THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION STRATEGIC PLAN - (2015/16 - 2021/22)

 
THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION STRATEGIC PLAN - (2015/16 - 2021/22)
THE REPUBLIC OF UGANDA

THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION
      STRATEGIC PLAN
    (2015/16 – 2021/22)

  To be a Model Institution and Centre of
    Excellence in Election Management

                    December, 2018

       Plot 55 Jinja Road, P.O. Box 22678 Kampala,
      Website: www.ec.or.ug, Email: secretary@ec.or.ug
        Telephone: +256-414-337500/337508-11,
          Fax: +256-312-262207/414-337595/6
THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION STRATEGIC PLAN - (2015/16 - 2021/22)
THE REPUBLIC OF UGANDA

THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION STRATEGIC PLAN
           (2015/16 – 2021/22)

      To be a Model Institution and Centre of
        Excellence in Election Management

                        December, 2018

           Plot 55 Jinja Road, P.O. Box 22678 Kampala,
          Website: www.ec.or.ug, Email: secretary@ec.or.ug
            Telephone: +256-414-337500/337508-11,
              Fax: +256-312-262207/414-337595/6
THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION STRATEGIC PLAN - (2015/16 - 2021/22)
Our Mission is

     “To efficiently organize, conduct and supervise regular,
       free, fair and transparent elections and referenda to
             enhance democracy and good governance”

ii                             The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION STRATEGIC PLAN - (2015/16 - 2021/22)
THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION STRATEGIC PLAN
                             (2015/16 – 2021/22)

 NAME                                    TITLE                SIGNATURE   DATE

Justice Byabakama Mugenyi Simon          Chairperson                      3/12/2018

Hajjat Aisha M. Lubega Basajjanaku Deputy Chairperson                     3/12/2018

Mrs. Justine Mugabi Ahabwe               Commissioner                     3/12/2018

Hon. Stephen Tashobya                    Commissioner                     3/12/2018

Mr. Emorut James Peter                   Commissioner                     3/12/2018

Ms. Etomaru Nathaline                    Commissioner                     3/12/2018

Mr. Sebaggala M. Kigozi                  Commissioner                     3/12/2018

Mr. Sam A. Rwakoojo                      Secretary                        3/12/2018

The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)                       iii
iv   The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
Table of Contents

TABLES.................................................................................................................................. vii
FIGURES............................................................................................................................... viii
ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS........................................................................................ viii
List of Appendices.................................................................................................................. viii
FOREWORD............................................................................................................................ix
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY............................................................................................................x

CHAPTER ONE
1.0 INTRODUCTION
1.1     Establishment and Mandate of the Electoral Commission................................................1
1.2     Functions of the Electoral Commission............................................................................1
1.2.1 Additional Powers ...........................................................................................................1
1.3     Legal Framework.............................................................................................................2
1.4     Other International Instruments......................................................................................5
1.5     Purpose and Objectives of the Strategic Plan ...................................................................5
1.5.1 Purpose...........................................................................................................................5
1.5.2 Objectives........................................................................................................................5
1.6     Approach to the Strategic Plan ........................................................................................5

CHAPTER TWO
SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS
2.1.1 Political Environment.......................................................................................................7
2.1.2 Economic Environment....................................................................................................7
2.1.3 Social-Cultural Environment............................................................................................8
2.1.4 Technological Environment..............................................................................................8
2.1.5 Environmental Issues......................................................................................................9
2.1.6 Legal Environment...........................................................................................................9
2.2      Performance Monitoring and Evaluation ......................................................................10
2.3     The Commission’s Performance during the FY 2015/2016.............................................10
2.4     Challenges Experienced Over the last Five Financial Years.............................................12
2.4.1 Office Accommodation and Storage Facilities..................................................................12
2.4.2 Perpetual Under funding of the Recurrent Budget .........................................................12
2.4.3 Spillover of Political Party/ Organization Primaries to Election Programs........................12
2.4.4 Commercialization of Politics.........................................................................................13
2.5     Election Related Violence...............................................................................................13
2.6     Emerging Issues............................................................................................................13
2.1     SWOT Analysis..............................................................................................................14
2.8     Lessons Learnt from Previous undertakings...................................................................16
2.9      Stakeholders Analysis...................................................................................................16

The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)                                                                               v
CHAPTER THREE
STRATEGIC DIRECTION FOR THE MEDIUM TERM
3.0     Introduction...................................................................................................................19
3.1     Vision............................................................................................................................19
3.2     Mission..........................................................................................................................19
3.3     Core Values...................................................................................................................19
3.4     Strategic Themes...........................................................................................................20
3.5     Key Result Areas (KRAs).................................................................................................20
3.6     Strategic Objectives.......................................................................................................20
3.7     Key Result Areas, Strategic Objectives, Interventions, and measures..............................21
3.8     Cross Cutting Issues: Gender, Equity, HIV/AIDS and Environment................................29
3.8.1 Gender and Equity.........................................................................................................29
3.8.2 HIV/AIDS......................................................................................................................29
3.8.3 Environment..................................................................................................................29
3.8.4 Corporate Social Responsibility......................................................................................30

CHAPTER FOUR
IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
4.1     Implementation Structure..............................................................................................31
4.2      Implementation Organogram........................................................................................33

CHAPTER FIVE
FINANCING OF THE PLAN
5.0     Introduction...................................................................................................................34
5.1      Total Cost of implementing the Plan .............................................................................34
5.2      Total to Implement the 2021 General Elections Roadmap..............................................35
5.3     Sources of financing for the plan....................................................................................35
5.4     Financing Strategies of the Plan.....................................................................................35
5.5     Detailed Cost Implication...............................................................................................36

