1,000,000   $1,000,000   $1,000,000   $1,000,000   $1,000,000   $1,000,000   $1,000,000   $1,000,000    $7,000,000
Ongoing Capital Maintenance              Annual Cost       $250,000     $250,000     $250,000     $250,000     $250,000     $250,000     $250,000     $250,000     $1,750,000
Facilities
Station IT Refresh                       Annual Cost       $172,000     $172,000     $172,000     $172,000     $172,000     $172,000     $172,000     $172,000     $1,204,000
Station Rehabilitation                   Annual Cost       $230,000     $230,000     $230,000     $230,000     $230,000     $230,000     $230,000     $230,000     $1,610,000
Station Signage Refresh                  Annual Cost        $19,000      $19,000      $19,000      $19,000      $19,000      $19,000      $19,000      $19,000       $133,000
Equipment
Communications System (Radios)                1             $50,000                                $50,000                                                            $50,000
                                                              Total    $4,374,000   $6,124,000   $7,844,000   $7,774,000   $7,174,000   $6,574,000   $7,544,000   $47,408,000

                                                                                    16
Locomotive 101-109 Top Deck Overhauls: Rail Runner service utilizes nine Motive Power MP36PH-3C
locomotives. Five were built in 2005 and four were built in 2008. Locomotives are typically subject to a
“midlife” overhaul 15 years from their first date of use. Midlife overhauls are necessary to correct wear in
mechanical and electrical parts, including the main engine, traction motors, trucks, switchgear, electrical
components, turbos, etc. Because many of these components are already repaired, replaced or
overhauled through other projects in this capital maintenance program, the “top deck” overhaul focuses
on the prime mover (diesel engine) and the main generator that powers the traction motors.

According to the lifecycle cost
models, the five oldest locomotives
should all be overhauled in FY2021
and the remainder should be
overhauled in FY2024. However,
because the capital maintenance
budget cannot absorb the $5.4
million ($600,000 per locomotive) to
perform these overhauls over just
two years, the overhauls will be
spread over five years. Therefore,
two locomotives per year will be overhauled between FY2020 and FY2023. The ninth locomotive will be
overhauled in FY2024.

PTC Capital Maintenance: Following PTC installation in the first half of FY2021, the onboard, wayside,
communication and hosted back office segments will require significant maintenance and component
replacement. Furthermore, the PTC system requires periodic licensing fees and software/hardware
upgrades. This project anticipates these needs by programming $1,750,000 in FY2021 and $3,500,000 in
subsequent years.

Traction Motor Repair: Traction motors are the electric motors in the truck assembly of a locomotive that
turn the wheels when power is applied from the main engine. Rail Runner locomotives experience traction
motor failures at higher rates than other passenger rail operators for a variety of environmental reasons
including altitude, climate and grade. When a traction motor fails, it has to be shipped out of state because
of the specialized equipment and parts required to perform the repairs. The program allocates $200,000
annually for traction motor repairs.

Turbocharger Replacement: The turbochargers on Rail Runner locomotives need to be replaced
periodically due to normal wear and lifecycle replacement requirements. $24,000 is included in each of
the program’s seven years to replace one turbocharger.

Wheel Replacement Program: Locomotive and car wheels wear over time and must be replaced based
on FRA’s regulations pertaining to wear. This program allocates $50,000 per year to replace approximately
15 wheels on Rail Runner rolling stock.

                                                     17
3.1.2 Fixed Guideway
Note: Projects labeled “Material Only” exclude labor. Instead, this labor is budgeted in Rio Metro’s annual
operations and maintenance contract with HTSI.

Ballast (Material Only): Ballast is used in the undercutting and resurfacing processes to restore the
roadbed upon which the ties and rail rest. Similar to repaving a highway, periodically cleaning and
replacing the ballast helps maintain the tracks’ alignment and ensures a safe and smooth ride. $200,000
is allocated annually to purchase 10,000 tons of ballast.

Bridge Components (Material Only): $30,000 is allocated annually to purchase bridge components for
minor or immediate repairs identified in the annual bridge inspection process.

Emergency Drainage Cleanout: Pipes,
culverts and other drainage structures along
the guideway can become clogged or
damaged because of flooding or excessive use
and may require emergency cleaning or
repairs. While the cost of this work can vary
widely from year to year, $80,000 is set aside
annually in line with historical costs.