CHAPTER SIX
MONITORING AND EVALUATION FRAMEWORK
6.0     Introduction...................................................................................................................45
6.1     Anticipated reforms........................................................................................................45
6.2     Pre-requisites for M&E Strategy.....................................................................................45
6.3     M&E Objectives.............................................................................................................46
6.4      M&E Scope...................................................................................................................46
6.5     Monitoring and Evaluation Process................................................................................46
6.6     Reporting/ Tracking data generation and consolidation.................................................47
6.7     Roles and Responsibilities of Key Actors.........................................................................47
6.8     Reporting and Dissemination of M&E Results................................................................48
6.9     Schedules of Annual and final review of the Strategic Plan.............................................48
6.10 The Electoral Commission Organizational Structure.......................................................48

vi                                                                The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
TABLES

Table 1 (a): Breakdown of the estimated cost of the Strategic Plan (Ugx. Billion)..................... xii
Table 1 (b): Required release of funds for the Strategic Plan (Ugx. Billion).................................1
Table 2: Different categories conducted in the 2015/16 General Elections...............................11
Table 3: Number of Candidates nominated for the various elective positions...........................12
Table 4: SWOT Analysis..........................................................................................................15
Table 5: Analysis of Commission stakeholders........................................................................18
Table 6: Results Framework....................................................................................................23
Table 7: Staffing Position........................................................................................................33
Table 8: Summary Cost of the Strategic Plan in Billions UGX..................................................35
Table 9: Cost of implementing the 2021 General elections roadmap (Ugx. Billions)..................36
Table 10: Detailed Cost Implication (UGX. Billion)...................................................................37
Table 11: M&E Institutional Roles and Responsibilities...........................................................48

The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)                                                                     vii
FIGURES

Figure I: Implementation Organogram.....................................................................................34
Figure II: Electoral Commission Organogram..........................................................................50

ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS

 EC                       Electoral Commission
 GOU                      Government of Uganda
 INF. TECH.               Information Technology
 NCF                      National Consultative Forum (for Registered Political Parties/
                          Organisations in Uganda)
 NIRA                     National Identification and Registration Authority
 NVR                      National Voters’ Register
 PPOA                     Political Parties and Organisations Act
 SIGs                     Special Interest Groups
 SMSs                     Short Messaging Services
 TR                       Transmission of Results
 VLS                      Voter Location Slips

List of Appendices

APPENDIX I
KEY MILESTONES FOR THE 2020-2021 GENERAL ELECTIONS ROADMAP...........................51

APPENDIX II
STRATEGY MAP.....................................................................................................................53

viii                                                          The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
FOREWORD

The Electoral Commission’s vision is to be a model institution and centre of excellence
in election management whereas, its mission is to efficiently organize, conduct and
supervise regular, free, fair and transparent elections and referenda to enhance
democracy and good governance in Uganda.

Achieving the Commission’s vision depends on successfully executing three strategic
themes, namely; operational efficiency, stakeholder satisfaction and service delivery,
data integrity and management. This creates a compelling place to work and provide
support anywhere/anytime. The Commission programs and work activities are all
aligned with these themes.

In line with the Government policy, the Commission has come up with the Strategic
Plan (2015/16- 2021/22) which is aligned to its mandate of conducting elections for
different categories and levels. The Commission’s success will be defined by providing
all stakeholders with an exceptional experience which occurs when our office becomes
a knowledgeable partner who anticipates and responds to stakeholder needs and wants.
In that regard, stakeholders will be able to access all solutions and necessary services
as and when required.

The performance dimensions of the Commission’s vision and strategies are: stakeholder
satisfaction, wise resource stewardship, efficient electoral processes and a knowledgeable
and skilled workforce. Satisfying stakeholders is enabled by optimum use of resources
which in turn is enabled by continuous improvement in service delivery processes, and
improved information sharing.

Another dimension to the Commission’s strategies deals with improving the institutional
capacity and ability. This will depend on improving workforce recognition and
motivation, aligning the Commission to core processes and using improved technology
and equipment.

Executing the strategies and achieving goals will depend on the strategic foundations of
the Commission, leadership commitment, interactive communications with stakeholders
and strong adherence to core values.

The Commission takes overall responsibility for developing strategic priorities for the
period covered in this Strategic Plan which is aligned to the National Development Plan
Phase II.

The Electoral Commission appeals to all stakeholders to consolidate partnership in
order to actualize free, fair and transparent elections. The Commission commits itself to
ensuring the successful implementation of this Strategic Plan.

For God and My Country

Justice Byabakama Mugenyi Simon
CHAIRPERSON, ELECTORAL COMMISSION

The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)                             ix
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
In order to effectively and efficiently fulfil its constitutional mandate, the Electoral
Commission has put in place a Strategic Plan covering the Financial Years 2015/16 -
2021/22 to guide it in the performance of its functions.
This approach has previously enabled the Commission to conduct general elections in
a smooth manner for it provides for phased funding of key election activities thereby
easing funding pressure on government given the limited resource envelope.

During the period under review, the Electoral Commission’s strategies will be anchored
on six Key Result Areas, namely:
i.   an institutionally strengthened Election Management Body (EMB);
ii.    free, fair and transparent elections;
iii.   credible, accurate and accessible National Voters’ Register;
iv.    effective and comprehensive Voter Education;
v.     an efficient service-oriented/ stakeholders focused Election Management Body
       (EMB); and
vi.    a strengthened Monitoring and Evaluation Framework.

This Strategic Plan was developed after consultation and involvement of various
stakeholders in a transparent manner and the Commission pledges to continue involving
them in its implementation. Secondly, the Commission reviewed its previous Strategic
Plan and carried out a Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT)
analysis; stakeholder analysis, value scan, operational environment, that is Political,
Economical, Social, Technological, Environmental and Legal (PESTEL) and developed a
balanced scorecard.

The electoral process leading to the 2016 General Elections in relation to the enabling
laws, various election reports, court rulings, comments and inputs from stakeholders
and the requirements of the Public Procurement and Disposal of Public Assets Authority
(PPDA) were reviewed for purposes of developing this Strategic Plan. Arising from the
above analysis, the Commission was able to align its priorities to the NDP II objectives.
The Electoral Commission’s Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22) has detailed specific
tasks to be performed by the Commission, when they will be performed with clear inputs/
resources, outputs, performance indicators, assumptions and responsibility centres for
implementation.

Some of the assumptions include:
•   The Electoral Commission’s (EC) Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF)
    ceiling will be adjusted upwards from the current threshold to cater for the
    requirements of the Strategic Plan and the General Elections;
•      Administrative Units (Districts and Lower Local Governments) will be created
       before July 2018 to enable the Commission plan appropriately;
•      Such creations will be accompanied by the relevant certificate of availability of
       funding from the Ministry of Finance, Planning and Economic Development;
•      By the Financial Year 2020/2021, the maximum number of Districts shall be
       141, Municipalities (80), Counties (200), Sub Counties (2,000), Parishes (9,500),
       Villages (65,200) and Polling Stations (35,000);
•      The Government will provide timely and adequate funding for the Strategic Plan
       and the General Elections;

x                                              The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
•          All stakeholders will embrace and support the Strategic Plan and the General
           Elections;
•          All the necessary legal reforms will be undertaken, at least, two years before the
           General Elections to facilitate proper planning, and implementation of the Strategic
           Plan and the General Elections Roadmap;
•          The wage bill will be adjusted to consider the above creations; and
•          Administrative Units and Women Councils/ Committees elections will be conducted
           during the Financial Year 2021/22.

It should be noted that since the conclusion of the 2015/2016 General Elections the
number of Administrative Units and voting population has increased as follows:

    a) Administrative Units                                   2015/16          Expected in 2020/21
       •     Districts
                                                                   112                              141
       • Municipalities                                             39                               80
       • Sub counties                                            1,398                            2,000
       • Parishes                                                7,431                            9,500
       • Villages                                               57,842                           65,200
       • Polling Stations:                                      28,010                           35,000
    b) Voting Population
       • Registered Voters                              15,277,198                         19,400,000

These changes affected the estimated cost of implementing this Strategic Plan. Other
cost drivers include:
i.   continuous improvements in the electoral process;
ii.        comprehensive voter education and stakeholder sensitization;
iii.       inclusion of the Supreme Court recommendations, and;
iv.        price changes and exchange rate fluctuation.

The cost of the Strategic Plan, including the 2020/21 General Elections, is estimated at
Uganda Shillings One Trillion Five Hundred Two Billion Four Hundred Eighty-Eight Million
Three Hundred Ten Thousand Five Hundred Seventeen only (Ugx.1,502,488,310,517/=)
broken down as follows;

Table 1 (a): Breakdown of the estimated cost of the Strategic Plan (Ugx. Billion)
    Financial Year   Presidential           Administrative            Wage     General               Total
                     and General            Units (LC I & II) and     Bill     Finance &
                     Parliamentary &        Women Councils/                    Administration
                     Local Government       Committees                         & Capital
                     Council Elections,     Elections, 2022                    Development
                     2020/21

FY 2018/19                        155.32                               50.96             57.89     264.17

FY 2019/20                        283.25                               53.50            246.94     583.70

FY 2020/21                        357.82                               56.18             53.08     467.08

FY 2021/22                          15.98                     55.77    58.99             56.81     187.54

GRAND TOTAL                        812.37                     55.77   219.63            414.72    1,502.49

The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)                                               xi
The Commission requires release of funds for the Strategic Plan as follows:

Table 1 (b): Required release of funds for the Strategic Plan (Ugx. Billion)

 NO    EXPENDITURE                                        FINANCIAL YEAR                           TOTAL
                                           2018/19      2019/20       2020/21        2021/22

  a.   (Non-Wage)

       Presidential and General              155.32       191.03        357.82          15.98      720.15
       Parliamentary & Local
       Government Council Elections,
       2020/21
       Youth, PWD and Older Persons                        92.23                                    92.23
       Councils and committees/
       Associations.
       Administrative Units (LC I                                                       55.77       55.77
       & II) and Women Councils/
       Committees Elections, 2022
  b.   Wage Bill

       Wage Bill                              50.96        53.50         56.18          58.99      219.63

  c.   Finance and Administration

       General Finance and                    57.89       180.94         53.08          56.81      348.71
       Administration and Capital
       Development
       Acquisition of other Capital                        66.00                                    66.00
       Assets - Relocation of EC HQRS

       GRAND TOTAL                           264.17       583.70        467.08         187.54    1,502.49

The Commission invites all stakeholders to support its cause during the implementation
of the Strategic Plan and commit to play their respective roles for its effective
implementation.

xii                                              The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
CHAPTER ONE

1.0   INTRODUCTION
      This Strategic Plan covers the period 2015/16 to 2021/22. It is in consonance with
      the theme “Enhancing good governance through conducting regular, free and fair
      elections and referenda in order to contribute to the promotion of political stability
      which is essential for social-economic development”. This is in line with the NDP
      II strategic direction of strengthening governance mechanisms and structures.

1.1   Establishment and Mandate of the Electoral Commission
      The Electoral Commission is established under Article 60 and mandated under
      Article 61 of the Constitution of the Republic of Uganda 1995 (as amended) to
      organize, conduct and supervise regular, free and fair elections and referenda,
      among other functions. In order to fulfill its mandate, the Commission is guided
      by its vision and mission.
      The vision is to be a model institution and centre of excellence in Election
      Management.