Frog Replacement: Frogs are an integral part
of a railroad turnout or switch. Frogs require
grinding and welding at periodic intervals to
extend their service life, and eventually need
to be replaced. The life span of a frog is highly
dependent on the tonnage that it carries,
requiring some to be replaced more often
than others. Based on historical need,
$50,000 is allocated to replace up to five frogs
per year.

Other Track Material (Material Only): In addition to ties, ballast and rail, the guideway requires other
minor components such as anchors, tie plates, spikes, etc. to remain operable and in a state of good repair.
$50,000 per year is programmed to purchase these ancillary materials.

Signal Component Replacement (Material Only): The signal system controls the movement of trains and
is essential to safety. Major components of this system—including control points; intermediate signals;
signal bungalows; switches and switch heaters; highway-grade crossing gates and signals; high water
detectors; dragging equipment detectors; pole line circuits; data and voice communications equipment;
etc.—have subcomponents that must be replaced periodically as they reach the end of their useful life or
because of the operating environment. $189,000 is allocated annually to replace these components.

Ties (Material Only): In order to keep the track in a state of good repair and at a suitable FRA-designated
class for Rail Runner and Amtrak passenger service (typically Class IV), about 11,500 ties are replaced each
year. $1 million per year is programmed to purchase these ties.

                                                    18
Ongoing Capital Maintenance: This project reserves funding for the capital maintenance of rolling stock,
fixed guideway, facilities and equipment that are not otherwise anticipated by the previous projects. The
amount allocated to this project is typically the difference between preceding project costs and the
anticipated obligation for the Section 5337 program, which can vary from year to year. Accordingly, the
final amount in Rio Metro’s grant application for this project is commonly adjusted upward or downward
from the amount shown in Table 3-1 ($250,000).

3.1.3 Facilities
Station IT Refresh: Each of the 15 Rail Runner station has multiple IT, audio and security components,
including a PC, router, network switch, uninterrupted power supply, audio controller, amplifier, speakers,
cameras, DVR, message board, etc. These components reach the end of their useful lives between 5 and
10 years, so the capital maintenance program now includes $170,000 annually to ensure that each
station’s IT components may be replaced every 7 years.

Station Rehabilitation: As with the Rail
Runner fleet, station infrastructure, especially
parking lots, are beginning to show wear and
may require a variety of treatments (e.g.,
crack sealing, overlay, and milling and paving).
Based on the lifecycle cost models, Rio Metro
should begin setting aside approximately
$230,000 per year, on average, to maintain
them in a state of good repair.

Station Signage Refresh: There are signs of
various types (monument, wayfinding, kiosk,
etc.) and sizes at Rail Runner stations that are
wearing, particularly because of UV- and sun-
related damage. Based on the lifecycle cost
models, Rio Metro should begin setting aside
approximately $19,000 per year, on average,
for repainting and resurfacing, and replacing
components and sign faces.

3.1.4 Equipment
Communications Equipment (Radios): Almost all Rio Metro rail staff utilize a radio (handheld or vehicle
based) on a regular basis to monitor train activity, respond to emergencies, maintenance calls, weather
events, etc. The entire set of radios is scheduled to be replaced in FY2022 at an estimated cost of $50,000.

                                                    19
3.2 Grade Crossing Improvement Program
The NMRX system has approximately 120 public highway- and pedestrian-railroad grade crossings. About
80 of these crossings are traversed by the Rail Runner, but others, for which Rio Metro has no direct capital
responsibility, are used exclusively by Amtrak (e.g., between control points Madrid and Lamy) or by BNSF
(e.g., crossings on industry spurs).

Over the years, NMDOT and Rio Metro have worked cooperatively to close or improve these crossings, as
they are locations where trains, vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists can potentially come into conflict. In
fact, NMDOT continues to allocate a portion of the state’s Section 130 (Railway-Highway Crossings
Program) apportionment from USDOT for NMRX system crossings. These Section 130 funds are
sometimes supplemented by tenant railroad contributions and local government funding when their
highway and pedestrian projects require crossing improvements. Table 3-2 identifies crossings presently
funded through the Section 130 program and unfunded crossings that are likely candidates for Section
130 funding as it becomes available.