      The mission is to efficiently organize, conduct and supervise regular, free,
      fair and transparent elections and referenda to enhance democracy and good
      governance”

1.2   Functions of the Electoral Commission
      The Electoral Commission is mandated under Article 61 of the 1995 Constitution
      of the Republic of Uganda to:
      a.     ensure that regular, free and fair elections and referenda are held;
      b.     organise, conduct and supervise elections and referenda in accordance with
             the Constitution;
      c.     demarcate constituencies in accordance with the provisions of the
             Constitution;
      d.     formulate and implement voter educational programmes related to elections;
      e.     compile, maintain, revise and update the voters’ register;
      f.     hear and determine election complaints arising before and during polling;
             and
      g.     ascertain, publish and declare in writing under its seal the results of the
             elections and referenda.
Article 62 of the Constitution provides that the Commission shall be independent and
shall in the performance of its functions be free from any direction or control of any
person or authority. The Constitution also directs Parliament to ensure that
adequate resources and facilities are provided to the Commission to enable it
effectively perform its functions (Art. 66).

1.2.1 Additional Powers
The additional powers of the Electoral Commission are defined in Section 12 of the
Electoral Commission Act (Cap 140). These include among others:
     a)    To appoint a polling day for any election subject to any law;
      b)     To design, print, distribute and control the use of ballot papers;

The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)                               1
c)   To provide, distribute and collect ballot boxes;
      d)   To establish and operate polling stations;
      e)   To take measures for ensuring that the entire electoral process is conducted
           under conditions of freedom and fairness;
      f)   To take steps to ensure that there are secure conditions necessary for the
           conduct of any election in accordance with this Act or any other law;
      g)   To promote and regulate through appropriate means civic education of the
           citizens of Uganda on the purpose and voting procedures of any election,
           including, where practicable, the use of sign language;
      h)   To ensure that the campaigns are conducted in an orderly and organized
           manner;
      i)   To accredit any non-partisan individual, group of individuals or an institution
           or association to carry out voter education subject to guidelines determined
           by the Commission and published in the Gazette;
      j)   To ensure compliance by all election officers and candidates with the provisions
           of this Act or any other law;
      k)   To take necessary steps to ensure that people with disabilities are enabled to
           vote without any hindrance;
      l)   To pay such allowances as the Minister responsible for finance may approve
           to election officers and other persons assisting the Commission in carrying
           out the purposes of this Act or any other law;
      m)   Subject to paragraph (n), and in consultation with the Minister, to engage on
           such terms as the Commission may determine, the services of any person
           whose special expertise may be required for the proper discharge of the
           functions of the commission;
      n)   To pay to any person engaged under paragraph (m) remuneration at such
           rates as may be determined by the Commission in consultation with the
           Minister responsible for finance;
      o)   To produce and submit to Parliament through the Minister a report on any
           election conducted by it within six months after the declaration of the results
           of the election; and
      p)   To discharge such other functions as are conferred upon the Commission
           by this Act or any other law made under this Act or as are necessary for the
           proper carrying out of the purposes of this Act.

1.3   Legal Framework
The Legal framework within which the elections are conducted consists of the
following;

a)    The Constitution of the Republic of Uganda, 1995 (as amended)
      The Constitution, among others, provides for the composition, independence,
      mandate and functions of the Commission in the electoral process and timelines
      within which to conduct the elections. The Constitution further provides for redress
      procedures to aggrieved presidential candidates (Art.104) in the Supreme Court
      after the declaration of election results.

2                                          The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
b)    The Electoral Commission Act, Cap 140 (as amended)
      This Act makes provisions, among others, relating to the mandate, staffing,
      powers and functions of the Commission, appointment of tribunals, demarcation
      of constituencies, maintenance, update of the voters’ register, the display of the
      voters’ register and related election matters.

c)    The Political Parties and Organisations Act, 2005 (as amended)
      The Political Parties and Organisations Act, among others, makes provision for
      the functioning and financing of Political Parties/Organisations, their formation,
      registration, membership and organisation; the prescription of their code of conduct
      (Section 19) and the establishment of the National Consultative Forum for Political
      Parties/Organizations in Uganda (Section 20).

d)    The Presidential Elections Act, 2005 (as amended)

        This Act provides for the election of the President and spells out the requirements for
        qualifications, nomination of candidates, sponsorship of candidates by political parties and
        organisations, facilitation of candidates, campaign period, polling procedure, counting,
        tallying and declaration of results and handling of petitions, among others.

e)    The Parliamentary Elections Act, 2005 (as amended)

         The Parliamentary Elections Act, 2005 provides for the mode of elections, requirements
        for qualifications, nomination of directly elected Members of Parliament, District Woman
        Representatives to parliament, Special Interest Groups representative candidates (Youth,
        UPDF, PWDs and Workers), sponsorship of candidates by political parties and organisations,
        campaign period, polling procedure, counting, tallying and declaration of results as well as
        handling of petitions, among others.

f)    The Local Governments Act, Cap 243 (as amended)
      The Local Governments Act provides for the establishment of Local Governments,
      their functions and powers, mode of election to the various local government
      councils, demarcations of electoral areas, qualification requirements, nomination
      requirements, election of Special Interest Group representatives (Older persons,
      Youth, and PWDs), sponsorship of candidates by political parties and organisations,
      campaigns, polling procedures, counting, tallying, declaration of results and
      handling of petitions, among others.

g)    The Kampala Capital City Authority Act, 2010
      This Act provides for, among others, composition, election of the Lord Mayor and
      Councillors of the Authority, including representatives of the four professional
      bodies covering lawyers, medical personnel, architects and engineers.

h)    The National Women Council Act, Cap 318 (as amended) and Attendant Regulations
      This Act provides for the establishment of the Women Councils and Committees
      from village to national levels, their composition, objectives and functions,
      administration and finances, nominations, qualifications, campaigns and polling
      procedures.

The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)                                       3
i)   The National Youth Council Act, Cap 319 (as amended) and Attendant Regulations
     This Act provides for the establishment of the Youth Councils/Committees from
     village to national level, their composition, objectives and functions, administration
     and finances, nominations, qualifications, campaigns and polling procedures.

j)   The National Council for Disability Act, 2003 (as amended) and Attendant
     Regulations
     This Act provides for the establishment of Councils and Committees for Persons
     with Disabilities from the village to the national level and the composition of the
     electoral colleges for purposes of electing their representatives to the various
     prescribed elective offices.

k)   The National Council for Older Persons Act, 2013 and Attendant Regulations
     This Act provides for the establishment of Committees and Councils for Older
     Persons from the village to national level and the composition of electoral colleges
     for purposes of electing their representatives to the prescribed elective offices by
     law.

l)   Labour Unions Act, 2006 and the Labour Union Regulations, 2006
     This law provides for the establishment of the electoral colleges for the election
     of the workers representatives to the district Local Government Councils and
     Parliament.

m)   Public Finance Management Act, 2015
     The Act provides for Public financial management in Uganda, establishing principles
     and procedures for sound fiscal macroeconomics management.

n)   Budget Act, 2001
     This Act provides for and Regulates the Budgetary Procedures for a systematic and
     efficient Budgetary process and for other matters connected therewith.

o)   National Planning Authority Act, 2002
     The Act provides for the composition and functions of the National Planning
     Authority in accordance with Article 125 of the Constitution and for other related
     matters. The Act established and mandates the National Planning Authority (NPA)
     as an autonomous statutory agency charged with management of national and
     decentralized planning in the country.

p)   PPDA Act of 2003
     An Act to establish the Public Procurement and Disposal of Public Assets Authority;
     to formulate policies in respect to public procurement and disposal activities and
     other connected matters.

q)   Rules and Regulations (Statutory Instruments)
     All the Acts have Statutory Instruments and / Regulations made pursuant to them
     for purposes of, among others, providing for various processes and procedures as
     well as forms, formats and schedules. These rules and regulations do operationalize
     the Laws/Acts.

4                                          The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
1.4   Other International Instruments
      In the development of the Strategic Plan, the Commission considered; Sustainable
      Development Goal (SDG) No. 5 which aims at achieving gender equality and
      empowering all women and girls;
      SDG No. 11 which aims at making Cities and human settlements inclusive, safe,
      resilient and sustainable;

      SDG No. 16 which aims at the promotion of peaceful and inclusive societies for
      sustainable development, providing access to justice for all and building effective,
      accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels.

      Consideration was also given to the East African Community, EAC Election
      Management Bodies Forum guided by Article 6 (d) of the EAC Treaty on good
      governance, democracy, rule of law, accountability, transparency, social justice,
      equal opportunities and gender equality among others.

      Other legal protocols and instruments which provide for political, social and
      economic stability in line with the national legal and policy instruments include
      the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, African Charter on Democracy and
      Good Governance and AU Declarations on Principles Governing Elections in Africa
      were considered.

1.5 Purpose and Objectives of the Strategic Plan
1.5.1 Purpose
      The Plan seeks to leverage on the innovations and reforms introduced during the
      last General Elections and addresses the challenges that were encountered therein
      in order to improve management of future electoral processes.

      It also aims at embracing new innovations and reforms as well as enhancing the
      organizational and individual capacity of staff in a bid to improve management of
      the electoral processes.

1.5.2 Objectives
      The objectives for formulating this plan are to: -
      a)     Improve democracy and good governance through organizing, conducting
             and supervising free, fair and transparent elections;
      b)     Strengthen institutional structures and instruments for transparent and
             credible democratic processes;
      c)     Improve the accuracy and accessibility of the National Voters’ Register;
      d)     Improve the stakeholders participation in the electoral processes and promote
             principles of democratic governance;
      e)     To improve the working relationship with stakeholders.
      e)     Improve the Commission’s Monitoring and Evaluation system for increased
             service delivery, efficiency and effectiveness.

1.6   Approach to the Strategic Plan
      This Strategic Plan is a product of consultations with stakeholders following the
      conclusion of the 2015/2016 General Elections. The process started with a review
      of the previous Strategic Plan 2013–2017, internal evaluation of the 2015/2016
      General Elections through an analysis of Election Observer reports, assessment

The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)                             5
survey and a series of regional and national workshops for staff and other
    stakeholders.

    These assessments produced a wealth of information concerning the Commission
    Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT), which were
    considered in the formulation of this Strategic Plan. The Plan is also informed by
    recommendations from stakeholder reports and previous court judgments which
    highlighted critical areas for attention and improvement in service delivery. Many
    of the recommendations for improvement are documented in form of proposed
    electoral reforms.

    During the 2016/17 budget process, public entities and constitutional institutions
    are required to reflect their spending and performance information in the Program/
    Performance Based Budgeting Tool. This is a new programme format and a new
    programme budget structure developed by the Ministry of Finance, Planning and
    Economic Development (MoFPED).

    Entities were requested to adjust their Strategic and Annual Performance Plans in
    line with the NDP II objectives. This Strategic Plan 2015/16 - 2021/22 therefore
    reflects this re-alignment and also incorporates the requirement for the Performance
    Based Budgeting.

6                                        The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
CHAPTER TWO

SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS
2.1   Operational Environment
      This chapter presents the Commission’s past and present political, economic,
      social-cultural, technological, environmental and legal information. These are aimed
      at identifying internal and external forces that may influence the Commission’s
      performance and choice of strategies in order to chart the Commission’s five-year
      plan.

2.1.1 Political Environment
      The country is peaceful which allows the smooth conduct of electoral activities
      countrywide. The current multiparty political dispensation allows political parties/
      organizations to participate in the democratic processes. The Commission therefore
      organizes the elections under that framework. Political parties/ organizations are
      given time to sponsor candidates for elective positions.