Unless otherwise noted, the crossings described on the following pages are typically reconstructed to
address the following common issues:
    The crossing has sunk below the level of the roadway and the field-side boards (those between
       the rails and the roadway edge) have turned inward toward the rail. This dip-like condition allows
       water to collect underneath and undermine the crossing and the approaching asphalt.
    The crossing boards are made of a material other than concrete (e.g., rubber, timber). These
       materials are more likely to deteriorate and deform. To increase longevity, all crossings are now
       reconstructed with concrete panels.
    The ties supporting the crossing boards have deteriorated, causing the screw spikes that hold the
       crossings boards in place to back out.

3.2.1 Funded Crossings
Alta Vista Trail (Santa Fe): While signed, the
existing sidewalk that crosses the railroad
tracks on the south side of Alta Vista St. lacks
lights and gates. This project will utilize
$97,000 in Section 130 funds in FY2020 to
install lights and gates at this east-west
crossing, thereby converting it into a multi-
use trail crossing in conjunction with a City of
Santa Fe project to extend the Rail Trail.

013759J Avenida Bernalillo (Town of
Bernalillo): The Avenida Bernalillo crossing,
which includes Main 1 and the Bernalillo
Siding, will receive new gate mechanisms at
and sidewalks through the crossing to connect
with recently constructed pedestrian improvements in the vicinity of the Downtown Bernalillo Station.
$400,000 is allocated in F2021.

                                                     20
Table 3-2: Grade Crossing Improvement Program
Grade Crossing Improvement Program
Funded
         Crossing           Funding       FY2020        FY2021        FY2022       FY2023        FY2024        FY2025        FY2026        7-Year Total
Alta Vista Trail              130           $97,000                                                                                            $97,000
Avenida Bernalillo            130                       $400,000                                                                             $400,000
Courthouse Road*              HSIP          TBD           TBD
Indian Service Road 88**     CMAQ           TBD
Lucero Road                   130          $160,000                                                                                          $160,000
Ortega Road                   130                                     $165,000                                                               $165,000
Rio Bravo Boulevard***       STP-U          TBD
Sawmill Spur: 8th Street      130                       $150,000                                                                             $150,000
Woodward Road***             STP-U          TBD
                            Subtotal       $257,000     $550,000      $165,000              $0            $0            $0            $0     $972,000

Unfunded
       Crossing             Funding       FY2020        FY2021        FY2022       FY2023        FY2024        FY2025        FY2026        7-Year Total
Claremont Avenue               --                                                   $472,000                                                 $472,000
Griego Road                    --                                                                              $185,000                      $185,000
Lomas Blvd.                    --                                       $98,000                                                                $98,000
Menaul Blvd.                   --                                     $204,000                                                               $204,000
Tribal Road 54                 --                                                                              $200,000                      $200,000
Trujillo Road                  --                                                                              $185,000                      $185,000
                            Subtotal               $0            $0   $302,000      $472,000              $0   $570,000               $0    $1,344,000
                           Total Cost      $257,000     $550,000      $467,000      $472,000              $0   $570,000               $0    $2,316,000
*Project funded/budgeted by the Village of Los Lunas. Does not appear in Rio Metro's budget.
**Project funded/budgeted by Kewa Pueblo. Does not appear in Rio Metro's budget.
***Project funded/budgeted by Bernalillo County. Does not appear in Rio Metro's budget.

          019462Y Courthouse Road (Los Lunas): As part of a larger safety improvement project, the Courthouse
          Rd. grade crossing will be relocated approximately 200 feet north and aligned perpendicular to the tracks.
          A four-quadrant gate system will also be installed that will protect the sidewalks at the crossing and make
          the crossing quiet-zone compatible. The larger project has HSIP funding in FY2020 and FY2021, although
          costs specifically attributable to the crossing are not presently known.

          013737J Indian Service Road 88 (Kewa Pueblo): Kewa Pueblo is constructing a multi-use trail along ISR
          88, which will include improvements to the existing crossing east of the Kewa Station. The larger project
          has CMAQ funding in FY2020, although costs specifically attributable to the crossing are not presently
          known.

          013760D Lucero Road (Town of Bernalillo): $160,000 has been programmed in FY2020 to construct
          pedestrian improvements in connection with the Downtown Bernalillo Station Crossing and Trail Safety
          Improvements, Phase II. The timber crossing panel was recently replaced with a concrete panel in FY2019.

          013773E Ortega Road (North Valley): $165,000 has been programmed in FY2022 to reconstruct this
          timber crossing.