      In a few cases, however, some districts and lower local governments have been
      created towards the time for the general elections. Much as this move is in the general
      interest of Ugandans, it impacts negatively on the Commission roadmap. Such
      creations also stress/strain the budget and the Commission ends up requesting
      for supplementary funding which in most cases is not readily available. Such
      creations also lead to belated reorganization of polling stations and demarcation of
      some electoral areas.

      To avoid disruption of the Commission roadmap, it’s advisable that these creations
      be made at least two years before the general elections so that they can be
      incorporated in the General Elections Roadmap. Approval of creations should be
      accompanied by the relevant certificate of funding from the Ministry of Finance,
      Planning and Economic Development.

2.1.2 Economic Environment
      The economy of Uganda has been growing over the past few decades. It has,
      however, been faced with a few challenges including rising inflation.

      Such changes in price and other factors stress/strain the budget and increase
      the cost of conducting elections. The cost per voter on average in the 2015/ 2016
      General Elections was $8.7 compared to $7.1 in the 2010/2011 General Elections.
      According to the data sampled, the average cost of conducting elections globally
      is $5 per voter. Sometimes, the exchange rate of the Dollar to the Uganda Shilling
      fluctuates upwards leading suppliers to demand for the difference even when the
      contracts have already been signed.

      The Commission payment structure to Field Election Officials has not been revised
      during the last four (4) General Elections. These include Presiding Officers (Ugx.
      40,000), Polling Assistants (Ugx. 20,000) and Polling Constables at (Ugx. 20,000).

      The allowance for transporting of Polling kit from Sub county to the polling
      station and back (Ugx. 10,000). The Commission has not been able to attract
      high caliber personnel to work as polling day officials due to this inadequate

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pay. The Commission therefore, is revising the rates of payment to polling day
     officials upward to address this challenge. The Commission has revised the rates
     as follows; Presiding Officers (Ugx. 50,000), Polling Assistants (Ugx. 30,000) and
     Polling Constables at (Ugx. 30,000).

     The Commission staff salaries which had not been revised since 1999 have been
     recently revised upwards. Government has promised to provide a commensurate
     Salary structure in the next financial year.

2.1.3 Social-Cultural Environment
     The Uganda population has been increasing at a rate of 3.3% annually. In the
     1980s the population of Uganda was about 10 million and it is currently about
     40 million as per Uganda Bureau of Statistics (UBOS) statistics. This fast growth
     in population stretches resources and therefore calls for a proactive approach by
     the Commission in planning for elections. For example, the number of polling
     stations and registered voters has been increasing. In 2006 there were 10,450,788
     registered voters in 19,786 Polling Stations; in 2010/2011 there were 13,902,720
     registered voters in 23,968 Polling Stations, while in the 2015/2016 General
     Elections there were 15,277,198 registered voters in 28,010 Polling Stations. It
     is projected that in 2021 the number of registered voters will be 19,400,000 in
     35,000 Polling Stations.

     While Voter education is one of the core mandates of the Commission, it is not
     done on a continuing basis. Activity based Voter Education has been adopted due
     to inadequate funding. The Commission has therefore planned to continuously
     conduct voter education in a bid to reverse this trend.

     As a growing democracy, the stepping up of voter education initiatives and
     programmes related to elections has been identified as one of the priorities which
     the Commission has to undertake during the period covered by the Strategic Plan.
     One area of focus will be mobilization of the Youths, Women and Persons With
     Disability. Increased visibility of outreach programmes, especially amongst the
     youth and specifically in educational institutions is one of the key components of
     the Commission’s strategy.

     In the previous strategic plan, the Commission worked with the National Curriculum
     Development Centre to integrate Voter Education in Primary and Secondary School
     curriculum. This initiative will still be undertaken in this strategic plan to ensure
     that all Ugandans aged six years and above are sensitized about the electoral
     processes.

     In addition, the Commission is undertaking outreach programs using its network
     countrywide to reach various institutions.

2.1.4 Technological Environment
     Worldwide, new innovations come into play to ease the conduct and administration
     of elections. New technologies in the areas of data management, communication
     and management of polling activities have been emerging. Some countries vote
     electronically to ease the administration of elections and make them cost effective.
     The Commission has moved in that direction through the introduction of the
     Biometric Voter Registration and Verification System (BVVS) and Electronic Results
     Transmission and Dissemination System (ERTDS). There is however, need for the
     Commission to improve and consolidate the use of these technologies.

8                                         The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
The Commission has also adopted a comprehensive communication strategy as an
      over-all guiding framework for production, dissemination, monitoring and evaluation
      of the Commission’s interaction with the media and stakeholder engagement
      campaign, aimed at promoting participation in the electoral process. Accordingly,
      the Commission uses both traditional media (newspapers, radio and television)
      and new media platforms online papers, websites, SMS and social media) in its
      engagement campaigns. Social media like Twitter handle @UgandaEc, hash tag
      #AskEc2016 and Facebook are used to create direct communication channels and
      interactive dialogue platforms with stakeholders. The Commission website www.
      ec.or.ug is critical in ensuring timely dissemination of information to stakeholders
      to facilitate their participation in the process.

2.1.5 Environmental Issues
      Environmental issues are of growing concern not only to Uganda but globally. The
      world over, there has been global warming and environmental degradation due
      to human activity which includes deforestation, air pollution, construction and
      careless disposal of non-bio-degradable materials. There are a few environmental
      issues which affect the Commission in the administration of elections which are
      worth mentioning. The Commission uses polythene bags, polythene sheeting,
      rubber bands, indelible ink markers, tamper evident envelopes, plastic basins and
      transparent ballot boxes which are not bio-degradable.

      These if not disposed of appropriately may pollute the environment. The Commission,
      therefore, plans to use recyclable election materials where practical.

      Other environmental factors that affect elections include adverse weather conditions,
      such as floods and drought.

2.1.6 Legal Environment
      Elections are conducted within the legal framework as spelt out in the various
      enabling electoral laws. The legal framework facilitates the Commission to execute
      its mandate. In a number of cases, however, submissions have been made for
      enactment/amendment of enabling laws and they have not been handled in a
      timely manner. The Commission has accordingly proposed that if it is to execute
      its mandate appropriately, the laws should be enacted/amended at least two years
      before the General Elections. In that regard, the Commission has already submitted
      its proposals to the line Ministry.

      Over the past few years, the Commission has experienced an increase in the
      number of election petitions filed in courts of law. The common grounds for the
      petitions following the 2015/2016 General Parliamentary elections included
      bribery and use of derogatory language by candidates, lack of requisite academic
      qualifications, non-resignation by public servants, non-compliance with the law,
      as well as forgery of academic documents. A considerable amount of money is
      spent by the Commission in contracting private law firms to compliment the efforts
      of its legal team in handling such petitions and payment of costs. There is also a
      misconception by stakeholders that the Commission is responsible for verifying
      academic credentials of aspiring candidates, yet this is the mandate of the National
      Council for Higher Education.

      The Commission has planned to intensify voter education in order to make aspiring
      candidates, voters and other stakeholders aware of the legal requirements and the
      consequences in case the laws are breached.

The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)                              9
Technological innovations have been applied to ease the conduct and administration
      of elections in the areas of voter registration, identification, data management,
      communication and management of polling activities. However, the existing legal
      framework is not in tandem with advancement in technology. The Commission
      has proposed amendments in the law to accommodate these innovations.

2.2   Performance Monitoring and Evaluation
      The overall objective of performance monitoring and evaluation (M&E) is to support
      coordination of Commission’s planned electoral activities. Inadequate M&E results
      into duplication of efforts, poor data quality, data gaps and poor assessment. The
      Commission is therefore, committed to improve M&E for effective implementation
      of its activities through enhanced performance standards, evidence based
      performance measurement, baseline information for Key Performance Indicators,
      capacity to undertake M&E, and use of the M&E systems.

2.3   The Commission’s Performance during the FY 2015/2016
      The following key achievements were registered during the FY 2015/2016:
      •        Conducted different categories of elections in accordance with the Electoral
               Commission Strategic Plan (2013-2017) and its attendant Roadmap launched
               on 7th May 2013.

      Table 2: Different categories conducted in the 2015/16 General Elections

          Category of Election                                                            Elective Positions
          Presidential                                                                                      1
          General Parliamentary                                                                          427
          District Chairpersons, District/City Local Government Councillors, the Lord
                                                                                                       3,156
          Mayor and Councillors for KCCA
          Municipality/City Division Chairpersons, Municipality Women Councillors
          (WEC), Municipality/City Division Directly Elected Councillors (DEC’s) and                   1,224
          KCCA Councillors
          Sub County/Municipal Division/Town Local Government Councils                                24,140
          Members of Youth Councils/Committees                                                      601,344
          Members of Councils and Committees of People With Disabilities                            334,528
          Members of Councils and Committees of Older Persons                                       334,528

      •        procured election materials and services on a timely basis;
      •        recruited, trained and deployed its own 1,392 Sub-county and 7,431 Parish
               Election Supervisors.
      •        conducted Voter Education and training, sensitized stakeholders and publicized
               all the electoral activities during the electoral process countrywide.
      •        re-organised polling stations from 23,968 to 28,010 for effective service
               delivery to stakeholders countrywide.
      •        compiled and updated the National Voters’ Register.
      •        Biometric Voter Registration System (BVRS) was introduced to capture finger
               prints and images of all registered voters during the update of the National
               Voters’ Register.
      •        After the display period, a total number of 15,277,198 were confirmed
               registered voters.

10                                                  The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
•       The Commission nominated 52,644 candidates as indicated in Table 3
              below.

      Table 3: Number of Candidates nominated for the various elective positions

          CATEGORY                                  Position       Party             Individual            Total
                                                                   Sponsorship       Candidates        Nominated

          President                                            1                 4                 4          8
          Directly Elected Members of Parliament          290              634               703          1,337
          District Women Representatives to
                                                          112              208               198            406
          Parliament
          Members of Parliament Representing
                                                              25            21                    52         73
          Youth, PWDs, UPDF, Workers
          District/City Chairpersons and
                                                       3,152             4,583              3,192         7,775
          Councilors
          Councilors Representing Professional
                                                               4                                              4
          Bodies at KCCA
          Municipality/City Division Chairperson
                                                          851            2,246              1,582         3,828
          and Councilors
          Sub county/Town/Municipal Division
                                                      24,140            28,529            10,684         39,213
          Chairperson and Councilors

          Total                                       28,575            36,225            16,415         52,644

      •       The eight Candidates nominated as presidential candidates were each issued
              with a copy of the National Voters’ Register.
      •       The Commission facilitated and supported the National Consultative Forum
              (NCF) activities in accordance with the law.
      •       The Commission received and handled 277 pre-polling complaints covering
              academic qualifications, noncompliance with set age requirements, among
              others.
      •       The Commission harmonized, monitored and supervised campaigns for the
              2015/2016 General Elections.
      •       A total of 805 National and 101 International Press members, 1,436 National
              Observers and 404 International Election Observers were accredited to
              observe the 2015/2016 General Elections.
      •       The Commission enhanced voter verification by use of Biometric Voter
              Verification System in each of the 28,010 Polling Stations on polling day.
      •       Easy location of respective polling station / centres by voters using the 15,
              277,198 Voter Location Slips (VLS) issued to all voters countrywide.
      •       The Commission recruited and deployed a total of 106,060 polling officials on
              polling day countrywide.
      •       The Commission registered a high voter turn-up of up to 67.62% during the
              Presidential and Parliamentary Elections.
      •       The Commission tallied, declared, ascertained and published in the Uganda
              Gazette results of the General Elections within the stipulated time.
      •       produced the General Elections Report in accordance with the provisions of
              Section 12(1)(o) of the Electoral Commission Act.
      It should be noted that 99.38% of the 2015/2016 General Elections activities was
      funded by the Government of Uganda while 0.062% was funded by the Development
      Partners under UNDP.