                                                                         21
019424P Rio Bravo Boulevard (Bernalillo County): As part of a larger project to reconstruct the Rio Bravo
Blvd./2nd St. intersection, the crossing will be reconstructed to include the replacement of cantilever
signals with a signal bridge. The larger project has STP-U funding in FY2020, although costs directly
attributable to the crossing are not presently known.

Saw Mill Spur: 019373G 8th Street (Albuquerque): The Saw Mill spur extends west from Main 1 and allows
BNSF to occasionally serve commercial and industrial businesses in the Saw Mill neighborhood located
between I-40 and Mountain Rd. The Saw Mill spur crosses 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 12th streets.
These crossings have rubber and timber panels that are warping, sinking and in some cases unravelling.
The 8th St. crossing features three tracks, one of which was upgraded with concrete panels in 2015. The
remaining two crossings will receive concrete panels in FY2021 at a cost of $150,000.

019415R Woodward Road (Bernalillo County): As part of a larger project to improve Woodward Rd., the
Woodward Rd. grade crossing will be reconstructed and a four-quadrant gate system will be installed. The
larger project has STP-U funding in FY2020, although costs directly attributable to the crossing are not
presently known.

3.2.2 Unfunded Crossings
019359L Claremont Avenue (North Valley): The rubber crossing boards have reached the end of their
useful life and need to be replaced with concrete panels. The NMRX Grade Crossing Pedestrian & Bicyclist
Safety Study also calls for extending the panels, relocating gate masts and guardrails that are in line with
existing sidewalks, constructing the sidewalks through the crossing, and potentially relocating a utility
pole. Additional signage, markings and detectable warning surfaces would also be installed. $472,000 in
FY2023 would be adequate to construct these improvements.

019453A Griego Road (Los Lunas): The Griego Rd. crossing has settled, causing a depression in the
roadway and track that will worsen over time. Although the crossing features concrete panels, their first-
generation design precludes easy removal and maintenance. The only option is to reconstruct the
crossing. Accordingly, $185,000 is recommended in FY2025.

019399J Lomas Blvd. Median Gates (Albuquerque): The two existing gate arms on the shoulders of Lomas
Blvd. are each long enough to span three vehicle lanes. However, their excessive length leads to several

                                                    22
problems: damage during high winds, long descent times to reach their final horizontal position, and gate
mechanism wear. The NMRX Grade Crossing Pedestrian & Bicyclist Safety Study also called for extending
the existing panels and modifying the sidewalk width for ADA compliance, in addition to installing
additional signage, markings and detectable warning surfaces. $98,000 is recommended in FY2022 to
construct these improvements.

019360F Menaul Blvd. Median Gates (Albuquerque): The two existing gate arms at the Menaul Blvd.
crossing suffer the same issues as those at Lomas Blvd. and would likewise benefit from median gates so
that the length of the existing gate arms may be reduced. The NMRX Grade Crossing Pedestrian & Bicyclist
Safety Study also called for relocating the existing masts to meet ADA requirements for sidewalk width,
diverting the sidewalk around a utility pole, and installing additional signage, markings and detectable
warning surfaces. $204,000 is recommended in FY2022 to construct these improvements.

019445H Tribal Road 54 Cut-Off Track (Isleta Pueblo): The crossing at Tribal Rd. 54 has two tracks, Main
1 and a cut-off track used by Amtrak trains that connects the Albuquerque Subdivision to the Gallup
Subdivision that is part of BNSF’s Southern Transcontinental route. While the Main 1 crossing was recently
reconstructed, the cut-off track has settled, causing a depression that affects both motorists and trains.
Furthermore, because this crossing is in the middle of a curve, it is possible that train wheels could leave
the rail and ride on the wooden crossing board. Finally, the deteriorating ballast is hindering drainage,
which will exacerbate these conditions with time. $200,000 is recommended in FY2025 to reconstruction
this crossing.

019457C Trujillo Road (Los Lunas): Like Griego Rd., the Trujillo Rd. crossing has settled, causing a
depression in the roadway and track that will worsen over time. Although the crossing features concrete
panels, their first-generation design precludes easy removal and maintenance. The only option is to
reconstruct the crossing. Accordingly, $185,000 is recommended in FY2025.

                                                    23
You can also read
Next slide ... Cancel