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2.4   Challenges Experienced Over the last Five Financial Years
      Elections are a process that encompasses planning, demarcation of electoral areas,
      registration and update of National Voters’ Register (NVR), display and production
      of the NVR, nomination of candidates, campaigns, polling day and post polling day
      activities and management of the election results.

      Throughout the process, the participation and cooperation of all stakeholders is
      pertinent. In the performance of its duties, the Commission put in place mechanisms
      to ensure transparency, accountability and impartiality. However, the following
      challenges were encountered in the process:

2.4.1 Office Accommodation and Storage Facilities
      Currently, the Commission Headquarters is located in a dilapidated structure,
      smelly, swampy, flood prone, pest infested area which is a great risk to not only
      the Commission’s expensive high-tech equipment but also to staff.

      During the last five years, the Commission decentralized some of its activities by
      establishing twelve regional offices in addition to its physical presence in all the
      districts. This was aimed at extending election services nearer to the electorate. As a
      result, the Commission spends large sums of money in renting office premises and
      storage facilities throughout the country. This expenditure could be eliminated if
      resources were allocated towards the construction of offices and storage facilities.

      Additionally, Government of Uganda completed plans for the construction of the
      Eastern route of the Standard Gauge Railway and Kampala Flyover Project which
      affect the current location of the Commission headquarters. The Commission
      was directed to find and relocate urgently to other premises in order to pave way
      for these Capital Development Projects. The Commission requires purpose-built
      headquarters and warehouses for its staff, election materials and equipment.
      There is also need to provide adequate and befitting office accommodation for
      the Electoral Commission Field Staff, which is vital for effective management and
      conduct of all electoral activities. Government is committed to provide the funds
      for acquisition of already built office premises for the Commission headquarters.
      Procurement process is ongoing.

      The Commission has acquired land in some districts for the construction of district
      and regional offices. However, the Commission Capital budget allocation remains
      inadequate to enable the undertaking of the required investments. This situation
      has remained unchanged for a long time and the Commission continues to receive a
      paltry UGX 200 Million on an annual basis as its capital development allocation.

2.4.2 Perpetual Under funding of the Recurrent Budget
      Whereas Government has continued to create new Administrative Units and
      Local Governments, the provision of recurrent expenditure has not grown
      proportionately.

      Each new district requires a total of Ug.shs. 512,977,906/- to be operationalized.
      This subsequently becomes recurrent.

2.4.3 Spillover of Political Party/ Organization Primaries to Election Programs
      Late resolution of complaints arising from party primaries leading to disruption
      of electoral programs, especially when there are last minute court orders which
      usually result into delayed printing of ballot papers or where ballot papers have

12                                          The Electoral Commission Strategic Plan (2015/16 – 2021/22)
already been printed and it is too late to reverse the printing for those disqualified
      by Court.

      It should be noted that a number of petitions which were lodged with the Commission
      arose from grievances that were not properly addressed during party primary
      elections. The Commission further notes that if this trend is not addressed, it will
      continue to impact adversely on its operations.

2.4.4 Commercialization of Politics
      During the campaign period, candidates offer gifts and money to lure the electorate
      to vote for them. This practice compromises the ability of the voters to make
      informed choices. Offer of these gifts and money amounts to bribery which in
      some cases leads to petitions in Courts of Law. The Commission received a number
      of complaints where candidates were alleged to have bribed some voters. Those
      who were aggrieved following the declaration and gazetting of the 2015/2016
      General Elections results filed petitions in the relevant Courts of Law. Some
      petitions resulted into the nullification of the elections. The Commission ends up
      spending large sums of money in settling Court costs and holding by-elections in
      the respective electoral areas. The Commission is unable to track bribery due to
      the country’s cash economy which makes it very difficult for the Commission to
      track the movement of money, and this remains a challenge. There is need for a
      concerted effort to stamp out this vice.

2.5   Election Related Violence
      Although the previous electoral period was generally peaceful, there were
      reported cases of voter intimidation and harassment in some areas, especially
      during campaigns and polling days. There were reported clashes of supporters of
      competing candidates, sometimes calling for the intervention of the Police. This
      is attributed to general indiscipline and increasing intolerance among supporters
      and candidates. The Commission planned to sensitize all stakeholders on election
      related violence and carry out outreaches in order to reduce electoral violence in
      future electoral processes.

2.6   Emerging Issues
      a) Multi-Sectoral Approach to Voter Registration
      In April 2014 Government embarked on a Mass Enrollment of citizens of 16 years
      and above under a multi-sectoral project approach dubbed National Security
      Information System (NSIS). The NSIS project provided data of registered citizens
      of 18 years and above, with bio-data, photographs, fingerprints and signatures
      which data the Commission used to compile the National Voters’ Register.

      b) Use of New Technology
      The Biometric Voter Verification System (BVVS) was introduced to identify and
      verify registered voters using bio-data with finger prints and images during polling.
      This further enhanced transparency in voting on polling days.

      c) Voter Location Slips
      To enhance voter identification on polling days, Voter Location Slips (VLS) were
      issued to all voters to facilitate in the location of respective polling stations. The
      VLS guide and direct voters to their particular polling stations/ centres.

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